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Effective signal-coverage comparison of an FM station and a 1400-kc AM station 






Regardless of your present power, if you face 
a coverage problem, if you share a crowded 
channel, consider FM. In nearly every case it 
will provide better coverage of the same area 
at less cost, or better coverage of more area 
at the same cost. To your audience this means 
improved reception. To you, this means a 
larger and more consistent audience and bet- 
ter service to your advertisers. 



Plan your FM station now and make full use 
of General Electric's vast background of ex- 
perience in the FM field. It is the one manu- 
facturer with experience in designing and 
building complete FM systems — from trans- 
mitters to receivers. For information on 
G-E's complete line of FM broadcast equip- 
ment, write direct to: Electronics Department , 
General Electric, Schenectady 5, N. Y. 



STUD I AND STATION EQUIPMENT • T R AN S M I T T EJR? 



GENERAL & ELECTRIC 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY ^CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



and night 



5 times the coverage by day 
35 times the coverage by night 




Station interference pattern produced by AM stations on 
the 1400-kc channel. The dots indicate location of stations. 
Large circles indicate possible 400-mile interference range. 



Establish a priority on delivery of your 
FM equipment. Write for your copy of the 
"G-E Equipment Reservation Plan" which 
explains in complete detail how General 
Electric can help you obtain early delivery 
of your broadcast equipment. 



General Electric's new FM equipment will 
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50 FM BROADCAST STATIONS ARE ON THE AIR; HUNDREDS OF APPLICATIONS ARE PENDING 



NTENNAS • ELECTRONIC TUBES • HOME RECEIVERS 



A-TELEVISION-AM ^£^fc <#**»/ 



THE COCA-COLA BOTTLERS 



of America 



PRESENT 




iowm 





For 



THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR 



MORTON DOWNEY 

Under Exclusive Management of 

MUSIC CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



_X RADIO ANNUAL \ 




PRESENTS 



The 1945 
RADIO 
fllUlOL 



a 



Edited by 
JACK ALICOATE 

Copyright, 1945, by the Radio Daily 
1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. Wisconsin 7-6336 



Printed by The Barnes Printing Co., Inc., Nev 



WBZ-A 

Boston-Springfield 




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Si 

OPIRIGHI DEPOSIT. 



RECEIVED 

APR 2 7 «* 

OFFICE 



CCTPt&XG^ 1 




BUY THESE ELEVEN ESSENTIAL STATIONS IN 
THE ELEVEN ESSENTIAL MARKETS 

Advertising dollars are best spent in essential markets— . 
radio efforts are best spent on essential stations. 

Once you have the facts on these prospect-rich markets 
... the facts on how they are best covered . . . your selec- 
tion of these eleven stations will become automatic. 

Here's why all eleven of these stations are essential to 
you: ( 1 ) they broadcast to 55% of the radio homes in the 
U. S.; ( 2 ) they are in markets whose buying power is 34.2% 
higher than the country's average. 

Call your nearest NBC Spot Sales Office listed below 
for complete data on audiences, buying habits, coverage, 
programs, spectacular successes, time available, costs- 
all the answers to your spot problems. 



NBC SP T SALES 



New York, Circle 7-8300 . . . Chicago, Superior 8300 ... San Francisco, Graystone 8700 . . 

Woshington, Republic 4000 . . . Cleveland, Cherry 0942 . . . Hollywood, Hollywood 6161 . . 

Denver, Maine 6211 . . . Boston, Hancock 4261 






& 



,-/ 







I? (I P W 11/ fl B II R ADI o Daily herewith presents the eighth edition of 
fUllLitfUIill RADIO ANNUAL, a volume compellingly reflecting 
the inevitably changing complexion and constant march, both of victory and of 
progress, of the colorful industry of RADIO. The thousand pages that 
follow are as accurate as humanly possible. The text comes from a 
thousand reliable sources. 



DEDICATION 



The great field of RADIO is now concerned, per- 
haps more than ever before, with the problems of 
preparedness. Preparedness first with the concluding stages of the War, 
and preparedness second, with the industry's own reconversion period as 
well as the advent of Television. It is to this dual purpose, specifically, 
that this 1945 Edition is dedicated. 



APPRECIATION 



The editor wishes to take this opportunity to 
thank all those who have so enthusiastically 
helped in the full revision, re-arrangement and material strengthening of 
this volume. To the FCC, the NAB, the world-wide organizations of NBC, 
CBS, the American Broadcasting Co. (Blue), and Mutual, as well as the 
great legion of radio showmen everywhere we gratefully acknowledge their 
assistance with a hearty and understanding thank you. 



«*■ 



hakGto& r 



EDITOR and PUBLISHER 




1 




Creators and Producers 
Of Radio Programs 



EDITORIAL 



INDEX 



— — A 

Acoustical Society of America 

Actors' Equity Association 

Advertisers' Index 

ADVERTISING: 

Advertising Federation of America .... 

Advertising Research Foundation 

Agencies, Addresses, Personnel, etc.. . . 

Agency Expenditures by Network 

American Assn. of Adv. Agencies 

Billings, Network 

Commercial Programs 

Expenditures, Network 

Agents and Managers, Talent 

ALABAMA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 

Chief Engineers of Stations 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 

Musical Directors of Stations 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 

ALASKA: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 

ALBERTA: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 

Musical Directors of Stations 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 

Alicoate, Jack, Introduction by 

All American Program of 1944, (RADIO 

DAILY Poll) 

American Assn. of Adv. Agencies 

American Bar Assn. (Standing Committee 

on Communications) 

American Broadcasting Co. (Refer to Blue 

Network) 

American Communications Assn 

American Council on Education 

American Federation of Musicians 

American Federation of Radio Artists. . . . 



__ American Guild of Musical Artists 973 

American Marketing Association 973 

971 

American Newspaper Publishers Assn.. . 973 
971 

American Radio Relay League 973 

American Society of Composers, Authors 
and Publishers: 

g 71 Article by Deems Taylor 729 

972 Personnel 974 

155 Publisher Members 730 

133 American Television Society 974 

g72 Announcers and Their Work, 1944 835 

133 Applications, FCC Regulations Regarding 

Broadcasting (See pages 198 and 203 

in 1944 Radio Annual) 215 

135 

Argentina, Stations of 1008 

897 

ARIZONA: 

„„„ Census and "Shifting Populations" 277 

_.r Chief Engineers of Stations 915 

„ Home Economics Directors of Stations.. 863 
ooo 
. Musical Directors of Stations 900 

„.„ Stations, Facilities and Personnel 350 

Arizona Broadcasting Co., Personnel 3L7 

Arizona Network, Personnel 317 

920 

647 ARKANSAS: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 277 

q „ n Chief Engineers of Stations 915 

- n » Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 863 

e ,_ Stations, Facilities and Personnel 353 

657 

Arrowhead Network, personnel 317 

ARTICLES: 
89 A Good Song Lives Forever, by Morton 

972 Downey 61 

AMP, by Clinton M. Finney 734 

972 ASCAP, by Deems Taylor 729 

Blue Network Co., by Mark Woods 291 

BMI, by M. E. Tompkins 736 

972 

Business Side of Radio, by M. H. 

972 Shapiro 131 

972 Canadian Post- War Plans, by Glen Ban- 
972 nerman 71 







Meet WHB's John Wahlstedt- 

"The Cook Tenor" . . . and our Program Directoi 



Do not mistake this stern-visaged gent for a Federal Judge 
or a member of the U. S. Senate. He's 237 pounds of 
Swedish tenor who has been a fixture at WHB since 1932. He 
began, and continues, as "The Cook Tenor", and in more 
than a decade has appeared on some 6080 half-hour pro- 
grams sponsored by the Cook Paint & Varnish Company. In 
1942, when Dick Smith became WHB's War Program Manager 
for the duration, John took over Dick's former duties as 
Program Director. 

As background, he has a Bachelor's degree in engineering 
from the University of Kansas; a Master's degree in educa- 
tion; and fifteen years' teaching experience. He left his 
position as Vice-Principal of Kansas City's East High School 
to devote his full time to WHB. He's a Shriner, a Jester, 
"the worst golfer in the state" (his claim); and he loves to 
hunt and fish, and fish and hunt. 

Meanwhile, he not only continues to sing daily on WHB 
for Cook's . . . but he's proud to sing in WHB's praise as 
the result of a Kansas City radio-station program-survey just 
completed by the Merchants' Association. Tabulated, here 
are the facts: 



RETAIL RADIO SURVEY _ 

Kansas City Merchants Association 
Tabulating 600 replies to 4775 questionnaires sent by the 

Association to home-makers in this area. 
Question: "Which radio station in Kansas City do you 
most prefer for Shopping Programs?" 

Answerss WHB 364 votes 60% 

Station B 87 votes.. 14% Station D 17 votes .028% 

Station C 47 votes. 078% Station E 5 votes .088% 

Question: "Do you listen regularly to any of the Shopping 

Programs which are now on the air?" 

Answers: Of the 600 replies, the following mentions 

were made: 

WHB — "Mary Jane on Petticoat Lane" 

228 mentions 38% 

WHB — "Sandra Lea" The Plaza Shopper 

174 mentions 29% 

Station B — Downtown Store Program 

139 mentions 23% 




For WHB Availabilities, 'Phone DON DAVIS 
at any oi these "SPOT SALES" offices: 

NEW SA Y S uR C K TY rVTV ^ arr J tt J Building HArrison 1 161 

ruir&rn 40 ° Mad,son Avenue ELdorado 5-5040 

HO I vwnnn 360 North Mich '9atl FRAnklin 8520 

SAN FZnsrn Hollywood Blvd at Cosmo Hollywood 8318 

MN FRANCISCO 5 Third Street EXbrook 3558 

KEY STATION for the KANSAS STATE NETWORK 

Kansas City . Wichita . Salina . Great Bend . Empona 

Missouri Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas j 



EDITORIAL i NPIX 

||||[|||||||||||||||||i||||l!lll!llll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllliy 



Chicago Looks to the Future, by Bill 

Irwin 69 

Columbia Broadcasting System, by Paul 

W. Kesten 297 

Equipment Men Eye the Peace, by H. N. 

Willets 907 

FM as an Educational Medium, by I. 

Keith Tyler 51 

Federal Communications Commission, by 

Paul A. Porter 33 

Film Outlook in Television, by Ralph B. 

Austrian 225 

Instantaneous Recordings, by Ralph C. 

Powell 909 

Market for Radio in 1945, by M. H. 

Shapiro 57 

Mutual Broadcasting System, by Edgar 

Kobak 303 

NAB, Article by J. Harold Ryan 35 

National Broadcasting Co., by Niles 

Trammell 309 

On the Washington Front, by Andrew 

H. Older 67 

Picture on Television, by Lewis Allen 

Weiss 229 

Progress of FM During 1944, by Myles 

L. Loucks 945 

Report on the "Voice of America," by 

Louis G. Cowan 45 

SESAC- by Paul Heinecke 742 

Symphonic Music on the Air, by Serge 

Koussevitzky 49 

Television Goes Commercial, by Allen 

B. DuMont 47 

Television Moves Ahead, by Frank 

Burke 223 

Twenty-Five Years of Radio, by Frank 

Burke 37 

U. S. Radio Stations at War, by M. H. 

Shapiro 43 

Wartime Sports Broadcasting, by Don 

Dunphy 63 

West Coast Had a Busy Year, by Ralph 

Wilk 65 

Women and Radio — 1945, by Mildred 

O'Neill 55 

Associated Actors and Artistes of America 974 
Associated Music Publishers: 

Article by Clinton M. Finney 734 

Officers, Personnel 734 

Publisher Members 734 

Assn. of Canadian Advertisers 974 

Assn. for Education by Radio 975 



Assn. of National Advertisers 975 

Assn. of Radio News Analysts 975 

Australian Broadcasting Commission 976 

Austrian, Ralph B., Article by 225 

Authors' League 976 



Backstage (People in Production During 
1944) 820 

Bannerman, Glen, Article by 71 

Behind the Mike (Radio Artists and Their 
Work, 1944) 748 

Billings: 

Agency Gross by Networks. 133 

Sponsor 133 

BLUE NETWORK CO.: 

Affiliates, Alphabetically Listed by City 340 

Commercial Programs in 1944 865 

Gross Billings by Agencies in 1944.... 133 

Network Map 292, 293 

Personnel 294 

Sponsor Expenditures, 1944 135 

Stations, Owned and Managed by 295 

Woods, Mark, Article by 291 

BMI Canada, Ltd 976 

Board of War Communications 73, 976 

Bolivia, Stations of 1009 

Brazil, Stations of 1010 

British Broadcasting Corporation 976 

British Guiana, Station of 1012 

British Honduras, Station of 1012 

BRITISH COLUMBIA: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 658 

Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI): 

Article by M. E. Tompkins 736 

Officers and Personnel 977 

Publisher Members 737 

Burke. Frank, Articles by 37, 223 

Business Side of Radio: 

Advertising Agencies 165 

Agency and Sponsor Billings 133 

American Assn. of Adv. Agencies 972 

Business Side of Radio, by M. H. Shapiro 131 

Census Data 273 

Federal Communications Commission.. 215 
Federal Trade Commission 978 




Available exclusively through 

Press Association, inc. 
5© Rockefeller Plaza 

New York 2©, N.V. 



EDITORIAL INDEX 

M 'I,,: :,l! ^ :■ 'I' ^.m^: ,| 1; :, -,1m -:M- ,',■ I i I P, , ■! , , , I-: ' , i ^ll MM , I I^M M' ! M I , fMil.h ,1 , I'M • M ! , I , , , , M , M I . ,MM 



First Advertising Agency Group 978 

National Industrial Adv. Assn 981 

Network Billings 133 

News Services 163 

Pacific Advertising Assn 982 

Publications (Radio) 259 

Research Organizations 214 

"Shifting Populations" Data 273 

Station Representatives 143 

War Advertising Council 987 

— c — 

Calendar of Holidays and Leading Events 125 

CALIFORNIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 277 

Chief Engineers of Stations 915 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 357 

CANADA: 

Article by Glen Bannerman 71 

Canadian Association of Broadcasters . . 977 

Canadian Broadcasting Corp 654 

Canadian Performing Right Society, Ltd. 977 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Section 653 

Stations, Alphabetically Listed by Call 

Letter 655 

Stations Listed by Province with De- 
tailed Information 657 

Station Representatives in Canada .... 143 

Catholic Actors Guild of America 977 

Catholic Writers Guild of America 977 

Census and Population Statistics: 

Census Data by Regions, Divisions and 

States 275 

Noble. Wm. P., Article on Market Data. 274 

Chicago Radio Management Club 977 

Chief Engineers of Stations 915 

Chile, Stations of 1012 

Codes: 

Censorship Lll 

NAB 967 

Colombia, Stations of 1014 

COLORADO: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 278 



Chief Engineers of Stations 915 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 375 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM: 

Affiliates, Alphabetically Listed by City 340 

Commercial Programs in 1944 865 

Gross Billings by Agencies, 1944 133 

Kesten, Paul W., Article by 297 

La Cadena de las Americas (Pan Ameri- 
can Network) of CBS Sttaions, Per- 
sonnel 994 

Network Map 298, 299 

Personnel 300 

Sponsor Expenditures, 1944 137 

Stations, Owned and Operated by 302 

Commentators: 

News, and Their Work in 1944 803 

Sports, and Their Work in 1944 815 

Commercial Programs of Networks in 1944 865 

Committee on Consumer Relations in Ad- 
vertising 978 

CONNECTICUT: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 278 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 379 

Connecticut State Network, Personnel.... 317 

Consulting Radio Engineers 921 

Costa Rica, Stations of 1016 

Cowan, Louis G., Article by 45 

Cuba, Stations of 1016 

— — D 

Daniel Boone Regional Network, Personnel 317 

DELAWARE: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 278 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 384 

Directors' Guild — Programs 859 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 278 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 385 

Dominican Republic, Stations of 1018 




HUTU BLOCK 

TEN WONDERFUL YEARS 

ON 

WNEW'S "MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM" 

NOW PRODUCING 

CHESTERFIELD'S "MUSIC THAT SATISFIES' 

ON CBS 



MASTER OF CEREMONIES 

CHESTERFIELD SUPPER CLUB 

ON NBC 



EDITORIAL I INDEX 

I:: 11.: I ,■:,... ^ ..-—:, ^ : : ■ ' Illllllllllll I Illllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIHII Illlllllllillllllllllllllll! 



Don Lee Broadcasting System, Personnel. 317 

Downey, Morton, Article by 61 

Dramatists' Guild, Officers 978 

DuMont, Allen B., Article 47 

Dunphy, Don, Article by 63 

E 

Ecuador, Stations of 1019 

EDUCATION: 

Association for Education by Radio .... 975 
Educational Broadcast Stations, FCC 

Regulations for Non-Commercial . . 989, 990 
FM as an Educational Medium, by I. 

Keith Tyler 51 

Federal Radio Education Committee . . . 978 

Institute for Education by Radio 979 

National Association of Educational 

Broadcasters 981, 989 

Non-Commercial Educational Stations. . 990 

El Salvador, Stations of 1020 

Engineers, Chiefs of Stations 915 

Equipment Firms, Officers, Addresses.... 923 
Expenditures: 

Advertising Agency, on Networks 133 

Network, by Sponsors 135 

F 

Federal Communications Bar Assn 978 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMISSION: 

FM Allocation Proposals 950 

Growth Chart of Stations, 1941-1944 59 

High Frequency (FM) Stations 952 

Personnel 216 

Porter, Paul A., Statement by 33 

Television Allocation, Proposed 249 

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ 
in America, Department of National 

Religious Radio 978 

Federal Radio Education Committee 978 

Federal Trade Commission 978 

Finney, Clinton M., AMP Article by 734 

First Advertising Agency Group 978 

FLORIDA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 278 
Stations, Facilities and Personnel 387 



FM Broadcasters, Inc 946, 979 

FM News Highlights— 1944 947 

FOREIGN: 

Censorship Code on Foreign Language 

Programs 120 

International Section 991 

Networks (Latin-American). .. .994, 998, 1006 
Stations (Latin-American) 994 

FREQUENCY MODULATION: 

Article on FM, by I. Keith Tyler 51 

FM Allocation Proposals 950 

FM Broadcasters, Inc 979, 946 

FM Developmental Stations 960 

FM News Highlights— 1944 947 

Pending Applications 953 

Progress of FM During 1944, by Myles 
L. Loucks 945 

Section 943 

Stations 952 

— G 

GEORGIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 279 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 395 

Georgia Broadcasting System 318 

Georgia Major Market Trio 318 

Guatemala, Stations of 1020 

Guilds 961 

— H — 

Haiti, Stations of 1020 

HAWAII: 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 649 

Heinecke, Paul, SESAC Article by 742 

Hollywood Victory Committee for Stage, 

Screen & Radio 979 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . . 863 
Honduras, Stations of 1021 

I 

IDAHO: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 279 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations.. 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 402 



K,G4& Smith 



DITORIAL I INDEX 






l!!llll[||||||||ill!l!lllllllll!ll!li;il![ii>i':l! ill llil III 11111111111111!' 



ILLINOIS: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 279 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 405 

INDIANA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 279 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 417 

Institute for Education by Radio 979 

Institute of Radio Engineers 979 

Iniercollegiate Broadcasting System 980 

Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee 980 

Intermountain Network, Officers 318 

International Broadcast Stations, U. S 992 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 

Workers 980 

International News Service 163 

International Section 991 

Introduction by Jack Alicoate 3 

IOWA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 280 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 863 

Musical Direclors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 423 

Irwin, Bill, Article by 69 

K — — 

KANSAS: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 280 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 863 

Musical Direclors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 43 L 

Kansas State Network, Officers 318 

KENTUCKY: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 280 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 437 

Kesten, Paul W., Article by 297 



Keystone Broadcasting System: 

Personnel 316 

Kobak, Edgar, Article by 303 

Koussevitzky. Serge, Article by 49 

L 

Lambs, The, Officers 980 

Latin- American Networks and Stations. ... 991 

Libraries, Script and Transcription 728 

Lone Star Chain, Officers 318 

Loucks, Myles L., Article by 945 

LOUISIANA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 280 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 441 

M 

Magazines, Radio 259 

MAINE: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 281 

Chief Engineers o! Stations 916 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 444 

Managers and Agents, Talent 897 

MANITOBA: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 661 

Market Research Council 980 

MARKET STATISTICS (U. S. Census): 

By States and Counties 275 

Growth of Stations — 1941 to 1944 59 

Noble, Wm. P., Article on Market Data. . 274 

Shapiro, M. H., Article by 57 

"Shifting Populations" 273 

MARYLAND: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 281 

Chief Engineers of Stations 916 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 447 

Maryland All-Home Network 318 

Mason-Dixon Radio Group 318 



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475 FIFTH AVENUE 



& (B. 



INC. 



NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



14 



DITORIAL I N-DEX 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllil 'iilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllK 



MASSACHUSETTS: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 281 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 453 

McClatchy BeelLne, Officers 319 

Mexico. Stations of 1002 

MICHIGAN: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 281 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 863 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 461 

Michigan Radio Network 319 

MINNESOTA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 90 1 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 47 L 

MISSISSIPPI: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 478 

Mississippi Broadcasters Association 319 

MISSOURI: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 884 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 483 

MONTANA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 488 

Musical Conductors and Their Work, 1944. 783 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

Music Publishers' Protective Association. . 980 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM: 

Affiliates. Alphabetically Listed by City. 340 
Commercial Programs in 1944 865 



Gross Billings by Agencies in 1944 .... 135 

Kobak, Edgar, Article by 303 

Network Map 304, 305 

Personnel 306 

Sponsor Expenditures, 1944 139 

_ ^ _ 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 

BROADCASTERS: 

Cede 967 

Personnel, Directors, Committees. . . .962, 980 

Resolution 970 

Statement by J. Harold Ryan 35 

National Assn. of Educational Broad- 
casters, Personnel 981 

List of Member Stations 989 

National Assn. of Performing Artists 981 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO.: 

Affiliates, Alphabetically Listed by City 340 

Commercial Programs in 1944 865 

Network Map 310, 311 

Pan American, Network of 998 

Personnel 312 

Stations, Owned and Operated by 315 

Trammell, Niles, Article by 309 

Nalional Independent Broadcasters 981 

National Industrial Adv. Assn 981 

National Variety Artists 982 

NEBRASKA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 491 

Nebraska Broadcasters Assn 982 

NETWORKS: 

Advertising Agency Gross Billings 133 

Affiliated Stations, Listed by City 340 

Blue Network Co 291 

Canadian Broadcasting Corp 654 

Columbia Broadcasting System 297 

Expenditures by Agencies and Sponsors 135 

Keystone Broadcasting System 316 

Mutual Broadcasting System 303 

National Broadcasting Co 3D9 

National Networks 289 

Pan American Networks 994 

Programs, Commercial, 1944 865 



15 



A i TO THE WINNERS OF THE 
■.GHTH ANNUM RADIO ONLY POLL 

, , hows who have given the mu 
d special thanks «o these stars and sho Uwhy we say 

• • ' • « font for CBS and thirteen for NBC . fhe way! 

first s as aga^ <-J ^ ^^ ^ ^ „,„,„, n e,wor.c 

again: . • • looks 



* M. WARING GLEE CLUB 

favorite Singing Group 

* ALAN YO c UNG fToworwr(M .fe) 
+ BREAKFAST CLUB-DON 

^lU----" 



Jp GUY LOMBARDO 

Favorite Vance Band (*«-«<) 

+ DOROTHY THOMPSON 
* AMERICAS TOWN MEET.NG 





ED. HERLIHY 

MASTER OF CEREMONIES "The Army Hour," NBC, Sunday, 

3:30-4:30 p.m., E.W.T. 
• 

NBC's RADIO REPORTER.... WEAF, Sunday, 1:00-1:15 p.m., E.W.T. 

• 

MASTER OF CEREMONIES. .. "The Children's Hour," NBC, Sunday, 

10:30-11:30 a.m., E.W.T. 
• 

NEWSREEL COMMENTATOR Universal Newsreel 

Successor to Graham McNamee 



RADIO SPONSORS 

• Procter & Gamble 
• Socony Vacuum 

• Brown & Williamson 
• Horn & Hardart 
• Sterling Dairy 
# Borden Co. 
• Kroger Co. 



18 



DDTOI^IAL II INDEX 



iiirmiiiiiiui: 



Regional Networks 317 

Sponsors Network Expenditures 135 

NEVADA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 282 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 493 

NEW BRUNSWICK: 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 662 

New England Regional Network 319 

NEW HAMPSHIRE: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 283 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 495 

NEW JERSEY: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 283 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 901 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 497 

NEW MEXICO: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 283 

Chief Engineers of Stations 917 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 500 

NEW YORK: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 283 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 503 

News Commentators and Their Work, 

1944 803 

News Events of 1944, Ten Outstanding. . . 39 

News Services 163 

Nicaragua, Stations of 1021 

Noble. Wm. P., Article on Market Data. . 274 

NORTH CAROLINA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 284 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 535 

North Central Broadcasting System 319 



NORTH DAKOTA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 283 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations.. 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 543 

Northern Broadcasting & Publishing, Ltd.. 319 

Northern California Broadcasters Assn. . . . 982 

Northwest Network 320 

NOVA SCOTIA: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 663 



o 



Office of Censorship: 

Code of Wartime Practices Ill 

Office of War Information, Domestic Radio 

Bureau: 

Radio Goes to War— 1944 41 

OHIO: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 284 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 546 

Ohio Association of Broadcasters 982 

OKLAHOMA: 

Census and "Shiiting Populations" 284 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 561 

Oklahoma Metropolitan Line 320 

Oklahoma Network 320 

Older, Andrew H., Article by 67 

O'Neill, Mildred, Article by 55 

ONTARIO: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 664 

Orchestra Leaders and Their Work, 1944. . 783 

OREGON: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 284 

Chief Engineers of Stations 918 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 565 

Organizations 961 



y^ 



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MAKE YOUR NEWS PROGRAMS 



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Monotonous repetition drives 
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235 EAST 45th STREET * NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 















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^ C ^o 

^4 



PDTOIRDAL INDEX 



P 

Pacific Advertising Association 982 

Pacific Broadcasting Co 320 

Pan-American Networks 994. 998 

Panama, Stations of 1021 

Paraguay, Stations of 1021 

PENNSYLVANIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 285 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 572 

Pennsylvania Broadcasters Assn 983 

Pennsylvania Network 320 

Peru, Stations of 1022 

Piedmont Broadcasting Corp 988 

Poll (RADIO DAILY'S All American Radio 

Program of 1944) 89 

Populations, Change by Regions, Divisions 

and States 275 

Porter, Paul A„ Article by 33 

Powell, Ralph C, Article by 909 

Press Associalion, Inc. (Associated Press). . 163 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLE: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 673 

PRODUCTION: 

Agents and Managers, Talent 897 

ASCAP, Article and Publisher Members 729 

Announcers and Their Work, 1944 835 

BMI, Article and Publisher Members ... 736 
Backstage (People in Radio Production 

During 1944) 820 

Censorship Code Ill 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 863 

Libraries, Script and Transcription 728 

Managers and Agents, Talent 897 

Musical Conductors and Their Work . . . 783 

Musical Directors of Stations 900 

News Commentators and Their Work, 

1944 803 

Orchestra Leaders and Their Work, 1944 783 
Programs of 1944, Network Commercial 865 

Program Producers 683 

Radio Artists and Their Work, 1944... 749 

Radio Directors and Their Work 859 

SESAC, Article and Publisher Members. 742 



Showman's Calendar 125 

Sports Commentators and Their Work, 

1944 815 

Transcription Libraries 728 

Vocal Artists and Their Work, 1944 793 

Writers, Radio 824 

Professional Music Men, Inc 983 

Program Producers 683 

Publications (Trade-Fan-Technical-General) 259 

PUERTO RICO: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 649 

Q 

Quaker Network 320 

QUEBEC: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 674 

R 

Radio Artists and Their Work, L944 749 

Radio Club of America 983 

Radio Council— WBRZ (FM) 983 

RADIO DAILY: 

All American Radio Program of 1944. . . 89 

FM News Highlights— 1944 947 

Television Highlights— 1944 232 

Radio Directors' Guild 984 

Radio Directors' Guild — Programs 859 

Radio Executives' Club of New York 984 

Radio Goes to War, OWI Summary 41 

Radio Manufacturers' Association: 

Personnel, Officers 912, 984 

Radio Manufacturers' Assn, of Canada .... 985 

Radio News Association 163 

Radio Programas de Mexico 1006 

Radio Script & Transcription Exchange, 
Federal Radio Education Committee .... 985 

Radio Technical Planning Board 985 

Radio Writers' Guild of the Authors' 

League of America 985 

Regional Networks 317 

Research Organizations 214 

Reuters 163 

RHODE ISLAND: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 285 



21 



first again ! 



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22 



DITORIAL INDEX 



. , ; , ; . ; ;| . „ , 



Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 593 

Rocky Mountain Radio Council 985 

Rules and Regulations, FCC: 

Applications (See pages 198 and 233 in 

1944 RADIO ANNUAL) 215 

Chain Broadcasting Regulations (See 
page 203 in 1944 RADIO ANNUAL). . 215 

FM Allocation Proposals 950 

Non-Commercial Educational 990 

Television Allocation Proposals 249 

Ryan, J. Harold, Article by 35 

s — 

SASKATCHEWAN: 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 678 

SESAC: 

Article by Paul Heinecke 742 

Officers, Address 986 

Publisher Members 743 

Shapiro, M. H., Articles by 43. 57. 131 

"Shifting Populations" in U. S. and Re- 
gions 275 

Showman's Calendar for 1945 125 

Society of Jewish Composers, Publishers & 

Song Writers 986 

Society of Motion Picture Engineers 986 

Song Writers' Protective Assn 986 

South and Central American Stations. ... 1008 

SOUTH CAROLINA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 285 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 964 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 595 

South Central Quality Network 321 

SOUTH DAKOTA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 285 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations. Facilities and Personnel 599 

Southern California Broadcasters' Assn. . . 986 

Southern Minnesota Network 321 

Sponsor Network Expenditures 133 

Sports Broadcasters' Assn. (New York 

Chapter) 986 



Sports Commentators and Their Work, 
1944 815 

STATIONS: 

Alphabetically (U. S.) by Call Letters 

with Index to Detailed Information . . . 324 
Alphabetically (U. S.) by City with Major 

Network Affiliations 340 

Blue Network Co., Owned, Managed, or 

Programmed by 295 

Applications, FCC Regulations (See 

pages 198 and 203 in 1944 RADIO 

ANNUAL) 215 

CANADA: J 

Alphabetically by Call Letters with Index 

to Detailed Information 655 

Chief Engineers of 920 

Geographically with Detailed Informa- 
tion Listed by Province 657 

Listed by Province 657 

Censorship Code Ill 

CBS, Owned and Operated by 302 

FCC Lists: 

High Frequency (FM) 952 

International 992 

Non-Commercial 990 

Television 237, 245 

Standard Band (Alphabetically Listed by 

Call Letters) 324 

Growth of Radio Stations, L941-1944, 

Chart 59 

Home Economics Directors of 863 

Mexican 1002 

Musical Directors of 900 

National Assn. of Educational Broad- 
casters 981, 989 

NBC, Owned and Operated by 315 

Representatives 143 

South American 994 

Standard Broadcast, Detailed Information 

Listed Alphabetically by States 347 

Station Statistics 43 

Stations. U. S., Article by M. H. Shapiro. 43 
Television 237, 245 

Surinam (Dutch Guiana), tStaoins of 1022 

— — T 

Talent, Managers and Agents 897 

Taylor. Deems, ASCAP Article by 729 

Technical Section 905 

Telephone Numbers, Important Radio 

100. 101, 102, 103 
TELEVISION: 

American Television Society 974 

FCC Allocation (Proposed) 249 

Film Outlook in Television, by Ralph B. 

Austrian 225 

Picture on Television, by Lewis Allen 

Weiss 229 

Stations, Commercial, Experimental. .237, 245 



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24 



IDDTOISlOAl I NDEX 



Television Associates, Inc 986 

Television Broadcasters' Assn 254, 986 

Television Facts and Figures 255 

Television Goes Commercial, by Allen 

B. DuMont 47 

Television Moves Ahead, by Frank 

Burke .. . . 223 

Television Press Club of New York 987 

Television Section 221 

Television Highlights— 1944 232 

Theater Television, FCC Proposals 

TENNESSEE: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 285 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 902 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 601 

TEXAS: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 286 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 607 

Texas Quality Network, The 321 

Texas State Network 321 

Tobacco Network, The. Personnel 321 

Tompkins, M. E„ BMI Article by 736 

Trade Publications, Radio and Television . . 259 

Trammell, Niles, Article by 309 

Transcription Companies 717 

Transcription Libraries 728 

Transcription Network (Keystone) 316 

Transradio Press Service 163 

Tri-City Stations of Virginia 321 

Twenty Year Club, Personnel 987 

Tyler. I. Keith, Article by 51 

— u 

Unions 961 

United Press Association 163 

U. S. Department of Interior — Radio and 

Television Section 987 

Uruguay, Stations of 1023 

UTAH: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 286 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 621 

— Y 

Venezuela, Stations of 1024 

VERMONT: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 287 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations . . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 623 



VIRGINIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 286 

Chief Engineers of Stations 919 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 624 

Vocal Artists and Their Work, 1944 .... 793 



w 



War Advertising Council 987 

War Food Administration 987 

WASHINGTON: 

Census and "Shirting Populations" 287 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Home Economics Directors 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 629 

Washington State Assn. of Broadcasters, 

Personnel 988 

Weiss, Lewis Allen. Article by 229 

WEST VIRGINIA: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 287 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations. Facilities and Personnel 634 

West Virginia Network 321 

Western Assn. of Broadcasters 988 

Wi!k, Ralph. Article by 65 

Willets. H. N., Article by 907 

WISCONSIN: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" .... 287 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 639 

Wisconsin Network, Inc 322 

Wolverine Network, The, Personnel 322 

Woman's National Radio Committee 988 

Writers for Radio 824 

Writers' War Board, Personnel 988 

WYOMING: 

Census and "Shifting Populations" 287 

Chief Engineers of Stations 920 

Home Economics Directors of Stations. . . 864 

Musical Directors of Stations 903 

Stations, Facilities and Personnel 645 



Yankee Network, The. Personnel 322 



Z Net, Personnel. 



322 



25 




RAYMOND PAIGE 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 
Featured on 

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN 

Corn Products Refining Company 

Management 

HAL HACKETT 
MUSIC CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

LONDON • NEW YORK • CHICAGO • SAN FRANCISCO • BEVERLY HILLS 
CLEVELAND • DALLAS 



26 



ADVERTISING 



INDEX 



— A — 

Abbott. Bud 50 

Advance Television .... 252 

Advertisers. The 266 

Air Features 692 

Alaska Broadcasting Co.. 646 

A'ber, David 779 

Alexander. Alton 709 

Alexander, Murray 712 

All-Canada Radio 661 

Allen, Irwin 813 

Allen. Julie B 768 

Allied Reccrd Mfg. Co... 724 

Ameche, Don 68 

American B'cast Co 16-17 

American Institute of Food 705 

Anderson, Eddie 767 

Andrews Sisters 74 

Associated Press 8 

Associated Program .... 682 
Associated Radio Televi- 
sion Production, Inc. . . 724 

Aull. Emily 651 

Ayer, N. W & Son, Inc.. 128 
Azul. Cadena, R. H. C. . 148 

— B — 

Bailey, Jack 345 

Baker. Art 805 

Baker, Jerry 797 

Barrett, Tony 760 

Barrier, Edgar 776 

Barton, Eileen 795 

Beasley, Irene 754 

Beck, Jackson 759 

Becker, Sandy 346 

Begley, Ed 772 

Benny, Jack 38 

Berg, Gertrude 762 

Bergen, Edgar 46 

Berle. Milton 42 

Betts. Johnny 802 

Bixby, Carl 826 

Black. Ivan 777' 

Blanc, Mel 774 

Block, Hal 825 

Block, Martin 10 

Blocki. Fritz 825 

Blue Network 16-17 

Boles. Athena Lorde ... 760 
Boles, Jim 760 



Bracken, Eddie 746 

Brady, Fred 106 

Bregman, Vocco, Conn. . . 73L 

Breneman, Tom 82 

British Broadcasting Corp. 34 

Broadcast Music, Inc 98-99 

Brooks, Joan 60 

Brown, Dick 795 

Bryan, Arthur Q 764 

Burn, Walter P 272 

Burns, Bob 756 

Burns & Allen 758 

— C — 

CFRB 669 

CHUM 671 

CKAC 675 

CKEY 671 

CKLW 672 

Cafe Society 777 

Can You Top This? 699 

Canadian Advertising . . 264 
Canadian Broadcaster . . 679 
Canadian B'cast Corp.. . . 652 

Cantor, Eddie 40 

Carson, Jack 750 

Carver, Zeb 774 

Charles, Lewis 844 

Cherniavsky, Josef 785 

Chimes, Michael 776 

Clair, Eugenia 140 

Clampett, Bob 228 

Clark, Lon 765 

Clarke, Phil 772 

Close, Upton 804 

Cohan, Phil 711 

CBS 121, 122, 123, 124 

Columbia Transcriptions. 716 
Combs, George Hamilton. 808 

Como, Perry 114 

Cooper. Jerry 796 

Costello, Lou 50 

Cotsworth. Staats 774 

Cott, Ted 711 

Courtney, Alan 775 

Courtney, Diane 796 

Cunning, Patrick Michael 226 
Curtin. Joseph 772 

— D — 

Daley, Cass 792 

27 



Dandridge, Ruby 773 

Davis. Joan 48 

De Angelo, Carlo 709 

Dean, Eddie 802 

Deutsch, Emery 788 

Dolan, Ken & Co 763 

Don Lee 288 

Donald. Peter 767 

Douglas, Don 770 

Downey, Morton . . . Fac. Pg. 1 

Doyle, Jim 845 

Dudley, Bernard 840 

DuMont, Allen B., Lab 220 

Durante, Jimmy 56 

Dutton, Myron 714 

— E — 

East, Ed and Polly 770 

Easy Aces 768 

Edwards, Ralph 66 

Ellington, Duke 784 

Ellis, Anita 797 

Emory, Carl 774 

Evans, George B 778 

— F — 
Fairchild, Edgar "Cookie" 786 
Farnsworth Television . . 222 

Fields. Gracie 107 

Finch Tele. . . Fac. Back Cover 

Finders Keepers 697 

Fitsgeralds, The 758 

Fizdale, Tom, Inc 779 

Flannery, Harry W 804 

Framer. Walt 828 

Frederic Brothers Agency 112 

— G — 

Gailmor, William S 808 

Gale Associates 706 

Gallop. Frank 837 

Garde, Betty 764 

Gardner, Ed (Archie) ... 52 

Gart, Jon 790 

Gary, Arthur 846 

General Amusement Corp. 701 
General Electric 

Inside Front Covers 

Georgia Broadcasting Co. 394 

Gillette, Mickey 790 

Gobel, Dolph 790 

Goodman, Benny 28 




li II I) II II I J 



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for 20th Century-Fox Films 

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28 



ADVERTISING DIN 

N! i'i hlilllhli -,11 h III!! 1 ,!:!:!!..! M 1 1 1,.,!- ."J Im ■ V ; , . i , -,l , i ' I ,' : : - ; ; '.u, , ,■. h I : . IT-!.| i I : : -,': : V.M 1 1 M , I T.i;l l i', I N : ,i.l i :' : ^.- , . ,- 



Goodman, Harry S 696 

Goodwin. Bill 835 

Graham, Frank 840 

Grauer, Ben 837 

Gray, Barry 847 

Green, Art » 841 

Greenwood, Charlotte . . 84 

Grey, Bill 776 

— H — 

Hadley, Hap 715 

Haines, Connie 799 

Haley, lack 754 

Hamilton, Gene 842 

Haven of Rest 706 

Hayes, George (Gabby). 780 

Heatter, Gabriel 806 

Henley. Arthur 786-827 

Herlihy. Ed 18 

Herman. Woody 782 

Hersholt, Jean 76 

Hill, Edwin C 807 

Hoff, Carl 789 

Hope, Bob 44 

Hopper, Hedda 72 

Home, Lena 794 

Hull, Warren 92 

International News 20 

Jarvis, Al 134 

Johnson, Erskine 705 

Johnson, Parks 92 

Jostyn, Jay 764 

Joy, Dick 841 

— K — 

KCKN 432 

KCMO 484 

KDYL 622 

KFDM 608 

KFEL 374 

KFI 360 

KFMB 368 

KFQD 646 

KFWB 361 

KGFJ 362 

KGHL 489 

KGKO 612 

KGW 568 

KLX 365 

KMBC 296 

KMTR 363 

KOA 375 

KROW 366 

KSD 482 

KSL " 620 

KSTP 474 

KWKH 440 

KXEL 428 

Kadell, Carlton 839 

Kasper-Gordon, Inc 686 



Kearns, Joseph 842 

Keating. Larry 844 

Keith. Maxine 771 

Kelk, Jackie 772 

Kennedy, John B 807 

Kent-Johnson, Inc 703 

Kermit-Raymond Corp. . . 24 

Kerner, Sam 713 

Keystone Broadcasting 

Between Pages 316-317 

Kirkwood, Jack 118 

Kyser, Kay 54 

Lake, Arthur 748 

Lang, William 843 

Lansworth, Lew X 828 

Latimer, Ed 770 

Lavalle, Paul 787 

Lee, Bert 816 

Linkletter, Art 752 

Listen, The Women 713 

Lcmbardo, Guy 36 

Lovejoy, Frank 766 

Lyons, A. & S„ Inc 104 

Lytell, Jimmy 788 

— M — 

MacQuarrie, Haven . . . 707 

Mack, Gilbert 766 

Malone, Ted .-. 769 

Mansfield, Ronny 801 

Manson, Charlotte 766 

Marks, Lt. Garnett 136 

March of Time 698 

Marks. Edward B. Music. 737 

Marks, Larry 829 

Marshall, Reg. D 785 

McBride, Mary Margaret 750 

McClatchy Broadcasting . 356 

McGeehan, Pat 843 

McGill. Jerry 827 

McGillvra, Joseph 144 

Mcintosh, Frank H 922 

Mclntyre, Hal 784 

McKeon, Jeanne 800 

McNeill, Don 78 

Mears, Martha 801 

Melvin-Rackin Publicity . 780 

Merry Macs. The 798 

Metronome 268 

Meyers, Ted 812 

Michelson, Charles 722 

Michigan Radio Network 460 

Miller, Allan H 704 

Miller, Irving 788 

Miller, Jack 788 

Miller, Marvin 811 

Mississippi Valley Net. . . 472 

Monroe, Lucy 793 

Moore, Garry 62 

Moorhead, Agnes 756 

Morgan, Raymond R. Co. . 138 

29 



Morris. Chester 768 

Morris, Edwin H. and Co. 730 
Morris, William, Agency. 108 

Morse, Carlton E 824 

Munson, Ona 764 

Murray. Lyn 786 

Murray, Mildred 765 

Musical Courier 270 

Mutual Broadcasting ...80-81 
Muzak 720 

— N — 

NBC 'Insert). . .Between 96-97 
NBC Radio-Recording . . . 680 

NBC (Thesaurus) 718 

NBC, Spot Sales 2 

NCAC 110 

National Radio Features 708 
Neblett Radio Productions 688 

Niles, Wendell 771 

Nilsson, Norma 761 

Nolan, Robert H 710 

North Central B'cast 472 

Novak, Frank 70 

— O — 

Oboler, Arch 826 

— P — 

Paige, Raymond 26 

Pan American B'cast.... 146 

Pearce, Al 757 

Pennell, Bill 809 

Petrie. Howard 838 

Philco 224 

Piano Playhouse 702 

Pictorial Photo Engraving 910 

Pratt, Ben 86 

Presto Recording Corp. . . 906 

Prindle, Don 771 

Pringle, Nelson 809 

Putnam, George, Lt 88 

— Q — 

Quiz Kids 90 

— R — 

Radio Craft 262 

RCA Back Cover 

Radio Engineering Labs. . 944 
Radio Programmas de 

Mexico. . .Facing Page 1024 

Randolph, Lillian 773 

Ray-Tele . 230-707-7 14-725-762 
Reeves Sound Studios . . . 723 

Reid, Don 798 

Richmond-Sanford Prod. . . 7 12 

Rickey, Al 789 

Ringling Bros, and Bar- 

num and Bailey 32 

Rockhill Radio, Inc 700 

Rogers, Roy 94 

Ross Federal Research. . 481 
Roy, Michael 847 

— S — 

Seeds, Russel M. Co 166 

Selznick, Saphier and Co. 132 



1939 



Still Going Strong! 



1945 




mailed 
a few a 



THE 01, THE IHI1 and THE HIIH.IUI' 

TEL-PIC Displays and Service 

314 RADIO STATIONS 

Coast to Coast. 

Each week more and more radio stations are contract- 
ing' for TEL-PIC displays. Renewed contracts are our 
best evidence as to satisfaction. These stations range 
from 250 Waiters to 50,000 Watters. Upon request we 
shall be happy to furnish names, etc. 

TEL-PIC LEADS BECAUSE . . . 
17 "" > 1 — Pictures are 

daily (not just 
week) . 
2 — Pictures printed on 70 

lb. coated stock. 
3 — TEL-PIC displays attract 

attention . . . 
4 — There are 5 beautiful 
colors screened on glass, 
including the American 
Flag. 
5- — S eparate removable 
slides with your copy 
changed weekly or 
monthly for station and/ 
or sponsor promotion. 
6 — Pictures are carefully 
selected so as to attract 
attention from passers- 

7 — TEL-PIC owns its own printing plant. 
8 — TEL-PIC manufactures its own displays. 
9 — TEL-PIC uses Press Association (division of AP) 
pictures. 
10 — Most important of all . . . 

TEL-PIC Originates not Imitates! 

Each merchant subscriber receives 100 bound booklets for free distribution con- 
taining photos of radio personalities that appear on your station with station copy. 
Covers of booklets are imprinted with your call letters, frequency and your message. 

If your present contract with a news service is expiring or if you are contemplating 
publicity for your station you owe it to yourself to investigate the TEL-PIC Plan. 
Why be satisfied with less than TEL-PIC offers? Remember TEL-PIC station renewals 
years after year are evidence that our stations must be satisfied. 

No other news picture company offers so much radio station publicity promotion 
to its station subscribers. 

TEL-PIC SYNDICATE, Inc. 

1697 Broadway New York, N. Y. 

TEL-PIC offers a new reciprocal payment plan to your radio 
station. Write for further details. No obligation on your part. 



famCbfBfff&le / 



30 



ADVElFl 



SESAC. Inc 14 

Shepard. Bob 838 

Shore, Dinah 58 

Singleton, Penny 748 

Smith, Kate 12 

Sobol, Hartman & Faggen 778 
Souvaine, Henry, Inc.... 694 

Spivak, Charlie 782 

Spot Sales, Inc 142 

Standard Rate and Data. 260 
Stark, Richard and Co.. 708 

Steel, Johannes 803 

Steele, Ted 116 

Stern, Bill 815 

Storm, Charles M. Co... 164 

Street, Dave 800 

Styles, Hal 130 

Swan, Bob 811 

Swing, Raymond 808 

Sylvern, Henry 790 

— T — 

Tailor Maids, The 126 

Tel-Pic Syndicate, Inc... 30 
The Texas State Network. 606 

Thomas. Ann 766 

Thompson, Johnny 799 

Transamerican 4 

Transradio Press Service 22 

Tri-Penn Market 591-576 

Tune In 258 

Tuttle, Lurene 770 

— U — 

United Press Radio News 162 
Universal Microphone Co. 908 
Universal Radio Prod. . . . 690 

— V — 

Vaile, Dave 812 

Valentino, Thomas J 723 

Van, Lyle 810 

Vincent, Chick Co 710 

Vola, Vicki 768 

Von Zell, Harry 834 

Voorhees, Don 786 

Vox Pop 92 

— W — 

WAGE 529 

WAKR 545 

WARM 587 

WATL 394 

WAZL 577 

WBAL 446 

WBAP 610 

WBAX 588 

WBIG 537 

WBNX 510 

WBNY 505 

WBYN 506 

WCAR 470 

WCAU 571 

WCBI 479 

WCBM 448 



WCFL 406 

WCOP 452 

WCOU 444 

WCSC 596 

WDAS 579 

WDEL 384 

WDRC 378 

WDSU 442 

WEBR 507 

WELI 381 

WELO 479 

WEMP 642 

WERC 574 

WEST 573 

WEVD 511 

WFAA 610 

WFAS 533 

WFBL 530 

WFBM .'... 416 

WFCI 592 

WFIL 580 

WFPG 557 

WGAL 591-576 

WGBR 538 

WGCM 478 

WGN 408 

WGPC 394 

WGST 397 

WGY 528 

WHAM 526 

WHAS 436 

WHB 6 

WHEB 494 

WHIO 554 

WHK 550 

WHKK 547 

WHN 512 

WHOM 496 

WIAC 650 

WIBC 418 

WIBG 581 

WIBW 430 

WIBX 532 

WINN 439 

WINS 514 

WINX 385 

WIOD 390 

WIP 582 

WISN 638 

WITH 450 

WJAX 388 

WJEF 468 

WJJD 411 

WJPA 557 

WJTN 509 

WJW 552 

WKBN 558 

WKBO 591-576 

WKMO 420 

WKNY 557 

31 



WKRC 548 

WKZO 468 

WLAW 457 

WLBC 421 

WLIB 504 

WLS 410 

WLW 308 

WMAN 556 

WMAQ 404 

WMC 602 

WMCA 516 

WMFJ 387 

WMT 290 

WNEL 648 

WNEW 519 

WOKO 502 

WOOD 466 

WOR 520 

WORK 591-576 

WORL 454 

WOV 524 

WPAT 499 

WPEN 584 

WPRO 594 

WPTF 540 

WQXR 522 

WRAK 589 

WRBL 394 

WRNL 627 

WROK 414 

WROX 479 

WRRF 541 

WSB 396 

WSRR 382 

WSTV 557 

WTBO 449 

WTIC 380 

WTOL 559-560 

WWJ 462 

WWRL 534 

WXYZ 464 

Waldrop. Jim 170 

Wallington, Jimmy 839 

Walton, Sidney 836 

Ward. Jack 776 

Ward, Perry 848 

Waring, Fred 64 

Warwick & Legler, Inc.. 168 

Wayne. Jerry 792 

Western Electric 904 

Westinghouse . .In. Back Cover 

Wolf Associates, Inc 695 

Wood, Harrison 810 

— Y — 
Yankee Network, The... 172 

Young, Adam J., Jr 150 

Young, Alan 752 

Young, Victor 787 

— Z — 

Zerbe. Lawson 769 

Ziv, Frederic W. Co 684 



"Jk 



ete. we 



ale aaaiti 



I" 



These words, the circus-day greeting of the 
traditional talking clown of a century ago, 
have lost none of their enthusiasm; indeed 
they have gained new meaning in 1945. 

Tested by the exigencies of the times and 
by hardships that troupers long ago learned 
to accept as facts-of-life in show business, the 
Big One proudly points its wagon tongues 
toward the open road and sends its agents 
out again among the loyal friends of the 
Circus — the Men and Women of Radio. 

There are only two days in circus business: 
today and tomorrow. Soon the bright ban- 
ners will be flying on the halyards of a new, 
f ameproof big top. The band tempo is 
circus gallop-time and the brass is wide open. 
And the echo of the old-time clown comes 
shouting up the corridors of a hundred 
years — 



JJ 



Jlete 



we an& cufcivi 



I" 




RINGLING BROS, and BARNUM & BAILEY 

Publicity Dept. 

Bev. Kelley . . . Frank Morrissey . . . Allen J. Lester 

Bill Fields . . . Frank W. Braden . . . Bernard Head 

32 



RADIO 

IN ITS 25TH YEAR 
A POWER FOR PEACE 



By PAUL A. PORTER 

Chairman, Federal Communications 

Commission 



AT this time and in the months to come 
when we must win the war, build world 
peace machinery and plan our domestic econ- 
omy to give jobs and opportunity to all our 
citizens, we are fortunate in having at hand 
such a powerful instrument as our broadcast- 
ing system. 

Now in its 25th anniversary year, American broadcasting has demonstrated on various 
thrilling occasions that it has the potentialities to be a leading, if not the leading force 
in assisting the nation to understand and conquer the complicated problems ahead. 




Herein lies radio's great opportunity for public service. As the casualty lists pour 
in from battlefields around the globe, as Americans ponder plans to prevent the bread- 
lines and soup kitchens of the past, and as they resolve that some way, somehow, a 
better way of life must come for all, they are placing new values on familiar forces. 
To be of maximum usefulness to the nation, radio must rise above its high accom- 
plishments in selling goods, in entertaining, in making big profits. 

To meet the challenging problems of the future in a truly democratic way, we 
shall need the widest dissemination of information, the fullest discussion from all points 
of view. It will be radio's upcoming and continuing prime responsibility to bring this 
to the nation. 

• 

Although there is a disposition in some quarters of broadcasting even after 25 
years of radio, to bring a 1920 attitude to bear on the responsibilities of 1945, there 
is also heartening evidence that that is by no means the universal approach. 

There is an increasing amount of public discussion on the responsibilities of our 
radio system in assisting citizens to cope with their local, national and world problems. 
Most leaders of the industry realize that such discussion is a recognition of the indis- 
pensability of radio as dynamic force for culture and education in our modern life. 



This 25th anniversary finds radio on the eve of spectacular technical develop- 
ments. Under the impetus of war, the engineers have pushed back the frontiers of 
the science of radio to an extent previously unhoped for. All the rest of us concerned 
with radio must have equal vision in assisting the art of radio to fulfill its highest 
destiny. 

Radio must never aspire to be only a sideshow in our civilization. Its goal must 
always be to improve itself as one of the greatest facts of that civilization. 



For Complete FCC Personnel Please Turn to Page 213 

• ••••••• 



33 




Dedicated to continued cooperation 
with United States and world radio 
in the interests of world peace 



Sitatton 
ffiritt^li^Sroabcfi^tin^ (Eorporrrtion 

I ======= from the - 

bRabie'fiEfetutflj^ &lub rf^tof ark 

Jor its unstinting cooperation Tuitk CjrocricarL. 
broadcasters, networks and independent stations to 
make complete the couerage of the war; 

.77/20 /or inspirma radio throughout tnc xuorld to 
become a poiuerjul voice xohich unll declare ever 
loudly for all the people their desire for euerlasttncj 
peace ■ — 

Presented bij the Stadia Gxecutioes Club ofOTeu^ork to the 
British broadcasting Corporation, ^December 6,1944. 



■President 

%xA\o £xtcuiwh)Q\ub cfOTeu/tjorfc 



BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



630 - 5th Avenue 



New York 20, N. Y. 



Washington 6, D. C. 


Chicago 11, III. 


Toronto 3, Ont. 


San Francisco 9, Calif 


1150 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 


430 No. Michigan Avenue 


354 JarvisSt. 


1060 Bush Street 


Executive 1465 


Delaware 6881 


Midway 5481 


Ordway 4949 



34 



felj 




RADIO 

SETS VAST PLANS 
FOR POST WAR ERA 



By 

J. HAROLD RYAN 

President National Association of Broadcasters 



A 



S THE SCROLL of history begins to 

unroll for the 1945 stanza, during which 

American Broadcasting celebrates its 

Twenty-Fifth Anniversary, it becomes clearly 

evident that because of the delayed progress 

of the European phase of the war a great 

deal of the planning that has been made for 

post-war activities is going to have to be changed. That is especially true in radio 

where technical and engineering developments are being held up until materials can be 

made available and the newest laboratory advances can be unveiled. 

With television, frequency modulation and facsimile hovering on the radio horizon, 
it is very apparent that once the war is over radiio broadcasting is going to take tre- 
mendous strides in developing new phases of the art and new means of delivering broad- 
casting programs as we have known them. The universal application and acceptance 
of television in the post-war period will entirely revolutionize radio and radio pro- 
gramming as it affects the average citizen and may even change to a considerable de- 
gree his accepted habits of listening. FM, on the other hand, is simply another method 
of delivering the broadcast programming with which we have long been familiar. 
Facsimile presents a challenge and an opportunity in the field of the newspaper of the 
air, although it must be admitted that during the past ten years progress has been slow. 

The National Association of Broadcasters some three or four years ago altered its 
By-Laws so as to admit to membership FM stations, television stations and facsimile 
stations. We now have in membership representatives of these new ranks in broad- 
casting and every month sees additions to the television and FM stations in the NAB. 

The Association has been engaged for sometime in strengthening and developing its 
aid to members along the lines of Employer-Employee relations, which it views as one 
of the most important and necessary services of this period. 

• 

Considerable thought has been given, and is being given, to the question of program 
development and improvement. During the past year a standing Committee of the 
Association has been created on programming, composed of program directors. A Radio 
News Committee has been formed and we are now planning a Committee of Farm Editors. 

In the line of business planning our Department of Broadcast Advertising is con- 
tinuing its efforts to interest and convert more retailers to the field of advertising over 
the air. The Retail Promotion Plan, staged over a year ago, resulted in a quite sub- 
stantial increase in air advertising from retailers. 

• 

Probably the most important and most pretentious plan that the NAB has in 
development for this and the post-war era is a standardized and authenticated form of 
measurement of station coverage. 

• 

But before the plans and dreams of radio people can be brought to fulfillment in the 
world of the future this war must come to a successful conclusion. 

For Complete NAB Section and Personnel Please Turn to Page 962 

• ••••••• 

35 



United States and Can 

v, others, and the boys 
To my brothers, 

in the band. 

v. Roosevelt Hotel. 
Xo the Hoose 

„ & Brother Co., taP-. 
T ° LaT ! Chelsea Curettes 
^TdaeUHpe Tobacco. 

a ndiriends,MCA. 



(fa IoJ>^o 



36, 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IFJAIII 



By Frank Burke 

Editor, RADIO DAILY 



'TWENTY-FIVE years ago the modern 
miracle — radio— was born and today 
"pledged to Victory" the industry ob- 
serves a quarter of a century of progress 
confident that the years ahead hold 
promise of a dramatic new era of expan- 
sion. 

It was during an election year, 1920, 
that radio was first heard. To be exact 
the late Dr. Frank Conrad broadcast the 
returns of the Harding-Cox Presidential 
election from KDKA in Pittsburgh. 
Therefore, historically, November 2, 
1920, is considered the birthdate of an 
art which in the short span of 25 years 
has become one of the nation's foi*emost 
industries. 

Since the early days of crystal sets, 
cumbersome storage battery receivers, 
earphones and sleepless nights of the 
late listeners, radio has grown to an in- 
dustry with 33,000,000 radio families, 
59,000,000 receivers and estimated gross 
network sales of over $126,000,000 during 
the year 1944. 

Today radio with four major networks, 
925 AM stations and several hundred ap- 
plications for FM and television licenses, 
enters 1945 pledged to support the war 
effort and with post-war plans for the 
electronic future. Proud of the industry's 
achievement, J. Harold Ryan, president 
of the National Association of Broad- 
casters, announced plans for dedicating 
the 1945 anniversary activities to the 
winning of the war. Ryan, in a formal 
proclamation, said: 

"1945 marks the Twenty-Fifth anni- 
versary of the American System of 
Broadcasting. 

"I therefore urge all stations and net- 
works to observe the anniversary through- 
out the year in a manner befitting the 
position of broadcasting in American pub- 
lic life. 

"Broadcasting is dedicated to the win- 
ning of the war. Let us use the slogan, 
"Radio's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary — 
Pledged to Victory." 

Act on Proclamation 

Acting on President Ryan's proclama- 
tion, network representatives met with 
NAB officials in New York last Decem- 
ber and formed the first committee for 
the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary observ- 



ance. Dr. Frank Stanton, vice-president 
of CBS; Robert D. Swezey, vice-president 
and assistant general manager of Mutual; 
Frank E. Mullen, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of NBC, and Mark Woods, 
president of the Blue Network, were 
asked to determine general network pol- 
icy and to correlate the activities of dra- 
matizing the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary 
plans. Later the Radio Manufacturers 
Association, Broadcast Music, Inc., Radio 
Corporation of America, and other or- 
ganizations joined in the movement to 
celebrate the anniversary year. 

To chronologically review the develop- 
ments of the radio industry since its in- 
ception a quarter of a century ago would 
require a volume. Suffice to say this in- 
dustry has an unparalleled record of 
achievement and today is one of the 
nation's ranking industries in volume of 
business. 

First Network Program 

Turning back the pages of radio his- 
tory one finds that in the early days mu- 
sic comprised more than two-thirds of 
the radio programming and the first spe- 
cial event of any importance to be broad- 
cast was the Dempsey-Carpentier fight 
by RCA from Jersey City on July 2, 1921. 
Records reveal that the first network pro- 
gram in history was carried by two sta- 
tions linked by telephone wires in Jan- 
uary of 1923. This program was a five- 
minute saxophone solo and was carried 
by WEAF, New York, and WNAC, Bos- 
ton. 

Greatest of all program trends in sta- 
tion and network operations over the 
past 25 years has been the developments 
in the field of news and special events. 
While the war in a large measure is re- 
sponsible for the present emphasis on 
news broadcasting there is every likeli- 
hood that after the return of peace 
reporting of national and international 
news will continue to play a major role 
in programming. 

Radio's twenty-fifth annversary sym- 
bol is "XXV". The industry has com- 
bined the now famous musical "V" with 
the "X" taken from the continental code. 
Together they symbolize 'Radio's Twenty- 
Fifth Anniversary — Pledged to Victory." 



37 



LUCKY STRIKE 


Presents 


Every Sunday Over NBC — 7 P.M.— E.W.T. 


JACK BENNY 


^rris L^ast 


MARY LI VI NGSTON E 


ROCHESTER 


PHIL HARRIS 


DON WILSON 


LARRY STEVENS 


Written by 


SAM PERRI N 


M 1 LTON JOSEFSBERG 


GEORGE BALZER 


JOHN TACKAB ERRY 



3* 



TEN OUTSTANDING 
RADIO NEWS EVENTS 
OF 1944 

D-Day In Europe. Outstanding coverage of the Invasion of France and the 
Philippines. 

James Lawrence Fly resigns as Chairman of the FCC to go into private law prac- 
tice. Senate confirms President Roosevelt's nomination of Paul A. Porter to suc- 
ceed Fly. 

FM convention in New York draws some 700 broadcasters and others in allied 
fields. # 

Edgar Kobak resigns executive post with the Blue Network and becomes presi- 
dent of Mutual Broadcasting System, succeeding Miller McClintock who resigned. 

• 

RCA-CRC-NBC signs with the AFM on the musician's union terms after failure 
to receive action from the WLB, in the dispute involving special fees for making 
recordings. 

• 

NAB adopts Station Coverage Yardstick plan of audience coverage at its an- 
nual convention in Chicago. Plan approved by the AAAA and the ANA. 

Hearings were held before the FCC on matters of allocation in alloting chan- 
nels to television and FM. 

Television Broadcasting Association holds two-day convention in New York. 

Greatest number of station sales and transfers in recent years with several news- 
papers significantly entering the field. 

House investigating committee held hearings throughout the year, providing 
many stormy sessions relating to former Chairman Fly, the WMCA case etc. 

• 

Outstanding Broadcasts: 
"The Land Is Bright," Fifth War Loan Program on CBS. 

NBC's kick-off show on the Sixth War Loan scripted by Robert Sherwood. 

George Hicks' (Blue) pooled broadcast from Naval craft in English channel 
during Invasion of France. 

"Return to the Philippines" — half hour documentary program on General Mac- 
Arthur's return to the Islands. 

"1944 in Review," presented by WOR over Mutual network. 



39 



THANKS A MILLION ...for helping us raise over a 
million Christmas Gifts for disabled War Veterans. 








EDDIE CANTOR 

'I Love To Spend Each Wednesday With You" 
9 P.M., E.W.T. — NBC 

Broadcasting Over 127 Stations for IP ANA and SAL HEPATICA 



40 



UM GOES TO WAR — 1944 



Radio Participation in War Information Campaign— 1944 

A Summary of Campaigns Conducted by OWI 
Domestic Radio Bureau with Time and Talent 
Contributions of Advertisers, Networks and Stations. 



OWI FACILITIES 



Est. Est. 

"Listener- Annual 

Impres- Value of 

No. of No. of War Messages sions" Time and 

Programs Per Week Per Year Per Week Talent 



20,082 

17,136 



1. Network Allocation Plan... 110 

Sponsored 260 

. . Sustaining ISO 

2. Special Assignment Plan . . . 

3. National Spot & Reg. Net- 

work Allocation Plan . . . 185 

4. Station Announcement Plan 

Network Affiliates. . . . 621 

Independent Stations. . 272 

TOTAL 893 

5. Special Events 

6. Women's Radio War Pro- 

gram Guide 1,000 



§ Number of station broadcasts per week. 
[* "Figures represent commercial value of time and 
assigned messages."] 



10,920 IC.0,000,000 $39, 000,000" 



95,000,000 



21,000.000 



1,356,264 
891,072 



8,149,000* 
2,774,000 



;>3,000,000 



alent of programs 



15,861,000" 
57,600* 



$66,141,600 
carrying OWI- 



Typical OWI Radio Campaigns in 1944 



CAMPAIGNS 



Station 
Pro- Annouuce- 
Weeks grams ments 



Estim. 

Listener 

Impressions 



Est. Value 

of Time 
and Talent 



WAC Recruiting 43 600 112,144 

Prepare for Winter 10 484 43,218 

Victory Gardens 16 274 36,330 

Red Cross War Fund 10 431 93,765 

4th War Loan 5 472 87,994 

War Production Comes First 4 226 

Cadet Nurse Corps 13 223 25,515 

Income Tox Regulations 8 315 10,248 

6th War Loan 4 817 25,012 

National War Fund 5 421 41,514 



1,318,256,000 

583,725,000 

1,095,480,000 

1466,205,000 

1 „'i90,543,000 

519,798,000 

625,695,000 

686,345,000 

1,675,297,000 

787,616,000 



$2,700,000 
1,500,000 
805,000 
2,000,000 
2,574,000 
1,000,000 
1,250,000 
1,314,000 
2,812,840 
1,500,000 



Breakdown of OWI National Campaigns by Agencies 



No. of 
Campaigns 

1. Treasury 14 

2. War Department 11 

3. WFA & Agriculture 16 

4. War Production Board 15 

5 : War Manpower 6 

6. Office of Price Administration 13 

7. Economic Stabilization 7 

8. War Shipping Administration 3 

9. Navy Department 7 



No. of 

Campaigns 

10. Red Cross 3 

11. Office of Defense Transportation.... 3 

12. Federal Bureau of Investigation .... 2 

13. National War Fund 1 

14. Federal Security 3 

15. Petroleum Administrator for War .... 3 

16. Miscellaneous 16 

TOTAL 123 




MILTON BERLE 



LET YOURSELF GO' 



CBS 



Rep.: WILLIAM MORRIS AGENCY 



42 



11. S. RADIO STATIOIS AT WAR 



By M. H. Shapiro 

Managing Editor, RADIO DAILY 



"^THROUGHOUT 1944 the American way of broadcasting continued to he a Hen/ion of war 

as well as an instrument of morale and dissemination of news and vital war messages for the 

home front. When World War II overlook the United Stales its radio system virtually proved 

itself a Secret Weapon, so completely did it integrate the people at large in presenting a solid 

front in the prosecution of its enemies. 

Graphic picture of the radio station status, standard, FM, educational, television and 
international outlets is presented below, as of January 1, 1945. 

Standard Stations 

There were 943 standard broadcast stations — 919 in operation and 24 under construc- 
tion. Mutual had 244 affiliates; the Blue, 194; CBS, 143; NBC, 149. 

* * * 

Frequency Modulation 

There were 46 high frequency (FM) broadcasting stations licensed and seven under 
construction, in addition to two temporary Class 2 experimental high frequency broad- 
cast stations also furnishing FM programs. There are 323 applications pending in 
FCC files to build new commercial FM stations when materials become available. 

* * * 

Television 

Six commercial television broadcast stations were licensed at the close of the year, 
all of which had maintained a minimum program schedule of four hours per week 
during the year. Three other construction permits for commercial television stations 
were outstanding. Twenty-five experimental television stations had licenses and fifteen 
others were under construction. Pending in FCC files are 98 applications to build com- 
mercial television stations when the freeze on civilian radio construction is lifted. 

* * * 

International 

A total of 31 international broadcast stations were operating within the United 
States at the close of the year and five others were under construction. 

All international broadcast stations are, of course, programmed by the Office of 
War Information or the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. These two 
offices have set the goal of 36 powerful international transmitters operating from 
within the United States to provide adequately the needs of psychological warfare. 
About 20 additional frequencies have been made available for international service. 

Educational 

Five channels are allocated for non-commercial educational broadcast stations 
adjacent to the commercial FM broadcast band. At year-end five stations were broad- 
casting regularly and five others were under construction. While these stations have 
not been subject to wartime restrictions on construction, under the FCC's Memorandum 
Opinion of April 27, 1942, equipment shortages and lack of skilled personnel have served 
to retard their development. Thirteen applications to build educational FM stations 
are pending in FCC files and 18 other applications received in 1944 were returned as 
incomplete or not wholly in proper form. According to the U. S. Office of Education, 
which is working closely with State Departments of Education, plans are under way 
in 31 of the 48 states for state-wide educational FM networks after the war. 

* * * 

Facsimile 

At the present time only three facsimile transmitting stations are authorized. 
Although the FCC's rules provide for multiplex transmission of facsimile by high fre- 
quency (FM) broadcast stations, no regular FM stations provide this service. Consid- 
erable interest has been evinced in multiplexing facsimile throughout the FM broadcast 
band and also in facsimile simplex operation after the war. 

43 




PEPSODENT PROGRAM 
PARAMOUNT PICTURES 



44 



REPORT ON THE "lid OE Ulliliin 

By Louis G. Cowan 

Chief, New York Office Overseas Branch, Office of War Information 



M 



A S the European countries have been 
liberated and the war has increased 
its tempo in the Pacific, the Overseas 
Branch of the Office of War Information 
has kept pace with the rapid offensive 
of the Army and Navy. 

Although radio is only one medium 
utilized by OWI in its psychological war- 
fare and informational programs, it is 
a vastly important one and the powerful 
strides made in that field by OWI are 
indicative of its advance in the whole 
overseas propaganda operation. But, as 
Edward W. Barrett, who was appointed 
director of the Overseas Branch of OWI 
in September, 1944, said as the year 
closed, "There is still an enormous job 
to be done." 

Progress in the Atlantic theater is 
illustrated by the April 30th opening of 
ABSIE (American Broadcasting Station 
in Europe), which also marked the first 
time Great Britain has ever permitted 
a foreign power to set up its own facili- 
ties for broadcasting on British soil. On 
D-Day, June 6, ABSIE was ready. It 
carried the voices of General Eisenhower 
and his supreme headquarters with in- 
structions to a France poised to rise 
and with warnings to the Germans that 
their defeat was inevitable. Later, on the 
continent itself, Radio Luxembourg was 
added to Allied radio stations and, with 
ABSIE and the stations at Algiers, it 
relays programs shortwaved from New 
York to target areas. 

Powerful Transmitters 

In September, 1944, three powerful 200 
kilowatt transmitters, built for the Gov- 
ernment by Crosley Corp. in Ohio, were 
added to the already formidable short- 
wave battery of OWI. 

On the West Coast, six new 50 kilo- 
watt transmitters were added during 
1944 to the four already operated by 
OWI and the two by CBS, thus almost 
doubling the hours of radio barrage 
against the Japanese. The opening of a 
new 100 kilowatt shortwave station at 
Honolulu and a 50 kilowatt medium wave 
station at Saipan helped to draw the 
psychological warfare radio net even 
tighter around our enemies in the Pacific 
theatei*. 



D-Day Activity 

At H-Hour on D-Day, 3:34 a.m., June 
6, the internal teletype system linking 
all radio and cable desks sent a flash to 
language desks reading: "First landings 
in Western Europe have started." At 
3:37 a.m. the flash was broadcast in 
French, at 3:47 a.m. in Italian, and at 
3:48 a.m. direct contact was made with 
SHAEF in London. 

The first news flash of General Mac- 
Arthur's landing on Leyte was sent out 
by OWI at the end of its 12:15 a.m. 
October 20th broadcast beamed at Ger- 
many and used in all languages from 
then on. Once again the Voice of Amer- 
ica had fulfilled one of its major roles 
of using the psychological advantage of 
a great military victory for the Allies. 

The Voice of America's programs to 
Europe have been as flexible as psycho- 
logical warfare demanded. As vast areas 
were liberated by the armed forces, OWI's 
function shifted from creating and main- 
taining pro-Allied resistance in occupied 
countries to a military phase — exploiting 
the psychological impact of actual ful- 
fillment of the predictions and promises 
of the first phase. It has now entered 
its third phase, that of holding its Euro- 
pean audience for the message of Amer- 
ica's role in war and peace. 

Shortwave Reorganized 

Shortwave broadcasting from New 
York was reorganized in December, 1944, 
tQ concentrate solid blocks of time in 
one language at best local listening 
hours. Thus at any time during evening 
hours, a French listener, for instance, 
will know he can pick up a French lan- 
guage program from New York, an Ital- 
ian listener is able to get a similar ser- 
vice in Italian. 

In the words of Elmer Davis, director 
of the Office of War Information, on the 
occasion of the dedication of the Crosley 
transmitters last September: "... The 
Voice of America, weak or strong, has 
had, from the very beginning, the same 
content — the truth — strong in the faith 
that truth was on our side. It has told 
the truth from those dark early days 
of defeat right down to these times when 
every day brings news of fresh victories; 
it will go on telling the truth. 



45 




S^>Uividau5 with 
L^kanie rv/cL^artki 



Supported pi 



(Ldgar £jergen ; 
ortimer Sonera 
ana 
Co 



-ompan 



i n 



4G 



TELEVISION lillKN rilMHKItritL 



By Dr. Allen B. DuMont 

President, Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Inc 



f^NE need not be a prophet to discuss 
post-war television. Nor attempt rash 
guesses. By the simple and safe expedi- 
ent of projecting recent engineering de- 
velopments, present attainments and 
logical plans into the near future we ob- 
tain a pretty comprehensive appraisal of 
commercial television. 

Three main factors in my opinion are 
responsible for our early transition from 
the noble television experiment to the 
full-fledged television business: 

1. Engineering know-how, which en- 
ables us to provide a truly satisfactory 
means of sending and receiving pro- 
grams. 

2. Programming, whereby we can pro- 
vide see-hear entertainment and enlight- 
enment worthy of an audience in tele- 
vision's own right. 

3. Sponsorship, whereby we are as- 
sured of adequate financial support for 
telecasting, in return for a worthy audi- 
ence. 

Taking up each of these major items 
in turn, here is post-war commercial tele- 
vision as I see it: 

Engineering Adequate 

Television engineering is adequate for 
immediate requirements, after a decade 
or more spent in developing and refining 
the electronic scanning technique. At 
first the war seemed to threaten continu- 
ing television progress, but as a matter 
of record it is contributing tremendously 
to our engineering and production expe- 
rience. The extensive and intensive ap- 
plication of cathode-ray tubes to the in- 
dustrial and fighting fronts has been 
responsible for numerous developments 
and refinements. Radar especially is 
contributing a tremendous fund of engi- 
neering experience, much of which still 
remains to be generally released and 
applied in television terms. 

The mass production of cathode-ray 
tubes for military needs has resulted in 
manufacturing methods, trained person- 
nel and productive facilities which must 
count heavily in supplying the demands 
of post-war home television. Especially 
so when rounded out by the experience of 



manufacturers in producing radar and 
oscillographic equipment which is closely 
related to the television l-eceiver. 
Skilled Craftsmen 

Another notable contribution is the 
training of hundreds of thousands of men 
in radar and electronics generally. The 
commercial success of television depends 
largely on satisfactory local servicing. 
Television is necessarily more intricate 
than radio. The installation calls for a 
special antenna. There are problems of 
location, direction, height, reflection and 
transmission line, calling for considerable 
experience in the handling of ultra-high- 
frequency signals and intricate circuits. 
Post-war television is fortunate indeed 
to have such specialized veterans avail- 
able. 

It is important to note that recent en- 
gineering progress is mainly in the 
direction of detailed refinement rather 
than any radical departure in established 
technique. For instance, we have re- 
cently achieved a remarkable improve- 
ment in pictorial detail by a finer trace 
and greater contrast in our cathode-ray 
tubes — about the last place we were look- 
ing for possible refinements. There is 
steady refinement of this sort taking 
place month by month. In fact, until 
the possibilities for refinement and im- 
provement have been practically ex- 
hausted, there is insufficient justification, 
in my personal opinion, to go to more 
scanning lines and higher transmiteting 
frequencies which would introduce new 
technical problems and obstacles to early 
commercialization. The trend today is 
still to exhaust the possibilities of 525- 
line scanning and present transmitting 
frequencies before going on to other 
standards. Likewise with color television 
which may well be considered after we 
have exhausted the entertainment possi- 
bilities of black-and-white pictures. 
Programming Explored 

In the matter of programming, we 
have sufficient experience already to pro- 
vide satisfactory entertainment and en- 
lightenment. While engineers and tech- 
(Please Turn to Page 53) 



47 



JOfll) D R VI S 



48 



SYMPHONIC MUSIC M TIE IMS 



By Serge Koussevitzky 



T AM extremely interested in the prog- 
ress of the radio. I often listen to our 
principal orchestras on the air — even to 
my own orchestra on those Saturday 
nights when there is a guest conducting. 
I am impressed by the excellent quality 
of broadcasting at its best. And I am 
greatly interested in the letters which 
come from all parts of the country. There 
is but one possible conclusion from all 
this: Symphonic music, which thanks to 
radio, has been brought to numberless 
people who were strange to it, is con- 
tinually gaining a larger audience. 
Choice of Programs 

As a conductor I am made aware of 
the importance of a wise choice of pro- 
grams for this vast and mixed audience. 
When a conductor plans his programmes, 
he does not simply write down what first 
occurs to him, or some music he happens 
personally to prefer. If he did that he 
would be neglecting the responsibilities 
of his position. He is responsible not only 
for the performance of a hundred men, 
but for what the thousands are to hear 
who constitute his concert audiences and 
the millions who constitute his radio au- 
diences. He is a leader in the broadest 
sense of the word^-a leader of his public 
no less than of his orchestra. He must 
choose what they shall hear, and if his 
reading of certain music carries his own 
conviction in the interpretation, he be- 
comes a director of general opinion. 

I feel this as more than a responsibil- 
ity. It is a privilege, and a privilege 
which I could never take lightly. That 
is why the problem of making a pro- 
gramme is always for me a matter of 
great care and thought. 

How shall I choose between new music 
and old music? If I decide to programme 
the Fifth Symphony of Beethoven, there 
will be some who have heard it too often 
and others who have not heard it often 
enough, either because they are young 
or because they are new converts to sym- 
phonic music, or because they live in 
musically remote communities. They are 
very_ important and they must have every 
consideration. If I decide to play a new 
work which departs from the lines of cus- 
tom and convention, those very ones who 
most want to hear Beethoven's Fifth 
Symphony or Brahms' First will be less 
interested. 



The letters which come to me from all 
sides after a broadcast interest me espe- 
cially because they are an indication of 
what the great radio audience wants. Of 
course it would be impossible to give all 
of these letter writers what they want, 
because, for one reason, they are always 
contradicting each other. I would answer 
those who complain of too many repeti- 
tions of the classical symphonies, that, 
as many times as I have heard and per- 
formed the symphonies of Beethoven or 
Brahms or Tchaikovsky, they hold for 
me a fresh stimulation. 

What Listeners Want 

To those who have written saying that 
they would rather not hear music of 
today, I would answer with the reassur- 
ance that there is music of such great 
beauty being written by our composers 
that the man who dismisses it is seri- 
ously depriving himself. The majority of 
the important composers of today are 
now in America. Some of them were 
born here, and others have come from 
Europe and made America their home. 
Not all of their music, but the best of 
their music, which I try to single out for 
my programmes, is the inspired voice 
of a new and growing art which, when 
it reaches its full flowering, may stand 
comparison with any past epoch in musi- 
cal history. If some of it sounds strange 
to you, if it seems to violate the tradi- 
tional rules of what constitutes beautiful 
combinations of sound, I ask you to be 
patient and listen with an open mind. 

The duty of every conductor now is 
no different from what it has been in 
the past. A conductor must be a prophet 
— not a mystical but a very practical one, 
who can look into the future far enough 
to see that what audiences now reject 
they will soon be begging for. An exam- 
ple of this is the Fifth Symphony by 
Shostakovitch, which was greeted with 
little attention and many objections when 
it was first heard. My answer to these 
objections was to repeat the symphony 
again and again until it became one of 
the most popular of contemporary sym- 
phonies in our repertory. The conductor's 
function as a "leader" is to bring about 
that change; to make the unpopular mu- 
sic of today the popular music of tomor- 
row, and always to have that tomorrow 
in his plans. 



49 



Bud 

ABBOTT c«. 



Lou 

COSTELLO 




Thursdays-NBC 

For CAMEL CIGARETTES 

* 

UNIVERSAL PICTURES 



New York 



Exclusive Management 

EDWARD SHERMAN 

Philadelphia 



Hollywood 



50 



FN IS l\ I III TITKIVH, MEDIUM 

By I. Keith Tyler 

Director of Radio Education, Ohio State University, and 
President, Association for Education by Radio 



V 



'HE development of frequency modu- 
lation radio offers a magnificent op- 
portunity to do a comprehensive and 
thorough job of educational -broadcasting. 
That this opportunity will be seized upon 
and made use of is by no means assured. 
Many dangers face the whole enterprise. 

It seems certain that the FCC will 
assign a sizeable number of channels to 
non-commercial educational broadcast- 
ing. This is in contrast to standard AM 
broadcasting in which educational sta- 
tions have always had to compete with 
the more amply financed commercial sta- 
tions for frequencies, hours and power. 
It will enable the non-profit stations to 
broadcast at times when they can best 
serve the educational needs of listeners. 
It will make possible the establishment 
of dozens, and possibly hundreds, of new 
stations by universities, colleges and 
school systems which have at long last 
awakened to the values in broadcasting 
only to find that no facilities were avail- 
able or that present facilities were inade- 
quate. 

Educational Independence 

The actual establishment and opera- 
tion of non-profit FM stations will free 
educational institutions from the ham- 
pering dependence upon commercial sta- 
tions for time and facilities. With time 
sales at new highs in 1944, it was becom- 
ing increasingly more difficult, if not im- 
possible, to secure desirable hours for 
educational offerings. Either no time at 
all was available or that given was not 
well suited to reaching listeners. With 
sponsors seeking new markets in the 
postwar period, it is doubtful if educa- 
tional programs will fare much better 
then, than now. So the independent 
operation of non-profit stations becomes 
a necessity if people needing and want- 
ing education are actually to be reached 
with such programs at the best times. 

Such stations also will make possible 
a decided increase in the number of edu- 
cational programs available to listeners. 
Many more minority interests can be 
served. 

Where several institutions competed 
for the opportunity to broadcast over 
limited commercial facilities, only the 
programs with the widest possible appeal 
to a large mass audience were likely to 



gain an airing. Needs of smaller groups 
had necessarily to be ignored. Now many 
of these institutions will operate stations 
serving the widest variety of needs — 
from foreign language lessons to gar- 
dening, from appreciation of poetry to 
popular psychology, from kindergarten 
stories to sixth-grade arithmetic, from 
music to drama. 

Certainly the need for education was 
never greater than it is likely to be after 
the war. Millions of men and women in 
the armed services will want the school- 
ing they missed without the necessity of 
going back to college. Citizens will in- 
quire background for the momentous deci- 
sions they will need to make in re-shap- 
ing the world. New problems of leisure- 
time pursuits, hobbies and interests will 
need to be accommodated. And such mat- 
ters as slum-clearance, city planning, 
regional development and postwar avia- 
tion need to be understood and appre- 
ciated. FM stations will make possible 
an abundance of programs dealing with 
such material. 

But the picture is by no means entire- 
ly a rosy one. In spite of the go-ahead 
from the FCC, educators and broadcast- 
ers alike should give serious thought to 
what may happen — to consequences 
which may be disastrous for radio edu- 
cation. 

Early Experiences 

In the first place, we may have a repe- 
tition of the earlier AM experience, with 
large numbers of educational stations 
initially established and then suspend- 
ing operations until only a handful re- 
main. The picture is more favorable this 
time, however. Most of the earlier sta- 
tions were engineering experiments, and 
stations gave up licenses when faced with 
the necessity for serious programming; 
this time, licenses are applied for in 
order to engage in program operations, 
and this presumes an acknowledgement 
of continuing program responsibilities. 
Last time, educational stations had to 
compete directly with commercial sta- 
tions for time and facilities; now they 
have their own channels. And, finally, 
educators are much more alive to the 
values of broadcasting. They are taking 
radio seriously. 



In the second place, there is a grave 
danger that commercial stations and net- 
works may look upon the establishment 
of FM educational stations as relieving 
them of the obligation to engage in pub- 
lic-service and educational broadcasting. 
They may feel free to devote themselves 
entirely to entertainment and commer- 
cialism. This would be the greatest ima- 
ginable mistake for educators and com- 
mercial broadcasters alike. 

It would be disastrous for commercial 
broadcasters because, in the long run, it 
would change the character of the so- 
called American System of Broadcasting 
and ultimately lose the substantial sup- 
port of listeners. American radio has 
built its solid reputation not alone on its 
Jack Bennys and Bob Hopes but also 
upon its NBC Symphony, its American 
School of the Air, its Columbia Work- 
shop, its University of the Air, its farm 
programs, and its service to the war 
effort. A pure entertainment venture 
with an unadulterated profit motive 
would have difficulty justifying its service 
to the public interest. 

It would be tragic for education be- 
cause mass enlightenment will need to 
rely upon the great mass audiences which 
have been developed by network radio. 
Minority interests, serious adult educa- 
tion and specialized educational services 
can utilize the separate FM stations best. 



But broad educational and cultural needs 
in music, in drama and in the discussion 
of public issues can best be met for the 
nation as a whole through the superb 
facilities of commercial network broad- 
casting. And for these features, such net- 
works will have established audiences 
which should not be given up if the whole 
American people is to be served. 
Income Level Involved 
In the third place, it must be recognized 
that the developments in FM generally, 
and FM educational stations in particu- 
lar, depend upon the maintenance of a 
high level of national income. With a 
nation-wide income total of $150 to $175 
billions, the American people can afford 
to make the change-over from AM to FM 
— a process involving the purchase of 30 
to 50 million new receiving sets. With 
a depression level of $60 billions, such a 
transition is doubtful. And the estab- 
lishment and support of educational FM 
stations depends upon a national income 
that can afford to sponsor mass educa- 
tion by radio through appropriations to 
universities, colleges and school systems. 
An economy of abundance will demand 
these measures for the education of all 
— a depression economy will eliminate all 
but the most elementary educational ex- 
penditures. The future of education by 
radio is inextricably intermingled with 
the future of the whole economy. 



(Continued from Page 47) 
mm GOES MmHWl~>>y *. Allen B.D lM . 



nicians have been devoting their spare 
time from urgent war jobs in order to 
gain practical telecast experience, we 
have had writers, producers and per- 
formers volunteering their services in 
order to learn the intricacies of this new 
medium for their talents. Many televi- 
sion headliners of tomorrow are now in 
the making. Recent technical advances, 
notably higher illumination levels and 
greater depth of focus, make available 
a larger stage and greater freedom of 
action. Ws have learned much about 
scenery and backgrounds, camera tech- 
nique, lighting and other details of pro- 
duction. Already we have trained writers 
and directors who know how to get the 
most out of televised productions. We 
are pretty well set on programming. 
Solve Sponsor Angle 
Lastly, we have evolved the sponsor- 
ship angle whereby telecasting can be 
placed on a self-supporting basis essen- 
tial to truly commercialized television. 
While engineers behind cameras and per- 
formers out front have worked out a 
satisfactory telecast art, we have had 



advertising men and advertisers working 
in the "commercial" or sales message and 
studying audience reactions. While the 
audience is still numbered in tens of 
thousands as against the millions for 
broadcasting, we can nevertheless gain 
the practical experience now for later 
business efforts. 

Seeing as well as hearing the "com- 
mercial" gives television a tremendous 
advantage over usual broadcasting. In 
fact, the sales message can be made fully 
as interesting and often more so than the 
sustaining feature, as contrasted with 
the veritable intrusion of "commercials" 
in the midst of otherwise enjoyable radio. 

With the -sponsorship angle already 
worked out, and with a growing list of 
sponsors ready to go along with expand- 
ing telecasting, we are rounding out the 
final phase of the television business. All 
we are waiting for is the release of neces- 
sary materials and manpower whereby 
we can build transmitters for telecasters 
throughout the country, and produce 
hundreds of thousands of television re- 
ceivers for homes. 



53 




KAY KYSER 



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE-PEET 
NBC— WEDNESDAY NIGHTS 



Exclusive Management 
MUSIC CORPORATION of AMERICA 



54 



THE WOMEN A \ II II Mill- III Li 



By Mildred O'Neill 

Radio Daily Staff Writer 



'"THE year 1944 came to a close on a 
happy note for the women of radio, 
not only for themselves but for the in- 
dustry and the war effort as well. They 
are now considered to be an integral part 
of the industry. Outright recognition 
came slowly, but when it did come it 
was unanimous with network and station 
officials and in the agency field. For over 
twenty years women have been trying 
to defeat the discrimination against them 
in a he-minded industry, a situation 
which, however, some few overcame. It 
was when the United States entered the 
war that radio gave challenge to woman's 
ability and they got their chance at jobs 
heretofore held only by men. 
Television 

Having broken down the barriers, it is 
only natural to find them at the begin- 
ning of 1945 in on the "ground floor" of 
the video art. There are women scenic 
artists, make-up specialists, announcers, 
sound technicians, script writers and pro- 
ducers. At this relatively early stage of 
the game there is a television station in 
Illinois which claims to be the first one 
of its kind in the country to be run 
entirely by women. Women are particu- 
larly suited to this work as it requires 
infinite patience and careful attention to 
detail. There is considerable promise that 
the field of television will be an important 
source of female employment when the 
sight and sound reign gets off to a flying 
start after the war. 

Women Directors 

A significant chapter on the progress 
of women in radio has been written by 
the Association of Women Directors. A 
subsidiary of NAB, this is the only 
women's organization in radio. The AWE) 
has a membership of 700 women, each 
of whom has been accredited by her sta- 
tion manager for the work of promoting 
a broader aspect to women's interest in 
radio and increasing through greater 
commercial sponsorship and improved 
public relations areas of service to in- 
dustry. This year 1945 will witness a 
move to consolidate the efforts of women 
in radio in both hemispheres. In this 
connection, the AWD has announced a 
special promotion, "Women of the United 
Nations," proposed to widen the scope 
of women's activities in broadcasting by 
means of wireless. Close co-operation 



will be maintained with 20 major women's 
organizations, the United Nations In- 
formation Office and the Inter-American 
Commission of Women. 

BBC Statistics 

The British Broadcasting Corporation 
offers another example of the widening 
of radio's portals to women. One out 
of every two employees at BBC is a 
woman. The largest influx has been in 
the engineering division where before 
the war no female had been employed 
other than a secretary. Now, more than 
500 women are working as operators, at 
studio centres, in recording rooms and 
at transmitting stations. Of these, 480 
are technical assistants, 23 program en- 
gineers, two have graduated to mainten- 
ance engineers and three have become 
assistant engineers. Only about one in 
four had had pre-war experience. In addi- 
tion, there are over 20 women announc- 
ers and 32 producers and there are 50 
program assistants. 

The Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion which operates Canada's two coast- 
to-coast networks also found it necessary 
to engage women to offset the inroads of 
war. Apart from this emergency, it felt 
there was a need adequately to present 
women's interests and as a consequence 
many were placed in important, even 
executive, posts. 

Women With OWI 

By the same token that radio has be- 
come an important part of every-day 
life and habit, so has the woman's day- 
time program which is directed at the 
female audience assumed an undisputed 
prominence in radio programming. Our 
government recognized this and through 
the Women's Activities section of the 
Domestic Radio Bureau of the Office of 
War Information launched the Women's 
Radio War Program Guide as a means 
of getting war messages to the daytime 
audience. 

The Guide has carried four war cam- 
paigns each month and broadcasters have 
been asked to use one message a week. 
The subjects that have been used in- 
clude Paper Shortage, Careless Talk, 
Give War Bonds and Stamps for Christ- 
mas, Nurses' Aides for Army Hospitals, 
and others equally pertinent. Co-opera- 
tion from women's programs with this 
movement has been reported as excellent. 



55 




Mgt LOU CLAYTON 



56 



THE MARKET FUR I! Ill I II IN 1945 



By M. H. Shapiro 

Managing Editor, RADIO DAILY 



D ADIO faces new problems of deter- 
mining 1 its best markets for 1945. 
With new markets still springing up and 
some wartime swollen markets tapering 
off, no newer population estimates by 
the Bureau of Census than November, 
1943, are available. This is due, of 
course, to the fact that the latest avail- 
able civilign population is based upon 
the last War Ration Book No. 4. 
• 

However, it is safe to assume that on 
a regional or state-wide basis there has 
been little change since 1943. Elsewhere 
in the Radio Annual, population figures 
for Regions and States are presented 
as well as Metropolitan District Coun- 
ties and all other counties with a city of 
25,000 population or more. These, natur- 
ally, are radio's basic markets and with 
only few exceptions each Metropolitan 
District County listed is a home for 
Radio. 

• 

When it is remembered that the coun- 
trv as a whole lost approximately 4,000,- 
000 in civilian population from April, 
1940-November, 1943, it is interesting to 
note that only a few Metropolitan Dis- 
tricts and other listed counties showed 
an equal or greater loss. Many of these 
ui'ban centers on the other hand showed 
substantial gains in civilian population. 
From this it can be said that a large por- 
tion of Radio's customers have come 
closer to the major buying centers and 
thus more receptive to Radio's message. 
Naturally, this has been a boon to the 
local stations and has increased the po- 
tential audience for stations in this class 
in those communities which show popu- 
lation gains. 

• 

On the other hand while the rural areas 
have shown the greatest loss in popula- 
tion this is counteracted by the large in- 
crease in spending power now enjoyed 
by the farmers. From an average cash 
farm income of $8,100,000,000 from 1934- 
1938, it is estimated that this figure 
would reach approximately $22,000,000,- 
000 in 1944 — an increase of 271 per cent. 
And as numerous surveys have shown 
that the farm family listens the most 



hours to radio this potential more than 
makes up for the fewer cash customers 
throughout the agricultural areas. 

• 

Radio Daily estimates that there are 
31,271,178 families in the United States 
with at least one radio set in operation. 
This national market is the greatest 
that can be reached effectively by a 
single media and represents nearly the 
entire market receptive to the national 
advertiser. During 1945 it can be con- 
fidently stated that radio will continue 
to show increases in total billing; as has 
occurred during the past several years. 
• 

If the war should end this year, it is 
not expected that there will be witnessed 
the same severe dislocation of population 
as quickly as happened in the early days 
of the war. In the past six months many 
surveys have been made among war- 
workers in cities with great population 
gain and a surprising percentage of those 
questioned said they intended to remain 
in their new homes rather than return 
from whence they came. This is partic- 
ularly true on the Pacific Coast, the re- 
gion with the greatest increase in popu- 
lation since 1940. Active planning to 
retain population growths has been under 
way for a long time in many communities 
and every effort will be made to main- 
tain the "new" city sizes brought on 
by the war. It is possible that industry 
will possibly change its location in many 
instances to be nearer many employed 
markets and bringing peacetime produc- 
tion and jobs to many of them rather 
than let them return to their pre-war 
status. 

• 

However radio evaluates these markets, 
a quick yardstick of postwar prospects 
is contained for the Metropolitan Dis- 
tricts in the statistical section of Radio 
Annual. The ratings for postwar take 
into consideration decades of population 
growth as well as wartime boom and 
can be used as a basis for postwar plan- 
ning at least. Since there will be no 
new national Census until 1950, the pop- 
ulation figures presented will probably 
not be superseded until that date. 



For Complete Census Statistical Section Please Turn to Page 273 



57 




f 



In nine polls for most populor g'rl singer during 
past year, Dinah Shore was voted: 

st — Radio Daily — all editors 

st — Billboard — All-C.l. poll in U. S. camps 

st — Motion Picture Daily — all radio editors 

st — Billboard — all radio editors 

st — Downbeat — popular music readers 

st— Billboard— all-U.S. High School poll 

st — Screen Cuide magazine — all readers 

st — Movieland magazine — all readers 

st — Cleveland Plain-Dealer — all-Ohio readers' poll 




Star of Dinah Shore's "Open 
House," NBC coast-to-coast 
every Thursday night, spon- 
sored by Birdseye Frosted 
Foods, produced by Young & 
Rubicam, Inc. 



Recording exclusively for 
RCA-Victor 



Co-starred in International's 
"BELLE OF THE YUKON" 



DINAH SHORE 



Management: WILLIAM MORRIS AGENCY 



58 



MI-GROWTH OF STATIOSS-1944 

Licensed Construction Special Broad- 
As of: Stations Permits cast Stations Total 

January 1941 826 91 5 882 

February 1941 830 46 5 881 

March 1941 831 54 5 890 

April 1941 832 54 5 89T 

May 1941 831 55 5 891 

June 1941 844 48 5 897 

July 1941 854** 43 — 897 

August 1941 ^ 859** 44 — 9oT 

September 1941 859** 53 — 912 

October 1941 869** 44 — 913~ 

November 1941 877** 38 — 915 

December 1941 882** 37 — 919 

Janua ry 1942 887 36 923 

try 194S 

1942 . 

1942 .. 
942 ... 
942 ... 
942 ... 
t 1942 . 
iber 19 
;r 1942 
iber 19' 
ber 194 
y 1943 
iry 194 

1943 

1943 . 
L943 77 

1943 . 
1943 .. 
t 1943 
tiber 1J 
>r~1943 
iber IS 
iber 19' 
ry 1944 
ry 1945 

**This figure includes 5 Special Broadcast Stations. 

• ••••••• 

59 



February 1942 


891 


32 


— 


923 








March 1942 


893 


31 


— 


924 


April 1942 


897 


27 


— 


924 


May 1942 


899 


25 


— 


924 


June 1942 


906 


18 


— 


924 








July 1942 


906 


19 


— 


925 








August 1942 


905 


16 


— 


921 








September 1942 


906 


14 


— 


920 


October 1942 


908 


11 


— 


919 








November 1942 


910 


9 


— 


919 


December 1942 


. 919 


9 


— 


918 








January 1943 


910 


7 


— 


917 


February 1943 


910 


6 


— 


916 


March 1943 


909 


5 


— 


914 


April 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 


May 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 


June 1943 


911 


1 


— 


912 


July 1943 


911 


1 


— 


912 


August 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 


September 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 


October 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 








November 1943 


911 


2 


— 


913 


December 1943 


910 


2 


— 


912 


January 1944 


910 


2 


— 


912 


January 1945 


919 


24 


— 


943 



, "S^ 




Flllllillili 



By Morton Ddwney 



T DO not believe that the current re- 
vival of old tunes can be interpreted 
as a trend. Looking- backward over many 
years in show business, I am inclined to 
believe that it is merely a survival of the 
fittest of numbers which awakened an 
emotional response in all people over a 
long period of time. 

Some songs (like some lucky people) 
are ageless. Graceful or gay, sentimen- 
tal or nostalgic — some even tragic! — 
they linger on. Linger on? They gain 
new life from jazz, swing or what-have- 
you in musical arrangements that key 
the tempo of each passing generation. 

You never can tell. Today some chap, 
somewhere, is polishing off a song des- 
tined to become a great hit. People will 
sing it, recording factories will smoke 
with hot wax, the bobby-soxers will go 
simply ma-a-a-d about it. And then — 
poof, out like a candle. 

What's the answer? Id be a presump- 
tuous guy to give a didactic answer be- 
cause I may be all wet. But here's some- 
thing I have first-hand knowledge of. 
Before I went overseas to tour hospitals 
behind the lines for the USO, the Broad- 
way boys kept taking me aside to advise 
me on what our lads would want to hear. 
'Be sure," they told me solemnly, "be 
very sure not to include any sad or corny 
home-and-mother stuff. What those kids 
want is hot, swingy stuff." 

What They Wanted 

Well, I followed the advice. I re- 
hearsed fast-moving numbers, hopped-up 
stuff with even a touch of risque. And 
in the first hospital I visited I threw the 
whole routine away. Because, do you 
know what those kids called for ? In this 
order: 1, "I'll Walk Alone." 2, "Spring 
Will Be a Little Late This Year." 3, 
"Irish Lullaby." 4, "Melancholy Baby." 
5, "Star Dust"- — and such perennials as 
'When Day Is Done," "All the World 
Is Waiting for the Sunrise," "When Irish 
Eyes Are Smiling." 

Why? For the simplest of all reasons. 
One thought is uppermost in the minds 
of those kids — home — whether it be where 
the woodbine twineth or a Brooklyn tene- 
ment. Home and mother and sweetheart. 
Corn — maybe, but it's corn with pretty 
sound kernels. 



The mood of those boys at the moment, 
to the exclusion of all else, is centered 
on those simple, homey things. But, 
to me, the most interesting thing is that 
after they're home, safe and sound and 
with the blood and mud behind them, 
they'll still be singing those songs ten 
years from now. And longer. 

It adds up, I think, to the fair conclu- 
sion that a good song never dies. Like 
wine, it mellows and strengthens with 
the years. America, still a young coun- 
try, is friendly and sentimental. That's 
why the songs — I mean the sound num- 
bers with nostalgic lyrics — that came out 
soon after the turn of the century with 
home and hearthside the very warp-and- 
woof of their story — that's why those 
songs are ageless. 

A Few Examples 

Let's look at a few examples of those 
deathless old songs. "You Made Me 
Love You," written in 1913 and sung and 
danced to by children of men and women 
who sang it when it first came out. 
"Shine on Harvest Moon," 36 years 
young. "On Moonlight Bay," written in 
1912. "Can't You Hear Me Calling, Caro- 
line" — the Germans were invading Bel- 
gium in World War I when that was 
published, back in 1914. Irving Berlin's 
unforgettable "All Alone" — that came 
from his facile pen in 1924. "Dinah," in 
1925, "Carolina Moon" in 1928— and that 
gay, rollicking 'Oh, You Beautiful Doll" 
that rattled the rafters in ballrooms, back 
in 1911, where the Turkey Trot was still 
a daring dance. 

Ray Noble, back in 1932, penned the 
sentimental "The Very Thought of You." 
As of this moment it is being played as 
often as "Don't Fence Me In" No, you 
just can't kill a good number — and who 
would want to ? These songs have earned 
the right to a spot in the heart of musi- 
cal America. In my opinion, I repeat, 
that I do not believe there is such a 
thing as trends in songs as the term 
applies to other fields. At regular inter- 
vals, a novelty or patriotic tune may 
sweep the country and after a brief flash 
pass into oblivion — never to be heard 
again. People in the entertainment world, 
song writers and music publishers all 
felt that the war would be productive 
of a trend. But it has not. 



61 








GAIN 1II1I 

on the air for 

CAMEL CIGARETTES 

Friday, 10:00-10:30 p.m., E.W.T. 
CBS 



Management 
NATIONAL CONCERT AND ARTISTS CORP. 



WARTIME SPORTS Hll.llirivmii 



By Don Dunphy 



*THE War has increased the responsi- 
bility of the Sports Announcer. At 
all times, in war or peace, his duty has 
been to the Radio Audience, to give a 
clear and accurate picture of what was 
happening in the field of sports whether 
his medium was a play by play descrip- 
tion of an event or a daily or weekly 
summary. But now with so many sports 
minded Americans in the service over- 
seas and almost wholly dependent on 
radio for their spoits information, his 
responsibility has increased manifold. 

After the attack on Pearl Harbor on 
December 7th, 1941, the continuance of 
sports during the war was very much 
in doubt. But sports continued and it 
soon became apparent that the morale 
factor of athletics for the civilian popu- 
lation and more important for the man 
and woman in uniform was of tremen- 
dous importance. Sports broadcasting 
immediately became an integral part of 
this picture. The Sports Announcer has 
always been the liaison between the game 
and the listener, he is the eyes of the 
radio audience. It is for him to occupy 
the seat of the person who cannot attend 
the game or fight and to see the event as 
the listener would were he present. Now 
with so many millions overseas or occu- 
pied on the civilian front and unable to 
otherwise keep posted, the responsibility 
of the sportscaster becomes more and 
more apparent. It is for him to see 
that they get the sports news that they 
want. 

Armed Forces Co-op 

Through the co-operation of the Armed 
Forces Radio Service, there have been 
sent overseas play by play descriptions 
of baseball, boxing, basketball, hockey, 
track meets and other sports events. 
These have gone out both live and re- 
corded along with daily and weekly sum- 
maries. We know from the mail re- 
sponse from the men in uniform how 
much sports by radio has done to bring 
"Back home" a little closer to "Over 
there." We know what they have done 
to keep alive his interest in sports, how 
much it has meant in the way of relaxa- 
tion and enjoyment. This has been indi- 
cated by the reports that have come 
back of a group of soldiers huddled in an 
igloo in the black of an Alaskan night 
listening to the play by play of the last 



World's Series between the Cardinals 
and the Browns, of fliers returning from 
a bombing mission asking for baseball 
scores, of parents mentioning letters 
from sons in which they talk of enjoying 
fight broadcasts, of soldiers and sailors 
the world over waiting impatiently by 
their sets for the kickoff in the Army- 
Navy football game. All these things 
should make the sports announcer even 
more anxious to do a good job and to turn 
out a better performance. 

Other Duties 

Aside from the actual descriptions and 
summaries there have been other duties 
for the sports announcer. There has 
been for instance the co-operation with 
the Office of War Information in putting 
important announcements before the pub- 
lic; the giving impetus to the various 
War Loan Drives; the calling attention 
to the Red Cross both in the matter of 
the blood banks and the raising of funds; 
also the important matter of reminding 
the folks at home to write to those in 
the service. 

In 1944 the New York Sports Broad- 
casters Association conceived the idea 
of putting on its own radio show in con- 
nection with the Fourth War Loan Drive. 
It was broadcast on Mutual and was 
called "The Golden Age of Sports." What 
started out as a germ of an idea soon 
grew into a billion dollar program. You 
in the industry who know something of 
the costs of talent imagine if you can 
the cost of a program with Jack Demp- 
sey, Babe Ruth and Frankie Frisch; with 
Benny Leonard and Barney Ross; with 
Red Grange and Bob Zuppke, with 
Gene Sarazen and Earl Sande; with 
Frank Hunter and Alice Marble; with 
Lester Patrick and the New York Rangers 
hockey team, and others. Add to them 
practically every topnotch sports an- 
nouncer in the country and you draw 
the conclusion that never again will so 
much sports talent be gathered on one 
program. Only the War Effort could have 
brought them all together. 

Yes, the War has increased the respon- 
sibility of the Sports Announcer but I 
think he has realized his responsibility 
and answered the question, the while 
striving to present a better and clearer 
sports picture. 



63 




ROD his PEnnsYLVfininns 

for 0UIEI1S-ILLII10IS GLASS CO. 

BLUE NETWORK . . . THURSDAYS ... 10 P.M., E.W.T. 

iMfflRGEfliEnT J0W1 0'COnnOR \w broadum, m york, heih york 

64 



THE WEST COOT lllll I RIM ffiffl 



By Ralph W ilk 

RADIO DAILY West Coast Representativi 



HpHE year 1944 was marked by more 
changes in ownership of Pacific Coast 
outlets than in any other 12 months. This 
was due to the FCC order, prohibiting 
anyone owning or controlling more than 
one station in any community. 

The Blue bought KECA, Los Angeles, 
from Erie C. Anthony, who retained 
ownership of KFI. KEX, Portland, was 
purchased by Westinghouse from ' the 
Oregonian Publishing Co., which will con- 
tinue to operate KGW. C. W. Meyers, 
owner of KOIN, Portland, disposed of 
KALE to the Portland Journal and 
Charles Couche. 

Station Status 

Birt F. Fisher sold his third interest 
in KOMO, Seattle, to the Fisher Brothers, 
and in turn acquired KJR, Seattle, from 
the brothers, to whom he is not related. 
Jack O. Gross bought 0. L. "Ted" Tay- 
lor's half interest in KFMB, San Diego. 
Sheldon Sackett, Marshfield, Ore., and 
Philip Lasky, manager of KROW, Oak- 
land, purchased Wesley I. Dumm's inter- 
est in the outlet. Dumm has bought 
KPAS, Pasadena, from the J. Frank 
Burke interests and retains KSFO, San 
Francisco. 

Ralph Sherwood and Mott Brandon 
sold KJBS, San Francisco, to a syndicate, 
but continue to operate KQW, San Fran- 
cisco. 

A significant development is that, due 
to carrying a heavy volume of business, 
several independent stations are in a good 
financial condition and able to set aside 
funds for any future FM and television 
plans they may wish to undertake. Short- 
age of newspaper space resulted in many 
advertisers buying radio time for the 
first time, and the broadcasters expect to 
retain much of this new business in the 
postwar period. 

The quality of programs for the four 
Coast nets showed improvement, with 



sponsors soending more money to gain 
quality. Saturday morning, which was 
formerly unpopular with time buyers, 
is now yielding much revenue for Coast 
broadcasters, with important programs 
using the heretofore despised time. 

Personnel Changes 

Several personnel changes developed 
during 1944. Don E. Gilman, long a 
leading figure in Western radio, resigned 
as the Pacific Blue's top man to become 
the "Will Hays" of the Coast petroleum 
industry. Don Searle left the manager- 
ship of KPO, San Francisco, to head the 
Pacific Blue's activities. Frank Samuels 
came down from San Francisco to become 
the Pacific Blue's sales manager, succeed- 
ing Tracy Moore, who resigned to join 
the Sonovox organization. 

John Swallow, veteran program mana- 
ger of NBC's Western division, left the 
net to enter the advertising agency field. 
Frank Conrad entered the Coast radio 
fold by becoming station relations mana- 
ger for the Pacific Blue. 

George L. Moskovics, who was the Co- 
lumbia Pacific's sales manager, went 
East and is now assistant to Howard 
Meighan, who is in charge of Columbia's 
radio sales. Charles E. Morin, who was 
Columbia's Pacific's Eastern sales mana- 
ger, is now the Coast net's sales manager. 

Joe Alvin, who was assistant director 
of NBC's Western division press depart- 
ment, was promoted to head the net's 
special events and news department. 

Paul Appleby left a Government post 
in Washington, D. C, to become vice- 
president and director of KIBO, Seattle, 
while Harold N. Graves, who also did 
Government work in the capital, joined 
the same outlet as vice-president in 
charge of finance and personnel. 

Pat Campbell joined Don Lee-Mutual 
and his duties include those of station 
relations manager. 



65 




66 



01 THE IUSIII\liTII\ I'llllU 



By Andrew H. Older 

Staff Correspondent, Radio Daily 



"D ADIO served two functions in the na- 
tion's capital in 1944 — it made news 
and it told the news. Radio itself could 
not, in the year 1944, make as important 
news as it spread, even though it played 
a vital part in making the good news 
from the war fronts. In a sense, how- 
ever, the news radio made vies in im- 
portance with that it carried. For the 
importance of radio as an instrument for 
the keeping of world peace keynoted 
most of the news radio made in 1944. 

In December, appearing before the 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee, As- 
sistant Secretary of State Archibald 
MacLeish declared that radio is one of 
the media which will do as much to safe- 
guard world peace in the future as the 
traditional diplomats. The appointment 
of MacLeish to the State Department 
post itself was clear indication of the 
recognition by our government of the 
absolute need for utilization of radio in 
fostering international friendship. 

Freedom of Radio 

Throughout the year, both on Capitol 
Hill and at the FCC, the fight to assure 
the complete freedom of the air — free- 
dom of listeners and freedom for broad- 
casters — which must be enjoyed in post- 
war America has gone on without pause. 
For not only has radio a major role to 
play in the preservation of world peace, 
but free radio is likewise a cornerstone of 
democracy in our own country. The two 
are related. World peace can be assured 
only if the voice of each nation speaks 
the will of the people of that nation, and 
only through radio and its sister media 
of public opinion can that will be de- 
termined. 

On Capitol Hill there were three major 
events in the move to safeguard radio 
freedom. The ill-starred investigation of 
the FCC by the special House Committee 
chaired by Rep. Clarence F. Lea drew to 
a close with what amounted to a clean 
bill of health for the commission. As we 
write this we've not seen the final report 
of the committee, but know from speak- 
ing with members that the FCC was 
found not to be the hotbed of radicalism 
and corruption which some congressional 
critics had maintained. 

Second event was the preparation of a 



thoroughgoing revision of the Communi- 
cations Act by Senator Burton K. 
Wheeler. Reactions to this bill were 
mixed, and it was abandoned in short 
order, but it was extremely important 
that the need for clear, modern stream- 
lined radio legislation was sufficiently 
apparent to our lawmakers that an at- 
tempt was made to outline such legisla- 
tion. Further attempts will be made. It 
is also important to recall that new radio 
legislation will not be written in a vac- 
uum on Capitol Hill; Wheeler's experi- 
ence makes it obvious that the voice of 
those men who have brought radio to its 
present eminence will be given full 
weight in further deliberations. 

The third event on Capitol Hill was 
the introduction of a joint resolution by 
Senator Claude Pepper and Representa- 
tive John Coffee calling for broadcast of 
the proceedings of the House and the 
Senate. The great functioning body of 
democracy, these and other members be- 
lieve, would find its democratic purpose 
furthered were it brought to the people 
in a way no medium other than radio 
can bring it. Radio, they feel, can return 
our democratic machinery to the status of 
the town council from which it sprang. 

FCC Hearings 

No discussion of the radio year in 
Washington would be complete without 
mention of two specific events. First is 
the series of hearings held by the FCC, 
during which all segments of the indus- 
try presented their views on post-war 
frequency allocation. Decision of the FCC 
on this all-important division of the 
spectrum is to be found elsewhere in this 
volume. 

The second event that must be men- 
tioned is the resignation of James 
Lawrence Fly as FCC chairman. Retiring 
to take up private practice, Fly will not 
be forgotten by the radio industry for 
many years to come. In his five years at 
the commission helm he was the most 
maligned and most respected radio regu- 
lator the industry has ever known. As the 
year closed, Paul Porter moved into the 
Chairman's office to lead the commission 
in the vital deliberations ahead of it as 
the post-war set up for broadcasting — 
AM, FM, television — shapes up. 



67 



I 




DON AMECHE 



Management 

George Frank, Inc. 



68 



CHICAGO LOOKS TO THE PI Tl lili 



By Bill Irwin 

RADIO DAILY Staff Correspondent 



^HICAGO is ready to assume a pre- 
eminent place in postwar radio and 
television. Plans already made and in 
the making assure this area of new 
projects in the broadcasting field and the 
improvement and expansion of existing 
facilities on a scale which would seem 
to bear out the prediction of Niles Tram- 
mell, president of the National Broad- 
casting Co., that Chicago will emerge 
as a television hub of the nation in the 
postwar era. 

From a television standpoint, particu- 
larly, Chicago is geographically favored. 
It would inevitably become the nerve 
center in any coast-to-coast tele hook- 
ups. It likewise offers unlimited possi- 
bilities for construction of physical fa- 
cilities in outlying areas. 

An example of this is found in the 
postwar plans of the newly-organized 
consolidated Television Corporation which 
call for a 200-acre suburban center, rival- 
ing New York's Radio City, where live 
television shows and films for television 
would be produced. The blueprint for 
this elaborate project includes a physical 
plant costing several millions and housing 
a staff of 1,000 directors, actors, techni- 
cians and cameramen. 

Television Plans 

Chicago looms large in the postwar 
television plans of at least three of the 
major networks, NBC, CBS and Blue, 
each of which has included the Windy 
City as the site of a commercial televi- 
sion station in applications filed with 
the FCC for licenses to operate such 
stations. During 1944, Paramount Pic- 
tures, Inc., also applied to the Federal 
Communications Commission for author- 
ity to operate a series of television relay 
stations, comprising a national televi- 
sion network, one of which would be 
situated in Chicago. 

Chicago already has two television 
transmitters in operation, W9XZV, owned 
by the Zenith Radio Corp., which has been 
broadcasting continuously scheduled pro- 
grams for nearly six years, longer than 
any television transmitter in the country, 
and WBKB, the Balaban & Katz station, 
which has been operating for the past 
two years. 



Network Tie-up 

The Blue Network recently announced 
that negotiations had been completed 
with Balaban & Katz to present network 
programs suitable for televising from 
the studio of WBKB. Two Chicago-orig- 
inated Blue Network programs which 
definitely will be televised are the Quiz 
Kids and the Breakfast Club. 

In its role as host to the 1944 national 
political conventions, Chicago was for a 
couple of weeks last Summer the radio 
hub of the nation, with the four net- 
works providing the most comprehen- 
sive coverage of party conventions in 
the history of broadcasting. NBC sup- 
plemented its schedule of broadcasts with 
telecasts of both the Republican and 
Democratic conventions. 

One of the most elaborate postwar 
radio-television projects is WGN's "The- 
ater of the Future." It will be one of 
the world's largest and most spacious 
radio studios, with a seating capacity 
of 2,000 and a stage capable of accom- 
modating a 75-piece orchestra, a chorus 
of 40 and the principals of a musical 
cast. The new WGN building is to be 
erected on a site just south of Tribune 
Tower, overlooking Michigan Avenue and 
the Chicago River. It will have two 
other theaters, each seating about 600 
persons. 

Radio-Tele Theater 

The WGN "Theater of the Future" 
is to be used first as a radio theater 
and later as a television theater. WGN 
has placed a postwar order with Gen- 
eral Electric for a 40,000-watt transmit- 
ter and telecasting equipment to cost 
more than a quarter of a million dollars. 

Another expansion program which 
awaits only the end of the war is that of 
the Blue Network's Central Division, 
which has been sharing quarters with 
NBC in the Merchandise Mart. The 
Blue's postwar plans call for new and 
more spacious headquarters in Chicago. 

Television Station WBKB also has 
postwar plans for expansion. The Navy 
at present is using half of the station's 
available space in the State-Lake Build- 
ing for its Basic Electronics Training 
School. 



o9 



FRANK NOVAK 


< 


Creator of most UNUSUAL musical combinations 




11:30-11:45 a.m. (E.W.T.) WOR-MUTUAL 

Sponsored by Van Camp's 

Monday to Friday 


1933-34. 
1934... 


"Wizard of Oz"; WEAF— for Jello 


• 
"Dixie Circus"; CBS — for Dixie Drinking Cup 


1938-39. 


"Swing To Chiclets"; WJZ— for American Chicle Co. 


1942-43. 


"Mr. and Mrs. North"— for Woodbury— 39 Weeks 


1943-44. 


."Hook 'N' Ladder Follies"; WEAF— 

for Goodyear Rubber Co. 


1944... 


"Believe It or Not Ripley"— for Pall Mall— 5 Weekly 




TRANSCRIPTIONS ...for SESAC Library 




RECORDS . . . Columbia-Victor-Decca 



70 



dunlin postwar puns 

By Glen Bannerman 

President and General Manager, Canadian Association of Broadcasters 



A/fUCH has been written and said dur- 
ing 1 1944 about the necessity of in- 
dustries and organizations planning for 
their post-war activities. If by post-war 
planning the writers and speakers mean 
the taking of steps to develop sound 
practices and essential expansions to face 
the era of peace in a readiness to enter 
competitively into serving the needs of 
the public, radio broadcasting in Canada 
has been steadily planning throughout 
the war. 

Insofar as the privately owned broad- 
casting stations are concerned, planning 
for the future has to take into considera- 
tion two important factors: First, im- 
provements in service to their listeners. 
This factor breaks down into two divi- 
sions — one, improvement in standards of 
programming and public service; two, 
improvements in technical development 
for clearer signals and better coverage. 

The second factor requires planning 
to make it easier to do business with 
commercial and prospective commercial 
sponsors. Since the private stations are 
entirely dependent upon the revenue ob- 
tained from commercial sponsors to carry 
out their obligations in serving the pub- 
lic, this second factor is of paramount 
importance. 

Standarization of Rate Structures 

In Canada, from the day that radio 
broadcasting became an advertising me- 
dium up until recently, the variations in 
frequency discounts and time period rates 
has been a bug-bear to time buyers and 
advertisers alike. This confusion un- 
doubtedly acted as a deterrent to the 
successful purchase and use of radio 
time. For years before the war the 
situation was a matter of discussion by 
broadcasters at the Annual Meetings of 
the Canadian Association of Broadcast- 
ers. Finally, in 1943, a standard rate 
structure committee was appointed. 

As a result of the work of this com- 
mittee, rate cards of all privately owned 
stations in Canada, with one or two ex- 
ceptions, have adopted a standard dis- 
count as between time periods down to 
the five minute programme and a stan- 
dard of frequency discounts for these 
same periods. This year, for the first 
time, the Canadian Association of Broad- 
casters has been able to place in the 



hands of time buyers a rate book of all 
privately owned station rates in which 
all but one or two stations are in line 
with the standard rate structure com- 
mittee's recommendations. 

A Yardstick of Measurement 

Radio station coverage is an important 
yardstick of measurement as a basis for 
the time buyer and advertiser to estimate 
what is available for the money invested 
in rrdio time. Up to 1944, no one stan- 
dard of measurement existed in Canada. 
In 1942 the Canadian Association of 
Broadcasters, at its Annual Meeting, 
authorized the setting up of a Joint Com- 
mittee of advertisers, agencies and broad- 
casting stations. The Committee was 
appointed and as a result of its findings 
and recommendations, the Bureau of 
Broadcast Measurement was organized 
in the summer of 1944. 

For the first time in radio broadcast- 
ing, advertisers and agencies now know 
that the covers ge figures for a station 
in British Columbia have been arrived at 
on the same standard as the figures for 
a station in Nova Scotia. While all sta- 
tions as yet are not members of the 
Bureau of Broadcast Measurement, 47 
out of 90 commercial stations are mem- 
bers. 

During 1944 the Canadian Broadcast- 
ing Corporation finally recommended that 
some 34 privately owned stations with 
power frozen at 1000 watts be author- 
ized to increase power to 5 k.w. This is 
the power authorized under the Havana 
Treaty. As soon as equipment is avail- 
able, these stations will take more power. 
Canadian RTPB 

Another phase of post-war planning is 
to be found in the establishing of a Cana- 
dian Radio Technical Planning Board. 
This Board will function in a similar 
manner for Canada as the Radio Tech- 
nical Planning Board does for the United 
States. The Radio Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation of Canada, with the blessing of 
the Radio Division, Department of Trans- 
port, is responsible for initiating the 
Board. Much of the material of the Radio 
Technical Planning Board in the United 
States will be basic, but usage of AM, 
FM and Television bands as they cover 
the Canadian picture will be subjects of 
future study. 



71 




"HEDDA HOPPER'S HOLLYWOOD" 

ARMOUR & CO. MON. EVE. (CBS) 

COLUMN DISTRIBUTED BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE — NEW YORK NEWS SYN. 




OF 





Chairman's Office: c/o Federal Communications Commission, 
Washington, D. C. 

The Defense Communications Board tvas created by Executive Order 
of the President on September 24, 1940, under authority of the Communica- 
tions Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 1064), as amnded. On June 15, 1942 a subse- 
quent executive order changed the name of the Defense Communications 
Board to the Board of War Communications. 



MEMBERS 

Chairman 

PAUL A. PORTER 

Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission 

REAR ADMIRAL JOSEPH R. REDMAN 

Director of Naval Communications 

MAJOR GENERAL HARRY C. INGLES 

Chief Signal Officer of the Army 

HON. WILLIAM L. CLAYTON 

Assistant Secretary of State in Charge of the Office of Transportation 

and Communications 

Secretary 

HON. HERBERT E. GASTON 

Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in Charge of Treasury Enforcement Activities 

Assistant Secretary 

CAPTAIN E. M. WEBSTER 

Chief of Communications 

U. S. Coast Guard 

ALTERNATES 

E. K. JETT 

Federal Communications Commission 

MAJOR GENERAL FRANK E. STONER 

Chief, Army Communications Branch 

CAPTAIN JOHN V. MURPHY 

Deputy Director of Naval Communications 

FRANCIS C. DE WOLF 

Tele Communications Division of Department of State 

CAPTAIN E. M. WEBSTER 

Chief of Communications of the U. S. Coast Guard 

COORDINATING COMMITTEE 

The duties of the Coordinating Committee include assistance to the 
Board in planning and coordinating work. It will maintain liaison with the 
Law Committee, Labor Advisory Committee, and Industry Advisory Com- 
mittee, for the purposes of advice and consultation and will supervise the 
work of the other committees, which will report directly to it. 



Chairman 

E. K. JETT 

Federal Communications 

Commission 

HARVEY B. OTTERMAN 

Department of State 



COL WESLEY T. GUEST 

War Department 

COMDR. FRANZ O. WILLENBUCHER 

Navy Department 

CAPT. E. M. WEBSTER 

U. S. Coast Guard 



73 



THE ANDREWS SISTERS 




£a Ve*«e Patty 



"The Andrews Sisters Show" 

Sundays, 4:30 P.M., E.W.T. 

BLUE NETWORK 

Personal Management: LOU LEVY, RKO Bldg., New York City 



74 



COMMITTEES OF THE 

board of idrr communicfiiions 



LAW COMMITTEE 

The duties of the Law Committee include the furnishing of legal 
opinions and advice, and the drafting of final reports and recommendations, 
proposed Executive Orders, proclamations, and legislation. The Law Com- 
mittee will report directly to the Board but will have liaison, for purposes 
of advice and consultation, with the Coordinating Committee, and, as may 
be necessary, with other committees. 

Chairman LT. COMDR. ERNEST R. FEIDLER, 

CHARLES R. DENNY Treasury Department 

General Counsel, Federal CAPT. FRANZ 0. WILLENBUCHER 

Communications Commission Navy Department 

COL. CONRAD E. SNOW RAYMOND T. YINGLING 

War Department State Department 

LABOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The duties of the Labor Advisory Committee include the submission 
of expert advice to the Board on all labor problems incident to the proper 
carrying out of its national defense mission. With the requirements of 
national defense as a primary consideration, the Labor Advisory Committee 
will submit recommendations to the Board on such problems as are referred 
to it by the Board. The Labor Committee will report directly to the Board 
but will have liaison for the purpose of advice and consultation with the 
Coordinating Committee and the Industry Advisory Committee. 
Chairman : Robert J. Watt 

Organization Representative Alternate 

American Federation of Labor Robert J. Watt Lawson Wimberly, IBE W. 

Congress of Industrial 

Organizations Joseph P. Selly Geraldine Shandros 

American Communica- 

National Federation of Telephone tions Association 

Workers Joseph A. Beirne John J. Moran, Vice-Pres. 

INDUSTRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The duties of the Industry Advisory Committee include the submission 
of expert advice to the Board on all problems of general concern to the 
communications companies incident to the proper carrying out of the 
Board's national defense mission. With the requirements of national 
defense as a primary consideration, the Industry Advisory Committee will 
submit recommendations to the Board on such problems as are referred 
to it by the Board. The Industry Advisory Committee will report directly 
to the Board but will have liaison for the purpose of advice and consulta 
tion with the Coordinating Committee and the Labor Advisory Committee 

Whenever a problem involving domestic or international broadcasting 
shall arise, the Chairman of the Industry Advisory Committee shall notify 
the Chairman of the Domestic Broadcasting Committee or International 
Broadcasting Committee, as the case may be, and such Domestic or Inter- 
national Broadcasting Committee shall designate a Delegate to act as a 
member of the Industry Advisory Committee on that problem. 

Chairman: Walter S. Gifford Secretary: Dr. C. B. Jolliffe 

75 







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Bj Howard Chandler Christy 


JEAN 


HERSHOLT 




8th YEAR 


i 


«*cJr. C^nridtian 


SPONSORED BY VASELINE 


CBS 


WEDNESDAY, 8:30 P.M. 



76 



• BOARD OF WAR COMMUNICATIONS • • • 



Organization Representative Alternate 

American Telephone and 

Telegraph Company Walter S. Gilford Keith S. McHugh 

Globe Wireless, Ltd Jack Kaufman R. W. Bunce 

International Telephone and 

Telegraph Corp Col. Sosthenes Behn Frank W. Phelan 

(All America Cableg 
and Radio, Inc.) 

Press Wireless, Inc Joseph Pierson D. K. De Neuf 

Radio Corporation of America .... David Sarnoff Dr. C. B. Jolliffe 

Tropical Radio Telegraph Co R. V. Howley 

R. A. Phillips 
U. S. Independent Telephone (Central Electric & 

Assn Telephone Co.) Clyde S. Bailey 

Western Union Telegraph Co A. N. Williams E. R. Shute 

AVIATION COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE 
The duties of this Committee include the study of all phases of domestic 
and international civil aviation radio facilities and communications services 
associated therewith. It will have liaison with the U. S. Government Facili- 
ties Committee and the State and Municipal Facilities Committee. With 
the requirements of national defense as a primary consideration, the Com- 
mittee shall recommend plans for the most efficacious use of all of these 
facilities in time of military emergency, giving due consideration to the 
needs of other governmental agencies, of industry, and of other civilian 
activities. 

Chairman : R. 0. Smith 

Organization Representative Alternate 

Aeronautical Radio, Inc R. O. Smith 

American Association of Airport 

Executives 

American Export Airlines, Inc.. . . W. A. Schrader M. H. McFarlen 

American Federation of 

Labor 
American Telephone and 

Telegraph Company R. L. Jones F. A. Cowan 

Department of Commerce (Civil 

Aeronautics Administration) . . . A. S. Stokes Eugene Sibley 

Federal Communications 

Commission T. E. Daniels 

National Advisory Committee 

for Aeronautics Charles H. Helms 

National Federation of 

Telephone Workers John J. Moran 

Navy Department Capt. Geo. H. De Baun 

Pan American Airways System. . .H. C. Leuteritz 

Private Fliers Association, Inc. . . . Roger Wolfe Kahn John M. Wells, 

State Department Arthur Lebel 

U. S. Coast Guard Lt. Comdr. F. A. Leamy Lt. Comdr. E. K. Rhodes 

War Department Col. Wallace G. Smith 

Department of Commerce 

(Weather Bureau) Delbert M. Little Ivan R. Tannehill 

Western Union Telegraph Co P. J. Howe H. M. Saunders 

DOMESTIC BROADCASTING COMMITTEE 
The duties of this Committee include the study of the physical aspects 
of domestic standard broadcasting and formulation of recommendations of 
such precautions, supplementary facilities and reallocations as it shall deem 
desirable under foreseeable military conditions. It shall also consider other 
domestic broadcasting systems including relay broadcasting, high fre- 
quency (FM) broadcasting, television, facsimile broadcasting and experi- 

77 




Sincere thanks to the 1051 
Newspapermen and women who voted 
"BREAKFAST CLUB" Favorite Daytime 
Variety Program in Radio Daily's 
1944 "All-American Radio 
Program" PCll. 



2W WcWeitt 



BREAKFAST CLUB 
Monday to Saturday, Inch 



BLUE NETWORK 
Chicago. 8 to 9 A.M., C.W.T. 



7S 



BOARD OF WAR COMMUNICATIONS • • • 



mental broadcasting. The Committee's work in all of these fields will 
include recommendations for the speedy and efficacious use in time of 
military emergency of all necessary domestic broadcasting facilities and 
communications services asosciated therewith, with the requirements of 
the national defense as a primary consideration. 

Chairman: Neville Miller* Secretary: A. D. Ring 

Organization Representative Alternate 

American Federation of Labor. .. .Lawson Wimberly Maynard F. Marquardt 

American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company G. L. Best H. H. Carter 

Blue Network, The K. H. Berkeley 3eo. 0. Milne 

Broadcasters Victory Council John Shepard III 0. L. Taylor 

Columbia Broadcasting System. 
Inc Earl H. Gammons Dr. Frank Stanton 

Congress of Industrial 
Organizations 

Facsimile, Inc John V. L. Hogan 

Federal Communications 

Commission George P. Adair Rosel H. Hyde 

FM Broadcasters, Inc Walter J. Damm Philip G. Loucks 

Finch Telecommunications 

Mutual Broadcasting System, Inc. . 

National Association of 
Broadcasters Neville Miller* Howard S. Frazier 

National Assn. of Broadcast Engi- 
neers J. H. Brown A. T. Powley 

National Broadcasting Company . . Frank M. Russell O. B. Hanson 

National Federation of 
Telephone Workers John J. Moran 

National Independent 

Broadcasters Harold A. Lafount Andrew W. Bennett 

National Television System Com- 
mittee of the RMA Engineer- 
ing Department W. R. G. Baker V. M. Graham 

Office of War Information 

State Department Harvey Otterman 

U. S. Independent Telephone 

Association Louis Pitcher Clyde S. Bailey 

War Department 

War Production Board F. H. Mcintosh J. R. Cruetz 

Western Union Telegraph 

Company H. P. Corwith A. W. Donaldson 

INTERDEPARTMENT RADIO ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

This Committee is designated under the provisions of Paragraphs 5 and 
7, but without reference to Paragraph 8, of the President's Executive Order 
of September 24, 1940. The duties of this Committee will include making 
special studies and recommendations regarding frequency allocations, with 
the requirements of national defense as a primary consideration but giving 
due consideration to the needs of governmental agencies, of industry, and 
of other civilian activities. 

Chairman: Comdr. Paul D. Miles 

Vice-Chairman : Capt. E. M. Webster 

Secretary : M. H. Woodward Assistant Secretary : L. R. Brady 

Organization Representative Alternate 

Department of Agriculture E. W. Loveridge E. C. Wagner 

Department of Commerce Dr. J. H. Dellinger L. H. Simson 

Federal Communications 

Commission T. A. M. Craven H. F. Carl 

79 



first things first 



Sometimes the hard way is the easiest— if you go at it right. 

Here at Mutual we're busy building a better network. For a 
solid decade, this has been a good network. To make it better 
—better for listeners, for artists, for stations, for clients— is a 
large order. And we plan to do it soundly, concentrating con- 
tinuously on first things first in all our operations. 

Foundations come first in any structure, and we think the 
rockbottom foundation for a radio network is the minds and 
skills of its personnel. Mutual is particularly well-grounded in 
this respect. Its directorate comprises successful broadcasters 
whose radio-business experience covers the whole span of 
broadcasting's quarter-century. . . a lineup of practical know- 
how outstanding in the entire field of commercial radio. 



This basis of first-hand experience has lately been strength- 
ened from within by the organization of a complete and able 
executive staff, headquartered in New York and buttressed at 
key points elsewhere. Into capable hands have been charged 
the various problems of general management as well as pro- 
gramming, station relations, sales and all other phases of 
efficient network operation. Mutual efforts toward improve- 
ment in each of these fields deliberately follow the funda- 
mental, first -things -first pattern . . . with the listener— the 
family on the receiving end of radio— foremost in our plan- 
ning at all times. 

Shouting from the housetop has no place on the Mutual sched- 
ule, but as we build upon this sturdy foundation, we think 
our "hard-way" approach may prove the easiest route to a 
better network after all. We'll let you know how it works out. 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 




TOM BRENEMAN 

Breakfast in Hollywood 
For Pep and Ivory Flakes 



BOARD OF WAR COMMUNICATIONS 



• • • 



Organization Representative Alternate 

Department of Interior Stephen L. Windes 

Department of Justice E. D. Coffey H. J. Walls 

Department of Labor 

U. S. Maritime Commission D. S. Brierley J. T. Welsh 

Navy Department Lt. Comdr. P. D. Miles Lt. ( jg) W. R. Foley, USNR 

Post Office Department Roy M. Martin Charles M. Knoble 

State Department Thomas Burke F. C. deWolf 

U. S. Coast Guard Capt. E. M. Webster Lt. Arthur L. Budlong 

War Department Lt. Col. A. G. Simson Capt. Wm. E. Plummer 

INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING COMMMITTEE 

The duties of this Committee include the study of all phases of interna- 
tional broadcasting and the formulation of recommendations concerning 
such precautions, supplementary facilities and reallocations as it shall 
deem desirable under foreseeable military conditions. With the require- 
ments of national defense as a primary consideration, it shall also recom- 
mend plans for the speedy and efficacious use of all necessary international 
broadcasting facilities in time of military emergency giving due considera- 
tion to the needs of other governmental agencies, of industry, and of other 
civilian activities. 

Chairman: Walter C. Evans Secretary: P. F. Siling 

Organization Representative Alternate 

American Federation of Labor. .. .Louis Barnett Lawson Wimberly 

Associated Broadcasters, Inc Wesley I. Dumm Royal V. Howard 

Columbia Broadcasting System, 

Inc Earl H. Gammons Edmund Chester 

Department of Commerce 

(Bureau of Foreign and 

Domestic Commerce) Howard E. Way 

Crosley Corporation (The) James D. Shouse R. J. Rockwell 

Federal Communications 

Commission P. F. Siling Geo. P. Adair 

General Electric Company Robert S. Peare 

Mutual Broadcasting System, Inc. . Alfred J. McCosker 
National Association of 

Broadcasters Neville Miller* Howard S. Frazier 

National Broadcasting Company, 

Inc John F. Royal Dr. Charles B. Jolliffe 

Navy Department Comdr. Fnauz O. Lt. Comdr. F. C. B. Jordan 

Willenbucher 
Office of Coordinator of 

Inter-American Affairs Don Francisco John W. G. Ogilvie 

Office of War Information James Weldon 

State Department Harvey Otterman Col. Carl H. Hatch 

War Department Maj. Gen. Alexander D. 

Surles 
Westinghouse Electric and 

Manufacturing Co Walter C. Evans L. B. Wailes 

World Wide Broadcasting 

Corporation Walter S. Lemmon Mark L. MacAdam 

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE 

The duties of this Committee include the study of all phases of domes- 
tic and international radiotelegraph and radiotelephone communications 
facilities (including mobile and fixed services) except aviation, amateur, 
Federal, State, and Municipal communications facilities. With the require- 
ments of national defense as a primary consideration, the Committee shall 
recommend plans for the most efficacious use of all of these facilities in 

83 



ALLMARK 

GREETING CARDS 



• sv ? \ 




Charlotte 
Greenwood 



• • * BOARD OF WAR COMMUNICATIONS • • * 

time of military emergency, giving due consideration to the needs of other 
governmental agencies, of industry, and of other civilian activities. 
Chairman: Capt. E. M. Webster Secretary: F. M. Ryan 

American Federation of Labor. .. .Andrew McDonald David D. Barry 

American Merchant Marine 

Institute, Inc R. J. Baker 

Organization Representative Alternate 

American Telephone and 

Telegraph Company W. G. Thompson F. M. Ryan 

Association of Edison 

Illuminating Companies G. G. Langdon 

Congress of Industrial 

Organizations H. C. Taylor W. P. Paschel 

Department of Commerce Dr. J. H. Dellinger L. H. Simson 

Edison Electric Institute H. E. Kent 

Federal Communications 

Commission William N. Krebs J. A. Russ 

Globe Wireless, Ltd Jack Kaufman R. W. Bunce 

Lake Carriers' Association Gilbert R. Johnson C. M. Jansky, Jr. 

Lorain County Radio Corporation Herman E. Hageman Frank C. Dunbar 
Mackay Radio and Telegraph 

Company Haraden Pratt L. Spangenberg 

Maritime Commission D. S. Brierley J. T. Welsh 

Mutual Telephone Company W. I. Harrington Alvah A. Scott 

National Federation of 

Telephone Workers John J. Moran 

Navy Department M. W. Arps 

Press Wireless, Inc Joseph Pierson D. K. DeNeuf, V. P. 

Radiomarine Corporation 

of America Chas. J. Pannill Arthur J. Costigan. 

R.C.A. Communications, Inc Wm. A. Winterbottom William H. Taylor 

South Porto Rico Sugar Company . T. J. Phillips 
Tropical Radio Telegraph 

Company R. V. Howley C. C. Harris 

U. S. Coast Guard Capt. E. M. Webster Lt. Comdr. C. H. Peterson 

U. S.-Liberia Radio Corporation. . .Byron H. Larabee 

War Department Col. Wesley T. Guest Maj. Orla St. Clair 

COMMUNICATIONS LIAISON COMMITTEE FOR CIVILIAN DEFENSE 
The duties of this Committee include the submission of expert advice 
on all communications problems in which the Defense Communications 
Board and the Office of Civilian Defense are mutually interested. With the 
requirements of national defense as a primary consideration, the Committee 
will submit recommendations to the Board on such problems as are re- 
ferred to it by the Board. In addition, the Committee shall have liaison 
with a similar committee of the Office of Civilian Defense and shall work 
with that committee in planning for the most efficacious use of communica- 
tions facilities for civilian defense. 

Chairman : William N. Krebs Secretary : Herbert A. Friede 

Organization Representative 

American Radio Relay League George W. Bailey 

Federal Communications 

Commission William N. Krebs 

International Association of 

Chiefs of Police Capt. Donald S. Leonard 

International Association of 

Fire Chiefs and International 

Association of Fire Fighters Herbert A. Friede 

National Bureau of Standards Alvin C. Hutton 

Office of War Information 

War Department Capt. Nelson Harton 

Signal Corps 

85 



TALENT CASTING LIST 



. PATRICIA BELL 

(LEx. 2-1100) 

. SHIRLEY BLANC 

(LEx. 2-1100) 

. BURT BOYER 

(LEx. 2-1100) 

. PATSY CAMPBELL 

(LEx. 2-1100) 

. MARY CONWELL 

(Clr. 6-3082) 

. BARBARA FULLER 

(LAc. 4-1200) 

. DORIS (DORTHEA) GRUNDY 

(LEx. 2-11000) 

. AMZIE STRICKLAND 

(LEx. 2-1100) 

BEN PRATT 



Talent Promotion 



Personal Publicity 



RKO Bldg., 1270 - 6th Ave., New York City CI. 6-3082 



BOARD OF WAR COMMUNICATIONS 



Labor Advisory Committee, De- Alternate 

fense Communications Board. .. .Joseph P. Selly 

Domestic Broadcasting Commit- 
tee, Defense Communications 
Board Neville Miller 

Telegraph Committee. Defense 

Communications Board R. H. Vehling 

Telephone Committee, Defense 

Communications Board Ralph I. Mabbs Clyde S. Bailey 

PRIORITIES LIAISON COMMITTEE 

The duties of this Committee include the study of non-military priori- 
ty problems that arise in the current work of priority ratings for materials 
requiring inter-departmental coordination, and such special problems as 
may be referred to it by the Board of War Communications or the Co- 
ordinating Committee. In addition, the committee will have liaison with 
the Priorities Planning Committee and may call upon the priorities repre- 
sentatives of the numbered committees of the Board as well as other Gov- 
ernment and industry experts for advice. 

Chairman : Lt. Comdr. R. H. Griffin 

Organization Representative Alternate 

Federal Communications 

Commission Manfred K. Toeppen 

Navy Department Lt. Comdr. R. H. Griffin 

State Department J. T. Keating Harvey Otterman 

U. S. Coast Guard Lt. Comdr. J. W. Ryssy 

War Department Lt. Col. Lyle D. Wise Capt. John G. Hubbard 

War Production Board Leighton H. Peebles 

PRIORITIES REPRESENTATIVES 
Amateur Radio Committee 

George W. Bailey, Chairman 
The American Radio League 

Cable Committee 
C. Mills, Chairman Benedict P. Cottone, Secretary 

Domestic Broadcasting Committee 
Dr. W. R. G. Baker, 

National Television System Committee 
of the RMA Engineering Department 

International Broadcasting Committee 
R. J. Rockwell, M. L. Prescott, 

The Crosley Corporation General Electric Company 

Radiocommunications Committee 
Arthur J. Costigan, Haraden Pratt, 

Radiomarine Corp. of America Mackay Radio and Telegraph Co. 

State and Municipal Facilities Committee 
Captain Donald S. Leonard, Chairman G. E. Nielsen, Secretary 

Telegraph Committee 
E. R. Shute, Chairman. Wm. J. Norfleet, Secretary 

The Western Union Telegraph Co. 

Telephone Committee 
Z. Z. Hugus, Chairman Clyde S. Bailey, Secretary 

Communications Liaison Committee for Civilian Defense 
Herbert A. Friede, George W. Bailey, 

International Assn. of Fire Chiefs The American Radio Relay League 

United States Government Facilities 
Lt. Col. A. G. Simson, Chairman 

87 




dt. Qeorge J-. Putnam, US.M.C.R. 

no%v serving with the 
American Armed Forces 



* * 

RADIO DAILY 

IS HAPPY TO PRESENT 
THE 

"ALL AMERICAN 
RADIO PROGRAM 
OF 19 4 4" 



PROGRAMS, artists and songs listed as winners on 
the following pages were chosen by 1,051 ballots 
as voted by the newspapermen and women of 
America. Each figure represents the exact number 
of votes received by the respective winners and the 
first five in each classification. All ballots have been 
checked by the Ross Federal Research Corp. which 
conducted the field work for Radio Daily and official 
certification was by a recognized firm of certified 
public accountants. Original signed ballots and 
worksheets used in tabulating votes are open to 
inspection by the industry. 

Trade acceptance of the Certified Poll was unani- 
mously received on January 9, 1945 when network, 
independent station and press association represen- 
tatives attended a luncheon at the Waldorf Astoria 
Hotel, New York, examined the ballots, and learned 
the methods used in obtaining them. 



89 




FIVE YEARS FOR THE SAME SPONSOR 



MILES LABORATORIES 

makers of 
Alka-Seltzer and One-A-Day Brand Vitamins 
through 
Wade Advertising Agency 

Blue Network 

Sunday Nights 

7:30 P.M. (E.W.T.) 




James Parks Louis G. Cowan & Company 

Exclusive Radio Representative Creator and Owner 



90 



ALL-AMERICAN WINNERS 

IN RADIO DAILY'S 

1944 CERTIFIED POLL 

Commercial Program 
INFORMATION PLEASE. Sponsored by H. J. Heinz Co.; Mondays, 9:30-10 p.m., 
EWT, on NBC network. Agency: Maxon, Inc. 

ft 
Entertainer 
BOB HOPE. Sponsored by The Pepsodent Co.; Tuesdays, 10-10:30 p.m., EWT, on 
NBC network. Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding, Inc. 

ft 
Symphonic Conductor 
ARTURO TOSCANINI. Sponsored by General Motors Corp.; Sundays 5-6 p.m. 
EWT, on NBC. The NBC-General Motors Symphony. Agency: Arthur Kudner, Inc. 

ft 
Dance Band (Sweet) 
GUY LOMBARDO. Sponsored by Larus & Brother Co., Inc.; Saturdays, 10-10:30 
p.m., EWT, on Blue Network. Agency: Warwick & Legler, Inc. 

ft 
(Dance Band (Swing) 
HARRY JAMES. Sponsored by Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., on CBS network for 
period in 1944. Agency: Newell-Emmett, Inc. (Currently on Danny Kaye program.) 

ft 
Male Vocalist (Classical) 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS. Sponsored by Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.; 
Sundays, 2:30-3 p.m., EWT, on NBC network. Agency McCann-Erickson, Inc. 

ft 
Male Vocalist (Popular) 
BING CROSBY. Sponsored by Kraft Cheese Co.; Thursdays, 9-9:30 p.m., EWT, on 
NBC network. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co. 

ft 
Feminine Vocalist (Classical) 
LILY PONS. Guest appearances during the year on various commercial programs. 

ft 
Feminine Vocalist (Popular) 
DINAH SHORE. Sponsored by General Foods Corp. Thursdays, 8:30-9 p.m., EWT, 
on NBC network. Agency: Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

ft 
Symphonic Program 
N. Y. PHILMARMONIC-SYMPHONY. Sponsored by United States Rubber Co., 
Sundays 3-4:30 p.m., EWT, on CBS network. Agency: Campbell-Ewald Co. 

ft 
Comedian 
BOB HOPE. Sponsored by Pepsodent Co., Tuesdays, 10-10:30 p.m., EWT, on NBC 
network. Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding, Inc. 

ft 
News Commentator 
LOWELL THOMAS. Sponsored by Sun Oil Co.; Monday through Friday, 6:45-7 
p.m., EWT, on NBC network. Agency: Roche, Williams & Cleary, Inc. 

ft 
Dramatic Series 
LUX RADIO THEATER. Sponsored by Lever Brothers Co.; Mondays 9-10 p.m., 
EWT, on CBS network. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co. 

ft 
Dramatic Serial 
ONE MAN'S FAMILY. Sponsored by Standard Brands, Inc.; Sundays 8:30-9 p.m., 
EWT, on NBC network. Agency: Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 

91 



Vox Pop 

Parks Johnson and Warren Hull 
(SINCE 32) 



CBS Network Mondays for 

BROMO SELTZER 



Address: 8-3 Tuscan Court, Great Neck, N. Y. 



92 



ALL-AMERICAN WINNERS 

IN RADIO DAILY'S 1944 POLL 

Sports Commentator 

BILL STERN. Sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. Fridays, 10:30-10:45 p.m., 
EWT, on NBC network. Agency: Sherman & Marquette, Inc. 

ft 
Children's Show 
LET'S PRETEND. Sponsored by Cream of Wheat Corp.; Saturdays, 11:05-11:30 
a.m., EWT, on CBS network. Agency: Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 

ft 
Educational Series 
AMERICA'S TOWN MEETING. Sponsored by Reader's Digest Association, Inc.; 
Thursdays, 8:30-9:30 p.m., EWT, on Blue Network. Agency: Batten, Barton, Durstine 
& Osborn, Inc. 

ft 
Quiz Show 
INFORMATION PLEASE. Sponsored by H. J. Heinz Co.; Mondays, 9:30-10 p.m., 
EWT. Agency: Maxon, Inc. 

ft 
Daytime Variety Show 
BREAKFAST CLUB (DON McNEILL). Sponsored by Swift & Co. (Participating 
program). Mondays through Saturdays, 9-10 a.m., EWT, on Blue Network. Agency: 
J. Walter Thompson Co. for Swift. 

ft 
Comedienne 
JOAN DAVIS. Sponsored by Sea'.test Inc. Thursdays, 9:30-10 p.m., EWT, on NBC 
network. Agency: McKee & Albright, Inc. 

ft 
Radio Announcer 
DON WILSON. Exclusive contract wiht Jack Benny-American Tobacco Co. pro- 
gram; Sundays, 7-7:30 p.m., EWT, on NBC. Agency: Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 

ft 

Woman Commentator 

DOROTHY THOMPSON. Sponsored by Trimount Clothing Co.; Sundays, 8:15- 
8:30 p.m., EWT, on Blue Network, to Dec. 17, 1944. Agency: Emil Mogul Co., Inc. 

ft 
Star Of Tomorrow (Male) 
ALAN YOUNG. Sponsored by Bristol-Myers Co.; Tuesdays, 8:30-9 p.m., EWT, 
on Blue Network. Agency: Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

ft 
Star Of Tomorrow (Female) 
JO STAFFORD. Appeared as vocalist during 1944 on Johnny Mercer Song Shop 
for Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. on NBC network. 

ft 
Popular Singing Unit 
FRED WARING GLEE CLUB. Sponsored by Owens-Illinois Glass Co.; Thursday, 
10-10:30 p.m., EWT, on Blue Network. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co. 

ft 
Comedy Team 
FIBBER McGEE and MOLLY. Sponsored by S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Tuesdays, 
9:30-10 p.m., EWT, on NBC network. Agency: Louis, Needham & Brorby, Inc. 

ft 
Song Of 1944 
I'LL WALK ALONE. Published by Mayfair Music Corp. Music by Jule Styne; 
words by Sammy Cahn. Introduced in the motion picture "Follow the Boys." 

ft 
Composition Of 1944 
HOLIDAY FOR STRINGS. Published by Bregman, Vocco & Conn. Music by David 
Rose; lyric by Sammy Gallop. 

93 






ROY 


ROGERS 




"King o i 


the Cowboys" 


Under 


Contract to 


Exclusive Management 


REPUBLIC PICTURES 


ART RUSH, INC. 



94 



Results of Radio Daily's 
• 1944 Certified Poll * 

First five in each of 28 categories is listed below, each representing 
the exact number of votes taken off 1,051 ballots. 



Favorite Commercial 
Program 

Information Please 104 

Fibber McGee & Molly 61 

Bob Hope Show 55 

Kraft Music Hall 47 

Edgar Bergen 43 

Favorite Symphonic 
Conductor 

Arturo Toscanini 273 

Serge Koussevitzky 99 

Andre Kostelanetz 61 

Leopold Stokowski 50 

Artur Rodzinski 38 

Favorite Sports 
Commentator 

Bill Stern 265 

Ted Husing 145 

Red Barber 37 

Harry Wismer 24 

Stan Lomax 18 

Favorite Dramatic Series 

Lux Radio Theater 262 

Mr. District Attorney 48 

One Man's Family 21 

Suspense 19 

Cavalcade of America). . . ,- 
Inner Sanctum } 

Favorite Woman 
Commentator 

Dorothy Thompson 275 

Kate Smith 27 

Lisa Sergio 20 

Mary Margaret McBride 10 

Hedda Hopper | 

Adelaide Hawley} (tie) 10 

Sheila Carter I 

Favorite Daytime Variety 
Show 

Breakfast Club 119 

Breakfast at Sardi's 76 

Club Matinee 13 

Mirth and Madness 8 

Glamor Manor 6 

Star of Tomorrow 
(Male) 

Alan Young 25 

Andy Russell 19 

Larry Stevens 16 

Dick Haymes 15 

Perry Como 14 



Favorite Children's Show 

Let's Pretend . 90 

Quiz Kids 63 

The Lone Ranger 40 

The Children's Hour 20 

Superman 18 

Favorite Educational 
Series 

America's Town Meeting 97 

Chicago Round Table 95 

Information Please 46 

American School of the Air 30 

Cavalcade of America 29 

Favorite News 
Commentator 

Lowell Thomas . 134 

Raymond G. Swing 131 

H. V. Kaltenborn 59 

Gabriel Heatter 50 

Walter Winchell } 

Fulton Lewis. Jr. * ue ' 4/ 

Favorite Musical 
Composition of 1944 

Holiday For Strings 63 

Shostakovich 8th Symphony 28 

Oklahoma 19 

Warsaw Concerto 18 

Beethoven Festival ] 

Black Brown & Beige}(tie) 3 

Blue Topia J 

Favorite Comedy Team 

Fibber McGee & Molly 297 

Bums & Allen. 145 

Abbott & Costello 82 

Edgar Bergen-McCarthy 6L 

Garry Moore & Jimmy Durante 56 

Favorite Comedienne 

Joan Davis 223 

Grade Allen 156 

Fanny Brice 93 

Gracie Fields 71 

Molly McGee (Marion Jordan) 47 

Favorite Song Hit of 1944 

I'll Walk Alone 119 

I'll Be Seeing You 71 

Swinging on a Star 51 

Trolley Song 42 

Long Ago and Far Away 18 



95 



Results of Radio Daily's 
• 1944 Certified Poll • 



Favorite Male Vocalist 
(Popular) 

Bing Crosby 648 

Frank Sinatra 49 

Frank Munn 24 

Kenny Baker 18 

Nelson Eddy 13 

Favorite Popular Singing 
Unit 

Fred Waring Glee Club 96 

Ink Spots 92 

Hour Charm Choir , 54 

Andrews Sisters 52 

The King's Men 37 

Favorite Dance Band 

(Sweet) 

Guy Lombardo 288 

Sammy Kaye 56 

Fred Waring 55 

Tommy Dorsey 43 

Wayne King 31 

Favorite Radio Announcer 

Don Wilson Ill 

Milton Cross 98 

Bill Goodwin ] 

Harry Von Zell} (tie) 60 

Ben Grauer 54 

Favorite Entertainer 

Bob Hope 268 

Bing Crosby 95 

Jack Benny 94 

Edgar Bergen 93 

Fred Allen 61 

Favorite Dramatic Serial 

One Man's Family 76 

The Aldrich Family 26 

I Lore a Mystery 23 

Those We Love 18 

Mr. District Attorney 1 ... . _ 

Liie Can Be Beautiful J " ie; ' 

Favorite Dance Band 
(Swing) 

Harry James 135 

Tommy Dorsey 86 

Benny Goodman 5L 

Kay Kyser 48 

Duke Ellington 40 



Favorite Quiz Show 

Information Please 440 

Take It or Leave It 152 

The Quii Kids 104 

Dr. I. Q 68 

Truth or Consequences 30 

Favorite Male Vocalist 
(Classical) 

John Charles Thomas 225 

Richard Crooks 113 

Nelson Eddy 108 

James Melton 08 

Laurits Melchior 49 

Favorite Comedian 

Bop Hope 385 

Jack Benny 125 

Fred Allen 118 

Edgar Bergen 62 

Ed Gardner 52 

Favorite Feminine Vocalist 
(Classical) 

Lily Pons 217 

Gladys Swarthout 120 

Marian Anderson 93 

Jessica Dragonetie 43 

Jeannette MacDonald . . 31 

Favorite Symphonic 
Program 

New York Philharmonic Symphony 320 

NBC Symphony of the Air 150 

Boston Symphony 123 

Philadelphia Orchestra 28 

Coca-Cola Show (Kostelanets) 23 

Favorite Feminine Vocalist 
(Popular) 

Dinah Shore 256 

Kate Smith 76 

Ginny Simms 61 

Frances Langford 47 

Hildegarde 38 

Stars of Tomorrow 
(Female) 

Jo Stafford 10 

Gloria Scott 8 

i°° n . Bro ° ks , 1 (tie) 7 

Patrice Munsel j 

GeorgiaGibbs 1 m 5 

Joan Davis \ 



96 



Nighttime listening in 




THE FIRST OF A SERI 
of Listening Habits is just completed. It contains details as to how the people 
in 1077 cities ... all the U. S. cities of 10,000 population and over ... re- 
sponded when they were asked "To which station do you listen MOST . . . 
at night, after 6:00 P.M." 



These pages give you the highlights. For complete information, write for 
the NBC book -"1077 Cities . . . and How They Listen at Night." 



In 1077 cities 




J:«^^y.^^i y «:»w^.;.^.•.Ki..u:,;..:.^.:, 



NBC leads the next network 

by 128% 




m jii jbqK 

57% of the Radio Families "Listen Most" to NBC 

HM,' JBEK JBi 

25% of the Radio Families "Listen Most" to Network B 

k 

6% of the Radio Families "Listen Most" to Network C 

It 

9% of the Radio Families 'listen Most" to Network D 





NBC leads by nearly 6 to 1 



In 860 cities NBC leads all other Networks (total radio fammes h.576.813> 

jki 

In 154 cities Network B leads all other Networks emu radio famines 1,254,996) 

i 

In 32 cities Network C leads all other Networks (^1^^^149,949) 



In 14 cities Network D leads all other Networks (^^o^^s^.m 



National Broadcasting Company 1 




A Stmce of Radio 
Corporatien «f Aawica 



HOW itllllll FlliNTN I in: VICTORY 



By John Salt 

North American Director of the BBC 



HTHE end of 1944 seems an excellent 
time to review the accomplishments 
of the BBC's European Service, which is 
the special radio service created at the 
time of the Munich crisis. As Radio 
Daily's Annual for 1945, goes to press, 
many of the countries occupied by the 
Nazis have been liberated. Amazing 
stories of the tremendous importance of 
BBC's European Service may now be 
revealed. Innumerable sacrifices were 
required on the part of the hundreds of 
radio technicians, producers, newsmen 
and broadcasters to keep the European 
Service going from England which has 
been at the front lines of the war. 

We do not consider that this story 
belongs to the BBC alone. It is some- 
thing in which all freedom loving people 
throughout the world may take pride. 

Maximum Resources 

It is true that it was the BBC that 
organized its maximum resources and 
energies to the task of keeping alive the 
will to resist and hope for liberation in 
the countries overrun by the Nazis, — But 
this is as it should be. If the war against 
the enemy were being fought near the 
United States it would have been the 
great American radio organizations that 
would have rolled up their sleeves and 
said: "This job comes first" as we did 
at Broadcasting House in 1939. 

Fan mail is usually considered by 
American broadcasters to be a good 
gauge of listening habits. What then 
would you think of a program pulling 
more than 4,000 letters a month! And 
what would you think if your letter writ- 
ers were risking jail and possible death 
by listening to your programs of writing 
letters ! 

From France alone the BBC's Euro- 
pean Service has received an average of 
4,000 letters monthly. But these, and 
thousands of other letters from Belgium, 
Holland, Czechoslavakia, Poland and 
even from within Germany, have been 
more than letters of appreciation. They 
have been a barometer by which to as- 
certain who is listening. From these 
letters have come invaluable information 
as to potential strength of the 1 Patriot 
forces in the various countries. 



BBC's European Service first began 
with about a half an hour a day i 
French, German and Italian, sandwiched 
into the Home Service. At the outbreak 
of the war six more languages were 
added. By April of 1944 the BBC was 
broadcasting 50 hours daily in 24 lan- 
guages to millions who were listening 
secretly at the risk of death. 

It was a few weeks before D-Day that 
ABSIE began to operate. This has re- 
sulted in the closest collaboration between 
the BBC and the OWI in technical and 
other fields. 

In preparation for D-Day the first in- 
structions to the people of Europe came 
from BBC's European Service and 
ABSIE. 

It was in 1944 that Jacques Duchesne 
returned to his beloved France. He had 
es:aped from occupied France to start 
with his patriots the program "Les Fran- 
cais Parlent Au Francais," over the BBC. 
When he stepped onto French soil he was 
greeted as a hero. All Frenchmen knew 
his voice, — It was the voice of Freedom. 
Said Duchesne to his countrymen, "Above 
all, we thank the BBC because they knew 
not only how to respect our freedom but 
also how to organize it." 

The "V" Campaign 

All Americans know of the power of 
the "V" campaign. But not all know of 
the origin of this momentous drive that 
united millions throughout the world into 
one mighty voice shouting "V For Vic- 
tory." It was in BBCs European Ser- 
vice that Victor Delavelaye, Belgium's 
Minister of Education, conceived the "V" 
program. Recently Delavelaye said to his 
compatriots, "You are free and have no 
more need of the voice that reached from 
the BBC in London and which gave you 
the reasons for hope." 

And in December Jean Guignebert, 
Director General of Radio Diffusion 
Francaise visited London where he said, 
"The whole of France was dependent 
on transmission from the BBC. The 
enormous majority got from them faith, 
hope and the certainty of victory. The 
salvation of an entire people is the most 
sensational of exploits to radio's credit." 



97 



_Xr ^tudu in ^J~i 



u in ^y~ia 



ured 



99% °f * ne dollar volume in the industry is represented by 
BMI licensees . . . 



972* commercial licensees in the United States and Canada 
. . . embracing all the major networks and the important 
FM and Shortwave broadcasters 

600 music publishers, affiliated with BMI, are creating many 
of the nation's top song hits consistently . . . and BMI 
has the exclusive performing rights to nearly a million 
titles of these publishers as well as of the performing 
rights societies of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico 
and Uruguay 

700,000 titles are listed as available for use in the latest BMI 
catalogue . . . music which ranges from the venerable 
classics to the newest in boogie-woogie 

30,000 phonograph records performable under the BMI license 
. . . and thousands more available in the libraries of the 
electrical transcription companies 

*As of February 1. 1945. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

Los Angeles New York Chicago 



A BMI BLnLh 

the +^rndudtru with 
uL5tanhet rJ^i 



icendeS 



EXTRA SERVICES extended to BMI affiliated statio 



ns 



COPYRIGHT RESEARCH SERVICE— up-to-the-minute information on 
music clearances, a complete basic catalogue, and regular 
supplements of BMI-licensed music 

BMI FIELD-MEN — trained to aid the station manager, they visit member 
stations regularly 

CONTINUITY SCRIPTS— that build salable programs 

DISC DATA — valuable source of available records by outstanding per- 
formers and kept up to date always 

BMI MUSIC MEMO — weekly informational bulletin for users of phonograph 
records and transcriptions 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS— of current releases provided to member sta- 
tions when available 

MUSIC DISTRIBUTION— music of every type published by BMI and 
affiliated publishers is mailed to stations periodically 

BMI PIN-UP SHEET — a monthly guide to the leading current popular tunes 

NEWSLETTER — issued monthly to keep radio men abreast of musical events 

PROGRAM SUGGESTIONS — of timely music for seasonal occasions 

SPECIAL PROMOTIONS — unusual and appropriate events often in the 
form of transcribed programs 

(Advertising agencies and transcription companies ■ 

which check their spot campaigns against our I 
list of licensees find their clearance problems 

eliminated by the use of BMI Music on BMI Stations. ■ 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

Los Angeles New York Chicago 

99 



IMPORTANT RADIO 

Telephone Numbers 
in NEW YORK 



Radio Stations 

WAAT (N. Y. Office) REctor 2-5878 

WAbC Wlckc. .nam 2-2000 

WSBR MAin 4-9735 

WtJNX Mt.rose 5-0333 

WSYN MUrray Hli 2-7760 

WCAU (N. Y. Office) Wlckersham 2-2000 

//. Af Circe 7-8300 

WEVD . . . • • BRyant 9-2350 

WGN (N. Y. Office) MUrray Hill 2-30*3 

WHN BRyanf 9-7800 

WHOM PLaza 3-4204 

WIBX (N. Y. Office) MUrray Hill 2-8228 

WINS BRyant 9-6000 

WJZ Circle 7-5700 

WLIB INgersol 2-1300 

WLW Circle 6-1750 

WMCA Circle 6-2200 

WNBF (N. Y. Office) MUrray Hill 2-5767 

WNCW PLaza 3-3300 

WNYC WOrth 2-5600 

WOR PEnnsylvania 6-8600 

WOV Circle 5-7979 

WPAT (N. Y. Office) PEnnsylvania 6-2945 

WQXR Circle 5-5566 

WRUL (N. Y. Office) PLaza 8-1085 

WWRL NEwtown 9-3300 

National Networks 

Blue Network Co Circle 7-5700 

Columbia Broadcasting System ... .Wlckersham 2-2000 

Keystone Broadcasting System LOngacre 3-2221 

Mutual Broadcasting System PEnnsylvania 6-9600 

National Broadcasting Co Circle 7-8300 

Station Representatives 

Adam Young, Inc LOngacre 3-1926 

John Blair & Co MUrray Hill 9-6084 

Blue Network Co Circle 7-5700 

The Branham Co MUrray Hill 6-1860 

British Broadcasting Corp Circle 7-0656 

Burn-Smith Co MUrray Hill 2-3124 

Capper Publications, Inc MOhawk 4-3280 

The Foreman Co ELdorado 5-0174 

Forjoe & Co VAnderbilt 6-5080 

Free & Peters, Inc PLaza 5-4130 

Headiey-Reed Co MUrray Hill 3-5469 

George P. Hollingberry Co MUrray Hill 3-9447 

The Katz Agency Wisconsin 7-8620 

Joseph Hershey McCillvra MUrray Hill 2-8755 

J. P. McKinney Circle 7-1178 

National Broadcasting Co Circle 7-8300 

John H. Perry Associates Murray Hill 4-1647 

Edward Petry & Co MUrray Hill 2-4400 

Pan American Broadcasting Co... MUrray Hill 2-0810 

lohn E. Pearson . PLaza 8-2255 

Juan Piza ELdorado 5-6788 

Radio Advertising Corp MUrray Hill 2-2170 

Radio Sales Wlckersham 2-2000 

William C. Rambeau Co LExington 2-1820 

Paul H. Raymer Co MUrray Hill 2-8689 

R H C Cadena Azul Wisconsin 7-1166 

Sears & Ayer LExington 2-0772 

Spot Sales, Inc ELdorado 5-5040 

Viola, J. Franklyn CHickering 4-3254 

The Walker Co MUrray Hill 2-7986 

Weed & Co VAnderbilt 6-4542 

Howard A. Wilson Co MUrray Hill 6-1230 

Wood, Helen MUrray Hill 2-8228 

Advertising Agencies 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc Circle 6-0200 

Badger & Browning tr Hersey Circle 7-3719 

Ted Bates, Inc Circle 6-9700 



BaKen, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, 

Inc ELdorado 5-5800 

Benton & Bowles, Inc Wlckersham 2-040C 

Bermingham, Castleman & Pierce, 

Inc LExington 2-7550 

The Biow Co., Inc Circle 6-9300 

Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance, 

Inc MUrray Hill 6-1800 

Franklin Bruck Advertising Coip Circle 7-766) 

Buchanan & Co MEdallion 3-3380 

Campbell-Ewald Co. of N. Y Circle 7-6383 

Calkins & Holden Wlckersham 2-6900 

Cecil & Presbrey, Inc Wlckersham 2-8200 

Compton Advertising Inc Circle 6-280C 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample Wlckersham 2-4200 

D'Arcy Advertising Co PLaza 8-2600 

Doherty, Clifford & Shanf;e:d, Inc BRyant 9-3140 

Sherman K. Ellis & Co PLaza 5-7711 

Erwin, Wasey & Co MOhawk 4-8700 

William Esty & Co CAIedonia 5-1900 

Federal Advertising Agency, Inc ELdorado 5-6400 

Foote, Cone & Belding Wlckersham 2-6600 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc MUrray Hill 6-5600 

Gardner Advertising Co COIumbus 5-2000 

Ceyer, Cornell & Newell, Inc. .. .Wlckersham 2-5400 

Grant Advsitising, Inc Circle 5-7870 

Lawrence C. Gumb'ner Adv. Agcy. . MUrray Hill 2-5680 

M. H. Hackett, Inc Circle 6-1950 

Hill Advertising Agency PLaza 3-7800 

Charles W. Hoyt Co., Inc MUrray Hill 2-0850 

Ivey & Ellington, Inc MUrray Hill 2-5204 

H. W. Kastor & Sons Advertising Co. 

COIumbus 5-6135 

Joseph Katz Co Wlckersham 2-2740 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc PLaza 3-0700 

H. M. Kiesewetter Advertising Agency, 

Inc LExington 2-0025 

Abbott Kimball Co., Inc PLaza 3-9600 

Knox Reeves, Advertising, Inc MUrray Hill 4-3982 

Arthur Kudner, Inc Circle 6-3200 

Lennen & Mitchell. Inc MUrray Hill 2-9170 

Marschalk & Pratt, Inc VAnderbilt 6-2022 

J. M. Mathes, Inc LExington 2-7450 

Maxon. Inc ELdorado 5-2930 

McCann-Erickson, Inc Circle 5-7000 

McKee & Albright COIumbus 5-2058 

Emil Mogul Co., Inc COIumbus 5-2482 

C. L. Miller Co MUrray Hill 2-1010 

Morse International, Inc LExington 2-6727 

Newell-Emmett Co., Inc AShland 4-4900 

Hixon O'Donell Adv. Agency Circle 5-6590 

Paris & Peart CAIedonia 5-9840 

Peck Advertising Agency PLaza 3-0900 

Pedlar & Ryan & Lusk, Inc PLaza 5-1500 

Arthur Rosenberg Co CHickering 4-4420 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc MUrray Hill 6-6400 

Redf ield-Johnstone, Inc PLaza 3-6120 

Sherman & Marquette, Inc Circle 6-1550 

Raymond Spector Co., Inc ELdorado 5-1270 

Kayton Spie.-o Co., Inc LOngacre 5-5090 

Street & Finney BRyant 9-2400 

I. D. Tarcher Co Circle 6-2626 

Weiss & Geller, Inc PLaza 3-4070 

J. Walter Thompson Co MOhawk 4-7700 

Warwick & Legler MUrray Hill 6-8585 

Ward Wheelock Co PLaza 3-7120 

Wm. H. Weintraub & Co Circle 7-4282 

Young & Rubicam, Inc AShland 4-8400 

Publications 

Advertising Age BRyant 9-6431 

Advertising & Selling CAIedonia 5-9770 



>00 



The Billboard MEdallion 3-1615 

Broadcasting PLaza 5-8355 

Metronome Circle 7-4500 

Printers' Ink MUrray Hill 3-6500 

Radio Advertising (Rates and Data) . . LExington 2-6611 

Radio Craft REctor 2-9690 

RADIO DAILY Wisconsin 7-6336 

Radio Retailing — Today PLaza 3-1340 

Radio & Television Weekly WAIker 5-2576 

Sales Management MOhawk 4-1760 

Standard Advertising Register MEdallion 3-5850 

Televisor, The LOngacre 5-1683 

Television WAtkins 9-7510 

Tide AShland 4-3390 

Tune-In Circle 5-8425 

Variety BRyant 9-8153 

News Agencies and 
Associations 

Associated Press Circle 6-41 1 1 

International News Service MUrray Hill 2-0131 

Press Association, Inc Circle 7-7363 

Radio News Association MUrray Hill 2-8198 

Reuters Circle 6-3960 

Transradio Press Service, Inc MUrray Hill 2-4185 

United Press MUrray Hill 2-0400 

Talent Agencies 

James Appell PLaza 3-7840 

Batchelor Enterprises, Inc Circle 6-4224 

Columbia Concerts Corp Circle 7-6900 

Consolidated Radio Artists, Inc COIumbus 5-3580 

Frank Cooper VAnderbilt 6-5661 

Wallace Downey, Inc Circle 6-6646 

Evans & Salter Circle 7-6900 

Fanchon & Marco CHickering 4-3956 

Frederick Bros. Artists Corp Circle 6-2144 

Moe Gale LOngacre 3-0350 

General Amusement Corp Circle 7-7543 

William Cernannt VAnderbilt 6-1750 

Spencer Hare MUrray Hill 2-0523 

Hesse & McCaffrey ELdorado 5-1076 

Estella Karn VAnderbilt 6-3860 

Bob Kerr COIumbus 5-8051 

Mark Leddy BRyant 9-1631 

Ben B. Lipset, Inc CHickering 4-2466 

A. & S. Lyons, Inc PLaza 3-5181 

Management Corp. of America Wlckersham 2-8900 

A. T. Michaud Circle 7-4064 

Mills Artists, Inc Circle 6-1566 

William Morris Agency, Inc Circle 7-2160 

Music Corporation of America. . .Wlckersham 2-8900 

National Concert & Artists Corp PLaza 3-0820 

James Peppe PLaza 3-2636 

Myron Selznick Co. of N. Y Circle 7-6200 

Stix, Thos. L Circle 7-2690 

Roy Wilson (Wilson, Powell & Hayward) . PLaza 9-4961 
Stan Zucker PLaza 3-0163 

Program Producers and 

Transcription and Recording 

Companies 

Advertisers' Broadcasting Co BRyant 9-1 176 

Advertisers Recording Service Circle 6-0141 

Air Features, Inc Wlckersham 2-2700 

American Institute cf Food Products ... PLaza 3-7146 
Arts Recording Studios & Recording Co... PLaza 8-0407 

Asch Recording Studios 'BRyant 9-3137 

Associated Music Publishers, Inc BRyant 9-0345 

Associated Radio & Television Prods.. LOngacre 5-3710 

Audio-Scriptions, Inc Circle 7-7690 

Basch Radio Productions MUrray Hill 2-8877 

Broadcasting Program Service BRyant 9-4324 

Ted Collins Circle 7-0094 

Columbia Recording Corp Circle 5-7300 

Decca Records, Inc COIumbus 5-2300 

Federal Transcribed Programs, Inc.. .CAIedonia 5-7530 
Allen A. Funt Radio Productions. . MUrray Hill 4-6148 

Wm. Cernannt VAnderbilt 6-1750 

H. S. Coodman Wlckersham 2-3338 

Kent-Johnson, Inc PLaza 3-7246 

Kermit-Raymond Corp ELdorado 5-551 1 

Lang-Worth Feature Programs Circle 6-7410 

Phillips H. Lord, Inc Wlckersham 2-2211 

Management Corp. of America Wlckersham 2-8900 



Charles Michelson MUrray Hill 2-3376 

Miller Broadcasting System. Inc Circle 6-0141 

C. D. Morris Associates PLaza 3-4144 

Muzak Transcriptions, Inc BRyant 9-1246 

NBC Radio-Recording Division Circle 7-5700 

Tr7-8916 

Lilian Okun, Inc TRafalgar 7-8196 

Donald Peterson Wisconsin 7-0069 

Radio Events, Inc MUrray Hill 6-3487 

RCA Manufacturing Co AShland 4-7605 

Reeves Sound Studios Circle 6-6686 

Rockhill Radio Productions ELdorado 5-1860 

Bernard L. Schubert, Inc PLaza 3-4670 

Henry Souvaine, Inc Circle 7-5666 

Standard Radio BRyant 9-4324 

Transamerican Broadcasting & 

Television Corp PLaza 5-9800 

Transcribed Radio Shows, Inc LOngacre 5-3440 

Tyro Productions COIumbus 5-3737 

Thomas Valentino Circle 6-4675 

Victor Recording Laboratory MUrray Hill 4-6200 

Roger White MUrray Hill 2-0295 

Wolf Associates PLaza 5-7620 

World Broadcasting System Wlckersham 2-2100 

F. W. Ziv, Inc PLaza 3-9612 

Organizations. I nions and 
Government Agencies 

Actors' Equity BRyant 9-3550 

Advertising Club CAIedonia 5-1810 

Advertising Federation of America. .. BRyant 9-0430 

AAAA LExington 2-7980 

American Communications Assn COrtlandt 7-3947 

American Federation of Musicians PLaza 8-0600 

American Federation of Radio 

Artists VAnderbilt 6-1810 

Army U. S., Information Service WOrth 2-1882 

ASCAP COIumbus 5-7464 

American Television Society CAIedonia 5-7430 

ANA MUrray Hill 5-9167 

Broadcast Music, Inc PEnnsylvania 6-5466 

Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs ..PLaza 5-3939 

Federal Communications Comm CAnal 6-4000 

Federal Trade Commission WHitehall 3-8000 

Institute of Radio Engineers MEdallion 3-5661 

Music Fublishers' Protective Association . .Circle 6-3084 

NAB— New York City MUrray Hill 2-1963 

NAPA Circle 7-8194 

National Labor Relations Board HAnover 2-4174 

National War Labor Board MUrray Hill 2-5820 

OW! Domestic Radio Bureau MUrray Hill 3-6800 

OWI Overseas Circle 6-4400 

Professional Music Men, Inc COIumbus 5-7362 

Radio Writers Cuild MUrray Hill 5-6930 

SESAC MUrray Hill 3-5365 

Song Writers' Protective Association. .COIumbus 5-3758 
Television Broadcasters Ass'n, Inc. . LAckawanna 4-4788 

U. S. Navy, Radio Section BRyant 9-1710 

War Manpower Comm CHickering 4-8800 

Women's National Radio Committee Circle 7-4108 

Writers' War Board MUrray Hill 3-6800 

Hotels 

Algonquin MUrray Hill 2-0100 

Ambassador Wlckersham 2-1000 

Astor Circle 6-6000 

Biltmore MUrray Hill 9-7920 

Commodore MUrray Hill 6-6000 

Edison Circle 6-5000 

Lincoln Circle 6-4500 

Lombardy PLaza 3-8600 

New Yorker MEdallion 3-1000 

New Weston PLaza 3-4800 

Park Central Circle 7-8000 

'ennsylvania PEnnsylvania 6-5000 

Plaza PLaza 3-1740 

Ritz Carlton PLaza 3-4600 

Ritz Tower Wlckersham 2-5000 

Roosevelt MUrray Hill 6-9200 

St. Moritz Wlckersham 2-5800 

St. Regis PLaza 3-4500 

Savoy Plaza Volunteer 5-2600 

Sherry Netherland Volunteer 5-2800 

Vanderbilt AShland 4-4000 

Waldorf-Astoria ELdorado 5-3000 

Warwick Circle 7-2700 



101 



IMPORTANT RADIO 

Telephone Numbers 
in LOS ANGELES 



Radio Stations 

KECA FAirfax 2121 

KFAC Fltzroy 1231 

KFI FAirfax 2121 

KFOX MUtual 2510 

KFVD DRexel 2391 

KFWB HEmpstead 5151 

KCER MAdison 2551 

KCFJ PRospect 2434 

KHJ HOIIywood 81 1 1 

KIEV HOIIywood 5341 

KMPC CHapman 5-2388 

KMTR Hillside 1161 

KNX HOIIywood 1212 

KPAS (Pasadena) RYan 1-6991 

KRKD TUcker 7111 

KWKW (Pasadena) RYan 1-6744 

XEMO-XERB (L. A. Office) PRospecf 9136 

Wctivorhs 

Blue Network Co Hillside 8231 

Columbia Broadcasting System HOIIywood 1212 

Between 10 P.M. and 8:30 A.M.. HOIIywood 7052 

Don Lee Broadcasting System HOIIywood 8111 

Inter-California Broadcasting System .... MUtual 2759 

Keystone Broadcasting System HOIIywood 5338 

L. A. Broadcasting Co Fltzroy 1231 

Mutual Broadcasting System HOIIywood 81 1 1 

National Broadcasting Co HOIIywood 6161 

Station Representatives 

Associated Recorded Program Service. . HOIIywood 8318 

Walter Biddick Co Richmond 6184 

John Blair b Co PRospect 3584 

Howard C. Brown & Co HOIIywood 6045 

Free b Peters GRanite 3615 

W. S. Grant Co VAn Dyke 6341 

Homer Griffith Co GRanite 6113 

Katz Agency, Inc TUcker 3219 

Joseph Hershey McGillvra Michigan 0921 

Edw. Petry b Co Michigan 8729 

Ralph L. Power MAdison 5617 

Radio Advertising Corp VAn Dyke 1901 

Radio Sales HOIIywood 1212 

Wm. Rambeau b Co GRanite 3636 

Paul H. Raymer Co '. . . . .VAn Dyke 1901 

Spot Sales, Inc HOIIywood 8318 

Howard H. Wilson Co GRanite 6113 

Advertising Agencies 

Alber R. H. Company PRospect 3331 

Allied Advertising Agencies, Inc DRexel 7331 

E. Emmett Atkinson (Pasadena) RYan 1-6586 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc HOIIywood 5131 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn. . .HOIIywood 7337 

Benton b Bowles Inc Hillside 9151 

The Biow Co HEmpstead 2377 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample HEmpstead 0716 

Botsford, Constantine b Gardner Michigan 1427 

Brisacher, Van Norden & Staff PRospect 9368 

Buchanan & Company, Inc MUtual 6316 

Bert Butterworth, Agency HOIIywood 7263 

Campbell-Ewald Richmond 6204 

The Caples Co MUtual 4143 

Coast Advertising Associates BRadshaw 2-4167 

Compton Agency HOIIywood 8301 

Erwin, Wasey b Company PRospect 5317 

Foote, Cone b Belding Michigan 7651 

Foote, Cone © Belding (Hollywood) . .HOIIywood 6265 

Carf ield b Cuild TRinity 3832 

Classer-Gailey & Co Fltzroy 2141 

Hillman-Shane-Breyer, Inc VAn Dyke 5111 



Hixson-O'Donnell Advertising MUtual 8331 

Jaffe & Jaffe Fltzroy 3104 

W. C. Jeffries Co WAInut 8824 

Lockwood-Shackelford TRinity 9801 

The Mayers Co PRospect 0101 

McCann-Erickson Inc Hillside 8268 

McCarty Co PRospect 9132 

McKee & Albright, Inc HOIIywood 8363 

Miner, Dan B Richmond 3101 

Morgan, Raymond R. Co HEmpstead 4194 

Needham, Louis b Brorby GRanite 7186 

Pacific Coast Advertising Richmond 6333 

Radio Program Agency BRadshaw 2-3530 

Radio Sales HOIIywood 1212 

Elwood J. Robinson Adv. Agy MUtual 1142 

Ruthrauff b Ryan Inc Hillside 7593 

Scholts Advertising Service Michigan 2396 

Russel M. Seeds Co GRanite 4185 

Smith & Bull HEmpstead 5671 

Barton A. Stebbins Advertising Agency. .TRinity 8821 

Sudler Culbreth Co TRinity 0709 

Thompson, J. Walter Co Hillside 7241 

R. W. Webster TRinity 2153 

Ward Wheelock Co Hillside 0191 

Warwick-Legler HEmpstead 8163 

Weinberg, Milton, Advertising Co TUcker 4111 

William H. Weintraub & Co GRanite 1631 

Young b Rubicam, Inc HOIIywood 2734 

Program Producers and 

Transcription and Recording 

Companies 

Abbott & Costello Radio Program BRadshaw 2-3205 

Adver-Disk Co HEmpstead 6879 

Air-Check Co CLadstone 2189 

All Star Radio Prods GRanite 4975 

Allied Record Mfg. Co HOIIywood 5107 

American Junior G-Man Club, Captain Jack's 

GRanite 9436 

Associated Recorders HOIIywood 0781 

Associated Studios Broadcast & Recording 

Hillside 0191 

Audio Pictures BRadshaw 2-1445 

Walter Biddick Co Richmond 6184 

Blue Network Hillside 8231 

Cinesound CLadstone 91 58 

Columbia Recording Corp GRanite 4134 

Columbia Pacific Network HOIIywood 1212 

Continental Radio Productions HEmpstead 8171 

Cruger Radio Productions HEmpstead 8254 

Patrick Michael Cunning Hillside 5915 

Decca Recording Division HOIIywood 5191 

Eccles Disc Recordings Hillside 8351 

Electro Recording CHapman 5-3283 

Electro-Vox Recording Studios GLadstone 2189 

Elliott Fisher GLadstone 6239 

Edw. Forman HEmostead 7648 

Martin A. Cosch BRadshaw 2-3205 

Charlotte Greenwood Sh~w HEmpstead 6232 

Hispano Broadcasting Co Michigan 4433 

Hollywood Music Recording Studios. .. HEmpstead 5407 

Hollywood Recorders GLadstone 1707 

International Artists, Inc HOIIywood 9718 

International Recording Studio HOIIywood 7391 

Johnson-Ayres HEmpstead 8171 

Sam Kerner. Inc HEmpstead 1813 

Keystone Broadcasting System, Inc. ... HOIIywood 5338 

Kennet Long Hillside 0191 

C. P. MacGregor Fltzroy 4191 

Haven MacQuarrie CRestview 6-7162 

Mitchel b West GRanite 7270 



102 



Mutual Recording Mutual 6872 

Raymond R. Morgan Co HEmpstead 4194 

Music City Clenn Wallichs Hollywood 8211 

NBC Radio-Recording Division Hollywood 6161 

Jack Parker CRanite 7584 

Ralph L. Power MAdison 5617 

B. D. Prager CLadstone 5013 

Radio Features HEmpstead 0723 

Radio News Reel Hollywood 9230 

Radio Producers of Hollywood Hollywood 6506 

Radio Recorders, Inc Hollywood 391 7 

James L. Saphier Hollywood 7211 

Radio Transcriptions Co. of America. .Hollywood 6928 

RCA Manufacturing Co Hillside 5171 

Rec-Art Studios PRospect 9232 

Sound Workshop BRadshaw 2-1233 

Stage No. 8 Hillside 5915 

Standard Radio, Inc Hillside 0188 

Telefilm, Inc CLadstone 5748 

Voice of Prophecy, Inc CHapman 5-2349 

World Broadcasting System Hollywood 6321 

Radio Artists Aqencies 

American Federation of Radio Artists. . .Hillside 5121 

Berg-Allenberg CRestview 6-3131 

Myrt Blum Associates CRestview 6-7071 

Consolidated Radio Service CLadstone 1929 

Everett N. Crosby, Ltd CRestview 1-1171 

Ken Dolan & Co CRestview 1-9185 

Margaret Ettinger Hillside 2141 

Feldman-Blum CRestview 1-5222 

Tom Fizdale, Inc Hollywood 7363 

Earle Ferris Associates Hollywood 7111 

George Frank, Inc Hillside 3188 

General Amusement Corp CRestview 1-8101 

Nat Goldstone CRestview 6-1071 

George Gruskin CRestview 1-6161 

Mitchell Hamilburg BRighton 0-4546 

Hayward-Deverich, Inc CRestview 1-5151 

M. C. Levee CLadstone 3115 

A. & S. Lyons, Inc CRestview 1-6131 

Morris Agency, William CRestview 1-6161 

MCA Artists, Ltd Crestview 6-2001 

National Concert & Artists Corp.. .CRestview 1-7121 

Orsatti Agcy CRestview 6-1008 

Art Rush CRestview 1-2165 

Salkow Agcy CRestview 1-9134 

James Saphier Hollywood 721 1 

Myron Selznick & Co., Inc CRestview 1-9171 

Edward Sherman Agcy CRestview 5-0186 

Publications 

Broadcasting Cr Broadcast 
Advertising CLadstone 7353 

RADIO DAILY GRanite 6607 

Radio Life HEmpstead 2025 

Variety Hollywood 1141 

Air Lines 

American Airlines TUcker 2471 

Pan American Airways Michigan 2121 

TWA Michigan 8881 

United Air Lines MAdison 1212 

Western Air Lines TUcker 1551 

Sport Arenas 

American Legion 

(Stadium-Hollywood) Hollywood 2951 

Los Angeles Coliseum Richmond 6391 

Cilmore Stadium WHitney 1163 

Railway Terminals 

Santa Fe Mutual 01 1 1 

Southern Pacific Michigan 6161 

Union Pacific TRinity 9211 

Hotels 

Ambassador Hotel DRexel 701 1 

Beverly Hills Hotel CRestview 1-8131 

Beverly- Wilshire Hotel CRestview 6-7111 

Biltmore Hotel Michigan 1011 

Christie Hotel Hollywood 2241 

Garden of Allah Hotel Hollywood 3581 

Hollywood Hotel HEmpstead 4181 

Hollywood Knickerbocker CLadstone 3171 

Hollywood Plaza Hotel CLadstone 1131 

Ravenswood Apt. Hotel Hollywood 5391 

Roosevelt Hotel Hollywood 2442 

The Town House Exposition 1234 



IMPORTANT RADIO AND GOVERN 

MENT TELEPHONE NUMBERS IN 

Washington, D. C. 



Federal Departments and 
Ayencies 

White House .. ." NAtiona! 1414 

State Department REpublic 5600 

Treasury Department Executive 6400 

War Department REpublic 6700 

Justice Department REpublic 8200 

Post Office Department District 5360 

Navy Department . • • REpublic 7400 

Interior Department 

(Office of Education) REpublic 1820 

Agriculture Department REpublic 4142 

Commerce Department District 2200 

Labor Department Executive 2420 

Federal Trade Commission Executive 6800 

FEDERAL COMMUNCATIONS 

COMMISSION Executive 3620 

Selective Service Board REpublic 5500 

War Manpower Commission Executive 4660 

War Production Board REpublic 7500 

War Labor Board REpublic 7500 

War Savings Staff, Radio Section Executive 6400 

Foreign Economic Administration Executive 7030 

Securities & Exchange Commission District 3633 

National Labor Relations Board NAtional 9716 

Wage & Hour Administration Executive 2420 

Social Security Board Executive 6500 

Supreme Court of the U.S Executive 1640 

D. C. Court of Appeals REpublic 3811 

Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. .REpublic 7500 

U. S. District Court (for D. C.) District 2854 

Capitol (Senate and House) NAtional 3120 

Radio Script & Transcription Exchange 

Extension 2225, REpublic 1820 

Bureau of Census District 2200 

Office of Censorship, (J. E. Fetzer) ... Executive 3800 

Office of Emergency Management REpublic 7500 

Office of Civilian Defense REpublic 7500 

Office of Price Administration REpublic 7500 

Office of War Information REpublic 7500 

X on-Governmental 

American Red Cross REpublic 8300 

Clear Channel Croup REpublic 3306 

FM Broadcasters, Inc NAtional 1199 

National Association of Broadcasters. . .NAtional 2080 

National Press Club REpublic 2500 

Radio Correspondents' Calleries NAtional 3120 

RADIO DAILY ORdway 9221 

Radio Manufacturers* Association NAtional 4901 

Radio Stations 

WINX REpublic 8000 

WJSV MEtropolitan 3200 

WMAL NAtional 5400 

WOL MEtropolitan 0010 

WRC REpublic 4000 

WWDC NAtional 7203 

Hotels 

Carleton Hotel MEtropolitan 2626 

Mayflower Hotel District 3000 

Raleigh Hotel NAtional 3810 

Shoreham Hotel ADams 0700 

Statler Hotel Executive 1 000 

Wardman Park Hotel Columbia 2000 

Willard Hotel NAtional 4420 

.Yeu?s Services 

Associated Press District 1500 

International News Service NAtional 1733 

Transradio Press NAtional 1178 

United Press Executive 3430 

Railway Terminals 

Baltimore & Ohio R. R Executive 0770 

Pennsylvania R. R Executive 6600 

Union Station Executive 7900 



103 



A.sS.LYOASinc 



Managers of Distinguished Artists 



15 YEARS 



OF 



RADIO LEADERSHIP 



New York 

HARRY G. OMMERLE 
IRENE ETKIN 
HARRIET RHODAY 



Beverly Hills 

FRANK HEALEY 
WYNN ROCAMORA 
MARGARET KENT 



New York 
515 Madison Ave. 



Beverly Hills 
356 No. Camden Drive 



104 



IMPORTANT RADIO 

Telephone Numbers 
CHICAGO 



m 



Radio Stations 

KSTP (Chicago office) SUPerior 8659 

WAAF RANdolph 1932 

WAIT FRAnklin 0660 

WBBM WHIfehall 6000 

WCAU (Chicago office) SUPerior 5072 

WCBD SEEly 8066 

WCFL SUPerior 5300 

WCRW LINcoln 2188 

WEDC CRAwford 4100 

WENR DELaware 1900 

WGES SEEly 8066 

WGN SUPerior 0100 

WHFC LAWndale 8228 

WHIP DEArborn 8600 

WIND (Chicago office) STAte 4176 

WJJD STAte 5466 

WLS MONroe 9700 

WLW (Chicago office) STAte 0366 

WMAQ SUPerior 8300 

WMBI Michigan 1570 

WMCA (Chicago office) SUPerior 5072 

WOR (Chicago office) SUPerior 5110 

WSBC SEEly 8066 

W51C STAte 1357 

National Networks 

Blue Network Co DELaware 1900 

Columbia Broadcasting System WHItehall 6000 

Keystone Broadcasting System STate 4590 

Mutual Broadcasting System WHItehall 5060 

National Broadcasting Co SUPerior 8300 

Station Representatives 

John Blair & Co SUPerior 8659 

The Branham Co CENtral 5726 

Burn-Smith Co CENtral 4437 

Capper Publications CENtral 5977 

Cox & Tanz FRAnklin 2095 

The Foreman Co FRAnklin 2359 

Free & Peters FRAnklin 6373 

Headley-Reed Co FRAnklin 4686 

George P. Hollingbery STAte 2898 

H3l Holman Co FRAnklin 0016 

The Katz Agency CENtral 4006 

Joseph Hershey McCillvra SUPerior 3444 

J. P. McKinney & Son SUPerior 9866 

National Broadcasting Co SUPerior 8300 

John E. Pearson Co FRAnklin 2359 

John H. Perry Associates HARrison 8085 

Edward Petry & Co DELaware 8600 

Radio Sales WHItehall 6000 

Radio Advertising Corp CENtraM743 

William C. Rambeau Co ANDover 5566 

Paul H. Raymer Co SUPerior 4473 

Reynolds-Fitzgerald, Inc STAte 4294 

Sears & Ayer SUPerior 8177 

Spot Sales, Inc FRAnklin 8520 

The Walker Co STAte 5262 

Weed & Co RANdolph 7730 

Howard H. Wilson Co CENtral 8744 

Advertising Agencies 

Aubrey, Moore & Wallace Inc.. ... RANdolph 0830 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc RANdolph 3456 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & 
Osborn, Inc SUPerior 9200 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample STAte 3800 



Buchanan & Co DELaware 5522 

Leo Burnett Co CENtral 5959 

Campbell-Ewald Co CENtral 1946 

The Caples Co SUPerior 6016 

Critchfield & Co SUPerior 3061 

Doremus & Co CENtral 9132 

Sherman K. Ellis & Co HARrison 8612 

Erwin, Wasey & Co., Ltd RANdolph 4952 

Albert Frank-Cuepther Law, Inc DEArborn 8910 

Foote, Cone & Belding SUPerior 4800 

Goodkind, Joice & Morgan SUPerior 6747 

Grant Advertising, Inc SUPerior 9052 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald, Inc SUPerior 3000 

H. W. Kastor Advertising Co., Inc CENtral 5331 

W. E. Long Co RANdolph 4606 

MacFarland, Aveyard & Co RANdolph 9360 

Maxon, Inc DELaware 3536 

McCann-Erickson, Inc WEBster 3701 

McJunkin Advertising Co STAte 5060 

C. L. Miller Co CENtral 1640 

Mitchell-Faust Advertising Co STAte 6610 

Needham, Louis, & Brorby STAte 5151 

Presba, Fellers & Presba CENtral 7683 

L. W. Ramsey Co FRAnklin 81 55 

Roche, Williams & Cunnyngham HARrison 8490 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc FRAnklin 0485 

Schwimmer & Scott DEArborn 1815 

Russell M. Seeds Co DELaware 1045 

Sherman 4 *'& Marquette, Inc DELaware 8000 

J. Waited Thompson Co SUPerior 0303 

Wade Advertising Agency. . . STAte 7369 

Weston-Barnett WHItehall 7725 

Young & Rubicam, Inc CENtral 9389 

Program Producers and 
Transcription and Recording 
m Companies 

Chicago Recording - Co : CENtral 5275 

Columbia Recording Corp WHItehall 600QJ 

Decca Records. Inc.. . DELaware 880Q 

EstelleLutz Artists Bureau HARrison 3433 

William Morris Agency, Inc STAte 3632 

Music Corporation of America DELaware 1100 

NBC Radio Recording Division SUPerior 830ff 

lames Parks Co CENtral 7980 

RCA Manufacturing Co WHItehall 4600 

Radio Recording Studios EDGewater 6461* 

Standard Radio, Inc. STAte 3 153/ 

Carl Wester & Co RANdolph 6922 

World Broadcasting System SUPerior 9114 

Yews Agencies and 
Associations 

Associated Press STAte 7700 

International News Service ANDover 1234 

RADIO DAILY OAKIand 4545 

Press Association. Inc STAte 4581 

Transradio Press Service STAte 7904 

United Press RANdolph 3666 

Organizations and Unions 

American Federation of Musicians STAte 0063 

American Federation of Radio Artists. . .SUPerior 6517 

Ascap STAte 8289 

Association For Education By Radio. ... DEArborn 7801 

Radio Council DEArborn 7801 



105 




It's Nice to Be With You Grade 



Fred Brady 



106 





"^%/^r 



This label identifies the organization best equipped 
to deliver — complete with writing, per- 
forming and production talent — everything 
from a 15-seconcl spot to a full hour 
recorded show. It guarantees the same 
"know-how" in transcriptions that the 
William Morris Agency has brought to its 
talent programs. 





WHY TRANSCRIPTIONS 



By Willis B. Parsons 
isst. Sales Mar.. NBC Radio-Recording Division, New York 



T OOKING at transcriptions from the 
right point of view, there is no dif- 
ference between a recorded program and 
a "live" show except that the transcribed 
program is "stored" on a disc until it 
is ready to be used. Both recorded and 
live shows start with the same elements — 
script, actors, music, production. The 
live show is broadcast immediately over 
a single station or simultaneously on a 
network of stations — the recorded show 
gets "in the groove" and comes out one 
week, a month or a year later over sta- 
tions in varying time periods depending 
on local availabilities. 

When you can't be personally at the 
stations you've selected for your spot 
schedule, directing the talent you want 
in the production you've chosen — but still 
insist on having a program that's "net- 
work calibre" in script, talent and pro- 
duction — then you're the best prospective 
customer for transcriptions. 

Advertiser's Viewpoint 

From the standpoint of the advertiser 
whose distribution or marketing prob- 
lems says "Use spot radio," recordings 
have distinct advantages. They permit 
flexibility of programming — and in these 
days of limited time availabilities, that 
is particularly important: a recorded show 
can be spotted at the best available time, 
perhaps at different times in different 
markets. Transcriptions give you pro- 
duction control of local broadcasts, 
whether a spot announcement or a vari- 
ety program, permit you to select the 
best actors, singers or musicians the big 
talent centers have to offer and produce 
the program the way you want it to 
go on the air. You have an advantage 
in producing the show, too — your actor 
makes a fluff, you can do it over; if your 
singer hits a sour note, you make an- 
other cut — you can correct the mistakes 
that, in a live program would have gone 
on the air and could never be recalled. 
In every market, you have the stame 
talent, the same excellent production, the 
same effect that you want produced down 
to the pronounciation of every syllable. 

The advertiser with a healthy budget 
can go as far as he wants in building 
a transcribed show tailor-made to his 
own specifications. But what about the 
local or regional advertiser who must 



make every radio advertising dollar do 
double duty ? He's up against tough com- 
petition from the big network shows and 
the elaborate programs p:oduced locally 
by many of the larger stations. The syn- 
dicated recorded program is the answer 
to his budget problem. Produced in tal- 
ent centers such as New York, Chicago 
and Hollywood, these transcribed shows 
are frequently written by the same au- 
thors, cast with the same talent, produced 
by the same directors who are responsible 
for many of the networks' leading pro- 
grams — yet, because their cost is shared 
by a number of advertisers, they are well 
within the means of limited budget ad- 
vertisers. 

Syndicated Programs 

The syndicated recorded program is 
complete, ready to go on the air, needing 
only the advertiser's sales message to be 
read by the local announcer. And if 
the advertiser wants to carry uniformity 
of presentation to the nth degree, he can 
have his commercials recorded as well. 

In the local radio picture, you should 
not overlook the recorded musical library 
service, for here is a wealth of fine musi- 
cal material recorded by dance bands, 
popular concert orchestras, symphony 
orchestras, outstanding instrumentalists, 
vocal soloists, choruses and specialty 
groups that can be presented in musical 
shows of every type. 

From the radio station's viewpoint, 
transcriptions are almost indispensable 
in these days of war-limited staffs. The 
advertiser's recorded shows simplify pro- 
gramming operations. The syndicated 
program gives the network affiliate a 
quality of production for local sponsored 
presentation that is comparable to the 
shows on its network feeds, helping the 
station to retain its audience. 

There was a time, not so many years 
ago, when the designation required by 
the FCC, "The following program is 
transcribed," was enough to start an 
epidemic of dial switching. Today, the 
listener might never be able to tell the 
difference between a "live" and a re- 
corded show except for this announce- 
ment, so great have been the improve- 
ments in production and recording tech- 
nique. And that's the final answer to 
the question: "Why transcriptions?" 



109 




'\faCU}n4%£ c (o€)Mcefot a/nd ' *J?m/i&& TD&tfw/udi<wi 



COOE OF LUflRTimE PRACTICES 

FOR HITIERICRn BROADCASTERS 
OFFICE OF CENSORSHIP 



AS OF FEBRUARY FIRST, 1945 



THIS is the third revision of the Code of Wartime Practices for Ameri- 
can Broadcasters. 

The principle of censorship remains the same. It is voluntary and 
broadcast management is responsible for fulfilling the function in its own 
medium. The broadcasting industry, to this end, should be constantly 
aware of the dangers inherent in (1) news broadcasts; (2) routine pro- 
gramming; and (3) commercial copy. 

To combat these dangers effectively, broadcast management must be in 
complete control of all programming every minute of every day of opera- 
tion. This responsibility should not be delegated to anyone over whom the 
management does not exercise control. 

The facilities of the Office of Censorship are at the disposal of broad- 
casters 24 hours a day, to assist them with consultation and advice when 
any doubt arises as to the application of this Code. The folloiving are the 
principal advisory guideposts (as revised) which are intended to aid in 
discharging censorship responsibilities : 



I. NEWS BROADCASTS AND 
COMMENTARIES 

Broadcasters should edit all news in the 
light of this Code's suggestions and of 
their own specialized knowledge, regard- 
less of the medium or means through 
which such news is obtained. 

Special attention is directed to the 
fact that all of the requests in this Code 
are modified by a proviso that the in- 
formation listed may properly be broad- 
cast when authorized by appropriate au- 
thority. News on all of these subjects 
will become available usually from Gov- 
ernment sources; but in war, timeliness 
is an important factor and the Govern- 
ment unquestionably is in the best posi- 
tion to decide when disclosure is timely. 

Caution is advised against reporting, 



under the guise of opinion, speculation, 
or prediction, any fact which has not 
been released by appropriate authority. 

It is requested that neivs in any of the 
folloiving classifications be kept off the 
air unless made available for broadcast 
by appropriate authority or specifically 
cleared by the Office of Censorship. 

(a) Weather. — Weather forecasts 
other than those officially released by the 
Weather Bureau. Mention of wind direc- 
tion or barometric pressure in current or 
past weather (including summaries and 
recapitulations) except when contained 
in EMERGENCY warnings released spe- 
cifically for broadcast by the Weather 
Bureau authorities. 

Note: Special events reporters, covering sports or 
any outdoor assignments (fires, flood, storms, etc), 
are cautioned especially against mention of wind 
directions. 



Ill 



"ONCE UPON A TIME THERE 
WAS A FINGER 




95 



Along about 1908 or 1909 (or maybe it was 1926) there was a baby born with 
a silver stop watch in its little kisser, tousled grey hair and an ulcer. Also, 
this Job had eleven fingers! 

"Gad!" said his old man, "What a natural for a radio producer! Just think how 
deftly he could throw a cue with that eleventh pinkie!" 

And so, all during his formative years, Little Finger was groomed for his 
mission in life. He couldn't play baseball like other kids, nor roller skate, nor 
upset garbage cans, just practice throwing cues. After each day of practice, the 
Super Digit was carefully washed, manicured, groomed and put to rest in a 
special leather carrying case. 

Then came the great day. A whole studio full of actors, musicians, announcers, 
writers and sound effects men was assembled just to have that wonderful 
finger thrown at them. "What a Hooper we'll get!" chortled the account 
executive. "What sales we'll get!" cried the sponsor. "What a show we'll get!" 
chorused the public joyfully. 

At last the great moment was upon them. Our hero took off his coat and opened 
his collar. Beads of sweat formed on his brow. He wound up — and THREW' 
THE MAGIC CUE! 

And what do you think happened? 

Why nothing, of course. No Hooper, no sales, no nothing — just a cancellation. 
All of which goes to show you kids. It ain't the finger that's important. It's 
the brain power and teamwork behind the finger that counts. 

The next time you have a radio problem, whether you need a ten second station 
break or a $25,000 a week variety show, how about dropping us a line or 
giving us a call? We don't promise to solve all your problems over night, 
(nobody is that good) but we do promise constructive, down-to-earth thinking. 
After all, what makes the radio business go, if it ain't ideas? Lots of people 
you know have ten fingers (or eleven) but how many people do you know 
with ten ideas? 




NEW YORK 
RKO BLDC. 
1270 6th AVE. 
Circle 6-2144 




AGENCY, INC. 
RADIO PRODUCTION 

CHICAGO 

75 EAST WACKER DRIVE 
STATE 0003 



HOLLYWOOD 
8584 SUNSET BLVD. 
CRESTVIEW 1-6244 



112 



BROADCASTERS' WARTIME CODE 



(6) Armed Forces. — Type and move- 
ment of United States Army, Navy and 
Marine Corps units, within or without 
continental United States including in- 
formation concerning — 

Location. 

Identity. 

Exact Composition. 

Equipment. 

Strength. 

Destination. 

Routes. 

Schedules. 

Assembly for Embarkation. 

Prospective Embarkation. 

Actual Embarkation. 

Such information regarding troops of 
friendly nations on American soil. 

Revelation of possible future military 
operations by identifying an individual 
known for a specialized activity. 

Exceptions: (1) Armed Forces in the 
United States: Those in training camps 
and units assigned to domestic police 
duty, as regards names, addresses, loca- 
tion and general character. 

(2) Armed Forces Outside the 
United States: 

Names and locations (without unit 
identification) if presence of United 
States forces in area has been announced 
officially. 

Names of Naval personnel without 
mention of their ships, unless said ships 
have been announced by the Navy as 
lost or damaged. 

(c) Ships (Convoys, etc.).— Type and 
movements of United States Navy, or 
merchant vessels, or transports, of con- 
voys, of neutral vessels, or vessels of na- 
tions opposing the Axis powers in any 
waters, including information concern- 
ing — 

Identity. 

Location. 

Port of Arrival. 

Time of Arrival. 

Prospect of Arrival. 

Port of Departure. 

Ports of Call. 

Nature of Cargoes. 

Assembly. 

Personnel. 

Enemy naval or merchant vessels in 
any waters, their 
Type. 
Identity. 



Location. 
Movements. 

Secret information or instructions 
about sea defenses, such as — 

Buoys, lights and other guides to 
navigators. 

Mine fields and other harbor de- 
fenses. 

Ship in construction — 

Type. 

Number. 

Size. 

Location. 

Advance information on dates of 
launchings, commissionings. 

Physical description, technical de- 
tails of shipyards. 

Movement of diplomatic exchange ships 
under the direction of the State Depart- 
ment. 

Exceptions: Movements of merchant 
vessels on Great Lakes or other sheltered 
inland waterways unless specific in- 
stances require special ruling. 

(d) Damage by enemy land or sea 
attacks. — Information on damage to 
military objectives in continental United 
States or possessions, including — 

Docks. 
Railroads. 
Airfields. 
Public utilities. 

Industrial plants engaged in war 
work. 

Counter-measures or plans of defense. 

Appropriate authority: for information 
about damage from enemy attacks to 
military objectives on land within con- 
tinental United States or possessions is 
the commanding officer in the zone of 
combat, or the Army Bureau of Public 
Relations, Washington. (For the Ha- 
waiian Islands, the Navy). 

(e) Action at sea. — Information about 
the sinking or damaging from war causes 
of war or merchant vessels in any waters. 

Appropriate authority : Appropriate 
authority for the release of news about 
the sinking or damaging of naval or mer- 
chant vessels in or near American waters 
is the commanding officer of the district 
in which the action occurs, or Naval Of- 
fice of Public Relations, Washington. 

(/) Enemy air attack. — Estimates of 
number of planes involved; number of 
bombs dropped; damage to — 



113 



■•■ ■ .tf: 








PERRY COMO 

Singing Star of 

"Chesterfield Supper Club' 1 

Mon. Thru Fri., 7-7:15 p.m., E.W.T. 

NBC 

Under Contract to 

20th Century-Fox Films • Victor Recording Artist 

GENERAL AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 



114 



BROADCASTERS' WARTIME CODE 



Fortifications. 

Docks. 

Railroads. 

Ships. 

Airfields. 

Public utilities. 

Industrial plants engaged in war 
work. 

All other military objectives. 
Warnings or reports of impending air 
raids; remote ad lib broadcasts dealing 
with raids, during or after action. 

Mention of any raid in the continental 
United States during its course, except 
on appropriate authority of the desig- 
nated representatives of the Defense Com- 
mander in whose area the raid occurs or 
the War Department in Washington. 

News which plays up horror or sensa- 
tionalism; deals with or refers to un- 
confirmed reports or versions; refers to 
exact routes taken by enemy planes, or 
describes countermeasures of defense, 
such as troop mobilization or movements, 
or the number and location of antiair- 
craft guns or searchlights in action. 

Exceptions: After an air raid, general 
descriptions of action after all-clear has 
been given. Nothing in this request is 
intended to prevent or curtail construc- 
tive reporting or programming of such 
matters as feats of heroism, incidents of 
personal courage, or response to duty 
by the military or by civilian defense 
workers. 

(g) Accredited Military and Naval 
Correspondents. — No provisions in this 
Code of Wartime Practices for Ameri- 
can Broadcasters modify obligations as- 
sumed by accredited correspondents who 
accompany Army or Navy forces or are 
given special accrediting by the War or 
Navy departments to visit restricted 
areas in the United States. 

These commitments, under War and 
Navy department practice, pledge such 
correspondents to submit to censorship 
anything they write in zones of combat 
or restriction, or what they may write at 
a later date as result of their observa- 
tion in these zones. The military depart- 
ment concerned is the censorship agency 
for all such material. 

In case of a protracted enemy attack 
on the continental United States, neces- 
sitating military declaration of a com- 
bat zone, censorship within such an area 
would, of necessity, be by military au- 
thority. Accrediting of news gatherers 



for such a zone will be as in any other 
combat area. In the case of such an at- 
tack and declaration of a military zone of 
combat, the requests in this Code remain 
applicable to broadcast operations out- 
side the declared area. 

(k) Planes— 

Air Units. — Military air units of the 
United States and the United Nations 
as to — 

Di.'position. 

Missions. 

Movements. 

New characteristics. 

Strength. 

Information concerning new military 
aircraft and related items of equipment 
or detailed information on performance, 
construction and armament of current 
military aircraft or related items; mili- 
tary activities of commercial air lines or 
the Civil Air Patro!. 

(0 Fortifications and Air Installa- 
tions. — Location and description of forti- 
fications, including — 

Coast Defense Emplacements. 

Anti-aircraft guns and other air de- 
fense installations. 

Defense Installation details of pub- 
lic airports used for military pur- 
poses. 

Camouflaged objects. 

Location of specially constructed 
bomb shelters. 

Information concerning insta'lations 
for military purposes outside the U. S. 

(j) Sabotage. — Specifications (includ- 
ing information on bottlenecks) which 
saboteurs could use to damage military 
objectives. No mention of sabotage should 
be made except on appropriate authority 
of the military agency concerned or the 
Department of Justice. 

(k) Production, (see also Sabotage) 
— New or secret Allied military weapons, 
identity and location of plants making 
them, designs or rate of production or 
consumption of any specific type of war 
materiel, formulas or experiments con- 
nected with war production. 

Information on imports, exports or 
Government stock piles of critical or stra- 
tegic materiels such as tin, natural rub- 
ber, uranium, chromium, tantalum, man- 
ganese, quinine, tungsten and high-octane 
gasoline. 



115 







;■ •:*■.■;. 



ay 

w 



;# 




■ ■ ■; :■ 



: 



TED STEELE 

and his Orchestra 

"CHESTERFIELD SUPPER CLUB" 
Monday thru Friday, 7:00-7:15 P.M., E.W.T. 

NBC 



116 



BROADCASTERS' WARTIME CODE 



Transportation — Movement or trans- 
portation of war materiel. 

Note: Progress of production for general cate- 
gories of war materiel such as planes, tanks, guns, 
vehicles and munitions may be reported, but statisti- 
cal information on specific weapons such as bombers, 
fighter planes, 155 mm. guns, medium tanks, etc., 
should be avoided without appropriate authority. 

(I) Combat Zone Interviews and Let- 
ters. — Interviews with service men or 
civilians from combat zones (including 
accounts of escapes from foreign terri- 
tory) should be submitted for review 
before broadcast, either to the Office of 
Censorship or to the appropriate Army 
or Navy Public Relations Officer. Letters 
from combat zones are censored at the 
source, for home and family consumption 
only. When used on the air, broadcasters 
should measure the contents of such let- 
ters in the light of the provisions of this 
Code. In case of any doubt, consult the 
Office of Censorship. (See clause on 
Armed Forces, regarding unit identifi- 
cations). 

(w) War Prisoners, Internees, Civi- 
lian Prisoners. — Information as to ar- 
rival, movements, confinement, escape or 
identity of military prisoners from war 
zones; identity of persons arrested or 
interned as enemy aliens; locations or 
operations of alien internment camps; 
place of confinement of civilians con- 
victed of treason, espionage or sabotage. 

Note: The appropriate authority for 
information as to war prisoners or their 
camps is the War Department; for in- 
formation as to resettled persons, the 
project official in charge; for informa- 
tion as to enemy aliens or their camps, or 
civilian prisoners described above, the 
Department of Justice. In any inquiry, 
please make certain whether the indi- 
viduals involved are military prisoners 
of war, enemy aliens or resettled citizens 
or aliens. 

(n) Military Intelligence. — Informa- 
tion concerning war intelligence, or the 
operations, methods, or equipment of 
counter-intelligence of the United States 
or its allies or the enemy. 

Information concerning secret detec- 
tion devices. 

Information concerning secret United 
States or Allied means or systems of 
military communication, including the es- 
tablishment of new International points 
of communication. 



(o) War News Coming Into the 
United States. — War information or- 
iginating outside United States territory 
may be broadcast if its origin is made 
plain. 

Any recordings or information for 
broadcast gathered in any form that is 
sent across the United States-Canadian 
border should contain nothing that will 
conflict with the censorship of the country 

in which the information originates. 

(p) General.— Casualties. Identifica- 
tion of combat casualties until made 
available for publication by the War or 
Navy Departments or the next of kin. 

Strategy. — Secret war plans or diplo- 
matic negotiations or conversations which 
concern military operations. 

Art Objects, Historical Data. — Infor- 
mation disclosing the new location of 
national archives, or of public or private 
art treasures. 

Diplomatic Information. — Information 
about the movements of the President of 
the United States (including advance no- 
tice of the place from which he will 
broadcast) ; information of official mili- 
tary, or diplomatic missions of the 
United States or of any other nation op- 
posing the Axis powers — routes, sched- 
ules, destinations within or without con- 
tinental United States; movements of 
ranking Army or Naval officers and staffs 
on official missions; movements of other 
individuals or units on military or diplo- 
matic missions. 



II. PROGRAMS 

These suggestions are made in order 
that broadcasters will have a pattern to 
follow in accomplishing the most impor- 
tant censorship function of program op- 
eration: keeping the microphone under 
the complete control of the station man- 
agement, or its renresentatives. 

(a) Request Programs. — Music. — No 
telephoned or telegraphed requests for 
musical selections should be accepted. No 
requests for musical selections made by 
word-of-mouth at the origin of broad- 
cast, whether studio or remote, should 
be honored. 

Talk. — No telephoned or telegraphed 
requests for service announcements 
should be honored, except as hereinafter 



117 



THE JACK KIRKWDDD SHOW 



LILLIAN LEIGH 

Character Comedienne 

BILL GREY 

Character Comic 



JEANNE McKEON 

Soprano 

JIMMY WALLINGTON 

Announcer 

JACK HILL 

Producer-Director 

IRVING MILLER 

Musical Director 

DON REID 

Tenor 



MARYELLYN MANDER 

Ingenue 

JACK KIRKWOOD 



Writers 

Margaret Wilkins 
Ned Cronk 
Henry Tobias 
Crowell Beech 
Don Reid 



Sponsored by IVORY SOAP AND OXYDOL 

C.B.S. Monday Thru Friday 
7 p.m. East — 10 p.m. Central — 8 p.m. West 



118 



BROADCASTERS' WARTIME CODE 



qualified. Such service announcements 
would include information relating to — 

Lost pets. 
"Swap" ads. 
Mass meetings. 
Personal messages. 
Club meetings. 
Club programs, etc. 
Vital statistics. 

The same precaution should be ob- 
served in accepting "classified advertise- 
ments" for broadcasting. 

No telephoned, telegraphed or word- 
of-mouth dedications of program features 
or segments thereof should be broadcast. 

No telephoned, telegraphed or word-of- 
mouth auction bids, contributions or simi- 
lar acknowledgments from listeners, 
should be broadcast. 

Exceptions : Emergency announcements 
(such as those seeking blood donors, doc- 
tors, lost persons, lost property, etc.) 
may be handled in conventional manner 
if the broadcaster confirms their origin. 
They should emanate from the police, 
the Red Cross, or similar recognized gov- 
ernmental or civilian agency. 

Service announcements may be honored 
when source is checked and material is 
submitted in writing, subject to rewrit- 
ing by station continuity staff. Requests 
for the broadcast of greetings or other 
programs to commemorate personal an- 
niversaries may be honored if the actual 
broadcast is not made on the anniversary 
date or at the time or on the date desig- 
nated in the request. 

ALL requests, subject to the above 
qualifications, may be honored when sub- 
mitted via mail, or otherwise in writing 
if they are held for an unspecified length 
of time and if the broadcaster staggers 
the order in which such requests are 
honored, rewriting any text which may 
be broadcast. 

(6) Quiz Programs. — It is requested 
that all audience-participation type quiz 
programs originating from remote points, 
either by wire, transcription or short 
wave, should not be broadcast, except as 
qualified hereinafter. Any program which 
permits the public accessibility to an open 
microphone is dangerous and should be 
carefully supervised. Because of the na- 
ture of quiz programs, in which the pub- 
lic is not only permitted access to the 
microphone but encouraged to speak into 
it, the danger of usurpation by the enemy 



is enhanced. The greatest danger here 
lies in the informal interview conducted 
in a small group — 10 to 25 people. In 
larger groups, where participants are se- 
lected from a theater audience, for ex- 
ample, the danger is not so great. 

Generally speaking, any quiz program 
originating remotely, wherein the group 
is small, wherein no arrangement exists 
for investigating the background of par- 
ticipants, and wherein extraneous back- 
ground noises cannot be eliminated at 
the discretion of the broadcaster, should 
not be broadcast. Included in this classi- 
fication are all such productions as man- 
in-the-street interviews, airport inter- 
views, train terminal interviews, and so 
forth. 

In all studio-audience type quiz shows, 
where the audience from which inter- 
viewees are to be selected numbers less 
than 50 people, program conductors are 
asked to exercise special care. They 
should devise a method whereby no in- 
dividual seeking participation can be 
guaranteed participation. 

(c) Forums and Interviews. — During 
forums in which the general public is 
permitted extemporaneous comment, 
panel discussions in which more than 
two persons participate, and interviews 
conducted by authorized employees of 
the broadcasting company, broadcasters 
should devise methods guaranteeing 
against the release of any information 
which might aid the enemy as described 
in Section I of the Code. If there is 
doubt concerning the acceptability of ma- 
terial to be used in interviews, complete 
scripts should be submitted to the Office 
of Censorship for review. (See para- 
graph (L) of Section 1.) 

(d) Special Event Reporting (ad 
lib). — Special events reporters should 
study carefully the restrictions suggested 
in Section I of the Code, especially those 
referring to interviews and descriptions 
following enemy offensive action. Re- 
porters and commentators should guard 
against use of descriptive material which 
might be employed by the enemy in plot- 
ting an area for attack. 

If special programs which might be 
considered doubtful enterprises in view 
of our effort to keep information of value 
from the enemy are planned, outlines 
should be submitted to the Office of Cen- 
sorship for review. 

(See also Paragraph (a), Section I.) 

(e) Simulated Air Raids, Blackouts. 



119 



BROADCASTERS' WARTIME CODE 



— In view of the provisions contained in 
Paragraph (/) Section I of this Code, 
which prescribe radio silence at the scene 
of an air raid until the "all clear" is 
sounded, it is the belief of this office, in 
which the Office of Civilian Defense con- 
curs, that broadcasting stations should 
not employ their facilities during a simu- 
lated air raid in any way which would 
encourage listeners to rely upon the 
medium for advice and assistance should 
an actual raid occur. This is intended to 
place no proscription on the legitimate 
broadcast of descriptions and commen- 
taries dealing with simulated air raids 
and blackouts after the events have been 
conducted. 

(/) Commercial Continuity. — Broad- 
casters should be alert to prevent the 
transmission of subversive or restricted 
information through the use of commer- 
cial continuity in program or announce- 
ment broadcasts. In this connection, the 
continuity editor should regard his re- 
sponsibility as equal to that of the news 
editor. 

ffl. FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
BROADCASTS 

(a) Personnel. — The Office of Censor- 
ship, by direction of the President, is 
charged with the responsibility of remov- 
ing from the air all those engaged in for- 
eign language broadcasting who, in the 
judgment of appointed authorities in the 
Office of Censorship, endanger the war 
effort of the United Nations by their 
connection, direct or indirect, with the 
medium. Bases of judgment in exercis- 
ing this function will be twofold: (1) 
current material written for broadcast 
or broadcast over American facilities; 
(2) past and /or present conduct of the 
individual, including evidence substan- 
tiating his sympathy with the regimes of 
our enemies. This function of the Office 
of Censorship is not intended to relieve in 
any measure the full responsibility rest- 
ing with the management of the foreign 
language broadcasting station to employ 
only those whose loyalty he does not ques- 
tion. There extends to such broadcast 
management the additional responsibility 
to report to the Office of Censorship the 
names of any personnel in this field who 
might be suspected for any reason. 

(b) Scripts. — Station managements 
are requested to require all persons who 
broadcast in a foreign language to sub- 
mit to the management in advance of 
broadcast complete scripts or transcrip- 
tions of such material. (This procedure 



does not apply to programs originated 
and produced by the Office of War Infor- 
mation and distributed to foreign lan- 
guage stations). It is further requested 
that this material be checked "on the air" 
against the approved script and that no 
deviations therefrom be permitted. These 
scripts or transcriptions should be kept 
on file at the station. 

(c) Censors and Monitors. — In order 
that these functions can be performed in 
a manner consistent with the demands of 
security, station managers are reminded 
that their staffs should include capable 
linguists as censors and monitors whose 
duty it will be to review all scripts in 
advance of broadcast and check them 
during broadcast against deviation. 

(d) Submission op Scripts. — From 
time to time, the Office of Censorship will 
ask foreign language broadcasters to sub- 
mit specified scripts to this office for 
I'eview. If a station obtains its foreign 
language program from another originat- 
ing point via network, these requirements 
do not apply; in such event the originat- 
ing station will be held responsible for 
fulfilling the requests contained herein. 

(e) Station managements are reminded 
that all provisions of this code, as out- 
lined in Section I and II, apply equally 
to foreign language broadcasting. 



Broadcasters should ask themselves, 
"Is this information of value to the 
enemy?" If the answer is "Yes," they 
should not use it. If doubtful they should 
measure the material against the Code. 

From time tu time the Office of Censor- 
ship may find it necessary to issue fur- 
ther communications either to interpret 
certain existing requests, amend or delete 
them, or otherwise to cover special emer- 
gency conditions. Such communications 
will be addressed to managers of radio 
stations and networks and should receive 
preferential attention. 

If information concerning any phase 
of the war effort should be made avail- 
able anywhere, which seems to come from 
doubtful authority, or to be in conflict 
with the general aims of these requests; 
or if special restrictions requested locally 
or otherwise by various authorities seem 
unreasonable or out of harmony with 
this summary, it is recommended that 
the question be submitted at once to the 
Office of Censorship, Washington. Tele- 
phone Executive 3800; Teletype WA-434. 
The Office of Censorship, 

Byron Price, Director. 
December 1, 1943. 



120 



1 air-time: I YEAR 




The CBS World News Studio in the forenoon of D-Day, June 6. 1944. Lefl to right: Ned Cofmer, Correspondent 
end Anafysf; Jesse Zousmcr, Night Nevss Editor; Bob Trout, Correspondent and Anclyst; Quentin Reynolds (broad- 
casting), News Analyst; Major George Fielding Eliot, Military Analyst; foreground, back to camera, Joseph King, 
News Reporter. During D-Day CBS broadcast 15 hours 52 minutes of news of the Allied Invasion of Normandy 



Between December 7, 1941 and December 7, 1944 there passed 
1096 days. 

During that period CBS broadcast a total of over 8686 hours, or 
361 days 22 hours, telling the American people how the war was 
being faced and fought, and how best they could help win it. 

That adds up to almost one total year of the three elapsed. 

During that relentless outpouring of war-information, 46,052 
separate CBS broadcasts, short, medium and long, offered 56,667 
distinct ideas touching the progress of the war and the best way to 
move forward toward victory. 

Of these 46,052 broadcasts, 25,891 were offered on commercial 
programs by patriotic CBS advertisers. The balance— some 
20,161— were broadcast as CBS sustaining programs. 



^^►Victory is not yet. It is more visible today than it was Pearl 



Harbor Day. But we do not know, we do not guess, when it will 
come. Only one thing we know— that until the eagle perches on our 
standards for good, we shall not relax the volume and frequency, 
nor reduce the quality, of the war-broadcasting in which all of 147 
CBS stations have played their becoming parts. 

Thus radio, as the strongest young arm of the American system 
of distributing ideas about goods, has proven that it can distribute 
equally tangible ideas about citizenship. The hard experience of 
war has seasoned and tem- 
pered radio for the challenge 
of its responsibilities and 
powers in insuring the peace. 
Radio will take up that chal- 
lenge with energy and 
humility— and without fear. 




The Roll Call of CBS War Advertisers: 



Admiral Corporation 


Campana Sales Corp. 


Eversharp, Inc. 




Allegheny-Ludlum Steel 


Campbell Soup Co. 


"42" Products, Inc. 




Corp. 


Celanese Corp. of America 


Gallenkamp Stores Co. 




American Home Products 


Chemicals, Inc. 


General Electric Co. 




Corp. 


Chesebrough Mfg. Co. 


General Foods Corp. 




American Oil Company 


Chrysler Corp. 


General Mills, Inc. 




American Tobacco Company 


Coca-Cola Co. 


Gillette Safety Razor Co. 




Anchor-Hocking Glass Corp. 


Coldstream Products Co. 


B. F. Goodrich Co. 




Armour & Co. 


Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 


Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 




Armstrong Cork Company 


Colonial Dames, Inc. 


Inc. 




P. Ballantine & Sons 


Consolidated Royal Chemical 


Grove Laboratories, Inc. 




Ballard & Ballard Co. 


Co. Inc. 


Gulf Oil Corp. 




Bank of America National 


Continental Baking Co. 


Hoffman Radio Corp. 




Trust & Savings 


Corn Products Refining Co. 


Hudson Coal Co. 




Association 


Cream of Wheat Corp. 


Hunt Bros. Packing Co. 




Barbasol Company 


Cresta Blanca Wine Co. 


International Silver Co. 




Herman Basch & Company 


Cudahy Packing Co. 


Jantzen Knitting Mills 




Bekins Van & Storage 


Curtiss Candy Co. 


Andrew Jergens Co. 




Company 


Day & Nigtit Mfg. Co. 


Johns-Manville Corp. 




Ben Hur Products, Inc. 


Dwight Edwards Co. 


Johnson & Johnson 




Bourjois, Inc. 


Electric Companies 


Johnstone Drug Sales Corp. 




Bowey's Inc. 


Advertising Program 


Kay Jewelry Co. 




W. Atlee Burpee Company 


Elgin National Watch Co. 


Lady Esther, Ltd. 




California Prune & Apricot 


Emerson Drug Co. 


Lamont, Corliss & Co. 




Growers Assn. 


Englander Co. 


Lever Bros. Co. 



Lewis-Howe Co. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

Lockheed Aircraft Corp. 

P. Lorillard Co. 

Los Angeles Soap Co. 

Manhattan Soap Co. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Co. 

Mennen Co. 

Miles California Co. 

Minneapolis-Honeywell 

Regulator Co. 
John Morrell & Co. 
C. F. Mueller Co. 
McKesson & Robbins, Inc. 
Noxzema Chemical Co. 
Owens-Illinois Glass Co. 
Pabst Sales Co. 
Pacific Coast Borax Co. 
Pacific Greyhound Lines, Inc. 
Packard Bell Co. 
Parker Pen Co. 



Peter Paul, Inc. 

Pet Milk Sales Co. 

Philco Corp. 

Philip Morris & Co. Ltd. Inc. 

Pillsbury Mills, Inc. 

Planters Nut & Chocolate Co. 

Plough, Inc. 

Procter & Gamble Co. 

Prudential Insurance Co. 

Quaker Oats Co. 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 

Richfield Oil Corp. 

Roma Wine Co. 

Schenley Import Corp. 

Sehutter Candy Co. 

Seal-Cote Company 

Servel, Inc. 

Signal Oil Co. 

Socony Vacuum Oil Co. Inc. 

Soil-Off Mfg. Co. 

Southern Cotton Oil Co. 



E. R. Squibb & Sons 
Standard Brands, Inc. 
Sterling Drug, Inc. 
Stulz Sickles Co. 
Joseph Tetley & Co. Inc. 
Texas Company 
Union Ice Co. 
United Air Lines Transport 

Corp. 
U. S. Rubber Co. 
U. S. Tobacco Co. 
Vick Chemical Co. 
Washington Cooperative Egg 

& Poultry' Assn. 
Welch Grape Juice Co. 
Western Sugar Refinery 
J. B. Williams Co. 
Wilshire Oil Co. 
Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. 
Yellow Cab Co. 



The Roll Call of the CBS Regiment: 



Akron, Ohio WADC 

Albany, Ga. __WGPC 

Albany, New York_.„_ _WOKO 

Albuquerque, New Mexico KGGM 

Anderson, S. C WAIM 

Asheville, N. C WWNC 

Athens, Ga. WGAU 

Atlantic City, N. J ._. .WBAB 

Atlanta, Ga. WGST 

Augusta, Ga WRDW 

Austin, Texas _...KTBC 

Baltimore, Md WCAO 

Bangor, Maine .'. WABI 

Beckley, W. Va WJLS 

Binghamton, N. Y WNBF 

Birmingham, Ala. WAPI 

Bisbee, Arizona KSUN 

Boston, Mass. __ 1 WEEI 

Buffalo, N. Y WKBW 

Burlington, Vt WCAX 

Cedar City, Utah KSUB 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa WMT 

Champaign, 111 WDWS 

Charleston, S. C WCSC 

Charleston, W. Va WCHS 

Charlotte, N. C WBT 

Chattanooga, Term. WDOD 

Chicago, 111 WBBM 

Cincinnati, Ohio WCKY 

Cleveland, Ohio WGAR 

Colorado Springs, Colo KVOR 

Columbus, Ga. WRBL 



Columbus, Ohio __ -WBXS 

Cookeville, Tenn WHUB 

Corpus Christi, Texas KEYS 

Dallas, Texas KRLD 

Danville, 111. .... WDAN 

Dayton, Ohio WHIO 

Decatur, 111. WSOY 

Denver, Colo KLZ 

Des Moines, Iowa.-. ...KRNT 

Detroit, Mich. WJR 

Dubois, Pa WCED 

Duluth, Minn KDAL 

Durham, N. C WDXC 

El Paso, Texas _ KROD 

Erie, Pa WERC 

Evansville, Ind WEOA 

Fairmont, W. Va...... WMMN 

Frederick, Md WFMD 

Fresno, Calif. .... KARM 

Ft. Myers, Fla WINK 

Gloversville, N. Y WENT 

Grand Forks, N. D. ..... ...KILO 

Great Falls, Mont KFBB 

Green Bay, Wise WTAQ 

Greensboro, N. C WBIG 

Harlingen, Texas .... KGBS 

Harrisburg, Pa WHP 

Hartford, Conn. _.. ..WDRC 

Honolulu, H. I KGMB 

Hilo, H. I KHBC 

Hopkinsville, Ky ..WHOP 



Houston, Texas KTRH 

Indianapolis, Ind WFBM 

Ithaca, N. Y WHCU 

Jacksonville, Fla WMBR 

Jamestown, N. D -KSJB 

Kansas City, Mo KMBC 

Kalamazoo, Mich. WKZO 

Keene, N. H WKNE 

Knoxville, Term WNOX 

Kokomo, Ind. ..... WKMO 

Lawrence, Mass. WLAW 

Little Rock, Ark KLRA 

Louisville, Ky. WHAS 

Los Angeles, Calif KNX 

Macon, Ga WMAZ 

Mason City, Iowa.. KGLO 

Memphis, Term. WREC 

Meridian, Miss. WCOC 

Miami, Fla WQAM 

Milwaukee, Wis. WISN 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn... WCCO 

Missoula, Mont KGVO 

Montgomery, Ala. __WCOV 

Montreal, Canada CKAC 

Mtmcie, Ind. .... WLBC 

Nashville, Term WLAC 

New Orleans, La. WWL 

New York, N. Y WABC 

Oklahoma City, Okla KOMA 

Omaha, Nebraska KOIL 

Omaha, Nebraska KFAB 

Orlando, Fla. _. .... WDBO 

Paducah, Ky. WPAD 

Parkersburg, W. Va WPAR 

Peoria, 111. WMBD 

Philadelphia, Pa. WCAU 

Phoenix, Arizona KOY 

Pittsburgh, Pa WJAS 

Portland, Maine ..... WGAN 

Portland, Oregon ... KOIN 

Providence, R. I. WPRO 

Quincy, 111 WTAD 



Richmond, Va .....WRVA 

Roanoke, Va. WDBJ 

Rochester, N. Y._.__ ......WHEC 

Sacramento, Calif ......KROY 

St. Augustine, Fla WFOY 

St. Louis, Mo KMOX 

Salt Lake City, Utah...... KSL 

San Antonio, Texas KTSA 

San Francisco, Calif KQW 

San Juan, P. R WKAQ 

Santa Fe, New Mexico KVSF 

Sarasota, Fla. WSPB 

Savannah, Ga. WTOC 

Scranton, Pa. .... WGBI 

Seattle, Wash. KIRO 

Shreveport, La. ... KWKH 

South Bend, Ind ....WSBT 

Spokane, Wash KFPY 

Spartanburg, S. C WSPA 

Springfield, 111 ._ WTAX 

Springfield, Mass WMAS 

Springfield, Mo. KTTS 

Stockton, Calif KGDM 

Syracuse, N. Y WFBL 

Tampa, Fla WDAE 

Topeka, Kansas WIBW 

Toronto, Canada CFRB 

Tucson, Arizona KTUC 

Tulsa, Okla. KTUL 

Uniontown, Pa. WMBS 

Utica, N. Y WIBX 

Washington, D. C WTOP 

Waterbury, Conn WBRY 

Watertown, N. Y WWNY 

Wausau, Wis WSAU 

West Palm Beach, Fla WJNO 

Wheeling, W. Va WKWK 

Wichita Falls, Texas KWFT 

Wichita, Kansas ..... ...... KFH 

Worcester, Mas:. .... WTAG 

Yankton, 5. D WNAX 

Youngstown, Ohio WKBN 



iLii ii i:f*...tli -ti'liy i? hi 



January 



March 



New Year's Day (In all the States, Territories, 

District ot Columbia and possessions). 

Paul Revere Born (1735). 

Proclamation ot Emancipation (1863). 

Georgia Admitted (1788). 

Utah Admitted (1896). 

New Mexico Admitted (1912). 

Anniversary of the Battle ot New Orleans (Lou 

isiana). 

Connecticut Admitted (1788). 

First Written Constitution Adopted at Hartford, 

Conn., (1639). 

Benjamin Franklin Born (1706). 

Robert E. Lee's Birthday (Alabama, Arkansas, 

Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North 

Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia). 

Stonewall Jackson Born (1824). 

Inauguration Day. Begun in 1937. To be observed 

every fourth year from that date by the 20th 

Amendment to the Constitution. 

Foundation Day. In the Canal Zone. 

Michigan Admitted to the Union (1837). 

Gen. Douglas MacArthur's Birthday. 

First A.E.F. Landed in Ireland (1942). 

McKinley Born (1843). 

Kansas Admitted (1861). 

Franklin D. Roosevelt's Birthday. 

Franz Schubert Born (1797). 



February 



1: Victor Herbert Born (1859). 
3: Horace Creeley Born (1811). 
6: Massachusetts Admitted (1788). 
7: Charles Dickens Born (1812). 
9: Nebraska Admitted (1867). 

11: Thomas A. Edison's Birthday. 
Daniel Boone Born (1734). 

12: Lincoln's Birthday (Alaska, California, Connecti- 
cut, Delaware, Illinois. Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mon- 
tana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Da- 
kota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Utah, Virgin Islands, Washington, 
West Virginia, Wyoming). 
Georgia Day. 

14: Valentine's Day. 

Admission Day (Arizona). 
Oregon Admitted (1859). 

15: Destruction of the Maine (1898). 

15: Constitution Day. In the Canal Zone. 

Susan B. Anthony Day. Observed in honor of the 
birthday of the pioneer crusader for equal rights 
for women. Governors of 33 States and 3 Terri- 
tories have honored the day by special procla- 
mations. 

19: Ohio Admitted (1803). 

20: Shrove Tuesday. Observed as Mardi Cras in Florida 
(in cities and towns where carnival is celebrated), 
Louisiana (Parishes of Jefferson, Orleans, St. 
Bernard, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, East 
Baton Rouge), Canal Zone. 

22: Washington's Birthday (All the States, Territories, 
District of Columbia and Colonial Possessions). 

23: Ash Wednesday (Lent Starts). 

27: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Birthday. 
First Railroad Charter (1827). 



Nebraska Admitted (1867). 
Texas Independence Day. 
Florida Admitted (1845). 
First Postage Stamp used in U S II! 
Pennsylvania Day. 
Vermont Admitted (1791). 
Boston Mass.icre ( 1 770 1 
Luther Burbank's Birthday (California! 
Maine Admitted (1820). 
Andrew Jackson Born (1767). 
St. Patrick's Day. 

Evacuation Day. In Boston, Chelsea, Re 
throp and Suffolk County. 
Fast of Esther. 
Crover Cleveland's Birthday. 
First Day of Spring. 
Emancipation Day (Puerto Rico). 
Maryland Day. 
First Day of Passover. 
Seward Day (Alaska I 
Transfer Day, in the Virgin Islands. 



April 



1 : All Fools' Day. 

1 : State Election. In Michigan. 

2: Palm Sunday. 

6: War Declared with Germany (1917) 

6: Army Day. Observed in New York, and some other 

States, by a display cf flage and by mil tary 

parades. 
7: Peary Discovered North Pole (1909). 

Good Friday. 

Metropolitan Opera House Opened in New York 

City (1830). 

Louisiana Admitted (1812). 
9: Surrender of Genera! Lee (1865). 

Easter Sunday. 
12: Halifax Independence Resolution (North Caro- 
lina). 
13: Thomas Jefferson's Birthday (Alabama). 
14: Assassination of Abraham Lincoln. 

Pan-American Day. 
19: Patriot's Day (Maine, Massachusetts). 
21: Anniversary cf Battle of San Jacinto (Texas) 
22: Morton's Birthday (Nebraska). 

Arbor Day (Nebraska). 

William Shakespeare Born (1564). 
24: First Newspaper Issued in America (1704). 

U. S. -Mexico War (1846). 
24: Arbor and Bird Day. In Massachusetts. 
25: War Declared with Spain (1898). 
26: Confederate Memorial Day (Florida, Georgia, Mis- 
sissippi) 

S'avery Abolished in U. S. (1865). 

First Shot of War with Cermany (1917) 
27: General U. S. Grant Born (1822). 
28: Pres-ident Monroe Born (1758). 

Maryland Admitted (1788). 
30: Louisiana Purchased. 

Washington Became First President 1 1789) 

Rhode Island Settled (1636). 



May 



1 : May Day. 

Child Health Day. 

Labor Day (Philippines). 

Dewey's Victory in Manila (li 
2: Stonewall Jackson Shot (1863). 

National Music Week. 



125 




126 



SHOWMAN'S CALENDAR 



Rhode Island Independence Day. 
Napoleon's Death (1821). 
Corregidor Surrendered (1942). 
Lusitania Torpedoed (1915). 
Johannes Brahms Born (1833). 
Confederate Memorial Day (Kentucky, North 
Carolina). 

Minnesota Admitted (1858). 
Florence Nightingale Born (1820). 
Mother's Day (2nd Sunday). 

Anniversary of the Signing of the Mecklenburg 
Declaration of Independence (North Carolina). 
Lindbergh's Flight to Paris (1927). 
South Carolina Admitted (1788). 
First Telegraph Message Sent (1844). 
Empire Day (Canada). 

Archduke Ferdinand of Austria and His Wife 
Assassinated in Serjevo (1914). 
Wisconsin Admitted (1848). 
Rhode Island Admitted (1790). 
Patrick Henry Born (1736). 

Memorial Day (In all the States, Territories, 
District of Columbia and Colonial Possessions, 
except Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, 
Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Caro- 
lina. South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee). 



June 



Kentucky Admitted (1792). 

Tennessee Admitted (1796). 

Confederate Memorial Day (Louisiana, Tennessee). 

King's Birthday (Canada). 

Jefferson Davis' Birthday (1808). 

Nathan Hale's Birthday (1756). 

D-Day (1944). 

Battle of New Orleans (1815). 

Franklin Drew Lightning From Sky (1752). 

Harriet Beecher Stowe's Birthday. 

Flag Day. 

Pioneer Day (Idaho). 

Bunker Hill Day. 

Battle of Waterloo (1815). 

Beginning of War of 1812. 

King John of England Granted Magna Carta (1215). 

West Virginia Day. 

Longest Day in Year. 

New Hampshire Joined the Union (1788). 

Penn Signs Treaty of I eace with Indians. 

San Juan Day. In Puerto Rico. 

Virginia Admitted (1788). 

First American Troops Land in France (1917). 



July 



Battle of San Juan Hill. 

Dominion Day (Canada). 

Battle of Gettysburg (1863). 

Garfield's Assassination (1881). 

Idaho Admitted (18P0). 

Independence Day. 

U. S. Military Academy West Point Opened (1802). 

John Paul Jones, Founder of U. S. Navy, Born 

(1802). 

Wyoming Admitted (1890). 

John Quincy Adams Born (1767). 

Forrest's Day (Tennessee). 

Stars and Stripes Adopted (1777). 

Bastille Day— First Celebrated in U. S. (1914). 

St. Swithin's Day. 

Santiago Surrendered. 

Pioneer Day (Utah). 

Occupation Day (Puerto Rico). 

Barbosa's Birthday. In the Canal Zone. 

Austria Declared War on Serbia (1914). 



August 



1 : Colorado Day. 

Beginning of World War (1914). 
3: Civic Holiday (Canada). 

Germany Declared War on England and France 

(1914). 



14: Atlantic Charter Signed by President F. D. Roose- 
velt and Primine Minister Winston Churchill. 

15: Panama Canal Opened (1914). 

16: Bennington Battle Day (Vermont). 

19: National Aviation Day. 

20: Bemamirt Harmon Born (1833) 

26: Suffrage for Women — 19th Amendment (1920). 

30: Germany Declared War on Poland (1939). 
Start of Second World War. 

September 

1: Cermany Invaded Poland. 

3: Labor Day. 

6: Lafayette Day. 

First Battle of the Marne. 
8,9: Rosh Hashonah. 

9: Admission Day (California). 
12: Defender's Day (Maryland). 
17: Constitution Day. 
17: Yom Kippur. 
22: Nathan Hale Executed (1776). 

First Day of Autumn. 
22: American Indian Day (4th Friday). 



October 



Wright Brothers Took First Long Distance Fligh. 

in Airplane (1905). 

Missouri Day. 

Chicago Fire (1871). 

Farmer's Day (2nd Friday) (Florida). 

Fraternal Day (Alabama). 

Canadian Thanksgiving Day. 

Columbus Day. 

Alaska Day. 

Surrender of Cornwallis (1781). 

Navy Day. 

Theodore Roosevelt Born (1858). 

Hallowe'en. 

Admission Day, Nevada (1864). 



November 

All Saints' Day (Louisiana). 

Liberty Day. In the Virgin Island (St. Croix only> 

General Election Day. 

North and South Dakota Admitted (1889) 

John Fhilip Sousa Born (1854). 

Montana Admitted (1889). 

Armistice Day. 

Washington Admitted (1889). 

Oklahoma Admitted (1907). 

Suez Canal Opened (1869). 

North Carolina Admitted (1789). 

Thanksgiving Day (4th Thursday). 



December 



Illinois Admitted (1818). 

Delaware Day. 

Pearl Harbor Attacked (1941) 

Eli Whitney Born (1765). 

U. S. Declared War on Japan (1941). 

Germany-Italy Declare War on U. S. (1941). 

U. S. Declares War on Germany-Italy (1941). 

Mississippi Admitted (1817). 

Alfred Nobel Born (1833). 

Indiana Admitted (1816). 

First Marconi Wireless Across Atlantic (19011 

Pennsylvania Admitted (1787). 

Alabama Admitted (1819). 

Bill of Rights Day. 

Boston Tea Party (1773). 

New Jersey Admitted (1787). 

Pilgrims Landed at Plymouth Rock (1620). 

Woodrow Wilson's Birthday (South Carolina). 

Christmas Day. 

Iowa Admitted (1848). 

Texas Admitted (1845). 

New Year's Eve. 



127 




Penn vs. Army, November 18, 1944 — Franklin Field. Operating from- 
field and studio, Ayer's television staff has completed another successful 
season of telecasting for its client Atlantic Refining Company, whose 
sponsorship of televised games dates back to October 18, 1941. 

Graphics in action 



To television Ayer's acknowledged agency leader- 
ship in the graphic arts now brings new vigor and 
drive — supplemented by wide experience in radio 
and commercial films. 



N. W. AVER & SON, INC. 

30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA * NEW YORK 



128 



y 



BUSINESS 



\ 



THE BU5IHE55 SIDE 

RADIO 



-k 



Agency and Sponsor Network Billings 

Station Representatives 

News Service 

Advertising Agencies 

Research Firms 

Federal Communications Commission 





TH ft T ■ ST/ JL JLbES Radio's Original "Good Neighbor" 

now "LEST YE FORGET" 



Also, 



Warner Bros.' 
KFWB 

America's First Rehabilitation Program for Ex-Servicemen (Sundays) 

"LET'S FACE FACTS" Wcn £wB ros/ 

News Views and Interviews (Daily) 
Announcer, Producer, Commentator, Dialectician, Emcee, Special Events 



130 



THE BUSINESS SIP] OF IMIIIII 



By M. H. Shapiro 



Managing Editt 



r^HRONICAL of radio's forward march 
during 1944 is virtually a repetition 
of the magnificent strides taken each year 
of its history, both from the standpoint 
of progressively good business and public 
service. Contributing every possible ef- 
fort to winning the war, offering co- 
operation on a scale no industry not actu- 
ally engaged in war production per se 
could attempt, the broadcaster, network 
or independent station, stood shoulder 
to shoulder with those on the home front 
giving their best. 

Naturally, along with all other media, 
radio received its share of increased ad- 
vertising appropriations and if wartime 
paper stocks held down some newspapers 
and magazines, it must be remembered 
that radio started with the unalterable 
limitation of time itself. That is, the 
number of hours during which listeners 
are receptive to the sponsor messages, 
much less the obvious as to the hours 
in a single broadcast day. 
Billings Up 

In each instance, the major networks 
showed substantial increases in gross 
billings. Spot and regional webs also 
fared comparatively well, with the over- 
all figure hovering around the 23 per cent 
mark. Net figures will deviate one way 
or the other, but indications are it will 
stand at that figure fairly close with 
not more than a 2 per cent differential in 
the final adjustment. Total billings be- 
fore various discounts are deducted will 
reveal gross radio time sales edging to- 
ward the $400,000,000 mark. Undoubted- 
ly, this year will see the mark actually 
reached, if not exceeded. The net pro- 
ceeds to the industry will approximate 
a figure $100,000,000 below the gross. As 
it concerns all industries, the net profit 
accruing to the radio industry will not be 
much more for 1944 than it was for 1943 
due to the increased Government taxes. 

In the figures for the sale of time, of 
course no provision is made for the talent 
sales which, it stands to reason, increases 
from year to year. As to its expanded 
billings, radio did not exactly sit idly by 
and wait for the business to come in, over 
the proverbial transom as it were. In 
some cases of course, the time if desir- 
able, was a sure sale to one client or 
another. However, diligent efforts by the 



research, sales, and sales promotion de- 
partments of the industry succeeded in 
rounding up considerable new business, 
business which never before used radio. 
Which applies also to the clients sold on 
going into markets not heretofore con- 
sidered. 

Problems En Route 

Not alone in this respect, radio's main 
problems were those of labor, the replace- 
ments for the manpower that went to 
war, and to be sure labor unions figured 
in the routine. Outstanding among the 
problems was the recording situation with 
the AFM. RCA, CBS and NBC saw fit 
to sign with the musicians' union on its 
own terms after a more than two-year 
cessation of work for the affiliated com- 
panies of these networks. 

Allocation hearings before the FCC 
resulted in FM, for the time being at 
least, being worried as to its future be- 
cause of the moves suggested to the 
higher frequencies in the spectrum. Tele- 
vision benefited somewhat in that it was 
being permitted to remain where it was, 
although provisions saw to it that neither 
television nor frequencies that may be 
needed in the public service were arbi- 
trarily frozen. 

As stated here in the past, broadcast- 
ing is not an industry that had to convert 
to war production as in the case of other 
great industries and it will not have to 
worry about a postwar change to nor- 
malcy. All its "changes" will depend 
on what happens to its clients rather 
than what actually happens to radio. 
Sound Position 

In this respect, there is no reason to 
believe that any untoward happening will 
take place and in the postwar era, radio 
stands to gain on most every count. It 
still holds, that brand names being kept 
alive now will .of necessity come back 
strongly in the flesh, so to speak, and 
the field is wide open in practically eveiw 
commercial project. Thus any halt in 
hostilities on anv particular front will not 
cause severe dislocation in the broadcast- 
ing setup; rather it will be the signal for 
increased desire on the part of clients to 
reach the consumer via the fastest means 
available. Which is predicated of course 
on the client seeing daylight as to normal 
peacetime production. 



131 



Agency and Sponsor 
Network Billings 



Blue Network Company 
1944 Agency Gross Billings 



J. Walter Thompson Company $ 6,100,528 

D'Arcy Advertising Co., Inc 3,720,991 

Compton Advertising, Inc 3,224,157 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc 2,259,120 

Wade Advertising Agency 1,828,699 

Young & Rubicam, Inc 1, 731,605 

Warwick & Legler, Inc 1,511,077 

Sherman & Marquette, Inc 1,057,752 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 1,029,412 

Hill Blackett & Company 914,599 

McCann-Erickson, Inc 889,1(51 

Schwimmer & Scott Advertising 

Agency 888,614 

Walker and Downing 886,901 

Knox Reeves Advertising, Inc 853,598 

Lennen & Mitchell, Inc 832,348 

Foote, Cone & Belding 822,754 

Aubrey, Moore Wallace, Inc 794,987 

MacFarland, Aveyard & Company, 

Inc 737,893 

William Esty and Company, Inc .... 657,764 

Newell-Emmett Co 576,455 

Hutchins Advertising Co.. Inc 544,752 

Leo Burnett Company, Inc 488,556 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc 480,042 

J. D. Tardier & Co 453,806 

Small & Seiffer, Inc 439,850 

Raymond Specter Company, Inc .... 439,268 

Duane Jones Company 431,384 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, 

Inc 430,616 

Henri Hurst & McDonald, Inc 429,008 

The Biow Company, Inc 415,146 

H. W. Kastor & Sons Advertising Co., 

Inc 356,065 

Benton & Bowles, Inc 346,261 

Buchanan & Co 326,709 

Sayre M. Ramsdell Assoc 301,931 

Tracy-Locke Company, Inc 287,780 

Ted Bates, Inc 286,361 

McJunkin Advertising Company. . . . 266,561 

Pedlar-Ryan & Lusk, Inc 219,026 

Keeling & Co., Inc 198,028 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, Inc. . . 166,676 

Critchfield and Company 164,643 

Sherman K. Ellis & Company, Inc. . . 162,190 

Pacific National Advertising Agency 157,097 

Burton, Browne Advertising 147,528 

Advertising & Sales Council, Inc. . . . 125,868 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc 121,996 

Emil Mogul Company, Inc 124,111 

A. W. Lewin Co 108,934 

Glicksman Advertising Co., Inc 101,988 

William H. Weintraub & Company. 

Inc 99,450 

Brisacher, Van Norden & Staff 89,528 

J. William Sheets 85,130 

Tucker Wayne & Company 82,768 

Hazard Advertising Company 77,359 

Franklin Bruck Advertising Corpora- 
tion 70,656 

Donahue & Coe, Inc 60,954 

Maxon, Incorporated 57,163 

The M. H. Hackett Co 55,488 

Pacific Coast Advertising Co., Inc. . . 41,982 



Roche, Williams & Cleary, Inc 11,076 

United stales Advertising Corpora- 
tion :t.-,,r,K7 

Alfred J. Silberstein-Berl Goldsmith 

Inc 35,588 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc 26,964 

Glasser Galley & Company 21,992 

Erwin, Wasey & Co., Inc 23.010 

Smith & Bull 21,854 

Raymond R. Morgan Company 17,066 

Rhoades & Davis 1 7,459 

Long Advertising Service 15,860 

Charles Sheldon Advertising Agency. 15,012 
Elwood J. Robinson Advertising 

Agency 13,509 

Brooks Advertising Agency 13,110 

Robert Smith Advertising 10,851 

Courtland D. Ferguson, Inc 10,315 

George Wessel 10,260 

Geyer, Cornell & Newell, Inc 8,935 

Direct 8,839 

John Stover Advertising Agency. . . . 5,910 

Hillman-Shane-Breyer I.'.' Hi 

Little & Co 4,122 

Reincke-Ellis-Vounggreen & Finn Inc. 3,948 

0. E. Hopfer-Industrial Advertising. . 3,146 

Century Advertising Agency 2,700 

Total $ 10.9 1 1 ,629 

Political 4 11 ,500 

Total $ 11,356,120 



Columbia Broadcasting System 
1944 Agency Gross Billings 



Young & Rubicam, Inc $ 7,966,037 

J. Walter Thompson Co 7,091,514 

Dancer-Fit/.gei aid-Sample 6,033,399 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc 4,434,356 

The Biow Co 4,057,915 

Compton Advertising, Inc 3,411,513 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 3,264,361 

Foote, Cone & Belding 3,040,127 

Ted Bates. Inc 2,248,027 

Wm. Esty & Co. Inc 2,232,440 

Benton & Bowles, Inc 2,123,510 

Arthur Meyerhoff & Co 1,698.519 

Maxon, Inc 1,555,966 

Newell-Emmett Co., Inc 1,520,922 

McCann-Erickson, Inc 1,321,420 

Campbell-Ewald Co 1,306,719 

Pedlar & Ryan, Inc 923,926 

Ward Wheelock Co 804,309 

Gardner Advertising Co 789,610 

Buchanan & Co., Inc 785,567 

Win. H. Weintraub & Co 772,317 

C. L. Miller Co 754,403 

Sherman & Marquette, Inc 716,627 

Warwick & Legler, Inc 712,107 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc 670,878 

D'Arcy Advertising Co., Inc 520,720 

Knox Reeves Advertising, Co 492,504 

Roche, Williams & Cleary, Inc 465,264 

Arthur Kudner, Inc 411,504 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc 407,566 

Duane Jones Co 372,111 

Addison Lewis & Associates 334,626 

Grant Advertising, Inc 330.991 



133 



Omtiatiatt id, the Sincebe&t tf-ohm 

BUT 

The ORIGINAL "Make Believe Ballroom" 

Is Still on KFWB in Its 12th Year 

With its Originator 

AL JARVIS 



fe^t 




Monday Thru Saturday 
11:00 to 2:30 P.M. 

National Representative, WILLIAM G. RAMBEAU COMPANY 
New York and Chicago 



134 



AGENCY— NETWORK— SPONSOR BILLINGS 



Joseph Katz Co 800,963 

Morse International 294,020 

Russel M. Seeds Co 282,573 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald, Ine 207,155 

Cruttenden & Eger 259,435 

Sorensen & Co 218, 156 

Lennen & Mitchell, Inc 171,257 

Walker & Downing 118,542 

Raymond R. Morgan Co 117,08(5 

H. W. Kastor & Sons Adv. Co., Inc.. . . 110,027 

Erwin, Wasey & Co 99,480 

Barton A. Stebbins. Inc 97,396 

Spitzer & Mills. Ltd 63,812 

Wade Advertising Agency 61,425 

Wallace-Ferry-Hanly Co 58,634 

Clements Co., The 52,760 

Ronalds Advertising Agecy 43,635 

Garfield & Guild 38,908 

Brooks Advertising Agency 38,281 

Brisacher & Van Nordem 36,972 

Hillman, Shane & Breyer, Inc 33,772 

Franklin Brack Advertising Corp 33,180 

Green-Brodie, Inc 30,812 

W. Earl Bothwell Adv. Agency 29,394 

Lake-Spiro-Shurman, Inc 29,342 

Western Advertising Agency 28,098 

Baker Advertising Agency 27,824 

Glasser-Gailey & Co 25,283 

Rhoades & Davis 20,706 

Hixson-O'Donnell Adv. Inc 20,286 

Long Advertising Service 19,908 

J. D. Tardier & Co., Inc 19,596 

Flager Advertising, Inc 12,892 

Beaumont & Hohman, Inc 11,583 

Pacific National Adv. Agency 11,357 

Sherman K. Ellis Co., Inc 11,340 

GiHham Advertising Agency 10,710 

Sayre M. Ramsdell Associates 10,216 

John L. Halpin 10,121 

Donahue & Coe, Inc 8,216 

Kelly Nason, Inc 7,722 

Armand S. Weill Co., Inc 7,540 

Don B. Miner Co 7,308 

Cockfleld, Brown & Co 6,993 

Lester H. Harrison Associates 5,681 

Bostford, Constantine & Gardner 4,563 

George M. Weessells Adv. Agency 4,060 

Schwimmer & Scott 3,323 

Elwood J. Robinson Adv. Agency. . . . 1,867 

Allied Advertising Agencies 1,102 

Furman, Feiner & Co 908 

Advertising Arts Agency 812 

Clarence B. Juneau 812 

Hugh A. Deadwyker 575 

Cotter Advertising Agency 370 

Copley Advertising Agency 125 

Total $66,791,319 



Mutual Broadcasting System 
1944 Agency Gross Billings 



Erwin Wasey & Co., Inc $ 2,406,501 

Hixson O'Donnel Adv., Inc 1,301,917 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc 1,230.241 

Donahue Co., Inc 1,056,848 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc 1,041,915 

R. H. Alber Co 950,309 

Ivy & Ellington, Inc 733,653 

Arthur Meyerhoff Co 677,421 

William H. Weintraub & Co., Ine 660,96 1 

Maxon, Inc 542,590 

Walker & Downing 539,659 

Wallace Ferry Hanly Co 499,862 

Stanley G. Boynton 475,623 

H. B. Humphrey Co 456,696 

Gardner Adv. Co 450,713 

Russel M. Seeds Co., Inc 438,095 

Gotham Adv. Co 425,477 

Raymond Spector Co., Inc 395,263 



Young & Rublcam, Inc 887,979 

Bermlngham, Castleman & Pierce, Inc. 322,920 

Calkins & i in 321,993 

3. Walter Thompson Co 277,961 

3. C. Hoskin Assoc 276,009 

McJunkin Adv. Co 267,192 

Leo Burnett Co 261 ,553 

Duane Jones Co 2 I .'!.■'! 19 

Roehe, Williams & Cleary, Inc 296,668 

Al Paul Lefton Co., Inc 164,198 

Warwick & Legler 138,567 

Biow Co., Inc 137,919 

Schwimmer & Scott 120,068 

Buchanan & Co I 15,825 

Rattan, Barton, Durst inc & Osborn, Inc. 88,248 

United States Adv. Corp 83,599 

The Caples Co 69,531 

Raymond R. Morgan Co 68,381 

Sterling Adv. Agency, Inc 62,889 

Grant Adv., Inc 59,21 1 

Clements Co., Inc 56,763 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald, Inc 56,374 

Cecil & Prcsbrcy, Inc 52,221 

The Joseph Katz Co 41,496 

Foote, Cone & fielding 36,321 

Weston Barnctt. Inc 20,642 

Van Sant. Dugdale & Co., Inc 20,161 

Lester Harrison Assoc, Inc 16,748 

D'Arcy Adv. Co., Inc l.-,.7Sl 

George H. Hartman Co 14,033 

Green-Brodie 13,220 

Furman Ferner & Co., Inc 10,146 

Harold Cabot Co., Inc 9,920 

L. W. Ramsey Co 9,314 

Hirshon-Garfield, Inc 5,408 

Allied Agencies 3.721! 

Direct II .2.-><> 

Locally Sponsored 1,260,638 

Total $19,533,650 



National Broadcasting Company 

1944 Agency Gross Billings 

Not Available 



Blue Network Company 
1944 Sponsor Expenditures 



The Coca-Cola Company 


. ? 3,720.991 




2,710,000 




2,259,129 


Miles Laboratories, Inc 


1,828,699 


General Mills, Inc 


1,726,506 






Socony-Vacuum Oil Co.. Inc 


1,351.673 


Swift and Company 


1,257,138 




1,219.912 


The Sherwin-Williams Co 


986.630 


Libby, McNeill & Libby 


937,814 




923,469 


Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 


885,486 




864,602 




819,686 




832,348 






Carter Products, Inc 


726.211 


Curtis Publishing Company 


603,619 


Lehn & Fink Products Corp 


579,252 


RKO Radio Pictures, Inc 


546,136 


A. E. Staley Mfg. Co 


530,882 


Hall Brothers, Inc 


515,816 



135 



GIARNETT MAR 


K S 


ANNOUNCER • NARRATOR 
ACTOR 

SPORTS AND NEWS COMMENTATOR 

NOW 

Lt. Garnett Marks 

u. S. ARMY 



AGENCY— NETWORK— SPONSOR BILLINGS 



American Meat Institute 

The Charles E. Hires Co 

Elgin National Watch Co 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc 

Larus & Brother Company, Inc 

Mail Pouch Tobacco Company 

Sterling Drug Inc. (Consumer Prod- 
ucts Company) 

RCA Victor Division of Radio Corp. 

of America 

Serutan Company 

The D. L. Clark Co 

William R. Warner & Co., Inc. 

(Dr. Earl S. Sloan, Inc.) 

Eversharp Inc 

O'Cedar Corporation 

Williamson Candy Co 

The Wander Company 

The Borden Company 

The Welch Grape Juice Co 

The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc 

The Texas Company 

Dr. Pepper Co 

General Foods Corp 

Manhattan Soaps Co., Inc 

The Geo. W. Loft Co 

Sweets Co. of America, Inc 

Owens-Illinois Glass Co 

Hastings Mfg. Co 

Lockheed Aircraft Corp 

Wheeling Steel Corp 

Gum Laboratories, Inc 

Falstaff Brewing Corporation 

Fisher Flouring Mills Co 

Raytheon Production Corp 

O'Sullivan Rubber Co., Inc 

Aluminum Co. of America 

Trimont Clothing Co 

The National Board of Fire Under- 
writers 

Time, Inc 

Harvel Watch Co 

Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Quality Foods, Inc. 

Adam Hat Stores, Inc 

Revelon Products Corp 

Skinner & Eddy Corp. (Alaska Pacific 

Salmon) 

S & W Fine Foods, Inc 

Safeway Stores, Inc 

Scripto Mfg. Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

American Cyanamid Co 

Standard Oil Co. of Calif 

Langendorf United Bakeries, Inc. . . . 

Grove Laboratories, Inc. 

Chatham Mfg. Co 

Sun Oil Company 

Wilson Sporting Goods Co 

Botany Worsted Mills 

Rainier Brewing Co 

Lyon Van & Storage Company 

The Mentholatum Company 

Peter Fox Brewing Co 

American Home Products Corp 

S. A. Moffett Company 

Seaboard Finance 

Austin Studios 

Barron-Gray Packing Co 

John H. Breck, Inc 

Northwestern Yeast Co 

Bekins Van & Storage ....-„. 



488,556 
480,042 
470,724 
453,806 
452,075 
448,932 

444,750 

439,291 
439,268 
437,969 

424,494 
415,146 
397,739 
397,248 
381,593 
370,564 
356,065 
325,788 
292,587 
287,780 
269,552 
261,564 
224,333 
240,476 
200,484 
198,028 
189,810 
164,643 
163,451 
156,504 
147,780 
147,528 
125,868 
124,996 
124,111 

120,096 
108,972 
108,934 
103,110 
101,988 
99,450 

85,130 
88,708 
83,185 
82,768 
78,512 
77,359 
75,740 
63,546 
60,954 
55,488 
41,076 
35,687 
35,588 
34,122 
29,088 
26,052 
24,042 
24,012 
23,010 
21,854 
20,384 
15,860 
15,042 
14,148 
13,110 



J. A. Folger & Company 

Washington State Apple Com mission 

Eastern Columbia Outfitting 

Rcsinol Chemical Company 

Union Ice Company 

Denalon Company, Inc 

Washington Co-Operative Egg & Poul- 
try Assn 

Nash-Kclvinator Corp 

Garrett & Co., Inc 

Corley Diet Food Company 

Wilco Company 

Red-ee Foods 

Shellmar Products 

Horace E. Dodge Boat & Plane Corp. 

Kerr Glass Mfg. Corp 

Bu-Tay Products Company 

Beneficial Casualty Company 

Kelite Products, Inc 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road 

The Soil-Off Mfg. Co 

Pacific Guano Company 

Ferry-Morse Seed Co 

Diesel- Wemmer-Gilbert Corp 

Peter Paul Inc 



11,594 
11,085 
10,851 
10,345 
10,260 
10,089 

9,317 
8,935 
8,400 
7,370 
6,840 
6,669 
5,910 
5,765 
5,472 
4,608 
4,246 
4,122 

3,948 
3,675 
3,146 
3,074 
2,700 
820 



Total $40,914,629 

Political 411,500 



$41,356,129 



Columbia Broadcasting System 
1944 Sponsor Expenditure 



General Foods Corp $ 5,537,409 

Lever Brothers Co 4,842,781 

Procter and Gamble Co 4,348,795 

American Home Products Corp 3,215,834 

William Wrigley Jr., Co 2,386,781 

Sterling Drug, Inc 2,307,314 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 1,912,727 

Standard Brands, Inc 1,872,575 

General Electric Co 1,635,957 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 1,627,423 

Campbell Soup Co 1,576,473 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 1,520,922 

Philip Morris & Co., Ltd 1,412,787 

U. S. Rubber Co 1,306,719 

General Mills, Inc 1,169,433 

American Tobacco Co 1,037,713 

Owens-Illinois Glass Co 964,919 

B. F. Goodrich Co 963,025 

E. R. Squibb & Sons 891,002 

Johns-Manville Corp 863,730 

Texas Co 811,940 

Pet Milk Sales Co 800,350 

Eversharp, Inc 782,443 

Chrysler Corp 782,064 

Quaker Oats Co 780,013 

Emerson Drug Co 772,800 

P. Lorillard Co 771,508 



137 



GuJttettthf P^aducUtf 



ELEVEN — 1 5-min. weekly NBC 



ONE — 30-min. weekly Blue 



(Western) 



SIX — 1 5-min. weekly Mutual (Western) 



ONE — 30-min. weekly Mutual (TC) 



FIVE — 30-min. weekly Blue (TC) 



(Western) 



We irnow of no other WESTERN advertising 
agency producing 24 network programs 
per week — 52 weeks in the year. 



RAYMOND It. II II II I, I \ COMPANY 

6362 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, California 



138 



AGENCY— NETWORK— SPONSOR BILLINGS 



Celanese Corp. of America 756,093 

Lady Esther, Ltd 754,317 

Bourjois, Inc 716,868 

Pabst Sales Co 712,107 

Continental Baking Co 705,288 

Chesebrongh Mfg. Co 656,700 

Electric Companies Adv. rrogram .... 651 ,921 

Prudential Insurance Co. of America. 620,405 

Schenley Products Co 571,458 

Gulf Oil Corp 556,264 

Anchor Hocking Glass Corp 544,677 

Roma Wine Co 530,274 

Coca-Cola Co 520,720 

Parker Pen Co 516,616 

Corn Products Refining Co 496,428 

Lewis-Howe Co 465,264 

Noxzema Chemical Co 438,167 

Pacific Coast Borax Co 432,990 

International Silver Co 420,106 

U. S. Tobacco Co 411,504 

Southern Cotton Oil Co 407,566 

Armstrong Cork Co 403,395 

Servel, Inc 382,358 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc 380,702 

J. B. Williams Co 345,800 

Cream of Wheat Corp 337,499 

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co.. 334,626 

Cudahy Packing Co 330,991 

Johnson & Johnson 311,340 

Armour & Co 295,792 

Vick Chemical Co 294,020 

American Oil Co 285,092 

Admiral Corp 259,435 

Curtiss Candy Co 257,975 

Mennen Co 256,198 

P. Ballantine & Sons 233,316 

Ballard & Ballard Co. 226,575 

Lockheed Aircraft Corp 224,583 

Bowey'g, Inc 218,456 

Pillsbury Mills, Inc 214,304 

Englander Co 165,750 

Gillette Safety Razor Co 161,387 

Democratic National Committee .... 148,999 

Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp 148,542 

Republican National Committee .... 131,414 

Los Angeles Soap Co 117,086 

Welch Grape Juice Co 110,027 

Manhattan Soap Co 105,912 

C. F. Mueller Co 99,396 

Planters Nut & Chocolate Co 91,563 

Joseph Tetley & Co., Inc 68,569 

Miles California Co 61,425 

Campana Sales Corp 58,634 

Hudson Coal Co 52,760 

Signal Oil Co 49,255 

Elgin National Watch Co 47,968 

Soil-Off Mfg. Co 41,850 

John Morrell & Co 40,880 

Western Sugar Refining Co 38,961 

Bekins Van & Storage Co 38,281 

Peter Paul, Inc 36,972 

Grove Laboratories, Inc 34,591 

"42" Products, Inc 32,020 

Business Men for Roosevelt, Inc 30,812 



Plough, Inc 29,842 

Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., inc 28,800 

Hunt Bros. Packing Co 28,051 

One Thousand Club of (he United States 

of America 25,636 

Colonial Dames, [no 25,283 

Packard Bell Co 25,272 

Ben Hur Products, Inc 22,869 

Andrew Jergens Co 21,411 

Yellow Cab Co 20,706 

McKesson & Bobbins, Inc 19,596 

United Air Lines Transport Corp 18,951 

Lamont, Corliss & Co 18,252 

Calif. Prune & Apricot Growers Assn.. . 16,432 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Co 15,871 

W. Atlee Burpee Co 12,892 

Consolidated Royal Chemical Co., Inc.. . 11,792 

Pacific Greyhound Lines, Inc 11,583 

Washington Coop. Egg & Poultry Assn. 11,357 

Dwight Edwards Co 10,721 

Phileo Corp 10,216 

Hoffman Radio Corp 10,179 

Democratic State Committee of N. Y.. . 10,121 

Kay Jewelry Co 10,018 

Barbasol Co 7,917 

Herman Basch & Co 7,722 

Johnstone Drug Sales Co 7,510 

Wilshire Oil Co 7,308 

Coldstream Products Co 6,699 

Miscellaneous 51,975 

Grand Total $66,791,319 



Mutual Broadcasting System 
1944 Sponsor Expenditures 



Sinclair Refining Co $ 1,301,917 

R. B. Semier, Inc 1,1 15.708 

Kellogg Co 1,000.739 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc 981 .118 

Gospel Broadcasting Assn 950,309 

Zonite Products Corp 732,427 

Mutual Benefit, Health & Accident Assn. 677,421 

Pharmaco, Inc 676,31 

Bayuk Cigars, Inc 667,865 

Gillette Safety Razor Co 543,590 

American Cigarette & Cigar Co., Inc.. 530,585 

Campana Sales Co 499.862 

Clark Bros. Chewing Gum Co 465,309 

Ralston Purina Co 450,713 

Grove Laboratories 438,095 

Lutheran Laymen's League 425, 1 ~ 7 

Serutan Co 395,263 

Employers' Group Insurance Co. of 

Boston, Mass 388,912 

Barbasol Co 352,961 

Stokely Bros.-Van Camp, Inc 321,993 

Dubonnet Corp 295,390 

Petri Wine Co 294,700 

Radio Bible Class 290,455 

General Cigar Co., Inc 277,961 



139 



"AMERICA'S GRAND HOSTESS" 

EUGENIA CLAIR 




KMTR 

3:15 P.M., P.W.T. 



140 



Veterans of Foreign Wars 

of the United States 
American Gold Star Mothers 



AGENCY— NETWORK— SPONSOR BILLINGS 



Voice of Prophecy, Inc 

Lumberman's Mutual Casualty Co 

Helbros Watch Co 

Young People's Church of the Air. . . . 

Lewis-Howe Co 

Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee Quality Foods, Inc... 

Wesley Radio League 

Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp.. . 

Contl Products Corp 

Duffy-Mott Co., Inc 

Frank H. Lee Co 

George W. Luft & Co 

Formflt Co 

Nat'l Small Business Men's Assoc 

Wilson Sporting Goods Co 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 

Coal Co 

Beaumont Co 

Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corp 

Carey Salt Co 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Knox Co 

Gotham Hosiery Co., Inc 

Waltham Watch Co 

Reichhold Chemicals, Inc 

Acme White Lead & Color Works. . . . 

Boots Aircraft Nut Corp 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Co 

Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co 

Table Products, Inc 

Miss Swank, Inc 

American Bird Products, Inc 

Sherwood Bros., Inc 

Coronet Magazine 

Hartz Mountain Products 

W. L. Douglas Shoe Co 

Loyal Order of the Moose 

Rust Craft Publishers, Inc 

Shipstead & Johnson 

Political Advertisers 

Locally Sponsored Shows 



261,553 
245,563 
•i I 1.1 90 

206,668 
196,669 
185,168 

182,183 
180,630 
101,198 
111,584 
1 38,567 
1 15,825 
100,596 
83,509 

80,109 

75,430 

71,350 

70,133 

69,531 

08,381 

02,380 

59,829 

59,241 

56,374 

52,221 

42,379 

41,496 

41,206 

36,324 

31,184 

20,642 

20,164 

19,467 

14,933 

9,920 

9,314 

7,925 

3,726 

421,422 

1,260,638 



Total $19,533,650 



National Broadcasting Company 

1944 Sponsor Expenditures 

Not Available 



Blue Network Company 
1944 Gross Monthly Billings 



January $ 2,895,700 

February 2,799,504 

March '. 3,080,398 



May . 

June . . . 
July . . . 
August 
Septembei 
October . 



November 
December 



3,161,738 
3,38 1,809 
3,1 72,048 
3,366,504 

:s,ixH.':»8 
8,620,408 
i.: i 1,581 
4,082,1 15 
1,138,24!! 



*$41,356,129 

;i i i,r>oo lor Political Sales. 



Columbia Broadcasting System 
Gross Monthly Billings. 1944 



January 
February 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



5,658, 
5,356, 
5,801, 
5,650, 
5,818, 
5,204, 
5,369 
5,321 
5,386 
5,795 
5,577 
5,819 



898 
56S 

663 
018 

782 
338 
947 

hi i 

7!HI 
354 
983 



Total $60,791,319 



Gross Monthly Billings 
Mutual Broadcasting System 



January $ 1,700,317 

February 1 ,605,839 

March 1,807.031 

April 1 ,075,009 

May 1 ,525,27G 

June 1 ,52 1 ,703 

July 1,511,393 

August 1,501,391 

September 1 .5 I 7 ,329 

October 1.911.010 

November 1 ,625,567 

December 1,535,1 55 



Total $19,533,050 



National Broadcasting Company 

Gross Monthly Billings 

Not Available 



141 




NEW YORK 
LOREN L. WATSON 

400 MADISON AVENUE 
ELdorado 5-5040 



CHICAGO: 

360 N. MICHIGAN AVENUE 
Franklin 8520 



SAN FRANCISCO 

THIRD AND MARKET STREETS 
Exbrook 3558 



HOLLYWOOD: 

HOLLYWOOD BLVD. AT COSMO 
Hollywood 8318 



142 



:< Radio Station * 
Representatives 



JAMES L. ALEXANDER 

Toronto — Concourse Bldg., James L. Alexander, Manager Adelaide 9594 

Montreal — Drummond Bldg., Frank Lewis, Manager Harbour 6448 

Stations— CKPC, Brantford, Ont.; QIC, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.; CKNX, 
Wingham, Ont.; CHLP, Montreal, Que.; CKTB, St. Catherines, Ont.; CJFX, 
Antigonish, N. S. 

ALL-CANADA RADIO FACILITIES LIMITED 

Calgary — Southam Bldg M 7691 

H. R. Carson, President-Managing Director; A. R. Gibson, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Montreal — Dominion Square Bldg., B. Hall Lancaster 6400 

Toronto— Victory Bldg., G. F. Herbert Elgin 2464 

Winnipeg — Electric Railway Chambers, P. H. Gayner 96-861 

Vancouver— 198 W. Hastings St., J. E. Baldwin Marine 9542 

Stations— CF AC, Calgary, Alta.; CJCA, Edmonton, Alta.; CFGP, Grand 
Prairie, Alta.; CJOC, Lethbridge, Alta.; CFJC, Kamloops, B. C; CKOV, 
Kelowna, B. C; CJAT, Trail, B. C; CKWX, Vancouver, B. C; CJVI, Vic- 
toria, B. C; CKRC, Winnipeg, Man.; CKNB, Campbellton, N. B.; CFNB, 
Fredericton, N. B.; CHNS, Halifax, N.S.; CJCB, Sydney, N. S.; CKOC, 
Hamilton, Ont.; CJCS, Stratford, Ont.; CKSO, Sudbury, Ont.; CFRB, Toronto, 
Ont.; CFCY, Charlottetown, P. E. L; CFCF, Montreal, Que.; CHNC, New 
Carlisle, Que.; CKBI, Prince Albert, Sask.; CKCK, Regina, Sask.; CKRM, 
Regina, Sask.; CHAB, Moose Taw, Sask.; VONF, St. Johns, Newfoundland; 
CJLS, Yarmouth, N. S.; CHWK, Chilliwack, B. C; CKFI, Fort Frances, Ont. 

ASSOCIATED BROADCASTING CO.. LTD. 

Montreal — Dominion Square Bldg Belair 3325 

M. Maxwell, President; M. Feldman, Vice-President; F. Maxwell, Secretary- 
Treasurer; R. J. Meyer, Sales Director; S. Vineberg, Program Director; J. O. 
Denis, French Director; J. Feldman, Recording Department; R. O. Stevenson, 
Manager of Syndicated Transcription Department. 

Toronto— 199 Bay St Adelaide 3248 

M. R. Raymond, Mgr., K. H. Gregory, Sales Mgr. 

BERTHA BANNAN 

(New England Representative*) 

Boston — 533 Little Bldg., Bertha Bannan; L. H. Morello, Secretary HUBbard 4370 

Stations— WLBZ, Bangor, Me.; WCSH, Portland, Me.; WRDO, Augusta, 
Me.; WHAI, Greenfield, Mass.; WHYN, Holyoke, Mass.; WBRK, Pittsfield, 
Mass.; WSPR, Springfield, Mass.; WTAG, Worcester, Mass.; WKNE, Keene, 
N. H.; WLNH, Laconia, N. H.; WFEA, Manchester, N. H.; WHEB, Ports- 
mouth, N. H.; WHN, New York, N. Y.; WSYR, Syracuse, N. Y.; WTRY, 
Troy, N. Y.; WIBX, Utica, N. Y.; WCAU, Philadelphia, Pa.; WJAR, Provi- 
dence, R. L; WWSR, St. Albans, Vt.; WDEV, Waterbury, Vt.; Connecticut 
State Network. 

"Stations represented on a regional basis in New England only. 

WALTER BIDDICK COMPANY 

Los Angeles — 568 Chamber of Commerce Bldg. (24) Richmond 6184 

Walter Biddick, President; M. Cornell, Vice-President; G. M. Biddick, 
George Link, Salesmen. 

Stations— KIEV, Glendale, Calif.; KFOX, Long Beach, Calif.; KLS, Oakland, 
Calif.; KHUB, Watsonville, Calif.; WJJD, Chicago, 111.; WIBW, Topeka, 
Kans.; WIBX, Utica, N. Y.; KSRO, Santa Rosa, Calif.; WIND, Gary, Ind.; 
KFAD, Nampa, Idaho; KCKN, Kansas City, Mo. 

143 



IF it's S/^ RADIO 




These Stations 
in These Markets 
are Your Best Dollar Values 



Boston 


WMEX 


Independent 


Sacramento KROY Columbia 


Charleston 


WGKV 


NBC 


Salt Lake City 


Denver 


KYOD 


Blue 


and Ogden KLO Mutual 


Grand Rapids 


WLAV 


Blue 


Spokane KFIO Mutual 


Los Angeles 


KPAS 


Independent 


Tacoma KMO Mutual 


Macon 


WBML 


Blue 


Tulsa KOME Blue & Mutual 


New Orleans 


WNOE 


Mutual 


Waterbury VYBRY Columbia 


Monroe 


KNOE 


NBC 


Wenatchee KPQ Blue 


Oakland 


KLX 


Independent 


Yakima KIT Mutual 


Port Arthur 


KPAC 


Mutual 




Pueblo 


KGHF 


Blue 


Intermountain Network All Mutual 

KLO-Salt Lake City-Ogden; KOVO-Provo; 


Rochester 


WSAY 


Mutual 


KVNU- Logan; KEUB - Price, all Utah; 
KID -Idaho Falls, Idaho; KYRS - Rock 


Rutland 


WSYB 


Mutual 


Springs, Wyo. 


JOSEPH HERSHEY 


JTGILLVRA, inc. 


NEW YORK, ir 
366 Madison Avenue 
MUrray Hill 2-8755 


CHICAGO, 1 

35 East Wacker Drive 

State 5282 


SAN FRANCISCO, 4 LOS ANGELES, 13 
627 Mills Building 448 South Hill Street 
Sutter 1393 Michigan 0921 






STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 

Chicago — 520 N. Michigan Avenue Superior 8660 

John Blair, President; Gale Blocki, Jr., Vice-President; Paul Ray, Charles 
Dilcher, Blake Blair. 

New York City — 341 Madison Avenue Murray Hill 9-6084 

George Boiling, Vice-President; Richard Buckley, William Weldon, Robert 
Hill Boiling, E. Schuyler Ensell, Robert Eastman. 

Los Angeles — 438 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Carleton E. Coveny Prospect 3584 

San Francisco — 608 Russ Bldg., Lindsey Spight, Vice-President Douglas 3188 

5"/. Louis — 350 Paul Brown Bldg., J. Chris Hetherington Chestnut 5688 

Stations— KSUN, Bisbee-Douglas, Ariz.; KOY, Phoenix, Ariz.; KTUC, Tuc- 
son, Ariz.; KHJ, Los Angeles, Calif.; KGB, San Diego, Calif.; KFRC, San 
Francisco, Calif.; KFEL, Denver, Colo.; WJAX, Jacksonville, Fla.; WQAM, 
Miami, Fla.; WFLA, Tampa, Fla.; KIDO, Boise, Ida.; WLS, Chicago, 111.; 
KXEL, Waterloo, la.; WFBR, Baltimore, Md.; WOW, Omaha, Nebr.; KODY, 
North Platte, Nebr.; WNBF, Binghamton, N. Y.; WNEW, New York, N. Y.; 
KFYR, Bismarck, N. D.; WBNS, Columbus, Ohio; WHP, Harrisburg, Pa.; 
WGBI, Scranton, Pa.; WROL, Knoxville, Tenn.; KTRH, Houston, Texas; 
KDYL, Salt Lake City, Utah; WMBG, Richmond, Va.; WMMN, Fairmont, 
W. Va.; WWVA, Wheeling, W. Va.; KOL, Seattle, Wash.; KGMB, Hono- 
lulu, T. H.; KXOK, St. Louis, Mo.; KFRU, Columbia, Mo.; Don Lee Mutual 
Network; Arizona Network; KGDM, Stockton, Calif. 

BLUE NETWORK COMPANY 

(National Spot and Local Sales Division) 
New York City— 30 Rockefeller Plaza Circle 7-5700 

Ralph E. Dennis, Manager, Blue Spot Sales. 
Chicago — Merchandise Mart Bldg Delaware 1900 

Roy McLaughlin, Manager. 
Hollywood— 6285 Sunset Blvd Hillside 8231 

Amos Baron, Manager. 
San Francisco — 1 1 1 Sutter St Graystone 6565 

Byron Nelson, Mgr. 
Detroit— 802 Fisher Bldg Trinity 2-7000 

John Donohue, Mgr. 
Pittsburgh — 171 Shaler Drive, Glenshaw Glenshaw 1287 

Robert Post, Mgr. 

Stations— KGO, San Francisco, Calif.; KECA, Los Angeles, Calif.; WMAL, 

Washington, D. C; WENR, Chicago, 111.; WJZ, New York, N. Y.; Pacific 

Coast Blue Network. 

D. L. BOUFFORD 
Toronto— 111 Yonge St., 1 AD. 7468 

Stations— CKCH, Hull, Quebec. 

THE BRANHAM COMPANY 

New York — 230 Park Avenue Murray Hill 6-1860 

M. H. Long, Vice-President; F. P. Motz, Vice-President; Joseph F. Timlin, 
Manager of radio department. 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Avenue Central 5726 

John Petrie, President; E. F. Corcoran, Vice-President; C. B. Peterson, Man- 
ager radio department. 

Detroit — General Motors Bldg., Harry Anderson Trinity 1-0440 

Dallas — Texas Bank Bldg., A. J. Putman Dallas 2-8569 

Atlanta— Rhodes Haverty Bldg., J. B. Keough Walnut 4851 

St. Louis — Arcade Bldg., J. E. Nicholson ... Chestnut 6192 

Kansas City — Board of Trade Bldg., G. F. Dillon Harrison 1023 

San Francisco — 5 Third St., George D. Close Garfield 6740 

Los Angeles— 448 S. Hill St., J. H. Hornung Michigan 1269 

Charlotte, N. C. — 612 Commercial National Bank Bldg., H. L. Ralls Charlotte 8839 

Memphis — 1018 Sterick Bldg., S. Arnold Memphis 8-2344 

Stations— KTHS, Hot Springs, Ark.; KWKH, Shreveport, La.; WCPO, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; WTJS, Jackson, Tenn.; WNOX, Knoxville, Tenn.; WMC, 
Memphis, Tenn.; KTBC, Austin, Texas; KRIC, Beaumont, Texas; KRLD, 
Dallas, Texas; West Virginia Network (WCHS, Charleston, WPAR, Parkers- 
burg; WBLK, Clarksburg; WSAZ, Huntingrcn, We:t. Va.). 

145 



THE PAN AMERICAN MARKET 

Your neighbors throughout the Americas are con- 
stantly increasing their purchases of U. S. products. 

Wise advertisers are using the great Pan American 
radio stations to reach this huge buying audience. 

Let us tell you how you can get your share of this 
rich fertile market. 

Representatives for radio stations in 



Alaska 


Dominican Republic 


Nicaragua 


Argentina 


Ecuador 


Newfoundland 


Bolivia 


El Salvador 


Mexico 


British Guiana 


Guatemala 


Panama 


Chile 


Haiti 


Paraguay 


Colombia 


Hawaii 


Peru 


Costa Rica 


Honduras 


Puerto Rico 


Cuba 


Iceland 
Venezuela 


Uruguay 



Pan American Broadcasting Co. 

330 Madison Avenue New York (17), N, Y. 

In Chicago . . . Fred Jones. 228 No. Lasalle St. 
In Hollywood . . . Homer Griffith, 6362 Hollywood Blvd. 



146 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



BROADCAST SALES CO. 

New York City — 280 Madison Ave., Peggy Stone MUrray Hill 5-2940 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave., George Roesler Randolph 9034 

Hollywood, San Francisco — Homer Griffith Co. 

Stations— WINN, Louisville, Ky.; KFNF, Shenandoah, Iowa; WPAG, Ann 

Harbor, Mich.; New England Cupboard. 

BURN-SMITH COMPANY. INC. 

Chicago — 307 N. Michigan Ave., John Toothill, President Central 4437 

New York— 551 Fifth Avenue, Robt. S. Keller, Mgr MUrray Hill 2-3124 

Los Angeles— Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Walter Biddick, Mgr Richmond 6184 

Stations— KMTR, Los Angeles, Calif.; WRUF, Gainesville, Fla.; WLOF, 
Orlando, Fla.; WALB, Albany, Ga.; WTRC, Elkhart, Ind.; WKBB, Dubuque, 
la.; KVFD, Fort Dodge, la.; KTRI, Sioux City, la.; WGRC, Louisville, Ky.; 
WLBJ, Bowling Green, Ky.; WHLN, Harlan, Ky.; WOMI, Owensboro, Ky.; 
WHAI, Greenfield, Mass.; WELL, Battle Creek, Mich.; WJLB, Detroit, Mich.; 
WFDF, Flint, Mich.; WKBZ, Muskegon, Mich.; WCNC, Elizabeth City, 
N. C; WGBG, Greensboro, N. C; WCBT, Roanoke Rapids, N. C; WSTP, 
Salisbury, N. C; WGTM, Wilson, N. C; WFTC, Kinston, N. C; WMFD, 
Wilmington, N. C; WHBC, Canton, Ohio; WMRF, Lewiston, Pa.; WBAX, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; WOPI, Bristol, Tenn.; WKPT, Kingsport, Tenn.; KFRO, 
Longview, Texas; KMAC, San Antonio, Texas; WFVA, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
WGH, Newport News, Va.; KWJJ, Portland, Ore.; Daniel Boone Network 
(WISE, Asheville, N. C; WKPT, Kingsport, Tenn.; WOPI, Bristol, Tenn.- 
Va.); WJLS, Beckley, W. Va.; WALL, Middletown, N. Y.; WAIM, Anderson, 
S. C; WMRC, Greenville, S. C; WISE, Asheville, N. C; WMFR, High Point, 
N. C; WLOU, Detroit, Mich.; WKLA, Ludington, Mich.; WRRN, Warren, 
O.; KPAB, Laredo, Texas; KFBC, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

HOWARD C. BROWN COMPANY 

Hollywood — 6404 Sunset Blvd Hollywood 6045 

Stations — 3XY, Melbourne, Australia; National Commercial Broadcasting 
Service (5 stations), New Zealand. 

CAPPER PUBLICATIONS 

N*u> York City— 420 Lexington Avenue Mohawk 4-3280 

William L. McKee. 

Chicago — 180 N. Michigan Avenue, E. W. Carlson Central 5977 

Kansas City, Mo. — 5604 Michigan Ave., Joseph H. Story, Jr Harrison 4700 

Sam Francisco — 1207 Russ Bldg., William B. Flowers Douglas 5220 

Stations— KCKN, Kansas City, Kans.; WIBW, Topeka, Kans. 

CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION 

Toronto — 354 Jarvis Street Midway 5481 

E. A. Weir, Commercial Manager; W. E. Powell, Asst. Commercial Mgr. 

Montreal — 1184 St. Catherine Street, West Lancaster 1136 

J. A. Dupont, Commercial Manager — Quebec Division. 
Stations— CER, Vancouver, B. C; CBA, Sackville, N. B.; CBO, Ottawa, Ont.; 
CBL, Toronto, Ont.; CJBC, Toronto, Ont.; CBJ, Chicoutimi, Que.; CBF, 
Montreal, Que.; CBM, Montreal, Que.; CBV, Quebec City, Que.; CBK, Wat- 
rous, Sask.; CBH, Halifax, N. S. 

THOMAS F. CLARK CO., INC. 

New York— 205 East 42nd St MUrray Hill 4-6317 

Thomas F. Clark, President; Miss Mary Dempsey, Manager; Mrs. E. A. 
Abernethy, Asst. Manager. 

Chicago — 35 East Wacker Drive Central 1112 

C. J. Anderson, Manager. 

Stations— KOKO, La Junta, Colo.; WTAL, Tallahassee, Fla.; WMJM, Cor- 
dele, Ga.; WLAG, La Grange, Ga.; WRLC, Toccoa, Ga.; WCAZ, Carthage, 
111.; KVAK, Atchison, Kansas; KSAN, San Francisco, Calif.; WSNJ, Bridge- 
ton, N. J.; WMFF, Plattsburg, N. Y.; WENT, Gloversville, N. Y.; WNBZ, 
Saranac Lake, N. Y.; WMBO, Auburn, N. Y.; WEGO, Concord, N. C. 

147 



r. h. t mm mi 

*7<4s Only A/etwonJz "Iked Cauebd. Guka 
A^iUaiel With 6. B. S. 

AM ADO TRINIDAD, President 
ING. CRISTOBAL DIAZ, Vice-President and General Manager 
DR. JOSE ROMAGUERA, Secretary 

RHC OWNS AND OPERATES THESE STATIONS 



Habana 


CMCY 






590 KC. 


20000 Watts 


Pinar del Rio 


CMAN 






1300 KC. 


1000 Watts 


Santa Clara 


CMHI 






570 KC. 


15000 Watts 


Camaguey 


CMJN 






740 KC. 


1000 Watts 


Holguin 


CMKV 






600 KC. 


2000 Watts 


Santiago de Cuba 


CMKN 






930 KC. 


2000 Watts 




SHORT WAVE 




Habana 


COCY 


11740 


KC 


25 m. 


5000 Watts 


Santa Clara 


COHI 


6450 


KC 


49 m. 


5000 Watts 



RHC — Cadena Azul network is equipped with an emergency 
plant in Havana; also two other plants, the CMGN at 
Jovellanos, Matanzas Province, on 1310 kc. and the CMJN 
at Ciego de Awla, Camaguey Province on 1270 kc. 




R. H. C. CADENA AZUL 



HUMBERTO D. GONZALEZ, u. s. representative 
220 West 42nd St., New York (18), N. Y., Wisconsin 7-1166 



14S 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



B. FRANK COOK 

(Southeastern Representative*) 

Atlanta, Ga. — 1104-22 Marietta St. Bldg Walnut 1231 

Stations— W ALB, Albany, Ga.; WFBC, Greenville, S. C. 
* Stations represented on a regional basis only. 

COX & TANZ 

Philadelphia — Drexel Building Lombard 17 20 

E. R. Tanz 

New York — A. P. Cox, Executive in Charge, 285 Madiron Avenue LExington 2-2450 

Chicago — 228 N. La Salle Street, J. C. Cox, Jr., Executive in Charge Franklin 2095 

Stations— KELD, El Dorado, Ark.; KFFA, Helena, Ark.; KWKW, Los 
Angeles, Calif.; WBLJ, Dalton, Ga.; WJOB, Hammond, Ind.; WKMO, 
Kokomo, Ind.; WASK, Lafayette, Ind.; KTNM, Tucumcari, N. M.; WGNC, 
Gastonia, N. C; KAST, Astoria, Ore.; WKPA, New Kensington, Pa.; WKOK, 
Sunbury, Pa.; WOLS, Florence, S. C; WFIG, Sumter, S. C; WJZM, Clarks- 
ville, Tenn.; WHUB, Cookeville, Term.; KNEL, Brady, Texas; WCHV, Char- 
lottesville, Va.; KTBI, Tacoma, Wash.; WIGM, Medford, Wise; WCRW, 
Chicago, 111.; KIUL, Garden City, Kansas; KSAM, Huntsville, Texas; WAGM, 
Presque Isle, Me.; KGFX, Pierre, S. D.; KEEW, Brownsville, Texas; WMFJ, 
Daytona Beach, Fla.; WBRE, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

HARRY E. CUMMINGS 

(Southeastern Representative* ) 

Jacksonville, Fla. — 1306 Barnett National Bank Bldg Jacksonville 3-0381 

Stations— WJAX, Jacksonville, Fla.; WIOD, Miami, Fla.; WFLA, Tampa, 
Fla.; WDBO, Orlando, Fla.; Daniel Boone Network (WOPI, Bristol, Tenn.- 
Va.; WKPT, Kingsport, Tenn.; WISE, Asheville, N. C); WHIO, Dayton, 
Ohio; WROL, Knoxville, Tenn. 

*Stations represented on a regional basis in Southeastern United States only. 

DOMINION BROADCASTING CO. 

Toronto, Canada — 4 Albert Street Adelaide 338 -j 

Hal B. Williams, Manager; Don Copeland, Recording Division Manager; 

Stan Francis, Production. 

Stations— CJLS, Yarmouth, N. S.; CKCH, Hull, Que.; CHLT, Sherbrooke, 

Que. 

FORJOE & COMPANY 

New York— 19 West 44th Street (18) Vanderbilt 6-5080 

Joseph Bloom, President; Pat Diamond and Gil;ert Salke, Sales; Delia 
Janoff, Office Manager. 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave., Hal Holman, Manager State 5262 

Philadelphia— 1301 Widener Bldg Rittenhouse 9698 

Charles Shall, Manager. 

Stations— WBNX, New York, N. Y.; WTBK, Detroit, Mich, (for East); 
KONO, San Antonio, Texas; WCOU, Lewiston, Auburn, Me.; WLIB, New 
York, N. Y. (for Midwest); WWSW, Pittsburgh, Pa.; KEYS, Corpus 
Christi, Texas; WIBM, Jackson, Mich, (for East); WINX, Washington, 
D. C; WMIN, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.; WBRW, Welch, W. Va.; WDAS, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; WRRF, Washington, N. C. 

R. C. FOSTER & COMPANY 

(New England Radio Advertising) 

Boston — 507 Statler Bldg Hubbard 3225 

Robert C. Foster, Gertrude Saxe, Manager. 
Owner (now in U. S. Navy.) 

*Stations—WDRC, Hartford, Conn.; WELI, New Haven. Conn.; WNLC, 
New London, Conn.; WATR, Waterbury, Conn.; WABI, Bangor, Me.; 
WGAN, Portland, Me.; WSAR, Fall River, Mass.; WHAI, Greenfield, Mass.; 
WLAW, Lawrence, Mass.; WNBH, New Bedford, Mass.; WBRK, Pittsfield, 
Mass.; WESX, Salem, Mass.; WMUR, Manchester, N. H.; WNEW, New 
York, N. Y.; WPEN, Philadelphia, Pa.; WAGM, Presque Isle, Me.; WPRO, 
Providence, R. I.; WSYB, Rutland, Vt.; WABI, Bangor, Me.; WGAN, Port- 
land, Me. 

*Represented on regional accounts only. 

149 



FREE & PETERS. INC. 

New York — 444 Madison Avenue Plaza 5-4130 

H. Preston Peters, President; Harold L. Behlke, Jones Scovern, Robert 
Bender, Frank X. Fitzpatrick, Fred W. Mitchell. 

Chicago — 180 N. Michigan Avenue Franklin 

James W. Knodel, Vice-President; Sherman R. Barnett, Secy.-Treasurer; 
Arthur H. McCoy, B. P. Timothy, John A. Cory, William Bryan, J. M. 
Gleason. 

Atlanta — 322 Palmer Bldg., James M. Wade Main 

San Francisco — 1 1 1 Sutter Street, A. Leo Bowman Sutter 

Hollywood — 6331 Hollywood Blvd Granite 

James L. Free, Chairman; Charles Gustafson, Hal W. Hoag. 
Stations— WMBD, Peoria, 111.; WISH, Indianapolis, Ind.; WOC, Davenport, 
la.; WHO, Des Moines, la.; KMA, Shenandoah, la.; WAVE, Louisville, 
Ky.; WCBM, Baltimore, Md.; WKZO, Kalamazoo, Mich.; KDAL, 
Duluth, Minn.; WTCN, Minneapolis, Minn.; KMBC, Kansas City, Mo.; 
KSD, St. Louis, Mo.; KOB, Albuquerque, N. M.; WGR-WKBW, Buffalo, 
N. Y.; WFBL, Syracuse, N. Y.; WPTF, Raleigh, N. C; WDBJ, Roanoke, 
N. C; WDAY, Fargo, N. D.; WCKY, Cincinnati, Ohio; KOMA, Oklahoma, 
City, Okla.; KTUL, Tulsa, Okla.; KOIN, Portland, Ore.; WCSC, Charleston, 
S. C; WIS, Columbia, S. C; KIRO, Seattle, Wash.; KRIS, Corous Christi, 
Texas; KXYZ, Houston, Texas; KEEW, Brownsville, Texas; WJEF, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 



6373 



5667 

4353 
3615 



ROMIG C. FULLER & ASSOCIATES 

(Northwest Representative*) 

Seattle— 2939 Fourth Ave., South Main 0110 

Stations— KELA, Centralia, Wash.; KGY, Olympia, Wash.; KUJ, Walla 
Walla, Wash. 

^Stations represented on a regional basis only. 



jfQJi a limited fiaitp. a^ 
pood izdia d>tatiOHd>. 



ADAM J. YOUNG Jr 

INCORPORATED 

Radio Station Representative 



150 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



6113 



5512 
1009 



W. S. GRANT COMPANY 

San Francisco — 582 Market St., W. S. Grant, General Manager Exbrook 6685 

Los Angeles — 412 W. 6th St., C. J. Evanson, Mgr Vandike 6341 

New York— 366 Madison Ave MUrray Hill 2-8865 

Phil Broderick, Mgr. 

Chicago — 540 N. Michigan Ave Del 1055 

Frank Back, Mgr. 

Stations— KHSL, Chico, Calif.; KMYC, Marysville, Calif.; KYOS, Merced, 
Calif.; KTRB, Modesto, Calif.; KVCV, Reading, Calif.; KTKC, Visalia, Calif.; 
KFJI, Klamath Falls, Ore.; KHUB, Watsonville, Calif.; KUEC, San Luis 
Obispo, Calif.; KPMC, Bakersfield, Calif.; KVOE, Santa Ana, Calif.; KOOS, 
Marshfield, Ore.; KBKR, Baker, Ore.; KLBM, La Grande, Ore.; KVAN, Van- 
couver, Wash. 

HOMER GRIFFITH CO. 

Hollywood — 6362 Hollywood Blvd. (28) Granite 

Homer Griffith, Owner and Manager. 

San Francisco — 681 Market St., (5), R. J. Bidwell, General Manager GArfield 

Portland (Ore.) — Studio Bldg BEacon 

James McLoughlin, Manager. 

Stations — KFQD, Ankorage, Alaska; KTRB, Modesto, Calif.; KJBS, San 
Francisco, Calif.; KSRO, Santa Rosa, Calif.; WIRE, Indianapolis, Ind.; KFNF, 
Shenandoah, la.; KSEI, Pocatello, Ida.; KTFI, Twin Falls, Ida.; KGEZ, Kali- 
spell, Mont.; KENO, Las Vegas, Nev.; KWIL, Albany, Ore.; KMED, Med- 
ford, Ore.; KWJJ, Portland, Ore.; KODL, The Dalles, Ore.; KPOW, Powell, 
Wyo.; KVRS, Rock Springs, Wyo.; KWYO, Sheridan, Wyo.; KBND, Bend, 
Ore.; KSLM, Salem, Ore.; KWRC, Pendleton, Ore.; KORE, Eugene, Ore.; 
KDFN, Casper, Wyo.; The Homer Griffith Co. also functions as the West 
Coast division of the Howard Wilson Co., Sears & Ayer, Inc., Taylor-Howe- 
Snowden Radio Sales and the Pan American Broadcasting Co. 

MELCHOR GUZMAN COMPANY, INC. 

(Latin American Representative) 

New York — 45 Rockefeller Plaza, (20) Circle 7-0624 

Melchor Guzman, President; A. M. Martinez, Vice-President. 

Stations — Argentina: LRI-LRX-LRU, Buenos Aires; Blue & White network; 

LU2, Bahia Blanca; LU8 Barioche; LV2, Cordoba; LU6, Mar Del Plata 

LW2-LRM, Mendoza; LT5, Resistencia; LU12, Rio Gallegos; LU4, Rivadavia 

LT3, Rosario; LV9, Salta; LV5, San Juan; LT9, Same Fe; LV7, Tucuman. 

Bolivia: CP3-CP2-CP38, La Paz. 

Chile: CA141, Antofagasta; CO 17, Conception; CD, Osorno; CD111, Punta 

Arenas; CD70, Temuco; CA90, Tocopilla; CD132, Valdivia. 

Columbia: HJFM-HJFH, Armenia; HJAN-HJAB, Barranquilla; HJCZ- 

HJCX, Bogota; HJER-HJEX, Cali; HJAF-HJAE, Cartagena; HJBB-HJBC, 

Cucuta; HJFD-HJFB, Manizales; HJDQ-HJDP, Medellin; HJFF-HJFK, 

Pereira. 

Costa Rica: TIPG, San Jose. 

Cuba: CMQ-COCQ, Havana; CMQ Network; CMJL, Camaguey; CMKJ, 

Holguin; CMHQ, Santa Clara; CMKU, Santiago. 

Dominican Republic: HIZ-HI1Z, C. Trujillo. 

Ecuador: HC2AJ-HC2AK, Guayaquil. 

Guatemala: TGW-TGWB-TGWC-TGWA, Guatemala City. 

Honduras: HRP1, San Pedro Sula; HRN, Teguciagalpa. 

Mexico: XEFQ, Cananea; XEBW-XEIW, Chihuahua; HEBL, Culiacan; 

XED-XEDQ, Guadalajara; XEDR, Guaymas; XEFM, Leon; XEDS, Mazatlan; 

XEZ, Merida; XEQ-XEQQ, Mexico City; XET, Monterrey; XEFW- 

XETW, Tampico; XETB, Torreon. 

Nicaragua: YNOW, Managua; YNPX-YNDS, Managua. 

Panama: HOK-HP5K, Colon; HOC-HP5A, Panama City. 

Peru: OAX6C-OAX6E, Arequipa; OAX1A, Chiclayo; OAX7A, Cuzco; 

OAX4P, Huancayo; OAX4U-OAK4V-OAX4W & OAX4B-OAX4G, Lima; 

OAX2A-OAX2B, Trujillo. 

151 



Puerto Rico: WKAQ, San Juan; WPAB, Ponce. 

Paraguay: ZP3, Asuncion. 

El Salvador: SR, San Salvador. 

Uruguay: CX16-CX24, Montivideo; CW7, Carmelo; CW33, Florida; CW43, 

Lavalleia; CX14-CXA19 & CX18-CXA9, Montevideo; CW35, Paysandu; 

CX43, Rivera; CW19, Rocha; CW31, Salto; CW41, San Jose; CW46, Tacu- 

arembo; CW45, Treinta Y Tres. 

Venezuela: XV6RE-XV6RC, Barcelona; YV5RI-YV5RY, Caracas; QV6RA- 

YV6RB, C. Bolivar; YV7RA-YV7RB, Cumana; QVIRF-QVIRX, Maracaibo; 

YV2RC, Merida; YV2RN-XV2RV, San Cristobal; YV1RC, Truillo; 

YV4RA-YV4RO, Valencia. 

ARTHUR H. HAGG & ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Avenue Central 7553 

HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 

New York — 405 Lexington Ave MUrray Hill 3-5470 

Frank M. Headley, President; Dwight S. Reed, John D. Allison, Vice-Presi- 
dents; Pat Sullivan, Ralph W. Barnes, George Backus, Frank Hays, Solicitors. 

Chicago — 180 N. Michigan Ave., (1) Franklin 4686 

Dwight S. Reed, Vice-President; John W. Davis, Paul R. Weeks. 

Detroit — New Center Bldg., (2), B. H. Keit, Vice-President Madison 4675 

Atlanta— 120 Marietta St., N.W., (3), E. W. Sweatman Walnut 1636 

San Francisco — 300 Montgomery St., (4), Ralph W. Mitchell, Vice-President. . .Yukon 1265 
Stations— WSGN, Birmingham, Ala.; WAGF, Dothan, Ala.; WALA, Mobile, 
Ala.; WSFA, Montgomery; WNBC, Hartford, Conn.; WELI, New Haven,. 
Conn; WFTL, Miami, Fla.; WAGA, Atlanta, Ga.; WGAC, Augusta, Ga.; 
WDAK, Columbus, Ga.; WROK, Rockford, 111.; KSO, Des Moines, la.; 
KANS, Wichita, Kans.; WITH, Baltimore, Md.; WSAM, Saginaw, Mich.; 
KFEQ, St. Joseph, Mo.; KMMJ, Grand Island, Neb.; WKNE, Keene, N. H.; 
WBAB, Atlantic City, N. J.; WHLD, Niagara Falls, N. Y.; WKIP, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y.; WFAS, White Plains, N. Y.; WSOC, Charlotte, N. C; WSJS, 
Winston-Salem, N. C; KILO, Grand Forks, N. D.; WJW, Cleveland, O.; 
WLOK, Lima, O.; WFMJ, Youngstown, O.; WSAN, Allentown, Pa.; WFBG, 
Altoona, Pa.; WJAC, Johnstown, Pa.; WAPO, Chattanooga, Tenn.; WSAR, 
Fall River, Mass.; WMIT-FM, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HOMER HOGAN & CO. 

Chicago — 410 N. Michigan Ave., Homer Hogan, General Manager Whitehall 4488 

Station — KWBU, Corpus Christi, Texas. 

HAL HOLMAN CO. 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave Franklin 0016 

Hal Holman, Owner. 
New York— 531 Fifth Avenue MUrray Hill 2-7986 

Stations— WJBK, Detroit, Mich.; WIBM, Jackson, Mich.; WKMO, Kokomo, 

Ind. 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 

Chicago— 307 N. Michigan Avenue (1) State 2898 

George P. Hollingbery, Owner; Fred F. Hague, Frank E. McCarthy, Charles 

E. Compton, Salesmen. 

New York City — 420 Lexington Avenue (17) MUrray Hill 3-9447 

F. E. Spencer, Jr., Manager; Paul J. Senft, Noel C. Breault, George E. Klayer. 

Atlanta — 510 Healey Bldg. (3), M. P. Martin, Manager Walnut 3856 

San Francisco — 300 Montgomery St. (4), R. J. Birch, Manager Douglas 4393 

Los Angeles— 601 S. Hill Street (14), J. V. Fisler, Manager Van Dyke 7386 

Stations— WPUQ, Jacksonville, Fla.; WIOD, Miami, Fla.; WSAV, Savannah, 
Ga.; WAAF, Chicago, 111.; KSCJ, Sioux City, la.; WJBO, Baton Rouge, 
La.; WSPR, Springfield, Mass.; WBCM, Bay City, Mich.; WWJ, Detroit, 
Mich.; WEBC, Duluth, Minn.; WJDX, Jackson, Miss.; WREN, Lawrence, 
Kans.-Kansas City, Mo.; KOWH, Omaha, Nebr.; WHAM, Rochester, N. Y.; 
WBIG, Greensboro, N. C; WADC, Akron, Ohio; WHIO, Dayton, Ohio; 
WEEU, Reading, Pa.; WARM, Scranton, Pa.; WTMA, Charleston, S. C; 
WSPA, Spartanburg, S. C; KTSM, El Paso, Texas; KVI, Tacoma, Wash.; 
WEAU, Eau Claire, Wise; Arrowhead Network (WEBC, Duluth; WMFG, 

152 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



Hibbing; WHLB, Virginia, Minn.); Rebel Network (WJDX, Jackson; 
WFOR, Hattiesburg; WAML, Laurel, Miss.); WRDW, Augusta, Ga.; WIP, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; KSCJ, Sioux City, Kans.; KGBX, Springfield, Mo.; KVI, 
Tacoma, Wash.; KFBI, Wichita, Kans. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCASTING STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

New York— 507 Fifth Ave VAnderbilt 6-6075 

Louis M. Bloch, Jr., Manager. 

Schenectady — Sacandaga Rd., David W. Borst 

College Stations — University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Brown Uni- 
versity, Providence, R. I.; Columbia University, New York, N. Y.; Univer- 
sity of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.; Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.; George- 
town University, Washington, D. C; Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y.; 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.; Haverford College, Haverford, Pa.; 
Knox College, Galesburg, 111.; University of Maryland, College Park, Md.; 
Princeton University, Princeton, N. J.; Rhode Island State College, Kingston, 
R. I.; University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr.; Wesleyan University, Middle- 
town, Conn.; Williams College, Williamstown, Mass.; Yale University, New 
Haven, Conn.; Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass.; Barnard College, New 
York, N. Y.; Pembroke College, Providence, R. I.; Stephen College, Colum- 
bia, Mo.; Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

New York City — 500 Fifth Avenue Wisconsin 7-8620 

G. R. Katz, President; S. L. Katz, Vice-President; Eugene Katz, Secretary; 
M. J. Beck, Treasurer; G. W. Brett, Vice-President & Sales Manager; A. Doris, 
Vice-President; S. R. Rintoul, M. S. Kellner, D. H. Denenholz, M. J. Flynn, 
H. R. Goldberg, Martin Beck, J. T. Ott, M. O'Mara, T. E. Kruglak, W. S. 
Wright, S. A. Machcinski. 

Chicago — 307 N. Michigan Avenue Central 4006 

G. H. Gunst, Vice-President & Manager; Sidney L. Katz, Lowell E. Jackson, 
David H. Decker, Roy Miller, Frank B. Heib. 

Detroit — General Motors Bldg Trinity 2-7685 

Ralph Bateman, Manager; W. J. Davis. 

Kansas City— Bryant Bldg Victor 7095 

W. K. Bailey, Manager, Charles Eatough. 

Atlanta — 22 Marietta Street Bldg Walnut 4795 

Fred M. Bell, Manager, Charles Coleman. 

Dallas — Republic Bank Bldg., Frank Brimm Central 7936 

Los Angeles — 530 W. 6th Street Tucker 3219 

Thomas Ray, Mgr. 

San Francisco — Monadnock Bldg Sutter 7498 

Richard S. Railton, Manager. 

Stations — KLRA, Little Rock, Ark.; KVOR, Colorado Springs, Colo.; KLZ, 
Denver, Colo.; WDAE, Tampa, Fla.; WGST, Atlanta, Ga.; WMAZ, Macon, 
Ga.; WTOC, Savannah, KGU, Honolulu, Hawaii; WCFL, Chicago, III.; 
WTAD, Quincy, 111.; WFBM, Indianapolis, Ind.; WMT, Cedar Rapids, la.; 
KRNT, Des Moines, la.; WWL, New Orleans, La.; WLAW, Lawrence, Mass.; 
KGHL, Billings, Mont.; WKRC, Cincinnati, Ohio; WWNC, Ashville, N. C; 
WSPD, Toledo, Ohio; WKY, Oklahoma City, Okla.; WFIL, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; WCAE, Pittsburgh, Pa.; WNAX, Yankton, S. D.; WREC, Memphis, 
Tenn.; USIX, Nashville, Tenn.; KUTA, Salt Lake City, Utah; WISN, Mil- 
waukee, Wise; WOL, Washington, D. C; WHOM, New York, N. Y.; 
WCOP, Boston, Mass. 

JOHN KEATING 

Portland, Ore.—6l6 Studio Bldg. (5) BEacon 4107 

Seattle— 318 Douglas Bldg., (1) Elliott 3300 

R. G. Chastain, James McLoughlin, Manager. 

Stations— KIDO, Boise, Ida.; KRLC, Lewiston, Ida.; KWIL, Albany, Ore.; 
KAST, Astoria, Ore.; KBKR, Baker. Ore.; KBND, Bend, Ore.; KODL, The 
Dalles, Ore.; KORE, Eugene, Ore.; KUIN. Grants Pass, Ore.; KFJI. Klamath 
Falls, Ore.; KLBM, La Grande, Ore.; KOOS, Marshfield, Ore.; KMED, Med- 

153 



ford, Ore.; KWRC, Pendleton, Ore.; KRNR, Roseberg, Ore.; KSLM, Salem, 
Ore.; KXRO, Aberdeen, Wash.; KVOS, Bellingham, Wash.; KELA, Centralia, 
Wash.; KEVE, Everett, Wash.; KWLK, Longview, Wash.; KGY, Olympia, 
Wash.; KMO, Tacoma, Wash.; KUJ, Walla Walla, ash.; KPQ, Wenatchee, 
Wash.; KIT, Yakima, Wash.; KOL, Seattle, Wash.; KHQ, Spokane, Wash.; 
KGA, Spokane, Wash. 

RAY LINTON & CO.* 

New York City— I E. 42nd Street MUrray Hill 2-1809 

Ray Linton, Owner; Blanche Horowitz, Secretary. 
Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Avenue State 6662 

Harold Higgins, Mgr. 

* This firm did not answer questionnaire. 

MACK RADIO SALES CO. 

Camden, N. J. — 18th Floor, City Hall Camden 0907 or 4523 

L. M. Maxwell, Sales Manager. 
Stations— WCAM, Camden, N. J. 

JOSEPH HERSHEY McGILLVRA, INC. 

New York— 366 Madison Avenue (17) MUrray Hill 2-8755 

Joseph H. McGillvra, President; Eugene H. Kraemer, Albert A. Cormier, 
N. P. Colwell. 

Chicago— 35 East Wacker Drive (1) State 5282 

Jack Stewart, Manager; Robert S. Russell, Jack Kamsler. 

Los Angeles— US South Hill Street (13) Michigan 0921 

Forrest Pearson, Lee Willson. 

San Francisco— 621 Mills Building (4) Sutter 1393 

Duncan A. Scott, Dorothy Hill, Maxwell J. Hunter. 

Stations— KLX, Oakland, Calif.; KPAS, Pasadena (Los Angeles), Calif.; 
KROY, Sacramento, Calif.; KVOD, Denver, Colo.; WBRY, Waterbury, 
Conn.; WBML, Macon, Ga.; WNOE, New Orleans, La.; WMEX, Boston, 
Mass.; WLAV, Grand Rapids, Mich.; KCMO, Kansas City, Mo.; WOV, New 
York, N. Y.; WSAY, Rochester, N. Y.; KOME, Tulsa, Okla.; KPAC, Port 
Arthur, Texas; KVNU, Logan, Utah; KLO, Ogden, Utah; KEUB, Price, Utah; 
KOVO, Provo, Utah; WSYB, Rutland, Vt.; KMO, Tacoma, Wash.; KIT, 
Yakima, Wash.; KPQ, Wenatchee, Wash.; WGKV, Charleston, W. Va.; 
KFIO, Spokane, Wash.; KNOE, Monroe, La.; KID, Idaha Falls, Idaho; KVRS, 
Rock Springs, Wyo.; KGHF, Pueblo, Colo.; CKLW, Detroit, Mich. 
XEW-XEQ, Mexico City, Mexico; RHC-Cadena Azul, Havana, Cuba. 
CJCJ, Calgary, Alta.; CJOR, Vancouver, B. C; CKX, Brandon, Man.; CFAR, 
Flin Flon, Man.; CKY, Winnipeg, Man.; CKCW, Moncton, N. B.; CHSJ, 
Saint John, N. B.; CHML, Hamilton, Ont.; CFPL, London, Ont.; CKCO, Ot- 
tawa, Ont.; CFOS, Owen Sound, Ont.; CHOV, Pembroke, Ont.; CKTB, St. 
Catharines, Ont.; CFRB, Toronto, Ont.; CKLW, Windsor, Ont.; CHLP, Mon- 
treal, Que.; CKAC, Montreal, Que.; CHNC, New Carlisle, Que.; CHRC, 
Quebec, ue.; CJBR, Rimouski, Que.; CJRL, Kenora, Ont.; CKRM, Regina, 
Sask.; CJGX, Yorkton, Sask.; CJCH, Halifax, N. S.; CFBR, Brockville, Ont. 

J. P. McKINNEY & SON 

New York City— 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N. L. O'Brien Circle 7-1178 

Chicago — 400 N. Michigan Avenue Superior 9866 

Los Angeles — 6362 Hollywood Blvd Granite 9596 

Homer Griffith, Manager. 
San Francisco — 681 Market St., R. J. Bidwell, Manager Garfield 5512 

Stations— WTHT, Hartford, Conn.; WDAN, Danville, 111.; WOKO, Albany, 

N. Y.; WABY, Albany, N. Y.; WENY, Elmira, N. Y.; WHDL, Olean, N. 

Y.; WHEC, Rochester, N. Y.; WRAK, Williamsport, Pa. 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

(National Spot and Local Sales Division) 

New York City— 30 Rockefeller Plaza Circle 7-8300 

James V. McConnell, National Manager; W. O. Tilenius, W. C. Roux, Asis- 
stant Managers. 

Boston — Hotel Bradford, 5E. Kettell Hancock 4261 

154 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



Cleveland — 815 Superior Ave., N. E., Donald G. Stratton Cherry 0942 

Chicago — Merchandise Mart Superior 8300 

Oliver Morton, Manager. 

Denver — 1625 California Street, James R. MacPherson Main 6211 

Hollywood — Sunset & Vine, Don Norman Hollywood 6161 

San Francisco — Taylor & O'Farrell Sts., C. Nielson . .Sutter 1920 

Washington, D. C. — Trans-Lux Bldg., Mahlon Glascock Republic 5400 

Stations— KPO, San Francisco, Calif.; KOA, Denver, Colo.; WRC, Wash- 
ington, D. C; WMAQ, Chicago, 111.; WOWO-WGL (until 1/45), Fort 
Wayne, Ind.; WBZ-WBZA, Boston-Springfield, Mass.; WEAF, New York, 
N. Y.; WGY, Schenectady, N. Y.; WTAM, Cleveland, Ohio; KYW, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; KDKA, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NATIONAL BROADCAST SALES LTD. 

Toronto — 25 King Street, West ELgin 1 165 

Roy H. Thomson, President; R. A. Leslie, Toronto Office Manager. 

Montreal — 660 St. Catherines St., West Harbour 3051 

Roy Hoff, Manager. 

Stations— CKEY, Toronto, Ont.; CJAD, Montreal, Que.; CJCH, Halifax, 
N. S.; aCKWS, Kingston, Ont.; CHEX, Peterborough, Ont.; CFCH, North 
Bay, Ont.; CJKL, Kirkland Lake, Ont.; CKGB, Timmins, Ont.; CKRN, 
Rouyn, Que.; CKVD, Val d'Or, Que.; CHAD, Amos, Que.; CFPA, Port 
Arthur, Ont. 

NEW ENGLAND RADIO ADVERTISING COMPANY 
Boston— 507 Statler Building Hubbard 3225 

NORTHERN BROADCAST SALES 

Toronto — Bank of Commerce Bldg Elgin 1 165 

R. A. Leslie, Manager; N. D. Brown, C. E. Wingrove. 

Montreal— 310 Keefer Bldg HArbour 3051 

Roy Hoff, Manager. 

Stations— CKWS, Kingston, Ont.; CJKL, Kirkland Lake, Ont.; CFCH, North 
Bay, Ont.; CHEX, Peterborough, Ont.: CKGB, Timmins, Ont.; CKRN, 
Rouyn-Noranda, Que.; CKVD, Val D'Or, Que.; CHAD, Amos (Northern 
Quebec B'casting System). 

NORTHWEST RADIO ADVERTISING CO.* 

Seattle — American Bldg Elliot 5488 

Edwin A. Kraft, General Manager; W. L. Paul, Assistant Manager. 

* Did not answer questionnaire. 

PAN AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

(Latin- American and Foreign Station Representative) 

New York City — 330 Madison Avenue, (17), E. Bernald, Manager MUrray Hill 2-0811 

Chicago— 228 North La Salle St., F. R. Jones, Manager State 5096 

Cleveland — 1635 East Twenty-Fifth St., Alonzo Hawley Prospect 2922 

Hollywood— 6562 Hollywood Blvd., H. O. Griffith Granite 1726 

San Francisco — 681 Market St., S. P. LaDue Douglas 4475 

Seattle— White Bldg., Hal Pearce Main 6626 

Stations: Argentina: Red Argentina de Emisoras Splendid (11-station net- 
work) Bolivia: CP2, La Paz; British Guiana: ZFY, Georgetown; Chile: 
Cooperativa Vitalicia (7-station network); Columbia: Radio Continental 
(4-station network); Costa Rica: TIPG, San Jose; Dominican Republic: 
HIN, Ciudad Trujillo; Ecuador: HCIBF, Quito and HCRB, Guayaquil; El 
Salvador: YSP, San Salvador; Guatemala: TGW, Guatemala City; Haiti: 
HHW and HHBM, Port-au-Prince; Honduras: HRN, Tegucigalpa; Nicara- 
gua: YNPS-YNDS, Managua; Panama: HP5J-HP6J, Panama City; Para- 
guay: ZP9-ZP1, Ascuncion; Peru: Compania Peruana de Radiodifusion (7- 

155 



station network) and OAX4A-OAX4T-OAX4Z, Lima; Puerto Rico: WIAC, 
San Juan; Montevideo; Venezuela: YV5RA-YV5RN, Caracas and YVIRA- 
YVIRV and fVIRK- YVIRL, Maracaibo; Newfoundland; VONF-VONG- 
VONH, St. Johns; KFQD, Ankorage, Alaska. 

JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Avenue FRanklin 2359 

John E. Pearson, Owner; Kay Fisher, Sales; Suzanne Masterson, Office 
Manager; Agnes Terrace, Secretary. 

New York— 250 Park Ave PLaza 8-2255 

Hines H. Hatchett, Manager; John McSweeney, Salesman; Kay Kane, Office 
Mgr.; Florence Albus, Secretary. 

Kansas City, Mo. — Dierks Bldg Grand 2144 

Christine Mitchell, Secretary. 

Stations— WIRE, Indianapolis, Ind.; WAOV, Vincennes, Ind.; KDTH, Du- 
buque, la.; KSAL, Salina, Kans.; WEW, St. Louis, Mo.; KWTO, Springfield, 
Mo.; WLOL, St. Paul, Minn.; WIND, Chicago, 111.; KLCN, Blytheville, Ark.; 
WCAR, Pontiac, Mich.; KGKL, San Angelo, Texas; KPLT, Paris, Texas; , 

KBST, Big Spring, Texas; KRBC, Abilene, Texas; KCMC, Texarkana, Texas; 
WHBL, Sheboygan, Wise; KATE, Albert Lea-Austin, Minn.; KYSM, Man- 
kato, Minn.; KFVS, Cape Giradeau, Mo.; KHMO, Hannibal, Mo.; WKRO, 
Cairo, 111.; WSPB, Sarasota, Fla.; KOAM, Pittsburgh, Pa.; WBIR, Knoxville, 
Tenn.; KTEM, Temple, Tex.; KCMO, Kansas City, Mo.; KWNO, Winona, 
Minn.; KWOC, Poplar Bluffs, Mo.; WINK, Ft. Myers, Fla.; WOV, New 
York, N. Y.; WCMI, Ashland, Ky.; KFDA, Amarillo, Tex.; KGKB, Tyler, 
Tex.; WLAK, Lakeland, Fla.; WLAP, Lexington, Ky.; KCRC, Enid, Okla.; 
KRRV, Sherman, Tex.; KVWC, Vernon, Tex.; Southern Minnesota Radio 
Network. 

JOHN H. PERRY ASSOCIATES 

New York— 310 East 45th St., (17) MUrray Hill 4-1647 

William K. Dorman, Manager; W. T. Kelly, W. T. Reither. 

Chicago — 122 S. Michigan Avenue, O. J. Ranft, Manager ....Harrison 8085 

Detroit — 7338 Woodward Avenue, J. J. Higgins, Manager Madison 0790 

Atlanta — 1220 Rhodfca-Haverty Bldg., Mrs. Alice S. Grant, Manager Walnut 1334 

Philadelphia— 12 South 12th St., Robert Hitchings, Manager Walnut 3555 

Stations— WJHP, Jacksonville, Fla.; WTMC, Ocala, Fla.; WDLP, Panama 

City, Fla.; WCOA, Pensacola, Fla. 

EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY, INC. 

New York City— 11 East 42nd Street MUrray Hill 2-4401 

Edward Petry, President; Henry Christal, Secretary-Treasurer; Henry Ring- 
gold, Albert Young, Jr., Mason McGuire, Lloyd George Venard, Volney F. 
Righter, John Harrington, James O. Parsons, Jr., Max Everett. 

Chicago — 400 N. Michigan Avenue Delaware 8600 

Edward Voynow, Vice-President; John Ashenhurst, Robert Boneil, James 
L. Thompson, Irvin Gross, Buell Herman. 

Detroit — General Motors Bldg Madison 1035 

William Cartwright. 

San Francisco — Russ Bldg., Earle H. Smith Garfield 4010 

Los Angeles — 601 W. 5th Street, Chester Matson Michigan 8729 

St. Louis— Shell Bldg., George Kercher Chestnut 7191 

Stations— KARK, Little Rock, Ark.; KARM, Fresno, Cal.; KFI, Los Angeles, 
Calif.; KQW, San Francisco, Calif.; WICC, Bridgeport, Conn.; WSB, Atlanta, 
Ga.; KFH, Wichita, Kans.; WHAS, Louisville, Ky.; WSMB, New Orleans, 
La.; WBAL, Baltimore, Md.; WNAC, Boston, Mass.; WLLH, Lowell, Mass.; 
WMAS, Springfield, Mass.; WAAB, Worcester, Mass.; WJR, Detroit, Mich.; 
KSTP, St. Paul, Minn.; WDAF, Kansas City, Mo.; KFAB, Lincoln, Nebr.; 
KOIL, Omaha, Nebr.; WBEN, Buffalo, N. Y.; WAGE, Syracuse, N. Y.; 
WGAR, Cleveland, Ohio; KVOO, Tulsa, Okla.; KGW, Portland, Ore.; 
WEAN, Providence, R. I.; WSM, Nashville, Tenn.; WFAA, Dallas, Texas; 
KGKO, Ft. Worth-Dallas, Texas; WBAP, Fort Worth, Texas; KPRC, Hous- 
ton, Texas; WOAI, San Antonio, Texas; KSL, Salt Lake City, Utah; WTAR, 
Norfolk, Va.; WRNL, Richmond, Va.; KOMO, Seattle, Wash.; KHQ, Spo- 
kane, Wash.; KGA, Spokane, Wash.; WTMJ, Milwaukee, Wise; Texas Qual- 
ity Network; Yankee Network, KFOR, Lincoln, Neb.; KTBS, Shreveport, La. 

156 






• • • STATION REPRESENTATIVES • • • 

RALPH L. POWER 

(Australian Representative) 

Los Angeles — 405-7 Van Nuys Bldg. (14) Madison 5617 

Station — Representation of stations in Australia, New Zealand and South 
Africa. 

RADIO ADVERTISING CO. 

New York— 521 Fifth Avenue (17) MUrray Hill 2-2170-1 

Louis J. F. Moore, Manager. 

Chicago — 333 N. Michigan Avenue (1) Central 1742-3 

M. J. McGeehan, Manager. 

Detroit — 28 W. Adams Ave. (26), Robert Baines, Mgr Cherry 8321 

San Francisco — Russ Bldg. (4), David H. Sandeberg, Manager Exbrook 2093 

Los Angeles— 707 South Hill St. (14), J. Leslie Fox Vandike 1901 

Stations— KROC, Rochester, Minn.; WJNO, W. Palm Beach, Fla.; WAZL, 
Hazleton, Pa.; WEST, Easton, Pa.; WCLE, Cleveland, Ohio; WHKC, Colum- 
bus, Ohio; WTOL, Toledo, Ohio; WMBS, Uniontown, Pa.; WKAT, Miami 
Beach, Fla.; WAAT, Newark, N. J.; WHKK, Akron, O. 

RADIO CENTRE LIMITED 

Toronto — 74 Wellington St., West WAverly 2036 

D. Spencer Grow, Manager. 
Station — CJCJ, Calgary, Alberta. 

RADIO REPRESENTATIVES, LTD. 

Toronto — 4 Albert Street WAverly 6151 

J. Slatter, General Manager. 

Montreal — 337 Dominion Square Bldg., W. Dippie, Mgr HArbour 7811 

Stations — CFCN, Calgary, Aha.; CJCJ, Calgary, Aha.; CFRN, Edmonton, 
Alta.; CKNW, New Westminister, B. C; CKMO, Vancouver, B. C; CKPR, 
Fort William, Ont.; CHGS, Summerside, P. E. I.; CKCH, Hull, Que.; CKCV, 
Quebec City, Que.; CHLN, Three Rivers, Que.; CHLT, Sherbrooke, Que.; 
CFQC, Saskatoon, Sask. 

RADIO SALES 

(The SPOT Broadcasting Division of the Columbia Broadcasting System) 

New York — 485 Madison Avenue Wickersham 2-2000 

Howard S. Meighan, Eastern Sales Manager; E. J. Heerdt, Jr., Sales Service 
Manager; Chas. H. Smith, Supervisor of Research; Dick Dorrance, Promotion 
Director; Alice Santti, Mgr., Clearance Dept.; Herbert A. Carlborg, G. R. 
Dunham, Jr., Wilbur Edwards, A. H. Flaten, Don Miller, Roy F. Shults, 
George L. Moscovics, Gordon Owen. 

Chicago — 410 N. Michigan Avenue Whitehall 6000 

J. Kelly Smith, General Sales Manager; Roger Huston, Western Sales Man- 
ager; Sangstrom Hettler, Ted McLoney, J. M. Ward, Wm. Parker. 

St. Louis — Mart Bldg., Carter Ringlep, Sales Manager Central 8240 

Charlotte, N. C. — Wilder Bldg., Royal Penny, Sales Manager Charlotte 3-8833 

San Francisco — Palace Hotel Yukon 1700 

Ole G. Morby, Sales Manager for Northern California & the Northwest. 

Los Angeles — Columbia Square Hollywood 1212 

Meredith Pratt, Sales Manager for Southern California. 

Stations— WAPI, Birmingham, Ala.; KNX, Los Angeles, Calif.; WTOP, 
Washington, D. C; WBBM, Chicago, 111.; WEEI, Boston, Mass.; WCCO, 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.; KMOX, St. Louis, Mo.; WABC, New York, 
N. Y.; WBT, Charlotte, N. C; Columbia California Network; Columbia 
New England Network; Columbia Pacific Network. 

157 



WILLIAM G. RAMBEAU COMPANY 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave Andover 5566 

William G. Rambeau, Owner; Mary S. Rucld, John R. Livingston, Ila Shaw. 

New York City — Chanin Bldg LExington 2-1820 

Paul S. Wilson, Manager; Helen Shatsick, Dorothy P. Phillips. 

Los Angeles — 5833 Fernwood Ave., Fred L. Allen, Manager Granite 3636 

Stations— KTKC, Visalia, Calif.; KFMB, San Diego, Calif.; KJBS, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif.; KMYR, Denver, Colo.; WNAB, Bridgeport, Conn.; WATR, 
Waterbury, Conn.; KBUR, Burlington, La.; WJEJ, Hagerstown, Md.; WDSM, 
Duluth-Superior, Minn.; WDGY, Minneapolis, Minn.; WIL, St. Louis, Mo.; 
WJTN, Jamestown, N. Y.; WHN, New York, N. Y.; WHEB, Portsmouth, 
N. H.; WRAW, Reading, Pa.; WHBQ, Memphis, Tenn.; KEVR, Seattle, 
Wash.; KFWB, Los Angeles, Calif.; KBON, Omaha, Neb.; KFUN, Las Vegas, 
N. M.; WFCI, Pawtucket, R. L; WTSP, St. Petersburg, Fla.; WCLO, Janes- 
ville, Wise; KBIZ, Ottumwa, la.; WNBH, New Bedford, Mass.; WOCB, 
Cape Cod, Mass.; WTAW, College Station, Tex. 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO. 

Chicago — 435 N. Michigan Avenue (11) Superior 4473 

Paul H. Raymer, Walter I. Tenney, Richard F. Kopf, Alan H. Schroeder. 

New York— 366 Madison Avenue (17) MUrray Hill 2-8689 

Fred C. Brokaw, Peirce L. Romaine, Paul Tiemer, Garfield C. Packard. 

Detroit— 28 W. Adams St. (2), Robert B. Rains Cherry 8321 

San Francisco — Russ Bldg. (4), David H. Sandeberg Exbrook 2093 

Los Angeles— 707 South Hill St. (14), J. Leslie Fox, Walter O. Miles Vandike 1901 

Stations— WBRC, Birmingham, Ala.; KTAR, Phoenix, Ariz.; KVOA, Tucson, 
Ariz.; KERN, Bakersfield, Calif.; KXO, El Centro, Calif.; KMJ, Fresno, Calif.; 
KMPC, Los Angeles, Calif.; KFBK, Sacramento, Calif.; KFSD, San Diego, 
Calif.; KTMS, Santa Barbara, Calif.; KWG, Stockton, Calif.; WDRC, Hart- 
ford, Conn.; WDEL, Wilmington, Del.; WSBT, South Bend, Ind.; KWFT, 
Wichita Falls, Kans.; WGAN, Portland, Me.; WCAO, Baltimore, Md.; 
WTAG, Worcester, Mass.; Michigan Radio Network; WXYZ, Detroit, 
Mich.; WOOD, Grand Rapids, Mich.; KWK, St. Louis, Mo.; WHK, Cleve- 
land, Ohio; KOH, Reno, Nev.; WSYR, Syracuse, N. Y.; WTRY, Troy, 
N. Y.; WKBN, Youngstown, Ohio; KEX, Portland, Ore.; WKBO, Harris- 
burg, Pa.; WGAL, Lancaster, Pa.; WORK, York, Pa.; WPRO, Providence, 
R. I.; WDOD, Chattanooga, Tenn.; WLAC, Nashville, Tenn.; WRVA, 
Richmond, Va.; KJR, Seattle, Wash.; Arizona Broadcasting Co.; McClatchy 
Bee Line; Tri-Penn Group; WJJD, Chicago, 111.; WSAI, Cincinnati, O.; 
WINS, New York, N. Y.; WCAU, Philadelphia, Pa. (Pacific). 

REGIONAL RADIO SALES COMPANY 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Avenue Central 6595 

George Clifford, Partner. 

Milwaukee— 231 W. Wisconsin Br. 2579 

Myles H. Johns, Sr., Partner; Winifred Land, assistant to Mr. Johns. 
Stations— WOSH, Oshkosh, Wise; WRJN, Racine, Wise; WOMT, Mani- 
towoc, Wise; WIGM, Medford, Wise; KGDE, Fergus Falls, Minn.; KVOX, 
Moorhead, Minn.;WHAT, Philadelphia, Pa. 

VIRGIL REITER & CO. 

Chicago — 400 N. Michigan Ave. (11) Superior 5072 

Virgil Reiter, Jr., Owner. 

Stations— WIBX, Utica, N. Y.; WCAU, Philadelphia, Pa. 

"RHC— CADENA AZUL" 

New York— 220 West 42nd Street Wisconsin 7-1166 

Humberto D. Gonzalez, U. S. Representative. 

Stations— Long Wave: CMAN, Pinar Del Rio, Cuba; CMCY, Habana, Cuba; 
CMHI, Santa Clara, Cuba; CMJN, Camaguey, Cuba; CMKV, Holguin, Cuba; 
CMKN, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba; Short Wave: COCY, Habana, Cuba; COHI, 
Santa Clara, Cuba. Note — All these stations are owned by the Cuban Blue 
Network, RHC Cadena Azul, (affiliated with the Columbia Broadcasting 
System) . 

SEARS & AYER, INC. 

Chicago — 612 N. Michigan Ave Superior 8177 

B. H. Sears, President; A. T. Sears, Secretary-Treasurer. 

New York City — 295 Madison Ave., P. Joseph Bogner, Jack Martin LExington 2-0772 

Kansas City— 15 W. 10th St., Wm. Temple, Mgr Victor 0021 

158 



• • • STATION REPRESENTATIVES > • . 

Hollywood — 6362 Hollywood Blvd., Homer Griffith, Mgr Granite 6113 

San Francisco — 681 Market St., Edith Olson Douglas 4475 

Portland — Studio Bldg. (5), James McLoughlin, Mgr Beacon 4107 

Seattle— 318 Douglas Bldg., R. G. Chastain, Mgr Elliot 3300 

Stations— WHMA, Anniston, Ala.; WJBY, Gadsden, Ala.; WMOB, Mobile, 
Ala.; WMSD, Muscle Shoals, Ala.; WHBB, Selma, Ala.; WKEU, Griffin, Ga.; 
WMTV, East St. Louis, 111.; WGIL, Galesburg, 111.; WCBS, Springfield, 111.; 
KTSW, Emporia, Kans.; WSON, Henderson, Ky.; WHOP, Hopkinsville, 
Ky.; WPAD, Paducah, Ky.; WHDF, Calumet-Houghton, Mich.; WJMS, Iron- 
wood, Mich.; WGCM, Biloxi-Gulfport, Miss.; WCBI, Columbus, Miss.; 
WFOR, Hattiesburg, Miss.; KWOS, Jefferson, Mo.; WMBH, Joplin, Mo.; 
WTMV, East St. Louis, 111.; WGH, Galesburg, 111.; WCBS, Springfield, 111.; 
KORN, Fremont, Nebr.; KGFW, Kearney, Nebr.; WBTA, Batavia, N. Y.; 
WLPM, Suffolk, Va.; WATW, Ashland, Wise; KDFN, Casper, Wyo.; 
KPOW, Powell, Wyo.; KWYO, Sheridan, Wyo.; KWFC, Hot Springs, Ark.; 
WJBC, Bloomington, 111.; WROX, Clarksdale, Miss.; WELO, Tupelo, Miss.; 
KTTS, Springfield, Mo.; WATN, Watertown, N. Y. 

SPOT SALES, INC. 

New York — 400 Madison Avenue ELdorado 5-5040 

Loren L. Watson, President; Fred Wester, District Manager; Bill Ewing, 
Acct. Exec; Griff Thompson, Special Operations. 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave Franklin 8520 

Edgar H. Twamley, District Mgr.; Willie Kissick, Eloise Heath. 

San Francisco — 5 Third St., John Livingston, Dist. Mgr EXbrook 3558 

Hollywood — 1650 Cosmo St., John Livingston, Dist. Mgr Hollywood 8318 

Stations— WABI, Bangor, Me.; WCAP, Atlantic City, N. J.; WENT, Glov- 
ersville, N. Y.; WGPC, Albany, Ga.; WHB, Kansas City, Mo.; WHYN, 
Holyoke, Mass.; WMFF, Plattsburgh, N. Y.; WSBA, York, Pa.; WSTV, 
Steubenville, O.; KBON, Omaha, Neb.; KGER, Long Beach, Cal.; KICA, 
Clovis, N. M.; KINY, Juneau, Alaska; KTKN, Ketchikan, Alaska; KYA, 
San Francisco, Cal.; WATL, Atlanta, Ga.; WRBL, Columbus, Ga.; WTBO, 
Cumberland, Md.; WHDH, Boston, Mass.; WTTM, Trenton, N. J.; WAKR, 
Akron, Ohio; WCED, DuBois, Pa.; WHJB, Greensburg, Pa.; WKST, New 
Castle, Pa.; WIBG, Philadelphia, Pa.; KQV, Pittsburgh, Pa.; WMPS, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 

STOVIN & WRIGHT 

Toronto— 1402 Victory Bldg ADelaide 9184 

H. N. Stovin, Partner; C. W. Wright, Partner; W. Enger, J. Knox, G. Arnot. 

Montreal — 608 Keefer Bldg., J. R. Pearcey, Mgr Plateau 8749 

Winnipeg — A. J. Messner, Manager, c/o Radio Station CKY Winnipeg 92191 

F. Ward, S. L. Irwin. 

Stations— CJOR, Vancouver, B. C; CKLN, Nelson, B. C; CFPR, Prince 
Rupert, B. C; CFAR, Flin Flon, Man.; CKX, Brandon, Man.; CKY, Winni- 
peg, Man.; CKCW, Moncton, N. B.; CHSJ, Saint John, N. B.; CFBR, Brock- 
ville, Ont.; CHML, Hamilton, Ont.; CKCR, Kitchener, Ont.; CFPL, London, 
Ont.; CKCO, Ottawa, Ont.; CFOS, Owen Sound, Ont.; CHPS, Parry Sound, 
Ont.; CHOV, Pembroke, Ont.; CKLW, Windsor, Ont.; CKAC, Montreal, 
Que.; CJBR, Rimouski, Que.; CHGB, Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere, Que.; 
CJRL, Kenora, Ont.; CJGX, Yorktown, Sask. 

TAYLOR— HOWE— SNODEN RADIO SALES 

Amarillo, Texas — Radio Building Amarillo 4242 

Alex Keese, General Manager; O. L. Ted Taylor, Gene Howe, T. E. Snowden, 

Partners. 

Chicago — 360 North Michigan (1), Tom Peterson, Mgr State 5260 

Dallas — 806 Tower Petroleum Bldg., C. Melville, Mgr Riverside 5663 

Guy Bradford, Assistant Manager. 

New York City— 19 W. 44th St., Jack Keasler, Mgr MU 2-2485 

San Francisco— 681 Market St. (28) Garfield 5512 

Hollywood— 6362 Hollywood Blvd. (28) Granit 6113 

Seattle— 2101 Smith Tower Elliott 7417 

Stations — KGNC, Amarillo, Texas; KFYO, Lubbock, Texas; KTSA, San An- 

159 



tonio, Texas; KRGV, Weslaco, Texas; KFDM, Beaumont, Texas; KTOK, 
Oklahoma City, Okla.; KRMD, Shreveport, La.; The Lone Star Chain; The 
Oklahoma Network. 

WILLIAM M. TEMPLE 

Kansas City, Mo.— 15 W. Tenth Street Victory 0021 

TEXAS DAILY PRESS LEAGUE, INC. 

Dallas — 507 Texas Bank Bldg., Irl W. Brown, Manager Central 9026 

New York — 60 East 42 nd St., Lowell W. Brown, Manager MUrray Hill 6-1788 

Chicago — 360 N. Michigan Ave., Don B. Milliken, Manager Franklin 5241 

St. Louis— 915 Olive St., Fred J. Wright, Manager Chestnut 1965 

San Francisco — 155 Sansome St., R. J. Birch, Manager Davenport 4164 

EDWARD S. TOWNSEND COMPANY 

San Francisco — Russ Bldg., Edward S. Townsend, Owner Exbrook 2164 

Stations— WIOD, Miami, Fla.; WOR, New York, N. Y. 

TRI-CITY STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 

Lynchburg, Va. — Allied Arts Bldg., Philip P. Allen, General Manager Lynchburg 3032 

Stations— WBTM, Danville, Va.; WLVA, Lynchburg, Va.; WSLS, Roa- 
noke, Va. 

J. FRANKLYN VIOLA AND COMPANY 

(Foreign Language Representative*) 

New York City— 152 W. 42nd St., J. Franklyn Viola, President CHickering 4-3254 

♦Stations represented for the broadcasting and producing of foreign language programs only. 

THE WALKER COMPANY 

New York— 551 Fifth Avenue MUrray Hill 2-7986-7 

J. Wythe Walker, C. Otis Rawalt, Frederic E. Lake. 

Chicago — 360 North Michigan Ave., Hal Holman State 5262 

Kansas City, Mo.— 15 W. 10th St., Wm. Temple Victory 0021 

Los Angeles — 568 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Walter Biddick Richmond 6184 

Stations — KFXJ, Grand Junction, Colo.; KFKA, Greeley, Colo.; KSEI, Poca- 
tello, Ida.; KTFI, Twin Falls, Ida.; WABI, Bangor, Me.; KGIR, Butte, Mont.; 
WJAG, Norfolk, Nebr.; KGNF, North Platte, Nebr.; KLPM, Minot, N. D.; 
WICA, Ashtabula, Ohio; KABR, Aberdeen, S. D.; KOTA, Rapid City, S. D.; 
Z-Bar Net (KGIR, Butte, Mont.; KPFA, Helena, Mont.; KRBM, Bozeman, 
Mont.); WOLF, Syracuse, N. Y.; WBRK, Pittsfield, Mass.; WAIR, Winston- 
Salem, N. C; WLBC, Muncie, Ind.; KOCY, Oklahoma City, Okla.; KGBS, 
Harlingen, Texas;KAWD, Brownwood, Texas; KXL, Portland, Ore.; KFBY, 
Spokane, Wash.; The Tobacco Network, North Carolina. 

WAXELBAUM & CO. 

(Foreign Language Representative) 

New York— 10 East 43rd St. (17) MUrray Hill 2-7398 

Benjamin Waxelbaum, Owner. 

Stations — Representative for broadcasting and producing of foreign-language 

programs only. 

WEED & CO. 

New York — 350 Madison Avenue VAnderbilt 6-4542 

Joseph J. Weed, President; Grace Hennesey, Secretary. 
Chicago— 203 N. Wabash Avenue Randolph 7730 

C. C. Weed, Vice-President. 

Detroit — General Motors Bldg., Charles M. Adell, Manager Madison 6366 

Boston — Statler Bldg., Dana Baird, Manager Hubbard 5677 

Hollywood — 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Lincoln P. Simonds, Manager Hillside 8611 

San Francisco — Mark Hopkins Hotel, Lincoln P. Simonds, Manager Yukon 1899 

Stations— KSFO, San Francisco, Calif.; WTIC, Hartford, Conn.; WWDC, 

Washington, D. C; WMBR, Jacksonville, Fla.; WSUN, St. Petersburg, Fla.; 

WSOY, Decatur, 111.; WTAX, Springfield, 111.; WHBU, Anderson, Ind.; 

WEOA, Evansville, Ind.; WGBF, Evansville, Ind.; WHOT, South Bend, 

Ind.; WBOW, Terre Haute, Ind.; KGLO, Mason City, la.; KGGF, Coffeyville, 

160 



STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



Kan.; KALB, Alexandria, La.; WRDO, Augusta, Me.; WLBZ, Bangor, Me.; 
WCSH, Portland, Me.; WORC, Worcester, Mass.; WSLI, Jackson, Miss.; 
KFBB, Great Falls, Mont.; WFEA, Manchester, N. T.; KGGM, Albuquerque, 
N. M.; WEBR, Buffalo, N. Y.; WMCA, New York, N. Y.; WWNY, Water- 
town, N. Y.; WAKR, Akron, O.; WCOL, Columbus, Ohio; WIZE, Spring- 
field, Ohio; WAYS, Charlotte, N. C; WRAL, Raleigh, N. C; WING, Day- 
ton, Ohio; WERC, Erie, Pa.; WJAR, Providence, R. I.; WFBC, Greenville, 
S. C; WDEE, Chattanooga, Tenn.; WRR, Dallas, Texas; KFJZ, 
Fort Worth, Texas; Texas State Network; WCAX, Burlington, Vt.; WTAQ, 
Green Bay, Wise; New England Regional Network; CFAC, Calgary, Alta.; 
Marjorie Mills Hour; CJCA, Edmonton, Alta.; CFGP, Grand Prairie, Alta.; 
CJOC, Lethbridge, Alta.; CKOV, Kelowna, B. C; CJAT, Trail, B. C; 
CKWX, Vancouver, B. C; CJVI, Victoria, B. C; CKRC, Winnipeg, Man.; 
CFNB, Fredericton, N. B.; CHNS, Halifax, N. S.; CJCB, Sydney, N. S.; 
CKOC, Hamilton, Ont.; CKWS, Kingston, Ont.; CKJL, Kirkland Lake, Ont.; 
CFCH, North Bay, Ont.; CHEX, Peterborough, Ont.; CJCS, Stratford, Ont.; 
CKSO, Sudbury, Ont.; CKGB, Timmins, Ont.; CFCY, Charlottetown, P. E. I.; 
CFCF, Montreal, Que.; CHAB, Moose Jaw, Sask.; CKBI, Prince Albert, Sask.; 
CKCK, Regina, Sask.; KNOW, Austin, Texas; KTHT, Houston, Texas; 
KABC, San Antonio, Texas; WACO, Waco, Texas; WKWK, Wheeling, 
W. Va. 

HOWARD H. WILSON COMPANY 

Chicago — 75 East Wacker Drive Central 8744 

Howard H. Wilson, Owner; S. M. Aston, George E. Halleman. 

New York— 551 Fifth Ave MUrray Hill 6-1230 

David F. Crosier, Manager; W. S. Clark. 

Hollywood — 6362 Hollywood Blvd., Homer O. Griffith Granite 6113 

San Francisco — 681 Market St., E. Olson, Mgr Garfield 5512 

Seattle— 318 Douglas Bldg., R. G. Chastain, Mgr Elliott 3300 

Portland (Ore.) — Studio Bldg., James McLoughlin, Mgr Beacon 4107 

Stations— WCOV, Montgomery, Ala.; WHBF, Rock Island, 111.; WDZ, Tus- 
cola, 111.; WDNC, Durham, N. C; WPIC, Sharon, Pa.; KELO, Sioux Falls, 
S. D.; KSOO, Sioux Falls, S. D.; WJHL, Johnson City, Tenn.; KROD, 
El Paso, Texas; WDEV, Waterbury, Vt.; WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va.; WKBH, 
La Crosse, Wise; WIBA, Madison, Wise; WEMP, Milwaukee, Wise; 
WAIT, Chicago, 111.; WHCU, Ithaca, N. Y.; WMAM, Marinette, Wise; 
WSAU, Wausau, Wise; WKMO, Kokomo, Ind.; WCOS, Columbia, S. C; 
WEBQ, Harrisburg, 111.; KPHO, Phoenix, Ariz.; KAVE, Carlsbad, N. M.; 
KUJ, Walla Walla, Wash. 

CFCN, Calgary, Alta.; CFRN, Edmonton, Alta.; CKPR, Fort William, Ont.; 
CFQC, Saskatoon, Sask.; CKCH, Hull, Que.; CHLT, Sherbrooke, Que. 

HELEN WOOD 

New York— 551 Fifth Ave. (17) VAnderbilt 6-0522 

Helen Wood, Manager; Lionel E. Colton, Account Executive; Margaret Sands, 
Office Manager. 

Stations— WSRR, Stamford, Conn.; WSNY, Schenectady, N. Y.; WIBX, 
Utica, N. Y.; Connecticut State Network. 

ADAM J. YOUNG, JR., INC. 

New York — 11 West 42nd Street LOngacre 3-1926 

Adam J. Young, Jr., President; Joanna Scott, Secretary. 

Chicago — 55 E. Washington Street Andover 5448 

Robert S. Russell, Manager; Dorothy Warner, Secretary. 
Stations— CKLW, Detroit, Mich.; CKX, Brandon, Man., Canada; CHML, 
Hamilton, Ont.; CJAD, Montreal, Que.; CKAC, Montreal, Que.; CFRB, 
Toronto, Ont.; CHUM, Toronto, Ont.; CJOR, Vancouver, B. C; CKY, 
Winnipeg, Man. 

161 




United Press began supplying news for radio 
in 1935, the first major service to do so. Every 
month since then its client list has lengthened. 
It is the first agency to supply news to all 48 
states. Both in the U. S. and abroad, it delivers 
news to more stations than do all other services 
combined. First to start, U. P. today is still, and 
more clearly than ever, first in the radio field. 



UNITED 
PRESS 
RADIO 
NEWS 



162 



NEWS SERVICES 



International News Service 

New York— 235 East 45th Street MUrray Hill 2-0131 

Executives 

President Joseph V. Connolly 

Editor-in-Chief Barry Faris 

Managing Editor Seymour Berkison 

Business Manager Walter E. Moss 

Sales Manager Frank J. Nicht 

Press Association, Inc. (Associated Press) 

New York— 50 Rockefeller Plaza Circle 7-7363 

Executives 

General Manager William J. McCambridge 

Assistant General Manager Oliver Gramling 

Radio News Director Tom O'Neil 

Radio News Association 

New York— 521 Fifth Avenue MUrray Hill 2-8198 

President Herbert Moore 

Reuters 

New York— 50 Rockefeller Plaza Circle 6-3960 

Executives 

Manager D. Kimpton Rogers 

News Editor Stanley Burch 

Secretary of Accountants Sally Ojala 

Chief Washington Correspondent Paul Scottrankine 

Senior Editor Robert Vivian 

Transradio Press Service, Inc. 

New York— 521 Fifth Avenue MUrray Hill 2-4053-4 

Executives 
President Herbert Moore 

United Press Associations 

New York— 220 East 42nd Street MUrray Hill 2-0400 

Executives 

President Hugh Bcrillie 

Vice-President & General Business Manager. . E. M. Williams 

Radio News Manager Phil Newsom 

Radio Sales Manager A. F. Harrison 

163 




The Cast of "The Boys from Boise," Television's first full length, 
original musical comedy, sponsored by ESQUIRE Magazine. 



"Mark well this evening of Septem- 
ber 28, 1944. This is the night tele- 
vision came of age . . . 'Boise' is to 
video what the late Thomas Edison's 
Train Robbery film was to movies, and 
a decade from now the trade will 
regard it as such." 

—THE BILLBOARD 



"Broadway last week had its premiere 
of' Bloomer Girl, ' but over on Madison 
Avenue there was an event that may 
be longer remembered. It was the 
premiere of 'The Boys From Boise,' 
the first full-length musical comedy 
to be written especially for television." 
—NEW YORK TIMES 



^>^ {^ 



t£4uam 



istl "lis, 

50 East 42 Street, New York 17, N. Y. 



ADVERTISING 
* AGENCIES * 



Listing includes agencies placing network and important spot 
business during 1944 and those handling larger local accounts. 

Key to Symbols of Membership and Recognition Abbreviation* 

AAAA . . . American Association of Advertising Agencies 

ABC . . . Audit Bureau of Circulation 

ABP . . . Associated Business Papers 

ANPA . . . American Newspaper Publishers' Association 

APA . . . Agricultural Publishers' Association 

FAAG . . . First Advertising Agency Group 

NOAB . . . National Outdoor Advertising Bureau 

OAAA . . . Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Inc. 

PPA . . . Periodical Publishers' Association 

PRB . . . Pacific Recognition Bureau 

SAAA . . . Southwestern Association of Advt. Agencies 

SNPA . . . Southern Newspaper Publishers' Association 



AD MASTERS ADV. & PUBLISHING 
CORP. 

519 11th St., N.W., Washington 4, D. C. 
Officers 

President John E. Waterfield 

Treasurer Edmund S. Goss 

Radio Account Placed— WINX, Washing- 
Ion, D. C. 

• 

ADVERTISING, INC. 

1523-29 Central National Bank Bldg., 

Richmond, Va. 

Phone 32800 & 32809 

ANPA— SNPA— APA 

First Advertising Agency Group 

Officers 

President J. Lynn Miller 

Vice-President M. T. Miller 

Secretary-Radio Director. .Alicia G. Smithers 

Production Manager W. H. Hoxie 

Radio Accounts Placed — Southern Dairies, 
R. F. & P. Railroad, Richmond Maid Mfg. 
Co., Henry R. Haase Furs, Sydnor & Hundley, 
Inc. # 

ADVERTISERS BROADCASTING 
CO., INC. 

117 West 46th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone BRyant 9-1176 

Officers 

Executive Director M. Keilson 



Radio Director Sholom Rubinstein 

Producer Jacob F. Keilson 

Continuity Chief Jacob I. Freedman 

Scripts & Commercials Morris Rivlin 

Program Planning David M. Hausdorff 

Radio Accounts Placed — Foreign Language 
Programs: General Food Corp. (Maxwell 
House Coffee, Diamond Crystal Salt, Sanka 
Coffee, Jell-0 Puddings, Baker's Cocoa); 
Horowitz-Margareten; I. Rokeach & Sons; 
R. B. Davis Co. (Cocomalt, Davis 
Baking Powder, Cut-Rite Waxed Paper; San 
Fay Tissue) ; Colgate Palmolive-Peet Co. 
(Colgate Dental Cream); B. T. Babbit Co. 
(Bab-O) ; Francis H. Leggett Co. (Premier 
Food Products) ; American Home Products 
(Anacin, BiSoDol, Kolynos Tooth Paste and 
Powder, Old English Household Products, 
Dexta, New Hair Groom) ; Best Foods Co. 
(Heckers' Cream Farina, H-0 Oats, Hillman's 
Mayonnaise) ; Ralston Purina Co. (Ralston, 
Instant Ralston, Shredded Ralston, Ry-Krisp) ; 
Barbasol Co. (Barbasol Brushless Shaving 
Cream) ; Penick & Ford, Ltd. (My-T-Fine 
Desserts) ; Ex-Lax, Inc. (E-Lax) ; Dugan 
Brothers (Dugan Breads) ; Carter Products, 
Inc. (Carter's Little Liver Pills) ; Breakstone 
Bros. (Breakstone's Food Products) ; "The 
'Junket' Folks"; General Baking Co. (Bond 
Bread & Cakes) ; Florida Citrus Exchange 
(Florigold Oranges & Grapefruit); Pillsbury 
Flour Mills Co. (Pillsbury's Farina). 



165 




i\u55el II HI. Speeds network 6no 
on the air toauu - - - 

^/^ "Raleigh Room" with 
HILDEGARDE 

for Brown &■ Williamson Tobacco Corporation 

*J^ "Carton of Cheer" starring 

HENNY YOUNGMAN with .... 

CAROL BRUCE & EDDIE HOWARD'S BAND 

for Brou'n 6> Williamson Tobacco Corporation 

_/% "People Are Funny" 

for Brown &■ Williamson Tobacco Corporation 



WS 



"Reveille Roundup" with 

THE GOLDEN GATE QUARTETTE 



ft 

for The Grove Laboratories, Jnc 



'World News Parade" with 
AAX HILL 

for W. A. Sheaffer Pen Company 



ft 

• MAX HILL 



RUSSEL M. SEEDS COMPANY, Advertising 

Palmolive Building Chicago 11, Illinois 

166 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



ADVERTISING & SALES 
COUNCIL, INC. 

Winchester, Va. 
PPA 

President & Time Buyer John Freihurg 

Account Placed — O'Sullivan Ruhher Co., 
Inc. 

• 

AETNA ADVERTISING AGENCY 

1776 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Phone, Circle 7-7510 

ABP 

Officers 

President Lawrence S. Morris 

President Julia Morris 

Radio Accounts Placed — WOR (Iceland 
and Latin Quarter), WJZ (Follow the Girls), 
WMCA (Blackstone Hotel, Miami, Fla.). 
• 

ALLEN & REYNOLDS. INC. 

833 Insurance Bldg. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Phone Atlantic 4445 

ANPA— APA— APB 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Earl Allen 

Executive-Viee-President-Secretary, 

Milton H. Reynolds 

Vice-President Harold Roll 

Vice-President Robert Savage 

• 

R. H. ALBER CO. 

151 So. Broadway, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

Phone PRospect 3331 

ANPA 

President R. H. Alher 

Spot Time Buyer Pauline Hagen 

Radio Account Placed — Gospel B'casting 
Assn. 

• 

ALLIED ADVERTISING AGENCIES 

167 S. Vermont, Los Angeles 4, Cal. 

Phone, Drexel 7331 

Officers 

President W. F. Gardner 

Vice-President A. H. Esary 

General Production Mgr W. H. Welsh 

Time & Space Buyer .Shirley Peron 

Los Angeles Office Mgr John T. Bradley 

Branch Offices 

725 Hearst Bldg., 3rd & Market Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone, Douglas 7018 

1001 Northern Life Tower 

Seattle 1, Wash. 

Phone, Elliott 0936 

Time & Space Buyer Florence Hoff 

317 American Bank Building 
Portland 5, Oregon 
Phone, Atwater 1926 



ANFENGER ADVERTISING 
AGENCY. INC. 

1706 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Phone CHestnut 6380 
AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Radio Director Vernon L. Morelock 

Asst. Radio Directors Ray D. Williams, 

Lynn Westbury Brown 

Traffic Jean Gose 

Television Director Vernon L. Morelock 

Branch Office 

1050 Canal Bldg., New Orleans, La. 

Phone Raymond 0845 

Manager Walter Winius 

Radio Director Bill Ryan 

Asst. Radio Dir Rita White Hennessy 

Radio Accounts Placed — Falls City Brew- 
ing Co., Jackson Brewing Co., Seven-Up 
Bottling Co., Jefferson Hotel, St. Louis Dairy 
Council, Reardon Co., Lion Oil Refining 
Co., Meyer Bros. Drug Co., American Pack- 
ing Co., Becker-Bischoff Chemical Co., 
Merit Clothing Co., Inc., Wenzel Tent & 
Duck Co. 

• 

ANDERSON. DAVIS & PLATTE. INC. 

50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone COlumbus 5-4868 

PPA — ANPA 

Officers 

President T. H. Anderson, Jr. 

Vice-President H. H. Smith 

Secretary-Treasurer-Time Buyer. .. .Lewis G. 
Van Akin. 

Branch Office 
821 15th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Phone NA 7142 
Radio Accounts Placed — Alexander Smith 
& Sons Carpet Co. (national spot, F. Schu- 
macher & Co. (national spot), Dry Dock 
Savings Institution (local). 

ANIOL & AULD 

Transit Tower, San Antonio, Tex. 

Phone Fannin 9148 

ABP— SNPA— SAAA 

Officers 

President Claude B. Aniol 

• 

ARROW ADVERTISING AGENCY 

79 Wall St., New York 5, N. Y. 

Phone WHirehall 4-8193 

Officers 

Radio Director Rosetta Valenti 

Space Buyer Angelo Sava 

Copy Chief H. D. Kline 

Marketing Dir Win. Balog 

Radio Accounts Placed — Colonial House 
Candies, Central Opera House, Times Sq. 
Motors, David's, Ridd Labs., Inc., Furniture 
Industry of America. 



167 



THE DANNY KAYE SHOW 

with HARRY JAMES 
and his MUSIC MAKERS 

PABST BREWING COMPANY 

PABST BLUE RIBBON BEER 




«. 



STAe ^4ieAc/io/llaft 0/teta gPtebenfa 



THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COMPANY 



PAINTS 



ma f /lis r^oyat ' (JamJ/am 




LARUS & BROTHER CO., INC. 
CHELSEA CIGARETTES AND EDGEWORTH PIPE TOBACCO 






TflNGEE 

''VARIETIES" with 

Sammy Kaye, Paul Winchell 

and Jerry Mahoney 

...TANGEE COSMETICS 



WARWICK & LEGLER, INC. 



T/SNGEE 

"SERENADE" 

w.th SAMMY KAYE \~ 

GEORGE W. LUFT COMPANY 



NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 



HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



ASSOCIATED ADVERTISING 
AGENCY, INC. 

Florida Natl. Bank Bldg., Jacksonville 2, Fla. 

Phone 3-1253 

ABP— SNPA— PPA 

Officers 

President M. Thayer Newman 

Executive Vice-President Hunter Lynde 

Vice-President Gordon Stewart 



THE AITKIN-KYNETT COMPANY 

1400 South Penn Square 

Philadelphia 2, Pa. 

Phone Rittenhouse 7810 

AAAA — ABC — NOAB — ABP — ANPA 

PPA — SAAA . . SNPA 

Officers 

Senior Partner-Time Buyer. . . .H. H. Kynett 

Partner A. K. Aitkin 

Partner M. E. Goldman 

Radio Director D. Langan 

Radio Accounts Placed — Stephano Bros.; 
Phillips Packing Co.; R. M. Hollingshead 
Corp. 



ATHERTON & CURRIER, INC. 

420 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone MOhawk 4-8795 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President J. W. Atherton 

Vice-President Lester Stone 

Secretary W. T. Tieman 

Treasurer H. P. Francis 

Time Buyer Wm. T. Tieman 

Program Director J. Dennis Molnar 

Branch Office 

100 Adelaide St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Radio Accounts Placed — Cuticura, 

Humphreys, Eno, North American Dye Corp., 

Scott's Emulsion, "Brylcreem," Phelps Dodge 

Refining Corp. 

• 

AUBREY, MOORE & WALLACE, INC. 

230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Randolph 0830 

ANPA — ABP — PPA — APA 

Officers 

President James T. Aubrey 

Vice-Presidents John C. Moore, 

John J. Finlay, L. O. Wilson. 
Radio Time Buyer-Production. John H. North 
Radio Accounts Placed — Chicago Solvay 
Coke Co., International Harvester Co., Mc- 
Ilhenney Co. (Tabasco), McKenzie Milling 
Co., Old Colony Beverages, Orange-Crush 
Co., Williamson Candy Co. (Oh Henry), 
O-Cedar Corp., Wyler & Co. 



N. W. AYER & SON. INC. 

West Washington Square Philadelphia 6, Pa. 

Phone Lombard 0100 

ANPA— PPA— ABP— APA— OAAA 

Officers 

President H. A. Batten 

Executive Vice-Presidents. .Gerold M. Lauck, 
Clarence L. Jordan 

Branch Offices 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-0200 

Radio Dept. 
Vice-President In Charge of Radio, 

H. L. McClinton 

Manager Radio Dept Robert Collins 

Talent Marge Kerr 

Comm. Copy Director Philip A. Young 

Business Manager T. J. McDermott 

Chief Time Buyer Clarence G. Cosby 

Radio Publicity Wauhillau La Hay 

Time Buyer Paul Kizenberger 

Television Director Donald N. McClure 

Comm. Films Director.. G. David Gudebrod 

Producers Wallace R. Magill, 

Les Quailey, J. F. Rourke, Charles A. 
Herbert, Joseph Ripley 

Writers Dorothy Zimmer, 

Jean Williams, Jean E. Bouillet, Ted 
Byron, Jay H . Smolin, Douglas W. 
Gibson 
Statler Office Bldg., Boston 16, Mass. 
Phone Hubbard 4970 

Vice-President E. Craig Greiner 

203 Taft Bldg., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Phone Granite 3697 

Manager Herbert C. Sanford 

135 S. LaSalle St., Chicago 3, 111. 
Phone Randolph 3456 

Vice-President Sterling E. Peacock 

235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 
Phone Sutter 2534 

Vice-President Carl J. Eastman 

2680 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 
Phone Randolph 3800 

Manager Thomas Jack Henry 

231 Dillingham Bldg., Honolulu 16, Hawaii 

Manager John S. Coonley 

Grosvenor House, Park Lane 

London Wl, England 

Manager Mortimer Bryans 

Radio Accounts Placed — Atlantic Refining 
Co., Bell Telephone System, Cliquot Club 
Co., Goodyear Engineering Corp., Hawaiian 
Pineapple Co., Dr. Hess & Clark, Illinois 
Bell Telephone Co., Kerr Chickeries, Michi- 
gan Bell Telephone Co., Electric Companies, 
Charles E. Hires Co., Wyandotte Chemical 
Co., United Drug Company. 

Television Accounts Placed — Atlantic Re- 
fining Co. 



169 



Si:. ■-:■'■--■ ; '' . :-' 



JIM WALDROP 

NBC, Radio City— N. Y. 



Current Sponsors Include . . . 
Procter & Gamble, Goodyear, Cuticura, Brown 
Shoe Co., VITAMINS- Plus, City Mills 

• 604 FIFTH AVENUE • 



BRyant 9-5365 



170 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



BARNES CHASE COMPANY 

530 Broadway. San Diego 1, Calif. 

Phone Franklin 7771 

ABP— ANPA 

Owner Norman R. Barnes 

Production Manager Wm. M. Price 

Radio Director Ruth F. Almstedt 

Branch Office 

1121 South Hill St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

Phone PRospect 4118 

Manager E. W. Rutledge 

• 

BADGER AND BROWNING 
& HERSEY. INC. 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 7-3720 

ANPA — PPA — ABP 

Officers 

President R. W. Hersey 

Chairman of Board J. L. Badger 

Treasurer F. S. Browning 

Radio Director Mrs. Marjorie de Mott 

Time Buyer H. W. Mallinson, Jr. 

Affiliated Agency 

Badger & Browning 

75 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 

Phone Liberty 3364 

Radio Account Placed — American Chicle 

Co., Denver Chemical Mfg. Co., Wilbur 

Suchard Chocolate Co. 



BALDWIN & STRACHAN, INC. 

370 Delaware Ave., Buffalo 2, N. Y. 

Phone WAshington 6854 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

President Wm. Baldwin 

Vice-Pres. & Treas Kenneth Strachan 

Radio Director J. F. Higgins 

Production Manager Roy Runk 

Publicity George Doherty 

Copy Miss Clara Crane 

Director of Radio & Television 

J. F. Higgins 

Radio Producer J. F. Higgins 

Radio Accounts Placed — Widmer's Wine 
Cellars, Inc., Iroquois Beverage Corp., 
O'Rourke Baking Co., Rochester & Pittsburgh 
Coal Co., Seven-Up Co. of Buffalo, Sattler's, 
Inc., Triple A Tablets. 
• 

BARLOW ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
INC. 

309 Syracuse-Kemper Bldg., Syracuse 2, N. Y. 

Phone 3-0131 

APA — PPA — ABP 

Officers 

President E. S. Barlow 

Vice-President E. S. Crawford 

Vice-President .H. H. Goodhart 

Secretary E. C. Watkins 



Production Manager F. B. Tompkins 

Copy Chief J. J. Hines 

Art Director H. C. Millard 

Radio Manager Wallace M. Hughes 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dairymen's League 
Co-operative Association, Inc., Haberle Con- 
gress Brewing Co., Lincoln National Bank Si 
Trust Co. 



BARRONS ADVERTISING CO. 

1737 McGce St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Phone HArrison 7730 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President & Treasurer Wheeler Godfrey 

Vice-President Frank H. Little 

Secretary A. W. Durrin 

Art Director Frank MacDonald 

Account Executives Ralph S. Page, 

Floyd L. Doan 

Radio Dent. 

Time Buyers H. W. Godfrey, 

Frank H. Little 

Production Director Floyd L. Doan 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dr. W. L. Wilson, 
Seidlitz Paint & Varnish Co., Diesel Power 
Engineering School, Manor Baking Co., Chev- 
rolet Dealers of Kansas City, The Sodiphene 
Co., Pla-Mor Amusement Co., Kansas City 
Public Service Co., W. B. Duke Beverage Co., 
C. H. Stein-Mans Mfg. Co., National Protec- 
tive Insurance Co., Nourse Oil Co., Sweeney 
Trade Schools, Inc., Nourse Oil Co., Mid- 
West Wool Co-op. 

• 

TED BATES, INC. 

630 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-9700 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— 

NAOB-ABC— APA— ABP 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Theodore L. Bates 

Asst. to Pres. & Chrm. of Plant Creative 

Board Thomas Buechner 

Executive Vice-President Joseph R. Busk 

Vice President-Secretary. .Thomas J. Carnese 
Vice President-Director of Media- 

Asst. Secretary Edgar Small 

Vice-President and Director of Radio 

Tom Revere 

Time & Space Buyers Richard Mann, 

MacDonald Dunbar, R. J. Fiechter. 

Assistant Treasurer Carlos Justiz 

Vice-President & Director of Research 

Clifford Parsells 
Radio Accounts Placed — Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Co. (Colgate Dental Cream, Octagon 
Soap Products, Palmolive Brushless and 
Lather Shave Cream, Crystal White Soap 
Products) ; Continental Baking Co., Standard 
Brands, Inc. (Royal Gelatin, Royal Puddings, 
Royal Baking Powder) ; Carter Products, Inc. 



171 



YANKEE 




£ ( Hometown Stations give you 
the reach of the range — inclusive 
local coverage of every down- 
town and neighborhood shopping 
center patronized by the listeners 
of 2,055,010 radio homes ... a 
potential audience of 8,377,543 
out of New England's 8,437,290 
population. 



THE YANKEE NETWORK, inc. 

Member of the Mutual Broadcasting System 
21 BROOKLINE AVE., BOSTON 15, MASS. Nationally Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 




BATTEN. BARTON, DURSTINE & 
OSBORN, INC. 

383 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone Eldorado 5-5800 

AAAA 

Officers 

President Brine Burton 

Chairman of Executive Committee- 

Vice-President & Treasurer. .F. R. Feland 

Chairman of Board Alex Oshorn 

General Manager & Vice-President, 

B. C. Duffy 
Executive Vice-President for Western Offices 
John C. Cornelius 
Vice-President-Director of Radio, 

Arthur Pryor, Jr. 
Asst. Director of Radio. . .Oliver M. Presbrey 

Radio Research Harry I. Woodworth 

Radio Merchandising Jack Moore 

Local Radio Mgr Gertrude Scanlan 

Chief Story Editor George Kondolf 

Radio Producers and Writers: 

David White, Kenneth Webb, Edwin 
Marshall, Walter Tibbals, Russell Am- 
bruster, Gladys Franklin, Robt. La Bour, 
Chet Gierlach, Josephine Lyons, Ted 
Long, Ann Bastow. 
Business Manager, 

Radio Dept Frank Silvernail 

Time Buyers Jim Moore, 

Elenore Scanlan, Robert Milan, Kath- 
erine V. Winn 

Publicity Wm. Maloney 

Television F. A. Long 

Branch Offices 

919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone Superior 9200 

Vice-President R. B. Barton 

Rand Bldg., Buffalo 3, N. Y. 
Phone Cleveland 7915 

Vice-President Stanley P. Irvin 

Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
Phone Grant 8060 

Vice-President Leon D. Hansen 

20 Providence St., Boston 16, Mass. 
Phone Hubbard 0430 

Vice-President Francis W. Hatch 

Northwestern Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 2, 
Minn. 

Phone Bridgeport 8881 

Vice-President H. H. Haupt 

Executive Vice-President. . .John C. Cornelius 

1515 Terminal Tower, Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Phone Prospect 3621 

Vice-President C. L. Davis 

1680 N. Vine St., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Phone Hollywood 7337 

Vice-President Wayne Tiss 

Russ Bldg., San Francisco 4, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 1017 

Vice-President Charles H. Ferguson 

Pacific Mutual Bldg., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
Phone Michigan 1354 



Vice-President W. B. Geissinger 

New Center Bldg., Detroit 2, Mich. 
Phone Madison 4816 

Manager F. Plummer Whipple 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Steel & 
Wire Co., Armstrong Cork Co., Boston Edi- 
son Co., The Boston Globe, Corning Glass 
Works, Cream of Wheat Corp., Cresta Blanca 
Wine Co., Dubonnet Corp., E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours & Co., Ethyl Corp., First Na- 
tional Bank of Boston, Fort Pitt Brewing 
Co., Gamble Stores, General Baking Co., 
General Electric Co., Golden State Co., Ltd., 
B. F. Goodrich Co, Hart Sehaffner & Marx, 
Hoffman Beverage Co, Household Finance 
Corp, Lyon Van & Storage, Marine Trust 
Co. of Buffalo, Minneapolis Brewing Co, 
Murine Co, Nehi Corp, North American 
Aviation, Inc., North Star Woolen Mills, 
Northwest Airlines, Inc., Northwestern Bell 
Telephone Co, N. Y. Telephone Co, Par-T- 
Pak, Penick & Ford, Ltd, Reader's Digest 
Assn., F. & M. Schaefer Brewing Co, E. R. 
Squibb & Sons, Servel, Inc., Southern New 
England Telephone Co, Standard Oil Co. 
of Calif, Tennessee Coal, Iron & R. R. Co, 
United Fruit Co, William Underwood Co, 
Wildroot Co, Western Auto Supply Co, 
Waitt & Bond. 

Television Accounts Placed — The William 
Carter Co, Reader's Digest Assn., Liberty 
Mutual Ins. Co. 



BENNETT. WALTHER & 
MENADIER. INC. 

69 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

Phone Kenmore 3820 

Officers 

President Nelson Bennett 

Vice-President Frederick P. Walther, Jr. 

Treasurer Royal W. Leith 

Secretary Dorothy Dodge 

Radio Accounts Placed — Washburn Candy 
Co, Hudson Coal Co. 



BENTON AND BOWLES. INC. 

444 Madison Ave, New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-0400 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Atherton W. Hobler 

President Clarence B. Goshorn 

Executive Vice-Pres.. . .William R. Baker, Jr. 

Secy.-Treas Edward R. Beach 

Radio Dept. 
Vice-Pres. in Charge of Radio. .Walter Craig 

Adm. Assistant Marion Connolly 

Business Manager Charles Gannon 

Supervisor of Daytime Radio. .Kirby Hawkes 

Script Editor Roy Bailey 

Casting Director Rita Dugan 

Vice-Pres.-Media H. H. Dobberteen 

Time Buyer Roland Van Nostrand 



173 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Spot Time Buyer Ruth Jones 

Producers Don Cope, 

Leslie Harris, Keith MacLeod, Tom Mc- 
Dermott, Dodie Yates, Hugh Hole 
(Spots, hitchhikes, etc.) 

Television Dept. 

Director Herb Leder 

Branch Office 

6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone Hillside 9151 

West Coast Representative Al Kaye 

Business Manager Betty Buckler 

Radio Accounts Placed — General Foods 
Corp. (Maxwell House Coffee, Diamond 
Crystal Salt, Baker's Chocolate, Post Toasties, 
Certo, Log Cabin Syrup, Sure-Jell, Post's 
40% Bran Flakes, Post's Raisin Bran, Gaines 
Dog Food), Prudential Insurance Co., Proc- 
ter & Gamble Co. (lory Snow, P. & G. White 
Laundry Soap). 

• 

BERMINGHAM. CASTLEMAN & 
PIERCE, INC. 

136 East 38th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone Lexington 2-7550 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB—APA— 

AAAA— PPA 

Officers 

President Arch Bermingham 

Executive Vice-President Stewart Wark 

Secretary-Treasurer Winston H. Hagen 

Radio Director George C. Castleman 

Television Dept Paul Wing 

Radio Accounts Placed — Griffin Manufac- 
turing Co., Inc., Conti Products Corp., Frank 
H. Lee Co., Berst-Forster-Dixfield Co., E. 
Pritchard, Inc. 

• 

FRANK BEST & CO., INC. 

9 Rockefeller PI., New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 7.6760 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— PRB 

Officers 

President Frank Best 

Vice-Presidents I. Marks, W. Taegen 

Secretary V. R. Best 

Time Buyer A. H. Van Buren 

Radio Accounts Placed — Geo. W. Helme 
Co., Prince George Hotel, C-O-Two Fire 
Equip. Co., Union News Co., Nassau Smelting 
& Refining Co. 

• 

THE BIOW CO., INC. 

9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-9300 

Officers 

President and Treasurer Milton H. Biow 

Secretary Richard M. Biow 

Vice-President E. J. K. Bannart 

Vice-President L. W. Thomas 

Asst. to the President C. H. Wolfe 



Radio Dept. 

501 Madison Ave. 

Business Manager Frank C. Barton, Sr. 

Director <>l Production Stanlej Joseloff* 

Eastern Production Manager. . .Walter Lurie 

Talent Buyer Lucille Webster 

Time Buyer Maria White 

Bulova Station Relations C. A. Snyder 

Special Program Writer Edith Oliver 

Asst. to Business VI gr Stanley Pulver 

Program Coordinators Betty Mandeville, 

Elizabeth Ready, Alfred Klinger 
Producers Harry Spears, 

Max Marein, Hal Block 

* Joined from Blue Network, March 15. 
Hollywood Office 
6111 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 
Cbief of Radio Production (New York and 

Hollywood) H. Calvin Kul.l 

Office Manager Maxine Anderson 

Producers William Spier, 

William Lawrence, Alton Rinker 
San Francisco Office 
485 California St., San Francisco, Calif 

Manager John Alden 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Procter and 
Gamble Co., Bulova Watch Co., Hillman 
Periodicals, Inc., Hills Brothers Co., Schen- 
ley Corp., Hunt Brothers Packing Co., San- 
Nap-Pak Co., Inc., M. & M. Candy Ltd., 
Philip Morris & Co. Ltd., Inc., Lady Esther 
Co., Ltd., Eversharp, Inc. 



THE BLACKSTONE COMPANY 

221 W. 57th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 7-7827 

Officers 

Owner Milton Blackstone 

Associate Jack Steiner 

Manager Gladys B. Berju 

Copy Director Homer Millard 

Art Director Edward M. Hawkins 

Production Manager Harry Dobrin 

Space Buyer Belle Appelbaum 

Account Executives Charles Kondla, 

Robert Towers, Mortimer Curtis, Jean 
Epstein 

Radio Dept. 

Director of Radio Wm. T. Cavanagh 

Script Writers Jesse Sandler, 

Paul Zousmer 

Time Buyer Sally Cavanagh 

Producer Wm. T. Cavanagh 

Television Dept. 
Note: Television activity under direction 
of William T. Cavanagh. 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Brass Rail, 
Century Theatre Circuit, Copacabana, Fabri- 
kant Brothers (diamonds), Pedro & Olga 
Dance Studios, Rogers' Corner, Steuben 
Tavern, Crossroads, Zanzibar, Eureka Ship- 



175 



building Corp., Bernarr Macfadden Founda- 
tion, Hotels of Sullivan County, Unicorn 
Press. 

• 

THE BLAINE THOMPSON CO. 

234 W. 44th St., New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone, BRyant 9-2480 

ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Myer Lesser 

Vice-President John J. Shubert, Jr. 

Vice-President Mario Lewis 

Radio Director Richard Ash 

Copy Chief Budd Getschal 

• 

W. EARL BOTHWELL 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Standard Life Bldg., Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Phone Court 6565 

AAAA-ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President W. Earl Bothwell 

Secretary-Treasurer A. A. Logan 

Radio Director H. B. Trautman 

Time Buyer T. H. Black, Jr. 

Asst. Radio Director Emily Wilson 

Radio Accounts Placed — P. Duff & Sons, 
Inc. (Duff's Baking Mixes). 
• 

BOTSFORD, CONSTANTINE & 
GARDNER 

115 SW 4th, Portland 4, Oregon 

Phone Atwater 9541 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP 

SNPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President David M. Botsf ord 

Treasurer Merle W. Manly 

Secretary Frankie Coykendall 

Vice-President C. P. Constantine 

Branch Offices 

Central Bldg., Seattle 4, Wash. 

Phone Elliott 3523 

Vice-President C. P. Constnntinr 

Russ Bldg., San Francisco 4, Cal. 
Phone Exbrook 7565 

Vice-President Stanley G. Swanherg 

629 So. Hope St., Los Angeles 14, Cal. 
Phone Michigan 1427 

Vice-President Hassel W. Smith 

Empire State Bldg., New York 1, N. Y. 

Phone PEnnsylvania 6-7871 
Radio Accounts Placed — Tillamook County 
Creamery Assn. 

• 

STANLEY G. BOYNTON AGENCY 

410-11 Fisher Bldg., Detroit 2, Mich. 

Phone TRinity 1-2552 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

President Stanley G. Boynton 

Vice-President L. C. Boynton 

Secretary V. V. Cory 

Treasurer C. Taylor 

Program Director, Asst. to Mr. Boynton, 

Larry Payne 



Traffic Manager ...Ruth Grinnewald 

Radio Producer Larry Payne 

Branch Offices 
17 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 
Phone MUrray Hill 2-0086 
Radio Accounts Placed — Radio Bible Class, 
Wesley Radio League, American Society of 
Industrial Engineers, Old Fashioned Church 
of the Air, Calvary Hour, Your Fellowship 
Hour, First Church of the Nazarene — De- 
troit, New World Coming, Highland Park 
Baptist Church, Devotional Hour, Your Wor- 
ship Hour, Chicago Evangelistic Institute, 
Michigan Conference Seventh Day Adven- 
tists, National Tennis Matches. 



THE I. CARSON BRANTLEY 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

ON Building, Salisbury, N. C. 

Phone 900 

Officers 

General Manager J. Carson Brantley 

Treasurer Robt. C. Lyerly 

Time Buyer A. N. Cheney 

Radio Accounts Placed — Stanback Co., R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Brown's Mule Plug 
Tobacco), Duke Power Co., Owen Drug Co. 



R. C. BRETH, INC. 

310 Pine St., Green Bay, Wise. 
Phone Howard 134 
ABP— ANPA— PPA 

President R. C. Breth 

Radio Accounts Placed — Home Mutuals In- 
surance Co., Western States Mutual Auto Ins, 
Co.. Brillion Iron Works, Inc. 



BRISACHER, VAN NORDEN 
& STAFF 

310 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 0276 

ANPA— APA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President Emil Brisacher 

Vice-President.... R. T. Van Norden 

Account Executive Charles H. Gabriel 

Radio Time Buyer Marie Eaton 

Radio Producers Gene Goldsmith, 

Walton Purdom 

Branch Offices 
Petroleum Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9368 

250 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, Plaza 8-1634 

Vice-President R. T. Van Norden 

Radio Accounts Placed — Acme Breweries, 
West Coast Soap Co., Peter Paul, Inc., 
Moore's Clothing Co., Par Soap Co., The 
Shasta Water Co., Sunset Magazine, Par-T- 
Pak, Golden Grain Macaroni Co., S. & W. 
Fine Foods, Nicholas Johnston (Photog- 
raphers), Robert Wallace Furs. 



176 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



BRESNICK & SOLOMONT 

216 Tremont St., Boston 16, Mass. 

Phone Liberty 4732 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Principal Oscar Bresnick 

Principal Chester L. Solomont 

Account Executives Joseph Blue, 

Arthur Cohen. George J. M. Riseman. 
Radio Accounts Placed — Federal Savings & 
Loan Assn. of New England, Dawson's 
Brewery, Inc., M. Hoffman & Co. 



BROADCASTING ADVERTISING CO. 

3055 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

Phone, Exposition 1339 

Officers 

Owners Van C. Newkirk 

Office Manager Betty Culbert 

Radio Accounts Placed — Crew of Good 
Ship Grace, Inc., Floyd B. Johnson, Grace 
Dotson, Calvary Assembly. 



BROOKS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

416 W. 8th St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 

Phone TRinity 0558 

ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

General Manager A. R. Brooks 

Secretary B. Brausberg 

Time Buyer A. R. Brooks 

Copy Chief Anne Miller 

Production M. Jackson 

Art Director A. L. Lee 

Acct. Exec Frank McMahon 

Copy Rose Kandell 

Radio Accounts Placed — Bekins Moving & 
Storage, Citizens Nat'l Trust & Savings Bank, 
Bekins Van & Storage Co., Everest & Jen- 
nings, Golden West Products Co., Roland J. 
Laupel Co. 

• 

BROOKE, SMITH, FRENCH & 
DORRANCE, INC. 

82 Hancock Ave., East, Detroit 1, Mich. 

Phone Columbia 0860 

52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone Murray Hill 6-1800 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP 

APA — NOAB 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Sturges Dorrance 

President Willard S. French 

Secretary-Treasurer Guy C. Smith 

Vice-President Charles W. Brooke 

Vice-Presidents H. M. Overstreet, 

Henry E. Pengel, Jr., C. C. Wilmot, J. G. 
Williams, Walter C. Ayers, Blount Slade 

Manager, Media Dept Herbert R. Bayle 

Director of Research Walter C. Ayers 



Director of Radio H. R. Baylc 

Radio Accounts Placed — Detroit; Goebel 
Brewing Co., Hudson Motor Car Co., New 
York; State of Maine, Church & Dwight, 
Christmas Club. 

• 

D. P. BROTHER & CO.. INC. 

General Motors Bldg.j Detroit 2. Mich. 

Phone Trinity 2-8250 

AAAA— ANPA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President-Treasurer D. P. Brother 

Vice-President C. Hatch, Jr. 

Secretary E. M. Reitz 

Director of Media Carl Georgi, Jr. 

Radio Accounts Placed — AC Spark Plug & 
Oldsmobile Division of General Motors Sales 
Corp. 

• 

FRANKLIN BRUCK ADVERTISING 
CORP. 

RKO Bldg., Rockefeller Center, 

New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 7-7661 

ANPA — PPA — APA 

Officers 

President Franklin Bruck 

Secretary and Radio 

Director M. J. Kleinfeld 

Vice-President Mort Heineman 

Radio Time Buyer Rae Elbroch 

Radio Traffic Milton Jurin 

Radio Production Howard Blake 

Research Director Jules Nathan 

Radio Accounts Placed — North American 
Accident Insurance Co., Manhattan Soap 
Company, Johnson Candy Co., Fashion 
Frocks. 



CHARLES BRUNELLE ADV. AGENCY 

15 Lewis St., Hartford, Conn. 
Officer 

President Charles Brunelle 

Radio Account Placed — Sage-Allen & Co., 
Inc. 



BUCHANAN & COMPANY. INC. 

1501 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone MEdallion 3-3380 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — SNPA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board, Treas.. . .John Hertz, Jr. 

President T. S. Buchanan 

Vice-President Arthur Ramsdell 

Secretary A. Grace Barrett 

Dir. of Radio & Television. .. .Martin Jones 

Assistant to Radio Dir Elise Bonnet 

Business Manager Nat Strom 

Television Dept Martin Jones, 

Patricia Sears 



177 



tiranch Offices 

919 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone Superior 3047 

Vice-President George Enzingcr 

427 West 5th St., Los Angeles 13, Cal. 
Phone Mutual 6316 

Vice-President Fred M. Jordan 

155 Montgomery St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 
Phone Yukon 2802 

Manager Ray Randall 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Texas Co., 
Paramount Pictures, Inc., Rainier Brewing 
Co., Adam Hats. 

• 

BUCHANAN-THOMAS 
ADVERTISING CO. 

412 So. 19th St., Omaha 2, Nebraska 

Phone AT 2125 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Partner C. C. Buchanan 

Partner L. H. Thomas 

Radio Director Adam Reinemund 



LEO BURNETT COMPANY, INC. 

360 North Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. 
Phone Central 5959 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP— SNPA 
Officers 

President Leo Burnett 

Executive Vice-President R. N. Heath 

Secretarv Naomi Burnett 

Treasurer E. Ross Gamble 

Vice-President DeWitt O'Kieffe 

Vice-President John Olson 

Vice-Pres.-Radio Frank W. Ferrin 

Time Buyer Pauline Watros 

Radio Producers Harry Eldred, 

Arthur Jacobson, Don Bernard, Fred 

Jacky 
Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Pure 
Oil Co., American Meat Institute, Jacques 
Mfg. Co.; National Spot: Lumbermen's Mu- 
tuall Casualty Co., Brown Shoe Co., Pure 
Oil Co., The Chicago Sun. 



BERT BUTTERWORTH AGENCY 

1606 N. Highland Ave. 

Hollywood 28, California 

Phone Hollywood 7263 



BYER & BOWMAN 

203 East Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 

Phone Main 3276 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Partners Herbert Byer, 

Gus K. Bowman, Joel M. Burghalter 
Radio Accounts Placed — The Skidoo Co., 
Ohio Laboratories, Inc., Berlou Mfg. Co., 
Budd & Co., War Finance Committee. 



HAROLD CABOT & CO., INC. 

24 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. 

Phone HANcock 7690 

AAAA— ANPA— APA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Harold Cabot 

Executive Vice-President. Henry W. Patterson 

Vice-President Donald D. Douglass 

Vice-President John E. Kennedy 

Vice-President-Art Director George R. Griffin 

Time Buyer Jacqueline Adams 

Radio Accounts Placed — H. P. Hood & 
Sons. Boston & Maine Railroad, The James 
Hanley Co., Douglas Shoe Co. 



CAHN-MILLER, INC. 

413 N. Charles St., Baltimore 1, Md. 

Phone Saratoga 4466-7 

PPA 

Officers 

President Louis F. Cahn 

Vice-President C. LeRoy Miller 

Account Exec George Gettman 

Retail Dept Miss Hilda Stern 



CALKINS & HOLDEN 

247 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-6900 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— 

PRB— SAAA— SNPA 

Officers 

Secretary-Treasurer R. P. Clayberger 

Radio Program Mgr C. H. Miller 

Asst. Manager T. H. Young 

Branch Office 
333 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago," 111. 

Radio Dept. Manager R. A. Washburn 

Radio Accounts Placed — Van Camp's, Inc., 
Oakite Products, Inc. 



CAMPBELL-EWALD CO., INC. 
(Eastern Division) 

10 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 7-6383 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Gen. Mgr F. D. Richards 

Exec. Vice-President W. E. Blodgett 

Vice-Presidents Duane W. Beurmann, 

L. B. Dudley, T. Park Hay, J. L. Spencer, 
Elmo Ecker, E. A. Elliott, W. A. McNabb 

Space & Time Buyer. E. A. Elliott 

Radio Director R. F. Hackenger 

Art Director W. A. McNabb 

Research Director J. L. Spencer 

Copy Director Sherwood King 

Publicity Director Joseph A. Bond 

Television Dept. 

Chairman of Committee Elmo Ecker 

Radio Accounts Placed — United States 
Rubber Co., Vita Var Corp. 



178 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



CAMPBELL-EWALD CO. 

General Motors Bldg., Detroit 2, Mich. 

Phone Trinity 2-6200 

AAAA— ANPA— ABP— PPA— PRB— 

APA— ABC 

Officers 

President Henry T. Ewald 

Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr H. G. Little 

Radio Director M. A. Hollinshead 

Vice President-Media Director. J. J. Hartigan 

Branch Offices 

230 N. Michigan Ave.. 

Central 1946, Chicago, 111. 

Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr E. W. Clements 

714 W. Olympic Blvd. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Richmond 6204 

Vice-Pres.-Manager R. H. Crooker 

Radio Accounts Placed — General Motors 
Corp., Consolidated Royal Chemical, Fould's 
Macaroni. 



CAMPBELL-MITHUN. INC. 

1370 Northwestern Bank Bldg. 

Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Phone ATlantic 3231 

ANPA— PPA— APB— AAAA— SNPA— 

SAAA— PRB 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Director Louis M. Knopp 

Time Buyer Arthur H. Lund 

Branch Office 

1024 Palmolive Bldg. 

Chicago 11, 111. 

Delaware 7553 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Director fm. Ballinger 

Radio Copy Donald Gardner 

• 

THE CAPLES COMPANY 

535 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone LExington 2-0850 

ANPA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President R. C. Caples 

Vice-President Lynn B. Clarke 

Radio Dept. 

Director of Radio Maxine Keith 

Time Buyer Ruth D. Folster 

Producer Maxine Keith 

Television Dept. 

Director of Television Maxine Keith 

Branch Offices 

225 East Erie St., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Superior 6016 

Vice-President R. N. Hartsing 

1504 Dodge St., Omaha, Nebr. 

Phone Jackson 1107 

Radio Department Head. . . .Russell Rullman 

412 West Sixth St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Mutual 4143 



Manager Arthur Caron 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Ex- 
press; Union Pacific Railroad; Chicago & 
North Western Railway; Railway Express 
Illinois Central. 



CARTER ADV. AGENCY, INC. 

609 Minnesota Ave., Kansas 'lily, kan-a> 
NAAN 
Officers 

President Charles W. Carter 

Vice-President Win. C. Rowe 

Secy.-Treas Josephine Dulilin 

Branch Office 
912 Baltimore Ave.. Kansas City, Mo. 
Radio Accounts Placed — Helzherg's Jew- 
elers), Rushton Baking Co.. Marshall's Auto 
Stores, Inter-State Bldg. & Loan Association. 



R. H. CARY, INC. 

(formerly Cary-Ainsworth, Inc.) 

908-10 Liberty Bldg., Des Moines 9, Iowa 

Phone 4-0375 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

President R. H. Cary 

Secretary Evonne Kordick 

Treasurer R. H. Cary 

Art Dir. & Prod. Mgr R. M. Williamson 

Account Executive A. W. Little 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Director Fred A. Reed 

Chief Time Buyer R. H. Cary 

Time Buyer Evonne Kordick 

Radio Accounts Placed — Chamberlain Sales 
Corp., Oelwein Chemical Co., Thompson 
Hybrid Corn Co., Tidy House Products Co., 
Hawkeye Casualty Co. 



CASANAVE & PEARSON, INC. 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-1647 

Officers 

President Chas. Casanave 

Vice-President Edward P. Casanave 

Vice-Pres. & Radio Dir C. H. Pearson 

Radio Account Placed — Cooper Safety Ra- 
zor Co. 

• 

CECIL & PRESBREY, INC. 

247 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-8200 

ANPA— AAAA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

Ch. Bd Chas. Presbrey 

Dir. of Radio, Tele., Public Relations, 

T. G. Sabin 
Radio Accounts Placed — Block Dubb, G. 
Washington Instant Broth, Oyster Shell. 



179 



COWAN & DENGLER, INC. 

527 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 2-0940 

ANPA — PPA — NOAB — APA 

Officers 

President Stuart D. Cowan 

V-P, Secretary-Treasurer H. W. Dengler 

Media Director-Time Buyer, 

Miss A. Marie Maus 

Office Manager .William Erichs 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Agricul- 
tural Chemical Co., Ebo Aircraft Corp., Is- 
brandsten-Boler Co., Inc. 



Production Manager Joan McAuliffe 

Account Executives E. W. Connor, 

Robert W. Conley, Denis Muir, Robert 

Kornfeld 

• 

COOLIDGE ADVERTISING CO. 

308-311 Insurance Exchange, Des Moines, la. 

Phone 2-0221 

AAAA — ABP — ANPA — PPA — APA 

Officers 

President Paul Blakemore 

Vice-President Henry Kroeger 

Production Manager N. E. deReus 



THE CHERNOW COMPANY 

350 Fifth Ave., New York 1, N. Y. 
Phone, PEnnsylvania 6-7037 

• 

NELSON CHESMAN COMPANY 

Hamilton Trust Bldg., Chattanooga 8, Tenn. 

Phone 6-4942 

SNPA 

Officers 

Pres. & Treas Henry Tritschler 

Vice-Pres John E. Fontaine 

Time Buyer.. H. Tritschler 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Chattanooga 
Medicine Co., Fleetwood Coffee Co., South, 
ern Agriculturist. 



DON COUPER 

441 Lexington Ave. 
Phone, MUrray Hill 2-2109 

• 

CRITCHFIELD & COMPANY 

720 North Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone Superior 3061 

ANPA — APA — PPA — NAOB 

Officers 

President Scott S. Smith 

Secretary R. C. Scrymiger 

Vice-President E. P. Nesbitt 

Radio Director M. E. Blackburn 

Radio Accounts Placed — Wheeling Steel 
Corp. 



THE CLEMENTS COMPANY, INC. 

1601 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone Rittenhouse 0236 

Officers 

President-Treasurer I. W. Clements 

Vice-President-Secretary. . .E. D. Masterman 

Director of Radio Alice Clements 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Modern 
Food Process Co., F. G. Vogt & Sons, Pharma- 
co, Inc., Hudson Coal Co., Horn & Hardart, 
Certified Milk Assn. 
• 

RUSSELL C. COMER ADVERTISING 
CO. 

Land Bank Building, Kansas City, Mo. 

Phone HArrison 3964 

APA 

Officers 

President Russell C. Comer 

Vice-President John C. Fehlandt 

Secretary A. M. Rockie 

Treasurer Cecil W. Trapp 

Recording Engn .F. Ries 



THE CONNOR COMPANY 

116 New Montgomery St., 

San Francisco 5, Cal. 

Phone, YUkon 0196 

APA— ABP 

Officers 

President Edward W. Connor 

Exec. Vice-Pres Robert W. Conley 

Treasurer Denis Muir 



HERBERT CHASON COMPANY 

232 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

MUrray Hill 3-6336-7 

ABP 

Officers 

President Herbert S. Chason 

Radio Account Placed — Mack Drug Co. 

C. P. CLARK, INC. 

2411 West End Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

Phone 7-6602 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — SNPA — NOAB 

First Advertising Agency Group 

Officers 

I'resident-In Charge of Radio.... C. P. Clark 

Secretary-Treasurer D. G. Goodwin 

• 

COMPTON ADVERTISING, INC. 

630 Fifth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

Pbone Circle 6-2800 

SNPA 

Officers 

President Richard Compton 

Executive Vice-President Trell Yocum 

Vice-Pres., Secy. & Treas.. .Leonard T. Bush 

Vice-Presidents Harold S. Barnes, 

Gordon Aymar, Craig Davidson, Guy 
Richards, Edward Battey, Jr., Frank 
Griffin, Robert D. Holbrook, John K. 
Strubing, Jr. 

Mgr., Radio Dept Lewis H. Titterton 

Program Mgr. & Tele Dir Wyllis Cooper 

Casting Director Isabel Olmstead 

Publicity Director Virginia Travers 



180 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Head Time Buyer Frank Kemp 

Radio Time Buyers Fred Apt, 

Harriet BeLille, Henry Clochessy, Jean 
Lawler 

Business Manager Helen Shervey 

New Program Buyer Joan Geddes 

Asst. Television Direetors. .. .James Manilla, 
Jose Di Donato 

Branch Offices 
Soeony Vacuum Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Manager L. 0. Holmberg 

New Center Bldg, Detroit, Mich. 

Manager R. W. Heizer 

Bryant Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Manager Merrell Boyce 

Gwynne Bldg., Cincinnati, O. 

Manager Robert Marsh 

411 E. Mason St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Manager Harry Scott 

6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Manager Murray Bolen 

Radio Accounts Placed — Procter & Gam- 
ble Co. (Ivory Soap, Ivory Flakes, Crisco, 
Barsalou Soap, Duz), Wheatena Corp., So- 
cony-Vacuum Oil Co., American Home 
Products Co., Krueger Brewing Co., Allis 
Chalmers Co., Goodyear, U. S. Time Corp. 

JOHN GOLBERT CRAIG ADV. 

903 Shipley St., Wilmington, Del 

Phone 6185 

PPA-ANPA-ABP— APA-NAAN 

Officers 

President J. C. Craig 

Vice-Pres R. V. Craig 

Sec. & Treas K. W. Anderson 

THE CRAMER-KRASSELT CO. 

733 N. Van Buren St.. Milwaukee 2, Wis. 

Phone Daly 3500 

AAAA — ABP — ANPA — PPA 

APA — NOAB 

Officers 

President A. W. Seiler 

Executive Vice-President H. N. Pasteur 

Vice-Presidents L. H. Ness, 

C. W. Faude 

Director of Media L. H. Ness 

Time Buyer Loretta Mahar 

Radio Director J. S. Stolzoff 

Chief Continuity Writer Elizabeth Taft 

Radio Accounts Placed — Plankinton Pack- 
ing Co., John Graf Co., The Massey-Harris 
Co., Country Gardens, Victor Stamm & Asso- 
ciates, Ed Schuster & Co., Amity Leather Co., 
Milwaukee Co., Milwaukee Gas Co., Sperry 
Candy Co., McConnon & Co. 

CRUTTENDEN & EGER 

64 E. Lake St., Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Central 7830 

PPA— ANPA— ABP 

Owner. Edmond I. Eger 



Acer. Exec I'att i<k Shannan 

Radio Account Placed — Admiral Corpora- 
tion. 



D'ARCY ADVERTISING COMPANY 

Missouri Pacific Bldg., St. Louis 3, Mo. 

Phone Central 6700 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — PRB — 

SAAA— SNPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President W. C. D'Arcy 

Secretary-Treasurer C. C. Pangman 

Branch Offices 
515 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 
Phone Eldorado 5-5435 
Vice-President in Charge of 

Radio Alfred N. Steele 

Radio Dept J. T. Irvine 

Wallace Pflueger 
Terminal Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

Phone Cherry 0158 

Stanley Seward, H. M. Cooper 

P. O. Box 1734, Atlanta, Ga. 

Phone Vernon 0021 

J. H. Kinsella 

90 Broadview Ave., Toronto, Canada 

Gramont Altenbernd 

Radio Account Placed — The Coca-Cola Co. 



JTMM DAUGHERTY, INC. 

706 Chestnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Phone Main 0790-0791 

ABP — PPA 

Officers 

President-Time Buyer.. James M. Daugherty 

Service Director Joseph E. Schmitt 

Radio Accounts Placed — Pepsi-Cola Bot- 
tlers of St. Louis, Meyer Bros. Drug Co., 
St. Louis Dairy Co. 



DANCER-FITZGERALD-SAMPLE 

221 No. La Salle St., Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone State 3800 

ABP— ANPA— APA— PPA— ABC— NOAB 

Executives 

Partners H. M. Dancer, 

C. L. Fitzgerald, J. G. Sample 

Treasurer Paul Keenan 

Acct. Execs D. D. Brown, 

Joseph Greeley, Thomas L. Greer, Robert 
F. Hussey, James S. Lind, G. H. Johnson, 
James L. Moloney 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Dir Roy Winsor 

Radio Acct. Exec Carl Stanton 

Radio Supervisors George Stellman, 

James West, H. Y. Bingham, Philip Bow- 
man 
Dir. Radio Contracts James J. Neale 



181 



Branch Offices 

247 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-2700 

Partner H. M. Dancer 

Acct. Execs Frank A. Kearney, 

Robert A. McNeil, Joseph I. Palistrant, 
A. W. Spence, George G. Tormey, Henry 
W. Doyle, James Duffy, E. J. Fitzgerald, 
Walter Holt 

Radio Acct. Exec Carl Stanton 

Room 1014, Taft Building, 1680 Vine St., 

Hollywood, Calif. 

Phone Hempstead 0716 

Manager Craig Maudsley 

Radio Talent Ann Parks, 

Eugene Powers, Suzanne Black 
Radio Accounts Placed — Affiliated Prod- 
ucts, Inc., Alba Chemical Company, Anacin 
Company, Bayer Company, Bi-So-Dol Com- 
pany, A. S. Boyle Company, Continental 
Illinois National Bank & Trust Co., Falstaff 
Brewing Corp., General Mills, Inc., Kilmer 
& Co., Inc., Knowlton Danderine Co., Koly 
nos Company, Inc., Larned Corp., The Mid 
way Chemical Company, Mystic Laboratories 
Ch'as. H. Phillips Chemical Co., Procter & 
Gamble Company, Sterling Products Com 
pany, Valmont of Canada, R. L. Watkins Co. 
Whitehall Pharmacal Co. 



BEN DEAN ADVERTISING AGENCY 

207 Houseman Bldg., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Phone 8-0666 
APA— ABP 

Owner Ben Dean 

Asst .Mildred Juneau 



DOE-ANDERSON ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

308 Martin Brown Bldg., Louisville 2, Ky. 

Phone Wabash 3193 

ANPA— PPA— SNPA— ABP— SAAA 

Officers 

President Elmer H. Doe 

Account Executive Warwick Anderson 



DOREMUS & CO. 

120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

Phone REctor 2.1600 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President Wm. H. Long, Jr. 

Exec. Vice-Pres W. H. Burnham 

Treasurer R. E. Williams 



JOHN C. DOWD, INC. 

Park Square Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

Phone Hubbard 8050 

Officers 

President-Radio Director John C. Dowd 

Executive Vice-President E. D. Parent 



DOHERTY, CLIFFORD & 
SHENFIELD INC. 

350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, N. Y. 

BRyant 9-3140 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President Lawrence L. Shenfield 

Vice-Pres. & Treas Arthur Cobb, Jr. 

Vice-Presidents Donald K. Clifford, 

Francis J. Doherty 

Secretary Wm. E. Steers 

Research Associate. Nora A. Fitts 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Director Chester MacCracken 

Head of Comm. Writing Dept.. .John Mullen 

Radio Time Buyer Helen Wilbur 

Publicity Director Robert H. King 

Producers Chester MacCracken, 

Myron Dutton 
Radio Account Placed — Bristol-Myers Co. 



THE RALPH L. DOMBROWER CO., 
INC. 

Dombrower Bldg., Richmond 19, Va. 

Phone 3-111-3 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— SNPA 

Officers 

Radio Director J. H. Fulmer 

Asst. Radio Director Beulah Gregory 

Acct. Exec Malcolm B. Dombrower 

Branch Office 
Colorado Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Manager Philip Rosenf eld 

Radio Accounts Placed— E. P. Murphy & 
Son, Inc., L. Bromm Baking Co., Inc., Pamp- 
lin Smoking Pipe & Mfg. Co., Inc., Sorbtex 
Foundation, Inc., Planters Peanut Oil & 
Fertilizer Co., Elars Medicine Corp., Little 
Oil Co. 



DONAHUE AND COE, INC. 

1270 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Columbus 54252 
ANPA — PPA — ABP — PRB — SNPA 

Officers 

President Edward J. Churchill 

Treasurer W. B. Patterson 

Secretary O. A. Kingsbury 

Radio Dir. & V.-President. .Edw. J. Fitzgerald 

Time Buyer Joe Lincoln 

Script Chief Latham Owens 

Production Robert Monroe 

Branch Office 

411 Hurt Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

Phone Main 5662 

Manager & Vice-Pres H. L. Morrill, Jr. 

Radio Accounts Placed — Scholl Mfg. Co., 
Metro-Goldwyn.Mayer, Grove's Labs, Beau- 
mont Co., Goldwyn Productions, Republic 
Pictures, Cagney Productions, N. Y. Herald 



182 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Tribune, Atlantic Beer, Radi 
Hall, Southland Coffee Co. 



City Music 



L. J. DuMAHAUT ADV. AGENCY 

827 David Stott Bldg, Detroit 26, Mich. 

Phone, RANdolph 9480 

Officers 

President L. Jerome DuMahaut 

Production Mgr Theresa Savin 



ROY S. DURSTINE, INC. 

730 Fifth Ave, New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone, Circle 6-1400 

PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President Roy S. Durstine 

Vice-President John R. Latham 

Secy.-Treas A. T. Gardiner 

Prod.-Traffie Mgr David R. Margaretten 

Art Director Harvey A. Spooner 

Radio Director Charles H. Furey 

Account Executives. .. .William E. Dempster, 
Ren Kraft, Roy Gordon, John 0. Elling- 
ton, Jr., Lee M. Rousseau 
Branch Offices 
333 No. Michigan Ave, Chicago 1, 111. 

Manager Ellis Travers 

Carew Tower, Cincinnati 2, O. 
Phone, Cherry 0032 

Manager Frederic Kammann 

Charge of Art & Prod Philip Goyert 



ELLIS ADVERTISING CO. 

15 Genesee Street, Buffalo 3, New York 

ABP— ANPA 

Officers 

Michael F. Ellis, Jerome R. Ellis 

Radio Dept. 

Jerome R. Ellis, Stephen Gotthelf, Doris 

Ansteth 

Branch Offices 

33 W. 42nd St, New York 18, N. Y. 

LOngacre 5-1567 

John W. Culiner 

74 King St. E, Toronto 1, Canada 

Waverly 3438 

Abbey A. Muter 



Officers 

President Louis R. Wusey 

Vice-President-General Manager, 

Howard D. Williams 

Treasurer James F. O'Connor 

Director of Radio C. H. Cottington 

Asst. Radio Director Joe Brattain 

Woman's Program Feggy de Gripenberg 

Time Buver Frank Haas 

Traffic Mgr O. Morley Tanney 

Television Dept. 

C. H. Cottington 

Branch Offices 

Erwin Wasey & Co, Ltd. 

230 N. Michigan Ave, Chicago, 111. 

Phone Randolph 4952 

Vice-President L. R. Northrup 

Harry K. Gilman 

Erwin Wasey & Co. of Minnesota 

Rand Tower, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Phone Atlantic 1223 

President Mac Martin 

Erwin Wasey & Co. of the Pacific Coast 

333 Montgomery St, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Exbrook 7004 

Vice-President S. R. Hutton 

Louis Honig 

714 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Prospect 5317 

Vice-President H. A. Stebbins 

Skinner Bldg, Seattle, Wash. 
Phone Maine 6435 

Vice-President W. E. Kraft 

Radio Accounts Placed — Lydia E. Pinkham 
Medicine Co, Musterole Co, The Barbasol 
Co, Consolidated Cigar Co, Carnation Co, 
R. B. Semler, Inc., Zonite Products Co, 
Primrose House, Inc., Seeck & Kade, S. C. 
Johnson & Son, Inc., National Lead Co, Les- 
lie Salt Co, Langendorf United Bakers, Inc., 
Schuckl Rancho Soup, Nash Coffee Co, Salis- 
bury & Saterlee Co, House of Herbs, Inc., 
Hillman Periodicals, Inc., Southwestern 
Brewing Corp, Oklahoma City Federal Sav- 
ings & Loan Assn., Central Dairy Products 
Corp, Long-Bell Lumber Co, National Life 
Assurance Co., E. R. Ledbetter Co, Ander- 
son-Pritchard Oil Corp., Minneapolis, St. 
Paul & Sault Ste. Marie R.R. Co, Telex Prod- 
ucts Co, Centennial Flour Mills Co, Crescent 
Mfg. Co, Brown & Haley, S. A. Moffett Co, 
I. F. Laucks, Inc., Ghirardelli Co, Hotel Mark 
Hopkins, Newell Gutrad & Co, Planters Nut 
& Chocolate Co, Tea Garden Products Co, 
Gloria Bristol Cosmetics, Dr. Hiss Shoe 
Clinic, Schalk Chemical Co. 



ERWIN, WASEY & CO., INC. 

Graybar Bldg, 420 Lexington Ave, 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MOhawk 4-8700 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— 

SNPA— NOAB— AAA 



SHERMAN K. ELLIS & CO. 

247 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 5-7711 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Sherman K. Ellis 

Exec. Vice-President C. E. Staudinger 



183 



Vice-Presidents E. S. Pratt, 

John F. Price 

Radio Time Buyer Harry Torp 

Branch Offices 

141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Harrison 8612 

Radio Executive Palmer Clark 

Radio Accounts Placed — Quaker Oats Co., 
Jules B. Singer, Joseph Beck, Kenneth 
Plumb, C. G. Wright, Donald Parsons, 
Macgregor Armiston 
Chop Stick Co. 



Secretary Nathan Rothenberg 

Vice-President Irving Gottlieb 



ROBERT G. FIELDS & CO. 

1100 Warner Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

Phone 6-1977 

PPA — SNPA — ABP 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Robert G. Fields 

Secretary R. H. Lane 



WILLIAM ESTY & COMPANY 

100 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone Caledonia 5-1900 

Officers 

President and Treasurer. William Esty 

Secretary E. H. Cummings 

Director of Radio Thos. D. Luckenbill 

Time Buyers John C. Esty, 

Richard Grahl. 

Radio Producers Don Bernard, 

Phil Cohan, Al Foster, Helen Phillips, 
Kenneth MacGregor, Tom Wallace, John 
Clarke. 

Television Dept. 
Kendall Foster, Kenneth MacGregor 
Radio Accounts Placed — R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co., Lehn & Fink Products, Inc., 
Pacquin's Hand Cream, Thomas Leeming & 
Co., Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co., Piel Bros., 
Tea Bureau, Inc. 



FEDERAL ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
INC. 

444 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone Eldorado 5-6400 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP 

Officers 

President Robert Tinsman 

Vice-Presidents James O'Brien, 

Jules B. Singer, Joseph Beck, Kenneth 
Plumb, C. G. Wright, Donald Parsons, 
Macgregor Ormiston, A. R. Beverly- 
Giddings, Hugh I. Connet, Laura E. 
Carson, John S. Davidson, Dr. W. W. 
Wulfeck 

Treas. & Secty George Dietrich 

Radio Director.... J. S. Davidson 

Radio Time Buyer Penelope Simmons 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Safety 
Razor Corp. (Gem) ; Joseph Dixon Crucible 
Co. (Ticonderoga Pencils), J. F. Trommer 
Co., Inc. (White Label), General Cigar Co. 
(Van Dyck), National Biscuit Co. (Shred- 
dies), Rockwood & Co. (Chocolate Bits), 
Durkee Famous Foods (Durkee's Dressing), 
Lily of France Corset Co. (Lilees Bras). 
• 

FURMAN & FEINER CO., INC. 

117 W. 46th St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, BRyant 9-2927 

Officers 

President Norman Furman 



FOLEY ADVERTISING AGENCY 

1012 NBC Bldg., Cleveland 14, Ohio 

Phone Cherry 1490 

Officers 

President Robert B. Foley 

Secretary-Treas Helen M. Little 

Acct. Exec L. M. Robertson 

Radio Director Robert B. Foley 

Radio Accounts Placed — I. J. Fox, Inc., 
The Bing Co., Ohio Floor Covering Co., 
Perry Auto Stores. 

• 

FORT & COMPANY 

Wilder Bldg., Charlotte 1, N. C. 

Phone 4-7122 

APA — SNPA 

Officers 

President John L. Fori 

Radio Accounts Placed — Union National 
Bank, Citizens Bank, Z. A. Hovis & Son (all 
local accounts). 

• 

CURT FRFJBERGER & CO. 

Cooper Building, Denver, Colo. 

Keystone 0487 

ABP— APA 

Officers 

Owner C. J. Freiberger 

Copy Chief R. Torgerson 

Radio Director. ; V. Foss 

Art Director B. Naylor 

Secretary N. J. Charon 

Bookkeeper L. A. Gaiman 

Acct. Exec J. M. Henderson 

Artist M. Brown 

Radio Accounts Placed — Tivoli-Union Co., 
Brecht Candy Co., Securities Credit Corp., 
Stone-Hall Brokerage, Toner's Inc., Cooper 
Coal Co., Central Bank & Trust Co. 



FOOTE, CONE & BELDING 

247 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-6600 

AAAA— ANPA— ABP— PPA— APA— ABC 

Officers 

Chairman of the Board Don Belding 

President Emerson Foote 

Chairman, Executive Comm.. . .Fairfax Cone 



184 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Secretary-Treasurer William R. Sachsc 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
(address above) 

President Emerson Foote 

V.P. & Gen. Business Mgr...M. P. Franceschi 
Director of Radio and Television 

Paul Rickenbacher 
Manager of Radio Department. Lee Strahorn 
Radio Time Buyer Lillian Selb 

CHICAGO OFFICE 

919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, III. 

Phone Superior 4800 

Chairman, Executive Comm Fairfax Cone 

Secretary-Treasurer William R. Sachse 

Director of Radio Stuart Dawson 

Radio Time Buyer. .. .Genevieve M. Lemper 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE 

601 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles 13, Calif. 

Phone Michigan 7651 

Chairman of the Board Don Belding 

Radio Time Buyer (See San Francisco 

Office) 

HOLLYWOOD OFFICE 

6117 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone Hollywood 6265 

Vice-Pres. & Manager. .Edmund L. Cashman 

Radio Production Managers Vic Hunter, 

Larry Berns, Albert Capstaff, Jack Mea- 
kin, Arnold G. Maguire, Jack John- 
stone, T. Freebairn Smith. 

Radio Time Buyer (See San Francisco 

Office) 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Phone Sutter 2355 

Vice-Pres. & Manager E. I. Harrington 

Radio Time Buyer Jane Sullivan 

(For Los Angeles and Hollywood offices 
also.) 
Radio Accounts Placed — The American 
Tobacco Company, The Cities Service Oil 
Company, Campbell Soup Company, Armour 
and Company, Albers Milling Company, Ben 
Hur Products, Inc., Bourjois, Inc., Califor- 
nia Fruit Growers Exchange, Hall Bros., Inc., 
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, Pepsodent 
Division of Lever Brothers Co., RKO Radio 
Pictures, Inc., Safeway Stores, Inc., Southern 
Pacific Company, Union Oil Company, Per- 
alta Wine Co., Purex Corp. Ltd., Selznick 
International and Walt Disney Productions. 



ALBERT FRANK-GUENTHER LAW. 
INC. 

131 Cedar St., New York, N. Y. 
Phone COrtlandt 7-5060 



ANPA — PPA — ABP — NOAB 

Officers 
Chairman of the Board. .. .Emmett Corrigan 

President Frank J. Reynolds 

First Vice-President & Treasurer 

Victor J. Cevasco 
Vice-President & Secretary. Harold E. Maples 

Radio Department John V. McAdams 

Branch Offices 
Post Office Square, Boston, Mass. 

Phone Hancock 5900 

Packard Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone Rittenhouse 3915 

1 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Dearborn 8910 

155 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone EXbrook 3484 



HARRY FEIGENBAUM 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

1420 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone Pennypacker 3623 

ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President Harry Feigenbaum 

Radio Dept. Manager David Wermen 

Radio Director & Talent Ralph A. Hart 



FERRY-HANLY COMPANY 

3200 Fidelity Bldg., Kansas City 6, Mo. 

Phone HArrison 4890 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President C. P. Hanly 

Vice-Presidents Bruce B. Brewer, 

H. M. Montgomery, C. L. Collette 

Secretary-Treasurer O. P. Luther 

New York Office 

500 Fifth Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone LOngacre 5-5000 

Manager H. M. Montgomery 

Chicago Office 

430 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone CEntral 8333 

Manager C. L. Collette 

Radio Accounts Placed — Skinner Mfg. Co., 
Nutrena Mills, Inc., Faultless Starch Co., 
Johnson & Johnson (TEK toothbrushes). 



LAWRENCE FERTIG & CO., INC. 

149 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 4-3300 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Treasurer Lawrence Fertig 

Radio Director Henry Bretzfield 

Radio Accounts Placed — Smith-Douglass 
Co., Inc. 



185 



FITZGERALD ADVERTISING 
AGENCY, INC. 

202 Southern Bldg., 833 Howard Ave., 

New Orleans 13, La. 

Phone Raymond 5194 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — SNPA 

APA — ABP — NOAB 

Officers 

President Joe L. Killeen 

Vice-President Joseph H. Epstein 

V.-P. and Time Buyer Leonard Gessner 

Secretary-Treasurer Roy M. Schwarz 

Radio Director Martha Dulin 

Radio Account Placed — Wesson Oil & 
Snowdrift Sales Co. 



Radio Dept. 

Radio Dir. (N. Y.) Lee Williams 

Time Buyer (N. Y.) G. L. Trimble 

Time Buyer (Cleveland) W. J. Staab 

Research Dir. (N. Y.) Milton Decker 

Television Dept. 

Director (N. Y.) Lee Williams 

Art Director (N. Y.) R. S. Chenault 

Movie Director (Cleveland) 

Reed Drummond 
Radio Accounts Placed — Commonwealth 
Shoe & Leather Co., Westminster, Ltd., 
Stouffer Restaurants, Cleveland National 
Bank, Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. (Lamp 
Division). 



FLACK ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Hills Bldg., Syracuse 2, N. Y. 

Phone 2-3129 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — APA 

Officers 

Owner John B. Flack 

Radio Account Executive 

Richard H. Wickham 

Radio Accounts Placed — Netherland Dairy, 
Keepsake Diamond Rings, Napteen Labs, 
Bardeen's, Inc. 



HARRY M. FROST CO., INC. 

260 Tremont St., Boston 16, Mass. 

Phone Liberty 0813-4-5 

ANPA-PPA 

President Karl M. Frost 

Treasurer Harry M. Frost 

Production Manager Harold E. Bessom 

Secretary Harvey P. Newcomb 

Radio Director & Time Buyer 

Harvey P. Newcomb 

Branch Offices 
Lynn, Mass. 
Radio Accounts Placed — Durkee-Mower, 
Inc., CeLect Baking Co., Cold Spring Brew- 
ing Co., Eastern Racing Assn., Eldred & 
Barbo, National Bakers' Service, Shubert 
Theaters, Supreme Wine Co. 

• 

FULLER & SMITH & ROSS. INC. 

71 Vanderbilt Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 6-5600 

1501 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Phone Cherry 6700 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA - ABP 

APA— ABC— NOAB 

Officers 

President (Cleveland) A. L. Billingsley 

Chairman of the Board (New York) 

J. E. Wiley 
Secretary-Treasurer (Cleveland) 

C. C. Reidenbaugh 
Exec. Vice-Pres. (Cleveland) . .E. L. Andrew 



AD FRIED ADVERTISING AGENCY 

201 Easton Bldg., Oakland. Calif. 
Phone Higate 6580 

Officers 

Radio Director Ad Fried 

Copy Director Tom Doyle 

Format Manager William Morgan 

Publicity Director Millie Adler 

Program Manager Elaine Trigger 

Television Dept. 
No commercial television is yet available 
in the San Francisco Bay Area, but we have 
two clients interested in being the first spon- 
sors of such broadcasts. At present Ad Fried, 
owner, has covered this field. 

Radio Accounts Placed — Darling Shops, 
Delanes Jewelers, Tasch Furriers, Oakland & 
San Jose Offices of Postal Union Life Insur- 
ance Co., Oakland Pro Football Association, 
Alameda Democratic County Central Com- 
mittee (Election & Political Rallies), Dynan 
Finance Co. 

Radio Producers — Ad Fried, Elaine Trig- 
ger, Tom Doyle. 



GARDNER ADVERTISING CO. 

915 Olive St., St. Louis 1, Mo. 

Phone Garfield 2915 

AAAA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board H. S. Gardner 

President E. G. Marshutz 

Secretary E. A. W. Schulenburg 

Treasurer E. R. Gardner 

Vice-Pres. & Director of Radio (St. Louis) 

C. E. Claggett 
Branch Offices 
9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
Phone Columbus 5-2000 
Vice-President in Charge of Radio, 

Roland Martini 

Radio Accounts Placed— Pet Milk Co. 

(Saturday Night Serenade, Mary Lee Taylor), 

Ralston Purina Co. (Tom Mix), Purina Mills 

(Grand Ole Opry), Hyde Park Beer. 



186 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



GARFIELD & GUILD ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

660 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone EXbrook 3420 

PPA— ANPA— NOAB— ABP— NAAN 
Officers 

President Sidney Garfield 

Vice Pres. & Director of Radio. .Walter Guild 

Radio Time Buyer M. Amundsen 

Radio Publicity Dir Frank King 

Production Dir David Bascom 

Radio Producers Walter Guild, 

David Bascom, Ted Dahl 
Radio Accounts Placed — Brite-Ize, Brody's, 
Capwell, Sullivan & Furth, El Dorado Oil 
Co., Euclid Candy Co., Alice Frock, Haskins 
Bros., Hurley Marine Works, Good Foods, 
Inc., Gravem-Inglis Baking Co., Kay Jewel- 
ers, Valley Church of the Air, Smith's, No- 
Doz Awakeners, Northrup King & Co., Remar 
Baking Co., Rosefield Packing Co., Hunt 
Brothers Packing Co., Chemicals, Inc., South- 
west Food Products, Betty Lou Foods, 
O'Rourke of California, Gulhard Chocolate 
Co., Louis Milani Foods, Hunt Brothers Pack- 
ing Co. 



W. W. GARRISON & COMPANY 

400 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone Superior 8191 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Treas W. W. Garrison 

Vice-Presidents Brooks Middleton, 

Earl Lines 

Secretary & Time Buyer G. P. Schill 

Radio Accounts Placed — Florida Citrus ex. 
change, W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co. (foreign), 
Gibson Refrigerator Co., Radar-Radio Indus- 
tries. 

• 

GERTH-PACIFIC ADV. AGENCY 

68 Post St., San Francisco 4, Cal. 

Phone, GARfield 1081 

AAAA— APA— ABP 

Officers 

Owner Edwin P. Gerth 

Account Executives Richard Sleight, 

J. R. Pitsker 

Art Director Dan Adair 

Branch Office 

219 W. 7th St., Los Angeles 14, Cal. 

Phone, TUcker 4769 

Manager David R. Showalter 

• 

GEYER. CORNELL & NEWELL, INC. 

745 Fifth Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone Wickersham 2-5400 

AAAA— PPA— ANPA— PRB—ABF 

Officers 

President Bertram B. Geyer 



Exec. Vice-President H. W. Newell 

Exec. Coinni. Chairman Joe M. Dawson 

Vice-Presidents R. M. Ganger, 

J. W. Bertch, II. M. Hempstead, A. A. 
Surin. Vernon M. Welsh, R. F. Tutth- 
Radio Dept. 

Directors Donald S. Shaw, 

Eleanor L. Larsen , 

Publicity Dir Edward F. Thomas 

Television Dept. 

Director Donald S. Sbaw 

Prod. Supervisor Eleanor L. Larsen 

Branch Offices 

U. B. Bldg., Dayton, O. 

Phone Fulton 4145 

Manager E. G. Frost 

14250 Plymouth Rd.. Detroit 22, Mich. 
Phone, Hogarth 5520 

Exec. Contacts H. M. Hempstead, 

R. E. Tuttle 
Radio Accounts Placed — Nash-Kelvinator 
Corp. 

Television Account Placed — Knox & Dun- 
lap Hats for Men and Women. 



GILLHAM ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Continental Bank Bldg., 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Phone 4-5516 

ANPA — APA -ABP 

Officers 

President & Treasurer M. C. Nelson 

Vice-Presidents J. Y. Tipton, 

Lon Richardson 

Secretary Virginia Murray 

Asst. Radio Dir Mary Lou Ritchie 

Acct. Exec, Radio Dir. & Producer, 

Victor V. Bell 

Art Dir. & Prod. Mgr Dan Leahy 

Radio Accounts Placed — Sego Milk Prod- 
ucts Co., Utah Oil Refining Co., Excelcis 
Products Co., Mountain Fuel Supply Co., 
Royal Baking Co., Walker Bank & Trust Co., 
Sweet Candy Co., Cloverleaf Dairy, Tracy 
Loan & Trust Co., Utah Power & Light Co., 
Utah State Fed. of Labor, Fisher Brewing 
Co., J. A. Hogle & Co., Porter Scarpelli Maca- 
roni Co. (Salt Lake City), Utah Lumber Co., 
Utah Copper Co. 

• 

GLASER ADVERTISING, INC. 

Statler Bldg., Boston 16, Mass. 

Phone Hubbard 7188 

AAAA — ABP — ANPA — PPA — APA 

Officers 

President Louis Glaser 

Radio Director M. B. Collins 

Production Manager Thomas F. Eccleston, Jr. 
Radio Accounts Placed — Hathaway Baker- 
ies, Inc., Rose-Derry Co. 



187 



GLASSER-GAILEY & CO. 

3275 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

Phone Fl. 2141 

Officers 

Partner G. F. Glasser 

Radio Director P. E. Gailey 

Time Buyer K. C. Jone? 



RAY K. GLENN ADVERTISING 

1366 First Natl. Bldg., Oklahoma City 2, Okla. 

Phone 3-5439 

ABP— ANPA— SAAA— SNPA— NOAB 

Officers 

General Manager Ray K. Glenn 

Radio Director Lowe Runkle 

Branch Offices 

1342 Liberty Bank Bldg., Dallas, Texas 

Phone CEntral 3334 

Manager T. A. Workman 

1615 Fort Worth Natl. Bank Bldg., 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Phone 2-2575 

Manager Duke Burger, Jr. 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Frito Co., 
Globe Laboratories, Bewley Mills, William- 
son. Dickey Mfg. Co., Producers Creamery 
Co., Cains Coffee Co., Hardeman-King Co. 

• 

MAX GOLDBERG ADV. AGENCY 

611 Railway Exchange Bldg. 

Denver, Colorado 

Phone: CH 5533 

ANPA— APA 

Personnel 

Radio Director Wes Battersea 

Radio Continuity Mrs. Dorothy Lutz 

Radio Continuity Mrs. Elizabeth Nixon 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dave Cook Sport- 
ing Goods Co., M. & 0. Cigars, Ambrose & 
Co. (Richelieu Wines, Jams & Jellies), State 
of Colorado, Denver Jewelry Co., New York 
Furniture Co., and Dundee Clothing Co. 



GOODKIND, JOICE & MORGAN 

919 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Superior 6747 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Affiliated with Raymond R. Morgan Co. 

Hollywood, Calif. 

Officers 

President Clyde M. Joice 

Vice President-Treasurer. M. Lewis Goodkind 
Vice-President-Merchandising, 

Harlow P. Roberts 

Acct. Executive Charles O. Puffer 

Copy Chief Garrick M. Taylor 

Space Buyer. Florence A. Neighbors 

Radio Accounts Placed — Service Stores, 
Inc., Planters Nut & Chocolate Co., Golden- 
rod Ice Cream Co., Planters Edible Oil Co., 



Iowa Soap Co., Pine Forest Co., Hooker Glass 
& Paint Co., Jewel Tea Co., Inc., Mid-Conti- 
nent Airlines, Inc., Priebes & Sons, Inc. 



GOTHAM ADVERTISING 
COMPANY 

2 West 46th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone LOngacre 5-2616 

APA— ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President C. E. Harris 

Radio & Tele. Director Arthur A. Kron 

Executive & Vice-Pres D. D. Sutphen, Jr. 

Sec. & Treas Arthur A. Kron 

Radio Accounts Placed — Hartley's Marma- 
lade, Lutheran Hour. 



GREY ADVERTISING 
AGENCY, INC. 

166 West 32nd St., New York 1, N. Y. 

Phone CHickering 4-3900 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — NOAB — APA 

Officers 

President Lawrence Valenstein 

Executive Vice-President Arthur C. Fatt 

Supervisor of Radio Herschel Deutsch 

Time Buyer Hermina Lukacsy 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dif Corp., Lam- 
bert Bros., Bucilla, Doughnut Corp., Easy- 
Do, Van Heusen, Simplicity. 



JULIAN GROSS ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

11 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 

Phone 7-7179 

Officers 

President Julian Gross 

Sec. & Radio Time Buyer. .Geraldine K. Ray 
Account Executive Robert Lewis 



GLICKSMAN ADVERTISING CO., 
INC. 

400 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 8-0716 

ABP — ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President Joseph Glicksman 

Vice-President-Secretary .William Glicksman 

Treasurer David Glicksman 

Radio Director Jos. Glicksman 

Radio Accounts Placed— Adam Hats, Portis 
Bros. Hat Co. 

• 

GRACE & BEMENT, INC. 

2866 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 

Phone, Cherry 9400 

ANPA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

Pres. & Treas Edward R. Grace 



188 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Vice-President Austin F. Bement 

Vice-Pres. Chg. Research & Media; 

Radio Time Buyer L. C. Grace 

Secretary A. M. Ganoung 

Production Manager Thomas C. Bacon 

General Manager J. R. Bracken 

Art Director Judson Ross 

Account Executives Dean Leith, 

Richard Burke, J. R. Bracken 



GRANT ADVERTISING, INC. 

1313 Gulf States Bldg., Dallas, Texas 

Phone Riverside 8121 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— PRB— SNPA 

Officers 

President Will C. Grant 

Vice-Presidents Claude R. Miller, 

George C. Bayna, Eugene W. Cooper 

Radio Directors L. G. Harris, 

D. Lockhart 

Branch Offices 

919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone SUperior 9052 

Radio Director James Whipple 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Phone Circle 5-4485 

Radio Dept John C. Morrow, 

Perry Dickey, Jim McClain, Evelyn 

Elam 

Edif. Guardiola, Mexico City, Mexico 

Phone 6-1380 
Padre Mier 474, Monterrey, Mexico 
Radio Accounts Placed— Vick Chemical 
Co. (Vitamins Plus), Mars, Inc., Cudahy 
Packing Co., American Chicle Co. (Bee- 
man's). 

• 

GREEN-BRODIE, INC. 

420 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-9533 

ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President Julian P. Brodie 

Secretary-Treasurer Alan Green 

Vice President-Art Director. Murray A. Levin 

Production Director Harold Lebow 

Radio Dept Julian P. Brodie 

Radio Accounts Placed — Pieter deWitt Dia- 
monds, Ltd., Trade Bank & Trust Co. 



GRISWOLD-ESHLEMAN 

2700 Terminal Tower, Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Phone MAin 7626 
AAAA— ANPA— PPA— APA—APB—NOAB 

Officers 

President C. L. Eshleman 

Radio Director Earl R. Preble 

Radio Accounts Placed — Fleetwing Corp. 



GUILFORD ADVERTISING AGENCY 

350 Fifth Ave., New York 1, N. Y. 

Phone, PEnnsylvania 6-8518 

Personnel 

Frances G. Guilford 

Space Buyer Amelia Pronko 

• 

M. H. HACKETT CO. 

9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-1950 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — NOAB 

Officers 

Partner Montague H. Hackctt 

Members : Robt. D. Spahn, 

John Small, Henry C. Bainbridge, Louis 
Redmond, Aida Stearns. 
Radio Accounts Placed — Riggio Tobacco 
Corp., Chatham Mfg. Co. 
• 

HART-CONWAY CO.. INC. 

Genesee Valley Trust Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 

Phone Main 2073 

ANPA — APA 

Officers 

President H. Lyman Hart 

Secretary M. Brinkman Hart 

Vice President Harold E. Kennedy 

Radio Director John P. Street 

• 

GEORGE H. HARTMAN CO. 

307 North Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone State 0055 

ANPA — PPA — APA — ABP — NOAB 

Officers 

President George H. Hartman 

Secretarv-Treasurer Frank R. Hartman 

Radio Director Thomas Kivlan 

Radio Accounts Placed — Hartz Mountain 
Products, Nelson Bros. Co., Simoniz Co., 
P. A. Starck Co., Sawyer Biscuit Co. 
• 

HENRI, HURST & McDONALD, INC. 

520 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone SUperior 3000 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President W. B. Henri 

Secretary W. D. McDonald 

Treasurer J. F. Hurst 

Space Buyer Louis C. Paul 

Radio Director Wm. E. Jones 

Radio Dept. 

Assoc. Radio Dir David W. Dole 

Publicity Dir Russell M. Cunningham 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Skelly 
Oil Co., John Morrell & Co., Acme White 
Lead and Color Works, Ballard & Ballard; 
National Spot: John Morrell & Co., Ballard 
& Ballard Co., Carolene Products Co., Bauer 
& Black (Blue Jay), Acme White Lead & 
Color Works. 



189 



HILL ADVERTISING 

250 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, PLaza 3-7800 

PPA— ABP 

Officers 

President Weston Hill 

Vice-President W. L. Ledwith 

Secretary Joe Cesare 

Radio Account Placed — Central Broadcast- 
ing Corp. 

• 

HILLMAN-SHANE-BREYER, INC. 

403 W. 8th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Trinity 1453 

Officers 

President David S. Hillman 

Vice-Pres Donald A. Breyer 

Gen. Mgr Hassel Smith 

Radio Dept. 

Director Charles F. Chaplin 

Time Buyer Selma Schonfeld 

Publicity Dir L. Moran 

Producers C. Chaplin, 

E. Braun, R. Ashby 
Radio Accounts Placed — 42 Oil Shampoo, 
42 Hair Oil Tonic. 

• 

HTXON-O'DONNELL ADV., INC. 

19 West 50th St., New York 20, N. Y. 

Circle 5-6590 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Gen. Mgr S. M. Morey 

Vice-President Thos. E. Orr 

V..P. & Radio Director. .. .L. B. Van Doren 

Vice-President A. W. Humm 

Secty. & Treas F. B. Hengge 

Radio Time Buyer Kathryn Shanahan 

Radio Accounts Placed — Richfield Oil 
Corp., Robertshaw Thermostat Co., Sinclair 
Refining Co. 



WILLIAM F. HOLLAND AGENCY 

Hotel Simon, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Phone MAin 3450 

Officers 

Owner, Sales, Buyer William F. Holland 

Copy B. J. Holland 

Art Director Dale Maxey 

Research Director Jean Clark 

Sales Clyde Hague 

Continuity James Parson 

Statistician Mack Fevria 

Production Cress Meinhardt 

Associate Mgr D. E. Holland 

Merchandising C. J. Schuck 



ROBERT HOLLEY ASSOCIATES 

1270 Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone. Circle 6-2850 

ABP 

Officers 

Owner Robert Holley 



Space Buyer Suzanne Hanson 

Radio Accounts Placed — General Amuse- 
ments, ASCAP. 



CHARLES W. HOYT COMPANY. INC. 

551 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 2-0850 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Officers 

President and Treasurer. .. .Everett W. Hoyt 

Secretary C. B. Donovan 

Vice-Presidents F. A. Whipple, 

W. K. Dingledine 

Director of Radio W. P. Smith 

Time Buyer C. B. Donovan 

Television Dir W. P. Smith 

Branch Office 

15 Lewis Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Phone 5-6066 

Vice-President F. A. Whipple 

Radio Accounts Placed — B. C. Remedy 
Co., Charles Gulden, Inc., Burnham & Mor- 
rill, E. L. Knowles Co. (Rubine), W. A. 
Taylor (Valliant Wine), The John G. Paton 
Co. (Golden Blossom Honey). 
• 

THE H S G ADVERTISING AGENCY 

19 East 53rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone WIckersham 2-3338 

Officers 

President-Treasurer H. S. Goodman 

Secretary H. Knuth 

Vice-President Everett F. Goodman 

Branch Office 

206 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

• 

H. B. HUMPHREY CO. 

1235 Statler Bldg., Boston 16, Mass. 

Phone Liberty 4714 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Vice-President & Radio Director, 

Wm. H. Eynon 

Asst. to Radio Dir Sally Larkin 

Branch Office 
420 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Vice-Pres H. B. Humphrey, Jr. 

Radio Accounts Placed — Rumford Chemi- 
cal Works, Christian Science Monitor, The 
Employers' Group Insurance Companies, 
Waltham Watch Co., Rustcraft Greeting 
Cards (Christian program only), First Church 
of Christ, Scientist. 

• 

HUTCHINS ADVERTISING 
COMPANY. INC. 

Cutler Bldg., Rochester 4, N. Y. 

Phone Main 3528 

APA— ANPA— PPA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President F. A. Hutchins 

Secretary & Treas F. Irving Hutchins 

Vice-Presidents J. P. McCarthy, 

Mosher S. Hutchins 



190 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Director of Radio Raymond P. Weis 

Brunch Offices 
3701 N. Rroad St.. Phila. 40, Pa. 
Radcliff 1900 
Vice-Pres. & Resident Mgr.. .Ernest R. Lo 
Vice-Pres. & Resident Mgr., 

Ernest R. Loveman 
19 W. 44th St., New York 18, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill 2-0716 
Vice-Pres. in Charge of Radio Rroadcast & 
Television Programming (located in 

N. Y. office) John E. McMillin 

1244 Dufferin St., Toronto, Canada 
Radio Accounts Placed — Philco, Schuler's 
Potato Chips. 



IVEY & ELLINGTON, INC. 

535 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

MUrray Hill 2-5204 

ARP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President Jesse T. Ellington 

Vice-Presidents T. S. Strong, 

T. M. Keresey, C. L. Landon, G. F. Mor- 
row 

Radio Dept. 

Media Director A. G. Graff 

Radio Production Hal James 

Radio Accounts Placed — Rayuk Cigars Inc., 
Sweets Company of America, General Raking 
Co., McKesson & Robbins Inc. 



JOSEPH JACOBS JEWISH MARKET 
ORGANIZATION 

6 East 46th St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone MUrray Hill 2-6995 

President, Owner & Treas Joseph Jacobs 

Vice-President & Prod. Mgr.. . .Morris Unger 

Time Huyer Joseph Jacobs 

Talent Ruyer M. Keilson 

Radio Director Sholom Rubinstein 

Script J. I. Freedman 

Research Dorothy Osof sky 

Radio Accounts Placed — Maxwell House 
Coffee, Diamond Crystal Salt, Rab-O, My-T- 
Fine Desserts, Premier Food Products, Ral- 
ston, Sanka Coffee, Grape-Nuts Wheat-Meal, 
Colgate Dental Cream, Anacin, "Junket" 
Rennet Products, Old English Household 
Products, Dugan Rros., H-0 Oats, Rond 
Rread, Rarbasol, Davis Raking Powder, Coco- 
malt, Cut-Rite Waxed Paper, San Fay Tissue, 
Florigold Oranges and Grapefruit, Pillsbury 
Enriched Farina, Heckers' Cream Farina, 
Hellmann's Mayonnaise, Whitehall Phar- 
macal Co. (New Hair Groom, Ri So Dol, 
Kolymos Tooth Paste & Powder), Aunt 
Polly's Soup Mix, Raker's DeLuxe Cocoa, 
Ry-Krisp, Shredded Ralston. 



JESSOP ADVERTISING CO. 

First Central Tower. Akron 8, Ohio 

Phone Franklin 3232 

Officers 

President M. K. Jessop 

Time Ruyer Charles A. Jessop 

Radio Director R. Gilbert 



THE RALPH H. JONES COMPANY 

Carew Tower, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Phone Main 3351 

AAAA — ARP — ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President C. M. Robertson, Jr. 

Vice-Presidents Stanley A. Wilier, 

James M. Nelson 

Secretary Elmer A. Vehr 

Time Ruyer Kathryn M. Hardig 

Publicity M. MacPherson 

Space Ruyer Wm. R. Frietsch, Jr. 

Branch Office 

580 Fifth Ave., New York City 

Phone Wisconsin 7-5500 

Manager Philip Meek 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dow Drug Co., 
Kroger Grocery & Raking Co., Carter Coal 
Co., Miami Margarine, Ten-R-Lpw, Kutol 
Products Co., Fifth Third Union Trust Co., 
Hotel Netherland Plaza. 



H. W. KASTOR & SONS 
ADVERTISING CO., INC. 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Central 5331 

ANPA— PPA— ARP— SNPA 

Officers 

President Henry K. Kahn 

Exec. Vice-Pres V. T. Mertz 

Vice-Presidents J. H. Wright, 

Mrs. R. F. Farquhar, Harold Merillat 
Radio Dept. 

Director J. H. Wright 

Time Ruyer George Duram 

Radio Traffic Marie McDonald 

Talent Ruyer Joan Herron 

Branch Offices 

9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 

Phone COlumbus 5-6135 

Manager G. Rrandt 

Arcade Rldg., St. Louis, Mo. 
Phone Central 6790 

Manager Herman Kastor 

6331 Hollywood Roulevard 

Hollywood, Calif. 

Phone Granite 1631 

Coast Radio Dir Arthur Daly 

Radio Accounts Placed — Procter & Gamble 
Co., Welch Grape Juice Co., Rlackhawk 
Rrewing Co., 8-In-l Company. 



191 



THE JOSEPH KATZ COMPANY 

444 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone Wlckersham 2-2740 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Officers 

President Joseph Katz 

Vice-President Nat C. Wildman 

Treasurer Charles M. Harrison 

Director of Radio Allen J. de Castro 

Radio Producers & Continuity Writers, 

Nat C. Wildman, H. E. Hudgins, Alvan 

Sommerfield 

Branch Offices 

8 South St., Baltimore, Md. 

Phone Lexington 1500 

Manager C. M. Harrison 

Director of Radio Robert G. Swan 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Oil Co., 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Co., Ex-Lax, Inc., 
Arrow Beer, Jests, Inc., Laco & Pompeian 
Products, Inc., Gibbs & Company, Inc., Mary- 
land Drydock, Gude's Pepto-Mangan. 



HENRY J. KAUFMAN ADVERTISING 

Homer Bldg., Washington 5, D. C. 

Phone District 7400 
ANPA— APA— ABP— PA— NAAN 

Officers 

Owner Henry J. Kaufman 

Radio Director Jeffery A. Abel 

Copy Chief William F. Sigmund 

Space Buyer Betty D. Gwyer 

Time Buyer Betty Ann Harper 



KEELING & CO., INC. 

1028 Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 

Indianapolis 4, Ind. 

Phone Riley 1478 

ANPA— AAAA— PPA 

Officers 

Pres Hal Keeling 

Exec. Vice-Pres. & Time Buyer.. Don Collins 

Vice-Pres. & Sec Wm. Hutchinson 

Radio Account Placed — Hastings Manufac- 
turing Co., Casite Corp. 



JAN KENYON'S ADV. AGENCY 

4432 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland 11, Calif. 
Piedmont 4680 



Manager & Director Publicist. . .Jan Kenyon 

Assistant Director Lee Franco 

Radio Producer Jan Kenyon 

Radio Accounts Placed — Jean Mater, Inc., 
Johansson Massage Institute, Dolores Premier 
School, Hank & Frank Bicycle Academy, 
Sherman Clay Box Office (Oakland) ; Gann 
Products Co., Cassou's French Bakeries. (All 
local accounts.) 



KAYTON-SPIERO CO., INC. 

230 West 41st St., New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone LOngacre 5-5090 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— PRB 

Officers 

President Gerald B. Spiero 

Vice-President Morris Kinzler 

Secretary-Treasurer Alvin J. Kayton 

Time Buyer Herman Jacobs 

Radio Account Placed — Twentieth Century- 
Fox Film Corp. 

• 

KELLY, ZAHRNDT & KELLY, INC. 

745 Cotton Belt Bldg., St. Louis 2, Mo. 
Phone Garfield 0777 



Officers 

President 

Vice-Pres. and Treasurer.. 
Vice-Pres. and Secretary. . . 

Director of Radio 

Assistant Director 

Radio Producers 

V. A. Kelly 
Radio Continuity Writers. 

V. A. Kelly 
Radio Accounts Placed— 
St. Louis Committee. 



..C. F. Kelly, Jr. 
..W. W. Zahrndt 

V.A.Kelly 

..C. F. Kelly, Ji. 
..W. W. Zahrndt 
..C. F.Kelly, Jr., 

..C.F.Kelly, Jr., 

Trems, Inc., Visit 



KENYON & ECKHARDT, INU. 

247 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 30700 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — APA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Otis Allen Kenyon 

President Thomas D'Arcy Brophy 

Treasurer Charles Vasoll 

Secretary Joseph A. Vessey 

Vice-Pres. & Dir. of Radio Dwight Mills 

Asst. Director of Radio Robert D. Wolf 

Producers : John Hines, 

Robt. Brilmayer 
Writers : Helen Hinckley, 

Peggy Holt, Davis Smith, John Mathews 

Branch Office 

135 S. La Salle St., Chicago 3, 111. 

Phone RAndolph 6470 

Vice-President in charge. . . .Chester A. Foust 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Charles 
B. Knox Gelatine Co., Standard Brands 
(Fleischman's Foil Yeast), Richard Hudnut, 
Wesson Oil & Snowdrift, Rock City, Bosco, 
Spool Cotton, Kellogg Co. (All-Bran, Gro- 
Pup, 40% Bran, Pep, Raisen 40% Bran), 
Corn Flakes, Rice Krispies, Krumbles, Shred- 
ded Wheat, Pepperidge Farm, Stetson Co., 
McHugh Bros. & Drummond, RCA, Savavins, 
Inc., S. B. Thomas Inc., R. B. Davis Co., 
Borden Co. 



192 



• • • 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



H. M. KIESEWETTER ADVERTISING 
AGENCY, INC. 

9 East 40th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
IMione Lexington 2-0025 
ANPA — PPA — ABP 

Officers 
President & Treasurer. .. .E. T. Kieseweller 

General Manager H. M. Kiesewetter 

Radio Dept. Manager Sainin S. Baker 

Radio Time Buyer Rhoda Kane Powers 

Radio Accounts Placed — Penn Tobacco Co., 
Bathasweet Corp., Lorr Laboratories, The 
Menncn Co. 



KIRCHER, LYTLE, HELTON & 
COLLETT, INC. 

321 West First St., Dayton 10, Ohio 

Phone 2151 

PPA— ABP— BPA 

Officers 

President J. Horace Lytle 

Vice-President R. C. Kircher 

Treasurer C. B. Helton 

Secretary Robert Collett 

Art Director Gustave Sigritz 



KNOLLIN ADV. AGENCY 

111 Sutter Bldg., San Francisco 4, Cal. 

Phone, SUtter 6110 

AAAA— APA— ABP 

Officers 

President James C. Knollin 

Art Director Norman Erickson 

Office Manager Alice Ernest 

Space Buyer Ina H. Hamman 

Account Executives Robert H. Knollin, 

Thomas J. McNamara 

Branch Office 

530 W. 6th St., Los Angeles 14, Cal. 

Phone, VAndike 4057 



MERRILL KREMER. INC. 

1711 Exchange Building, Memphis, Tenn. 
Phone 5-4343 

— ABP— SNPA— APA— PANY— NAAN 

ANPA 

Officers 

President Merrill Kremer 

Secretary and Treasurer Ernest Lee 

Vccount Executives Merrill Kremei, 

Homer Gentry. Polly Cooper, Martha 
Haynil 



Production Director 

Time Buyer 



loiner Gentry 
.Poll) Cooper 



ABBOTT KIMBALL CO., INC. 

250 Park Ay,., New York, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-9600 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Radio & Television Departments 

Vice-President Cecil H. Hacketl 

Time Buyer Miriam Traeger 

Branch Offices 
333 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Executive-in-Charge Grant Chamberlain 

10 West 21st Street, Kansas City, Kans. 

Executive-in-Charge David Mindlin 

3055 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Executive-in-Charge Helen Hedstrom 

Rudio Accounts Placed — National Spot: 
Renoir Parfums, Ltd.. Marshall Field & Co., 
Bonne Bell Inc., Black, Starr & Gorhani, 
Joe Lowe, Inc., Ann Haviland Laboratories. 

Television Accounts Placed — Dobb Hats, 
Harper's Bazaar. 



KLINGER ADVERTISING CORP. 

119 W. 57th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-2660 

Officers 

President-Radio Account Exec. .A. A. Klinger 

Secretary, Treas. & Acct. Exec E. French 

Radio Accounts Placed — Madison Long 
Island Personal Loan Co., Madison Finance 
Co. of N. J., Servus Clothes, Samuel Schlos6- 
man & Sons, Inc., Stanback Co.. Ltd., Bridge 
Apparel Shops, Smilin' Irishman, Kent Mo- 
tors, Ideal Motors, Price Motors, Superior 
Agencies, Inc. 



KNOX REEVES ADVERTISING, INC. 

600 First National Bank Bldg. 

Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Phone Bridgeport 7701 

ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

President E. E. Sylvestre 

Executive Vice-President Wayne Hunt 

Vice-Presidents J. H. Sarles, 

Elizabeth B. Reeves, Helen A. Brown 

Secretary & Treasurer C. L. Greenwood 

Radio Director Russell Ness 

Director of Media & Research, 

Dr. A. R. Root 
Radio Program Production. .. .H. K. Painter 

Radio Script E. B. Reeves 

Time Buyer Dr. A. R. Root 



193 



Branch Office 
415 Chanin Bldg.. New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 4-3982 

625 Market St., San Francisco 5, Calif. 

Phone SUtter 6744 

Vice President R. W. Stafford 

Radio Production Manager. .. .Hal Burdick 
Radio Account Placed — General Mills, 
Inc. 



ARTHUR KUDNER, INC. 

630 Fifth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-3200 
AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ARP 

Officers 

President J. H. S. Ellis 

Vice-Presidents E. J. Owens, 

Sam D. Fuson, Charles F. Gannon, Ken- 
neth Collins 

Director of Radio Myron P. Kirk 

Script Buyer Alan Ward 

Time Buyer Eleanore Manning 

Production G. Bennett Larson 

Branch Offices 

New Center Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Phone Madison 5315 

Robert Copeland 

Albee Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Phone National 5506 

Frank Getty 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: U. S. 
Tobacco Co., National Spot: Goodyear Tire 
& Rubber, General Motors, Benson & Hedges. 



LAMBERT & FEASLEY, INC. 

9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone COlumbus 5-3721 

ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President John L. Johnston 

Executive V-P Gordon Seag rove 

V-P.-Radio Director Martin Horrell 

General Manager Frank Mace 

Radio Accounts Placed — Lambert Phar- 
macal Co.; Prophylactic Brush Co.; Phillips 
Petroleum Co. 



LANDSHEFT, INC. 

810 Liberty Bank Bldg., Buffalo 2, N. Y. 

CI-7260 

ANPA— ABP 

Officers 

President A. Wm. Landsheft 

Vice-President H. L. Barber 

Production Mgr D. B. Weiss 

Art Director N. Johnston 



LAUESEN & SALOMON 

520 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 
Phone SUperior 0738 
ABP — ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President A. M. Salomon 

Account Executive Wendell Walker 



J. R. EUPSICK ADVERTISING 
AGENCY, INC. 

122 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone MUrrav Hill 5-9145 

ANPA — ABP — PPA 

Officers 

President J. R. Kupsick 

Vice President Saul Kampf 

Radio Director Frank Powderly 

Space Buyer E. M. Fordsman 

Radio Accounts Placed— Arco Publ. Co., 
Hecht Co., N. Y. Auto Exchange, Greiner 
Motor Sales, Maple Motors, Paul Kaskali, 
Cascade Laundry, United Institute of Aero, 
nautics, Ben Marden's Riviera. 



LAKE-SPIRO-SHURMAN, INC. 

2800 Sterick Tower, Memphis 3, Tenn. 

Phone 5-1571 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— SNPA 

Officers 

President Avron Spiro 

Secretary-Treasurer M. M. Shurman 

Radio Director Clark R. Brown 

Radio Accounts Placed — Plough, Inc., The 
Piso Co. 



LEEFORD ADVERTISING AGENCY 

315 Fourth Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 

Phone STuyvesant 9-1742 

PPA 

Officers 

President-Radio Director David D. Lee 

Treasurer W. C. Hoyt 

Radio Account Placed — Remington-Rand, 
Inc., American Writing Machine Co. 



LENNEN & MITCHELL, INC. 

17 East 45th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 2-9170 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — APA — NOAB 

Officers 

President Philip W. Lennen 

Vice President-Treasurer Robert W. Orr 

Secretary Arthur L. Lynn 

Director of Radio S. James Andrews 

Radio Producer Travis D. Wells 

Rudio Accounts Placed — John H. Wood- 
bury, Inc., Andrew Jergens Co., P. Lorillard 
Co., Inc., Tide Water Associated Oil Co., 
Parfums Schiaparelli, Inc., Lehn & Fink. 



194 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



LANG, FISHER & STASHOWER. 
INC. 

1010 Euclid Ave., Cleveland 15, Ohio 

Phone Main 6579 

ANPA— ABP— PPA 

Officers 

President H. J \ck Lang 

Vice President-Secretary A. B. Fisher 

Vice President-Treasurer. .Fred P. Stashowcr 

Production Manager George DeWitt 

Radio Director A. B. Fisher 

Radio Accounts Placed — Railley Corp., 
Bonne Bell, Inc., Yellow Cab Co. 



AL PAUL LEFTON CO., INC. 

1617 Penna. Blvd., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

Phone RIttenhouse 1500 

ANPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President A. P. Lefton 

Vice-Presidents G. W. Wolfsten, 

P. Brown, T. A. Ballantyne 
Public Relations Dir., 

Andrew McLean Parker 

Time Buyer H. B. Gotwals 

Branch Offices 

521 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone VAnderbilt 6-4340 

Vice-Presidents R. J. Herts, 

M. S. Gladstone, R. J. Misch 
Radio Director Carl Mark 



LEIGHTON & NELSON 

202 State St., Schenectady 5, N. Y. 

Phone 6-4202 

ABP — PPA — ANPA 

Officers 

Partners Winslow P. Leighton 

and George R. Nelson 

Radio Director George R. Nelson 

Copy Director Cecil Woodland 

Radio Assistant Marilyn Hermant 

Radio Accounts Placed — Saratoga Racing 
Assn., William W. Lee & Co., The Stanton 
Brewery, Inc., Breslaw Bros. Furniture, Stan- 
ton Brewery, Saratoga Vichy Spring Co., 
Rudolph Bros., D'Jimas Furs, Central Super 
Markets, Colonial Ice Cream Co., Morris 
Plan Bank, Wallace's Dept. Store. 



Radio Dept. 

Copy Director Barbara D. Aiton 

< lopywriters Eleanore Zacnglc, 

Gladys D. Kauffinan 



A. W. LEWIN CO.. INC. 

10 East 19th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

ELdorado 5-3545 
AAAA— ABP-ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Partners A. W. Lewin, 

S. M. Weiss 

Traffic Mgr M. A. Cahill 

Account Exec Maurice Marks 

Branch Office 

11 Commerce Street, Newark 2, N. J. 

Mitchell 2-7244 

Radio Accounts Placed — National Spot: 
Harvel Watches, June Dairy Products Co., 
The Corsetorium. 

• 

ADDISON LEWIS & ASSOCIATES 

1414 Foshay Tower, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Phont AT 6235 

ABP-ANPA— PPA-NOAB-APA 

Officers 

Owner Addison Lewis 

Time Buyer Margie Anderson 

Account Executives Edward Grubb, 

Harvey Kruse, J. A. Quint, Arthur Grove, 

Don Johnson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Minneapolis-Hon- 
eywell. 

• 

LEON LIVINGSTON ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

Mills Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Sutter 7340 

AAAA — ABP — ANPA — PPA — NOAB 

Officers 

President Leon G. Livingston 

Vice-President W. C. Day 

Radio Time Buyer Zonabelle Samson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet (Peet's Granulated Soap), Simon Mat- 
tress Mfg. Co., Nestle's Milk Products, Inc., 
Italian Swiss Colony, Haas Bros. 



TED LEVY ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Temple Court Bldg., Denver 3, Colorado 

Phone CHerry 4521-2 

ABP — ANPA — APA 

Officers 

Owner Ted Levy 

Production Manager William Robertson 

Office Manager Elinor Herron 



THE W. E. LONG COMPANY 

155 North Clark St., Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Randolph 4606 

ANPA— NOAB 

Officers 

Director of Radio E. J. Sperry 

Asst. Dir. of Radio Bob Struble 



195 



Supervisor of Syndicated Programs, 

Richard J. Slater 

Script James A. Armstrong 

Hollywood Producer Paul Quan 

New York Producer Irene Beasley 

Music Direction Delos Owen 

Radio Accounts Placed — Agency is a spe' 
cialist in wholesale baker advertising ser- 
vicing hundreds from coast to coast on a 
transcribed syndicated basis. 



LLOYD, CHESTER & DILLINGHAM. 
INC. 

9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Phone Circle 5-8800 
ANPA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President Laurence M. Lloyd 

Vice-President Charles M. Pietsch 

Production Manager William T. Kaleb 

Media Director John J. Hagan 



LOGAN & ARNOLD 

621 S. Hope St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
ANPA— AAAA— PPA— APA—ABP 

Officers 

President Dudley L. Logan 

Exec. Vice-Pres J. C. Arnold 

Vice-President Van Davis 



MACE ADVERTISING AGENCY. INC. 

507 Lehmann Bldg., Peoria, 111. 

Phone 7197 

ANPA— ABP— APA— NAAN 

Officers 

President J. F. Fellay 

Trea. & Radio Time Buyer Jay J. Keith 

Vice-President Robert J. Rice 

Radio Director Ann McNatt 

Radio Accounts Placed — Keystone Steel & 
Wire Co., Consolidated Products Co., Schultz, 
Bausan & Co. 



MALCOLM-HOWARD ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

20 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Webster 2110 

ABP— APA— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Owner-Time Buyer Arthur M. Holland 

Radio Account Executive. . . .Max G. Holland 

Radio Director Maury Cliff er 

Radio Writers Hal Tate, 

Nikki Kaye, Ray Freedman, Eileen Rietz, 

Mauri Cliffer. 

Radio Accounts Placed — Dad's Root Beer, 
Joy Candy Shoppes, Roller Derby, Alert 
Laundry, Holland jewelers, Newart Co., 
Burde Cologne, Fij-Oil Shampoo, Rubin's 
Apparel, Roller Derby. 



EARLE LUDGIN, INC. 

121 West Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Franklin 1762 

ANPA — ABP — PPA — APA 

Officers 

Partners Earle Ludgin, 

V. R. Bliss, J. H. Caro, J. H. Willmarth 
Radio Director V. R. Bliss 



JOSEPH MAXFIELD COMPANY 

36 Exchange Place, Providence 3, R. I. 

Phone GAspee 4456 

ABP — ANPA 

Officers 

President Joseph M. Finkle 

Vice-President Archie M. Finkle 

Treasurer Bruno Schnabel 

Executive Secretary Anne E. Woled 

Time Buyer Joseph M. Finkle 

Radio Director Dorothy M. Taipe 

Radio Accounts Placed — Old Monastery 
Wine Co., Eclipse Food Products, Corp., Jack 
& Harry's Auto Stores, Candy Mart Stores. 



MacFARLAND, AVEYARD & CO. 

333 North Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, III. 

Phone Randolph 9360 

ANPA — PPA — ABP — SNPA 

NOAB 

Officers 

President Hays MacFarland 

Vice-Presidents A. E. Aveyard, 

Malcolm A. Jennings, Allen B. Dicus, 

Harry M. Coleman 

Secretary-Treasurer B. G. Ruttingh 

General Manager Allen B. Dicus 

Radio Director & Producer Evelyn Stark 

Time Buyer Bergi Boe 

Production Manager Edwin C. Frank 

Branch Office 

RCA Bldg., New York, N. Y. 

Circle 6-2890 

Radio Director H. C. Klein 

Vice-President-Gen. Mgr.. George MacGovern 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Curtis 
Publishing Co., Nat'l Board of Fire Under- 
writers; National Spot: Omar, Inc., Burma- 
Vita Co., United Wallpaper, Inc., Curtis Pub- 
lishing Co., Northwestern Yeast Co., Zenith 
Radio Corp. 



196 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



MacLAREN ADVERTISING CO. 
LTD. 

372 Bay St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Phone Elgin 0321 
ANPA— CAAA— CDNA— CWNA— 

CNN & PA 

Officers 
President-General Manager. .J. A. MacLaren 
Viee President-Assistant General 

Manager E. V. Reehnitzer 

Vice-President-Treasurer I. E. Reynolds 

Secretary G. T. Scroggie 

Director James Ferres 

Radio Dept. 

C. M. Pasmore, M. Rosenfeld, 

H. H. O'Connor, Hugh Horler 

Branch Offices 

900 Dominion Square Bldg., 

Montreal, Que., Canada 

Phone Plateau 9556 

Office Manager E. H. H. Smith 

911 Electric Ry. Chambers, 

Winnipeg, Man., Canada 

Phone 26-622 

Office Manager E. P. Thompson 

305 Province Bldg., Vancouver, B. C, Can. 

Phone Marine 6268 
Office Manager W. D. M. Patterson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Impe- 
rial Oil, Ltd., Tuckett, Ltd., People's Credit 
Jewelers, S. F. Lawrason Co., Dalglish (Ont.) 
Ltd.; National Spot: Bulova Watch Co., Ltd., 
Canadian Life Underwriters, People's Credit 
Jewelers, O'Cedar of Canada, Tuckett Ltd. 

• 

DAVID MALKIEL ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

260 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
Phone Liberty 1421 
ANPA— ABP— PPA 

Officers 

Owner David Malkiel 

Secretary Martha Brest 

Radio Dept Harry Weinbaum, 

Martin Kadis, Morey Schwartz, Harry 

Lawrence 

Radio Accounts Placed — I. J. Fox Co., 
Ace Vacuum Cleaners, Drive-In Theaters, 
Inc., Paramount Baking Co., E. M. Loew's 
Theaters, Greater Boston Theaters, Inc., RKO 
Theaters, Steuben's Restaurant, Canadian 
Ace Ale, Casa M a n a n a , Elm Farm 
Foods Co., Serta-White Cross Co., Freilicher 
Kabtzen, Lithuanian Corp. Group, Rio Ca- 
sino, Royal Crown Cola of Boston, Old 
Monastery Wines, Ritter Dancing School, 
Essex Hotel, Avery Hotel, Granada Vine- 
yards, Inc., Glendale Coal Co., Racing Guide, 



Ray Galvin, Kasanof's Bread, RosofFs, Totem 
Pole Ballroom, Belmont Furn., L. P. Rogers 
& Son, Washington Jewelers, Bahijuice Or- 
anges, Corner House, Franklin Insulation Co., 
Freda's Restaurant, Artie Clothes, Richards 
Clothing Co. 



MANSON-GOLD ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

1004 Marquette Ave., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 
Phone GEneva 9619 
ABP— PPA— ANPA 

Officers 

Account Executive D. P. Nathanson 

Account Executive Meyer Gold 

Account Executive Jean Hadley 

Account Executive Bruce Sielaff 

Radio Dept. 

Radio Director D. P. Nathanson 

Time Buyer Jean Hadley 

Talent Buyer Bruce Sielaff 

Producers D. P. Nathanson, 

Jean Hadley 

Television Dept. 
Director D. P. Nathanson 

Branch Office 

1520 Crossroads of the World, 

Hollywood, Calif. 

Branch Manager D. P. Nathanson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Red Devil Soot 
Remover, Snyder's Drug Stores, Janney Best 
Paints, Pfunder's Tablets, Char-Tex. 



JOSEPH MAXFIELD COMPANY 

87 Weybosset St., Providence 3. R. I. 

Phone GAspee 4456-7 

ABP— ANPA 

Officers 

President Joseph M. Finkle 

Vice-Pres Archie M. Finkle 

Treasurer Bruno Schnabel 

Exec. Sec Anne E. Woled 

Time Buyer Joseph M. Finkle 

Radio Dir Dorothy M. Taipe 

Radio Accounts Placed — Candy Mart Stores, 
Inc., Eclipse Food Products Corp., Inlaid 
Optical Co., National Glass Co., R. I. Sales 
Co., Shiloh Bottling Co., Metropolitan The- 
aters. 



197 



MARSCHALK & PRATT COMPANY 

535 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone VAnderbilt 6-2022 

ANPA — PPA — ABP — APA —ABC — 

AAAA — NOAB 

Officers 
Partners Harry C. Marschalk, 

G. A. Poetschke, S. H. Giellerup, S. L. 

Meulendyke 

Director of Radio Carlo De Angelo 

Radio Continuity Writers... G. W. Freeman, 

Bennett Kolb, Edmund Mitchell, John 

R. Allen 

Radio Account Placed — Standard Oil Co. 
of N. J. 



J. M. MATHES, INCORPORATED 

122 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone LExington 2-7450 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— SNPA 

Officers 

President J. M. Matlies 

Treasurer A. E. Cox 

Secretary Carle Rollins 

Vice-Presidents. .William B. Okie, Lester Loh 
Vice-President-Director of Radio, 

Wilfred S. King 
Time Buyer Edna Cathcart 

Radio Accounts Placed — Ludens, Inc.; Na- 
tional Carbon Co., Canada Dry Ginger Ale & 
Spur, Magazine Repeating Razor Co., Inter- 
national Salt Co., Bleachette, Pure Foods 
(Herbox), Pan-American Coffee Bureau, 
Burlington Mills. 



MAXON, INC. 

2761 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Phone Fitzroy 5710 

ANPA— PPA— APA— AAAA— ABP 

ABC— NOAB— TAB— CCA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Lou R. Maxon 

President T. K. Quinn 

Vice-President Searle Hendee 

Treasurer W. I. O'Neil 

Secretary G. Reginald McKiel 

Radio Department Ed Wilhelm, 

P. R. Pumphrey 

Branch Offices 

570 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone Eldorado 5-2930 

Vice-President In Charge W. Ray Baker 

955 Main St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Phone Bridgeport 6-2177 

Vice-President In Charge W. Ray Baker 

919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Delaware 3536 

Vice-President L. J. Sholty 

Radio Accounts Placed— Gillette Safety 
Razor Co., General Electric Co., Ford Motor 



Co., Pfeiffer Brewing Co., H. J. Heinz Co., 
Griesedieck Brewery, Feigenspan Brewing 
Co., Dobler Brewing Co. 



THE MAYERS COMPANY 

1240 S. Main St., Los Angeles 27, Calif. 

Phone PRospect 0101 

ABP— ANPA— PRB—FAAG 

Officers 

Principals Henry Mayers, 

J. R. Mayers, Arthur Mayers 

Manager Radio Dept Gertrude Stark 

Time Buyer Alden Weiss 

Assistant Dean Simmons 

Production Martin Weinstein, 

Vern Davies 

Radio Accounts Placed — Pennzoil Co., 
Sears Roebuck & Co., Southern Calif. Tele- 
phone Co., Gordon Bread Co., Dad's Root 
Beer, California Bank. 



McCANN-ERICKSON, INC. 

50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 5-7000 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President H. K. McCann 

Chairman of Exec. Comm. . .Harrison Atwood 

Executive Vice-President Carl B. Robbins 

Vice-President and General Manager of 

New York Office L. S. Briggs 

Vice-Presidents Harrison Atwood, 

L. E. Firth, J. L. Deane, C. A. Hoppock, 
W. E. McKeachie, R. E. Thompson, E. F. 
Wilson, Gordon E. Hyde, Myron C. Lech- 
ner, E. D. Madden, J. J. McCarthy, Hugh 
A. Mitchell, C. A. Posey, R. W. St. Hill 
and Earl C. Donegan. 

Secretary-Treasurer John L. Anderson 

Director of Research L. D. H. Weld 

Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. of Research Dept. 

Jackson Taylor 
Vice-Pres. in charge of Radio 

Lloyd O. Coulter 
Associated with Mr. Coulter. Arthur J. Kemp 

Radio Producers Dorothy B. McCann, 

Clarence Olmstead, Russ Johnston 

Radio Time Buyer .Wm. C. Dekker 

Radio Research Marion Harper, Jr. 

Branch Offices 

910 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Webster 3701 

Vice-President-Mgr Homer Havermale 

Vice-President H. G. Smith 

Vice-President J. H. Jameson 

Guardian Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Phone Cherry 3490 

Vice-President-Manager. . .Albert A. Sommer 



198 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 






Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 
Phone Randolph 9710 

Manager Rena Johnson 

6331 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Phone Hillside 8268 

Manager A. J. Bruhn 

448 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone Michigan 4049 

Manager Burt Cochran 

Hodgson Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Vice-Pres. & Mgr R. B. Donnelly 

Vice-President. Merrill Hutchinson 

114 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Douglas 5560 

Vice-President and Manager. Henry Q. Hawes 

Vice-Presidents M. S. Achenbach, 

R. H. Cochran. F. II. McCrea, C. E. 
Persons, C. F. Ohliger 
Public Service Bldg., Portland, Ore. 
Phone Atwater 4305 
Manager R. B. Calkins 

Radio Accounts Placed — New York: Ameri- 
can Molasses Co., Axton-Fisher Tobacco Co., 
Chesebrough Manufacturing Co., Gruen 
Watch Co., Manufacturers Trust Co., James 
McCutcheon & Co., National Biscuit Co., 
Pacific Coast Borax Co., Stomberg-Carlson 
Co., Stanco, Inc., Westinghouse Electric and 
Manufacturing Co. 

Chicago: Standard Oil Co. of Nebraska, 
Standard Oil Co. of Indiana, Milk Founda- 
tion, Inc. 

Cleveland: Leisy Brewing Co., Richman 
Bros. Co., Standard Oil Co. of Ohio. 

Detroit: Altes Brewing Co. 

Los Angeles: Globe Mills Co., Southern 
California Gas Co. and Southern Counties 
Gas Co., The Squirt Co. 

Minneapolis: Pillsbury Flour Mills Co., 
Twin City Federal Savings & Loan Assn., 
Gluek Brewing Co., First National Bank, 
Northwest Scrap Dealers Assn. 

Portland: Northwestern Electric Co., Pa- 
cific Power & Light Co., Portland Gas & 
Coke Co. 

San Francisco: Anglo California National 
Bank of San Francisco, Associated Dental 
Supply Co., California Packing Corporation, 
California Walnut Growers Assn., Harold 
H. Clapp, Inc., Dwight Edwards Company, 
General Brewing Corporation, Hale Bros. 
Stores, Inc., Pacific Gas & Electric Co., Roma 
Wine Co. 



r. e. McCarthy advertising 

AGENCY 

1002 Tampa Theater Bldg., Tampa 2, Fla. 
Phone 2323 
PANY— SNPA 
Officers 

President R. E, 

Secretary M. A 



McCarthy 
McCarthy 



Treasurer M. C. Benito 

Time Buyer : R. E. McCarthy 

Continuity M. D. King 

Radio Accounts Placed — Borden's-Poin- 
settia Dairy. Southern Brewing Co., Peninsu- 
lar Telephone Co., Lenfestey Supply Co., 
Pioneer Tire Co. 



THE McCORD COMPANY, INC. 

1100 Hodgson Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Phone Bridgeport 1225 

APA— ANPA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Treasurer R. D. McCord 

Vice-President Louis Melamed 

Secretary C. F. Baker 

Director of Radio E. B. Grove 

Production Manager T. L. B. Campbell 

Radio Time Buyer Edith M. Knutsen 

Radio Accounts Placed— W. H. Barber Co., 
Conrad Fur Co., Central Cooperative Live- 
stock Assn., Furniture Exposition Mart, The 
Hilex Co., Chocolate Products Co., Goodman 
Bros., Jewelers, Minneapolis Gas Light Co., 
Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation, Griggs, 
Cooper & Co., Milk Foundation of Minneapo- 
lis, American Benefit Assn., Boutill's, Minne- 
sota Farm Bureau Service, Anaconda Sales 
Co., Sanitary Food Mfg. Co. 



McJUNKIN ADVERTISING CO. 

228 N. LaSalle St., Chicago 1, 111. 
Phone State 5060 

Officers 

President Gordon Best 

Vice-Presidents Roy M. Kirtland, 

Leroy A. Kling, Willard E. Stevens, Dade 

B. Epstein, James W. Egan, Hal R. 

Makelin 
Account Executives Joseph J. Klein, 

Donald B. Skinner 

Manager, Radio Dept Hal R. Makelin 

Media Dept. Manager Edwin A. Trizil 

Production Manager W. C Mottershead 

Radio Accounts Placed — Joseph Schlitz 
Brewing Co., Carey Salt Co., Florsheim Shoe 
Co- Chef Boiardi Food Products Co., Bren- 
ner Bros., Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Jewel 
Food Stores, Andes Candies. 



199 



McKEE & ALBRIGHT. INC. 

1400 South Penn Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone Locust 4737 

ANPA— PPA— APA— OAAA 

Officers 

President Roy J. McKee 

Vice-President-Treasurer. .David R. Albright 
Vice President-Radio Director, 

James A. McFadden 

Radio Producer Robert L. Redd 

Time Buyer E. R. Walmsley 

Vice-President-Merchandising, 

Howard H. Yaw 
Secretary T. E. Libby 

Branch Office 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone COlumbus 5-2058 

Equitable Bldg., Hollywood, Calif. 

Phone Hollywood 8363 

Radio Accounts Placed — Sealtest, Inc. 



A. McKIM, LTD. 

Dominion Square Bldg., Montreal, Que., Can. 

Phone Lancaster 5192 

Officers 

President-General Manager C. T. Pearce 

Radio Director E. W. Brodie 

Secretary-Treasurer J. B. Stephens 

Branch Offices 

320 Bay St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Phone Elgin 5351 

Manager D. E. Longmore 

Electric Railway Bldg., Winnipeg, Man., 
Canada 

Manager A. A. Brown 

514 Province Bldg., 
Vancouver, B. C, Canada 

Manager H. S. Watson 

376 Strand, W. C. 2, London, England 
Manager H. Suffell 

• 

ARTHUR MEYERHOFF & CO. 

410 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Delaware 7860 

ANPA— PPA— AAAA—ABP 

Officers 

General Manager Arthur E. Meyerhoff 

Financial Manager J. H. Hildebrandt 

Director of Radio Nelson A. Shawn 

Radio Space Buyers Mary Hauser, 

Annette Kennelly 

Copy Chief M. E. Chon 

Acct. Executives R. J. Rosenthal, 

John H. Black, John Lemmon, Andrew 
M. Howe 

Branch Office 

759 N. Milwaukee St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Phone Marquette 3144 

Manager George Grabin 



DAN B. MINER CO. 

Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 

Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 3101 

AAAA — ANPA — ABP — NOAB 

CAN — APA 

Officers 

President Dan B. Miner 

Vice-Presidents John C. Morse, 

Isabel Moses 

Secretary-Treasurer M. R. Sweeny 

Radio & Television Director Neg Monett 

Radio Producer Neg Monnett 

Branch Offices 
(Affiliated with Continental Agency Network) 
Radio Accounts Placed— Interstate Bak- 
eries, Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Bill Hay 
Reads the Bible (66 station cooperative 
show), Weber's Bread, Wilshire Ooil; Na- 
tional Spot: Roman Meal Bread. 



C. L. MILLER COMPANY 

521 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 2-1010 

ANPA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President C. L. Miller 

Sec'y & Ass't Treasurer George Carhart 

Radio Director Roger White 

Branch Office 

333 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Central 1640 

Manager I. M. Tuteur 

Radio Accounts Placed — Corn Products 
Refining Co., Curtis Candy Co., Keeley Brew- 
ing Co., Cooter Brokerage Co., Gordon Bak- 
ing Co., Tastyeast, Inc. 



EMIL MOGUL CO., INC. 

250 West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, COlumbus 5-2482 

ABP — ANPA 

Officers 

Radio Director Emil Mogul 

Radio Time Buyer Helen Munroe 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Tri- 
mount Clipper Craft Clothes. National Spot: 
Barney's Clothes, San Gabriel Wine Co., Na- 
tional Shoe Stores. 

• 

MOSELLE & EISEN 
ADV. AGENCY 

522 Fifth Ave., New York 18, N. \. 

Phone, MUrray Hill 2-2651 

PPA— APA 

Officers 

Partner Rose Moselle 

Partner Henry Eisen 

Space Buyer-Prod. Mgr D. Chilton 

Art Director Frederick H. Cassens 

Publicity & Radio Miss Margo 

Account Executives Henry Eisen, 

Rose Moselle, M. M. Semons 



200 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



THE CHESTER C. MORELAND CO. 

1104 Times-Star Tower, Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

PArkway 1178 

PPA — ABP — ANPA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer. .. .Chester C. Moreland 

Vice-Presidents Win. G. Steiner, 

Bryce L. Schurman 

Secretary Walter H. Strauss 

Radio Dept Thomas H. Birch 

• 

RAYMOND R. MORGAN CO. 

6332 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 

Phone Hempstead 4194 

Officers 

President Raymond R. Morgan 

General Manager R. E. Messer 

Radio Accounts Placed — Folger Coffee Co., 
White King Soap Co., Sparklett's Drinking 
Water Corp., Kerr Glass Mfg. Co., Grocer's 
Packing Corp., Campbell Cereal Co., Knox 
Co., Chapman Park Hotel, O'Brien Candy 
Co., Biltmore Florists. 



MORSE, INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

122 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone LExington 2-6727 

PPA 

Officers 

Chairman of the Board Carl J. Balliett 

President Mansfield F. House 

Vice-President & Art Director. . .J. P. Sawyer 

Secretary and Treasurer Laura K. Long 

Dir. of Media Herbert G. Selby 

Prod. Mgr E. R. Harris 

Radio Dept. 

Manager Chester C. Slaybaugh 

Time Buyer Eunice C. Dickson 

Dir. of Radio Prod Nick Dawson 

Asst. Dir. of Radio Prod.... John T. Mitchell 

Branch Offices 

205 Johnston Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Vick 

Chemical Co., Matchabelli, Inc.; National 

Spot: Vick Chemical Co., Vitamins Plus, 

Alfred D. McKelvy Co. 

• 

MOSER & COTINS, INC. 

10 Hopper St., Utica 3, N. Y. 

Phone Utica 4-6141 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB—APA 

Officers 

President & Treasurer A. S. Cotins 

Secretary Mrs. M. B. Blair 

Vice-Presidents James N. Brown, 

Hugo W. Glaeser, A. Montgomery Hunt- 
ington 



Art Director \. M. Huntington 

Mgr. M.-.lia Depl Miaa L. B. Mang 

Acci. Execs George P. Hodges, 

F. S.Hubbell 
Mgr. Production Depl Fred Michel 

Radio Accounts Plucrd — West End Brewing 
Co., Oswego Candj Work-, Inc., C. A. Durr 
Packing Co., Near's Food Co., Inc. 



MOSS ASSOCIATES 

415 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone VAnderbilt 6-1828 

ABP— PANY— APA 

Officers 

President Joseph H. Moss 

Radio Director Hines Hacbette 

Space Buyer Betty Math 

Radio Accounts Placed — Harman Watch 
Co., U. S. Rockwool Insulators, Neoderm 
Inst., Thomas M. Quinn & Sons, Inc.- 



NATIONAL EXPORT ADVERTISING 
SERVICE, INC. 

405 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 9-6835 

Officers 

President Paul Kruming 

Vice-President Thomas W. Hughes 

Treasurer Frank Neuhauser 

Time Buyer Eduardo Martinez 

Branch Offices In: 

Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, 

Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, 

India, Chili 

Radio Accounts Placed — Carter Products, 

Inc., General Foods Corp., H. J. Heinz Co., 

Lambert Bros., Lever Bros. Co., Quaker Oats 

Co, Welch Grape Juice Co., Wm. R. Warner 

Co. 

• 

NEEDHAM. LOUIS & BRORBY, INC. 

135 S. LaSalle St., Chicago 3, 111. 

Phone State 5151 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — APA 

ABC — NOAB 

Officers 

President Maurice H. Needham 

Secretary-Treasurer Otto R. Stadelman 

Vice-Presidents John J. Louis, 

Melvin Brorby, Harry Phelps, W. Ray 
Fowler, Jr. 

Time Buyer O. R. Stadleman 

Branch Offices 

1680 North Vine St., Hollywood, Calif. 

Phone Granite 7186 

Manager Cecil Underwood 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Kraft 
Cheese Co., S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. Na- 
tional Spot: Swift & Co. (Sunbrite Cleaner). 



201 



NEFF-ROGOW, INC. 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 74231 

Officers 

President Walter J. Neff 

Vice-President William Rogow 

Radio Accounts Placed — Bond Stores, Inc., 
Melville Shoe Corp., Sears Roebuck & Co., 
Joseph Martinson & Co., Abraham & Straus, 
Inc., Ruby Lane Stores, Young's Hat Stores. 



Radio Accounts Placed — National Waste 
Paper Conservation Campaign. 



JOHN H. OWEN, INC. 

595 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 
Personnel 

Director of Radio Bernard H. Pelzer, Jr. 

Time Buyer Marc Seixas 



NELSON CHESMAN COMPANY 

Hamilton Trust Bldg., Chattanooga 8, Tenn. 

Phone 64942 

SNPA 

Executives 

Partners Henry Tritschler, 

John E. Fontaine, S. M. Kelly 
Radio Dept. 
Director & Space Buyer. . . .John E. Fontaine 

Acct. Exec Henry Tritschler 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Chattanooga 
Medicine Co., Fleetwood Coffee Co., South- 
ern Agriculturist, Double-Colo. 



NEWELL-EMMETT COMPANY 

40 East 34th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone AShland 4-4900 

AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — PRB — 

NOAB— SAAA— SNPA 

Partners Clarence D. Newell, 

William Reydel, John P. Cunningham, 
Frank Donshea, C. S. Walsh, R. L. Stro- 
bridge, F. H. Walsh, G. S. Fowler, T. J. 
Maloney 

Radio Director Blayne Butcher 

Time Buyer Newman McEvoy 

Radio Accounts Placed — Liggett & Myers 
Tobacco Co. (Chesterfields), Loose-Wiles Bis- 
cuit Co., Pepsi-Cola Co., Beech-Nut Packing 
Co., Economics Laboratories, Kirkman's Soap, 
Sherwin Williams. 



THEO. A. NEWHOFF ADV. AGENCY 

1403 Court Square Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 

AAAA— ANPA— ABP 

Officers 

President Theodore A. Newhoff 

Vice-President Marx S. Kaufman 

Secy.-Treas R. M. Newhoff 

Radio Director S. L. Reed 

Production Manager B. A. Johnson 



PARIS & PEART 

370 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone Caledonia 5-9840 

ANPA — ABP — PPA 

Co-Partners A. G. Peart, 

John H. Rehm 

Radio Time Buyer A. C. De Pierro 

Radio Accounts Placed — The Great Atlantic 
& Pacific Tea Co., Spratts Dog Food. 



MERRITT OWENS 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

201 Commercial National Bank Bldg. 
Kansas City 12, Kans. 

Phone Dr. 7250 
ABP— ANPA— APA 

Owner Merritt Owens 

Radio Accounts Placed — Interstate Moving 
& Storage, Junge Biscuit Co., Leo Stern 
(Photographer). 



PACIFIC NATIONAL ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

605 Union St., Seattle 1, Wash. 

Phone Eliot 1401 

ANPA— AAAA— NOAB 

Officers 

President Wm. H. Horsley 

Radio Director Trevor Evans 

Secretary H. O. Stone 

Radio Time Buyer G. M. Nyman 

Branch Office 

Spalding Bldg., Portland 4, Ore. 

Phone ATwater 4339 

Manager Mrs. Ruth Foland 

Radio Accounts Placed — Fisher Flouring 
Mills Co., Washington Co-op Egg & Poultry 
Assn.; Spot: Fisher Flouring Mills Co., Im- 
perial Candy Co., Oregon-Washington-Cali- 
fornia Pear Bureau, Yakima Valley Peach 
Bureau, N. W. Cherry Bureau. 



OLIAN ADVERTISING CO. 

1409 Ambassador Bldg., St. Louis 1, Mo. 
Phone CEntral 8380 
ABP— ANPA— NOAB . 
Officers 

Owner Irwin A. Olian 

Radio Director-Time Buyer. . . .Virginia Loeb 
Radio Continuity James L. Spencer 



PECK ADVERTISING AGENCY. INC. 

400 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-0900 

Officers 

President Harry Peck 

Secretary-Treasurer Harry Krawit 

Vice-President Walter Schwartz 

Director of Radio Arthur Sinsheimer 



202 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



PEDLAR & RYAN, INC. 

250 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone PLaza 5-1500 
AAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP 
Officers 

President Thomas L. L. Ryan 

Executive Vice-President. .Harold B. Thomas 

Vice-President E. G. Sisson, Jr. 

Vice-President Ernest P. Zohian 

Treasurer Harold B. Thomas 

Secretary H. C. Sutherland 

Assistant Treasurer W. F. Cantrell 

Supervisor Nighttime Radio. .Joseph S. Bell 
Supervisors Daytime Radio 

Elizabeth C. Shay, William Barrett 

Radio Copy Chief Cyril J. Mullen 

Time Buyer Mary Dunlavey 

Radio Accounts Placed— Sterling Drug 
(Ironized Yeast), Procter & Gamble (Camay, 
Chipso, Dash). 



PETTINGELL & FENTON, INC. 

247 Park Ave., New York. N. Y. 

Phone, ELdorado 5-2685 

ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Officers 

Pres. & Secy Atherton Pettingell 

Exec. Vice-Pres., Treas. & Space 

Selection. . . Fleur Fenton 

Asst. to President Charles B. Strauss 

Asst. to Vice-Pres Pauline Duff 

Men's Wear Planning Louis Krauss 

Copy Executive Theodora Aronstam 

Supervisor Service Depts.. .Howard B. Ellison 

Exec. Art Director Jack Russell 

Art Director Robert Thomson 

Publicity Virginia Vincent 

Production Manager Barney Bravman 

Space Buyer Bernice Newton 

Mgr. Billing Dept Mary Zales 

• 

PITLUK ADVERTISING CO. 

Alamo Nat'l Bank Bldg., San Antonio, Texas 

Phone Garfield 7268 

ABP — ANPA — PRA — SAAA — 

SNRA — NOAB 

Officers 

Owner Jack N. Pitluk 

General Manager Norman D. Schwerke 

Vice-President C. R. Cusick 

Art Director Gus J. Wild 

Time Buyer Lee Wood 

Radio Dept. Manager Fred G. Allen 

• 

PLATT-FORBES, INC. 

386 Fourth Ave., New York 16, N.Y. 

Phone CAledonia 5-4440 

Officers 

President W. A. Forbes 



Vice-President-Treasurer. . .Rutherford Piatt 

Vice-President T. F. Cosgrove 

Secretary W. S. Walker 

Space Buyer & Prod. Manager. .T. O'Donnell 
Branch Office 
75 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 
G. Frank Sweet 

Phone Hartford 7-9017 
Radio Accounts Placed — Peter Paul, Inc., 
Oxo, Ltd. 



R. J. POTTS— CALKINS & HOLDEN 

215 \V. Pershing Road, Kansas City 8. Mo. 

Phone Victor 4433 

APA — NOAB — ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President R. J. Potts 

Vice-Presidents J. B. Woodburv, 

C. C. Tucker, E. A. Warner, C. L. Rob- 
inson 

Secretary-Treasurer Jerry McKee 

Account Executives Ralph Page 

John M. Farrell, G. S. Lannon 
Radio Dept Connie Joan Connor 



THE POTTS TURNBULL COMPANY 

10th Floor, Carbide & Carbon Bldg. 

Kansas City 6, Mo. 

Phone Victor 9400 

ANPA — PPA — APA — NOAB — ABP 

Officers 

President W. J. Krebs 

V-P.-Production Mgr D. E. Dexter 

Secretary G. F. Magill 

Treasurer E. T. Chester 

Time Buyer B. G. Was»er 

Acct. Executives N. P. Rowe. 

C. R. Lawson, Blair McPhail, W. B. Stone 



SAYRE M. RAMSDELL ASSOC, INC. 

3701 N. Broad St., Philadelphia 40, Pa. 

Phone Radcliff 1900 

ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President S. M. Ramsdell 

Exec. Vice-Pres. & Treas E. B. Loveman 

Vice-President F. A. Hutchins 

Radio Account Placed — Philco Hall of 
Fame. 

• 

THE L W. RAMSEY ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 

Union Bank Bldg., Davenport, Iowa 

Phone 3-1889 

ANPA— PPA— ABP 

Partner & Gen. Manager L. W. Ramsey 

Partners E. G. Naeckel, 

A. C. Naeckel. W. J. Henderson, George 
Bischoff 



203 



Partner & Service Dir A. M. Walgren" 

Art Director Paul Norton 

Production Mgr Wayne H. Ross 

Technical Consultant W. A. Giraldi 

Branch Office 

230 N. Michigan Ave.,Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Franklin 8155 

President L. W. Ramsey 

Vice-President & Gen. Mgr F. L. Eason 

Vice-Presidents N. B. Langworthy, 

L. H. Copeland 

Production Manager Vito M. Volino 

Secretary E. G. Naeckel 

Art Director E. J. McCabe 

Radio Dir Fred Herendeen 

406 E. Superior St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Phone Anthony 9396 

Manager Frank Dunigan 

Radio Accounts Placed — F. W. Fitch Co., 
National Oats, Bituminous Casualty Corp., 
Victor Animatograph Corp., Voss Bros. Mfg. 
Co. 



THE RANDALL COMPANY 

75 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

Phone 7-1179 

Executive 

Radio Director Catherine A. Gilbert 



CHAS. DALLAS REACH CO. 

58 Park Place, Newark 2, N. J. 

Phone Market 3-5100 

AAAA - ANPA — PPA — ABP — APA 

Officers 

President-Director of Radio, 

Chas. Dallas Reach 

Vice-President Howard E. Sands 

Vice-President Edw. C. Stover, Jr. 

Secretary F. R. Risley 

Radio Accounts Placed — Cut-Rite Waxed 
Paper, R. B. Davis Sales Co., Koppers Co.- 
Minnesota Division, Admiracion Labora- 
tories, L. E. Waterman Co., Dugan Bros, of 
New Jersey, Inc. 

• 

REISS ADVERTISING 

221 W. 57th St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone COlumbus 5-7733 

ANPA — ABP — PPA — APA 

Officers 

President Joseph Reiss 

Vice-President Harold Reiss 

Secretary-Treasurer B. M. Reiss 



ROCHE, WILLIAMS & CLEARY, INC. 

135 S. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Randolph 9760 

ANPA— APA— PPA— NOAB 

Officers 

President J. P. Roche 

Treasurer D. J. Kelly 



Asst. Treas. & Secty M. F. Williamson 

Vice-Presidents J. M. Cleary, S. Weston, 

Guy C. Pierce, Lloyd Maxwell, R. A. Porter 

Director of Radio Phil Stewart 

Branch Offices 

225 S. 15th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone PEnnypacker 2766 

In Charge Guy C. Pierce 

400 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone PLaza 3-7444 

In Charge R. A. Porter 

Radio Director Harold F. Kemp 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Lewis- 
Howe Co., Schutter Candy Co., Sun Oil Co. 
National Spot: Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul 
& Pacific RR., Domestic Finance Co., Dr. 
Peter Fahrney & Sons Co., Holland Furnace 
Co., Kenton Pharmacal Co., Inc., National 
Toilet Co., John Puhl Products Co., Port- 
land Cement Assn., Sempray Jovenay Co., 
The Studebaker Corp. 



RESNIK-MTLLER-ENGLAND, INC. 

152 Temple St., New Haven, Conn. 

Phone 7-0241 

Officers 

President & Treasurer Harry D. Resnick 

Secretary Harvey N. Ladin 

Radio Dept. Manager Ellen Simmons 

Branch Offices 

75 Pratt St., Hartford, Conn. 

Phone 2-9987 

Manager Harry D. Resnik-WTIC 

77 Summer Hill Ave., Worcester, Mass. 
Phone 6-0223 

Manager Isabelle Whitaker-WTAG 

26 Custom House St., Providence, R. I. 
Phone Gaspee 9526 

Manager Frank Jones- WJAR 

• 

C. E. RICKERD, INC. 

5462 Second Blvd., Detroit, Michigan 
Phone Temple 1-3636 
Officers 
President-Treasurer-Time Buyer, 

C. E. Rirkerd 

Treasurer Geo. Rickerd 

Secretary Fred B. Collier 

Production Royal CresBy 

RILL ASSOCIATES 

507 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone, MUrray Hill 2-5147 

Officers 

President I. R. Hill 

Exec. Vice-Pres B. N. Hill 

Space Buyer L. Denis 

Art Director .M. Desmond 

Radio Dir. & Radio Time 

Buyer B. Newmark 

Charge Copy S. Chalfin 

Publicity P. Leighton 

Account Executives I. R. Hill, 

B. N. Rill, L. Denis 



204 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



REDFIELD-JOHNSTONE. INC. 

420 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-6120, 1, 2, 3 

ANPA— PPA— ABP— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

Chairman of the Board L. L. Redfield 

President E. F. Johnstone 

Vice-President N. Rosoff 

Secretary A. Hollander 

Asst. Treasurer G. Hepenstal 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Howard 
Clothes, Inc. National Spot: Stera-Kleen, 
Allenru, Gold Medal Haarlem Oil Co., How- 
ard Clothes, Inc., Grelva, Inc., Woolfoam 
(Wool Novelty Co.). 



EMIL REINHARDT 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

1736 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Templebar 2408 

ABP — ANPA — APA 

Officers 

Owner Emil Reinhardt 

Copywriter Dave Lane 

Artist Dir Robert Shelton 

Artist Edna Shelton 

Radio Dept. 

Manager Joseph Connor 

Time Buyer Mildred McMahon 

Radio Accounts Placed — Kilpatrick's Bak- 
eries, Mary Sellens, Inc., Standard Beverages, 
S. F. Brewing Corp., Brenner's, Kahn's, Paci- 
fic Guano Co., Central Bank. 



Treasurer Charles S. Silver 

Production Manager II. B. Fleischman 

Research Director. .. .Walter Alwyn-Srhmidt 

Copy & Plans Harrison J. Cowan, 

H. B. Sadler, Joseph Elner 

Radio Dipt Arthur Koxnberg, 

Samuel Rubenstien, Charlea S. Silver 

Radio Accounts Placed — Longine-^ ittenaui 
Watch Co., Corinthia Lipstick, Henna Foam 

Shampoo. 

• 

RUSSEL AND ROBERTS 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

7 Church St., Patcrson 1, N. J. 
Phone ARmory 4-3400 

Officers 
President & Treasurer Ahram Eisenman 

Radio Accounts Placed — New Jersey State 
Industrial Union Council-C. I. O., American 
Labor Party. 



CHARLES L. RUMRILL & CO. 

311 Alexander St., Rochester 4, N. Y. 

Phone Stone 592 

ABP 

Officers 

Partners Charles L. Rumrill, 

J. E. Porter, Earl A. Rogers 
Time Buyer G. Grantly Wallington 

Radio Accounts Placed — Radio Station 
WHAM. 



RONALDS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
LTD. 

701 Keefer BIdg., Montreal, Que. 

Phone Plateau 4803 

ANPA 

Officers 

President Russell C. Ronalds 

Vice-Pres E. M. Putnam 

Treas Angus Ahern 

Radio Dir N. K. Vale 

Branch Office 
New Wellington Building, Toronto, Ontario 
Radio Dept R. J. Avery 



ARTHUR ROSENBERG CO.. INC. 

570 Seventh Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 
Phone CHickering 4-4420 
ANPA— PPA— APA— AGP— NOAB 
Officers 
President & Dir. of Copy & Plans, 

Arthur Rosenberg 

Vice-President Samuel Rubenstein 

Secretary A. A. Rosenberg 



RUTHRAUFF & RYAN, INC. 

405 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 6-6400 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP— NOAB— APA 

Officers 

President F. B. Ryan 

Senior Vice-President Cal J. McCarthy 

Executive Vice-President. . .Everett J. Grady 

V-P & Secretary Ralph Van Buren 

Director of Media Daniel M. Gordan 

V-P & Director of Radio. .Donald D. Stauffer 
V-P & Associate Director.. S. Heagan Bayles 
V-P in Charge of Radio Programs 

Merritt W. Bamum, Jr. 

Business Manager C. T. Ayres 

Production Directors Ted Huston, 

Jack Van Nostrand, Lee Cooley, Robert 
Steel, Fred Essex, Marguerite Bowman, 
Willson Tuttle, John Wellington 
Radio Commercial Supervisor 

Regina Morgan 

Time Buyer T. C. Fisher 

Radio Publicity Director Grant Y. Flynn 



205 



Brunch Offices 

360 N. Michigan Ave.. Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Randolph 2625 

Executive Vice-President Paul Watson 

Vice-President-Director of Radio 

Ros Metzger 

Production Director N. E. Heyne 

Time Buyer Alhert Callies 

7430 Second Blvd., Detroit 2, Michigan 

Phone Madison 1980 

Vice-President in Charge. .Mathew J. Casey 

812 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Phone Main 0128 

Manager Oscar A. Zahner 

1680 N. Vine St., Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone Hillside 7593 

Radio Director Nate Tufts 

Production Directors Knowles Entrikin, 

Ken Hodge, Sam Pierce, Dave Young, 
Bob Ballin 

712 Main St., Houston, Texas 
Phone Charter 4-1741 

Manager W. Van A. Combs 

235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Douglas 5822 

Manager Howard O. Nelson 

1216 Third Ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Phone Main 6727 

Manager F. S. Mullins 

Carew Tower, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Phone MA 2413 

Manager John L. Magro 

80 Richmond St., Toronto, Canada 
Phone Adelaide 4096 

Manager Douglas Philpott 

Radio Production S. Ramsay Lees 

Radio Accounts Placed — American To- 
bacco Company, Bendix Home Appliances, 
Inc., Chrysler Corporation, Delaware, Lack- 
awanna & Western Coal, Electric Auto-Lite 
Company (U. S. and Canada), Gilmore Oil 
Company, Griesedieck Bros. Brewery Co., 
Lever Brothers Company, Lever Brothers 
Limited, Noxzema Chemical Company, Pep- 
sodent Co. of Canada, Ltd., Pharmaco, Inc., 
Quaker Oats Co., Radio Corporation of 
America, Jacob Ruppert Brewery, Taylor- 
Reed Corporation, G. Washington Coffee Re- 
fining Co., Whitehall Pharmacal Co., Win. 
Wrigley Jr. Co., Savings Banks Association 
of State of New York. 

• 

ST. GEORGES & KEYES. INC. 

250 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone, PLaza 3-6920 

ABP — ANPA — PPA 

Executives 

President Maubert St. Georges 

Vice President Stanley J. Keyes, Jr. 

Radio Dept. 
Radio Director Victor Van Der Linde 



Time Buyer Charlotte Rains 

Television Dept. 

Director Victor Van Der Linde 

Radio Accounts Placed — James McCreery 
& Co., C. F. Mattlage Sales Co., Alfred Dun- 
hill, Inc., Street & Smith, Seydel Chemical 
Co., Revere Copper & Brass, Inc. 



SCHWIMMER & SCOTT 

75 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone Dearborn 1815 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

Partners Walter Schwimmer, R. J. Scotl 

Time Buyer Evelyn Vanderploeg 

Radio Accounts Placed — Peter Fox Brew 
Co., Hirsch Clothing Co., Salerno-Megowen 
Biscuit Co., Studebaker Sales Co. of Chicago, 
Rudolph Wurlitzer Co., Walgreen Drug Co., 
Congress Cigar Co., Coronet Magazine, Schut- 
ter Candy Co., Sealy Mattress Co., B. S. 
Pearsall Butter Co., Chicago Daily News. 

• 

RUSSEL M. SEEDS COMPANY. INC. 

Palmolive Bldg., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone, Delaware 1045 

ANPA — ABP — SNPA — PPA 

Officers 

President. Freeman Keyes 

Chairman of Board Freeman Keyes 

Treasurer Jack Harding 

Secretary H. J. Smith 

Vice-Presidents Paul Richey, 

George Bayard, A. D. Keyes, Harry 
Maus, E. G. Bentley 

Radio Director Jack Simpson 

Time Buyers June Jackson, 

Hub Jackson 

Branch Offices 

Lemcke Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Phone Market 1395 

Vice-President Paul Richey 

Treasurer. Jack Harding 

Taft Bldg., Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone, Granite 4185 

Office Manager E. Brockhoff 

Radio Accounts Placed — W. A. Sheaffer 
Pen Co., Pinex Co., Keystone Steel & Wire 
Co., Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., 
Grove Laboratories, Inc. 



SHERMAN & MARQUETTE, INC. 

Room 3400 Palmolive Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Delaware 8000 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — PRB — SAAA 

SNPA — APA — NOAB 

Officers 

President Stuart Sherman 

Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Arthur Marquette 



206 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Radio Director Morgan Ryan 

Time Buyer C. E. Bonnesen 

Branch Office 

50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 6-1550 

Vice-President & Manager Carl S. Brown 

Radio Director Morgan Ryan 

Time Buyer Kelso M. Taeger 

Radio Account Placed — Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Co. (for Colgate Shave Creams, Colgate 
Tooth Powder, Halo Shampoo, Quaker Oats 
Co. (for Quaker Farina and Ful-O-Pep Feeds, 
Quaker Puffed Wheat Sparkies, Quaker 
Puffed Rice Sparkies), Dr. W. B. Caldwell, 
Inc. (Dr. Caldwell's Laxative), Syrup of Figs, 
Sante, Pape's Cold Compound, Blackstone 
Aspirin, Tasty Lax. 



DOUGLAS D. SIMON ADV. 

280 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone, LExington 2-7873 

Officers 

President Douglas D. Simon 

Vice-President Carolyn Glass 

Treas.-Space Buyer Anita Chinkel 

Account Executive Charles H. Sandak 

Production Manager Sidney Jerome 

Art Director Doris Brinkerhoff 



SIMON & GWYNN, INC. 

624 Commerce Title Bldg., Memphis, Tenn. 

Phone 5-2404 

SNPA 

Officers 

President Milton Simon 

Exec. V-P & Sec. Treas H. N. Gwynn 



SMALL & SEIFFER, INC. 

24 West 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone Wisconsin 7-8765 

ANPA— PPA-APA 

Officers 

President Albert Seiffer 

Secretary & Treasurer Marvin Small 

Time Buyer Joya Krakauer 

Radio Accounts Placed — Arrid, Allcock 
Mfg. Co., Souplets. 

• 

SMITH & DRUM, INC. 

650 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Trinity 3454 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— PRB— NOAB 

Officers 

President A. Carman Smith 

Vice-President Harry C. Drum 

Radio Account Placed — General Petroleum 
Corp. 



SIMONS-MICHELSON CO. 

1207 Washington Blvd., Detroit 26, Mi. I. 

Phone CHerry 30(H) 

AAAA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

Partners L. N. Simons, 

L. J. Michelson 

General Manager Leon Wayburn 

Radio Director. .. .Marie Margaret Winthrop 

Production Art Copland 

Copywriters Mary Schraa. 

Margaret Mikjian 
Radio Accounts Placed — Local: Schmidt's 
Beer, Pepsi Cola, Wigley's Super Markets. 
Colonial Dept. Store, Mac-o-Lac, B. Siegel 
Co.; Spot: Plasti-Kate, Benrus Watch, Blue 
Home Oil, Crown Furniture, Detroit Free 
Press, Detroit Times, Forest & Hudson (Mean- 



SPITZER & MILLS LTD. 

19 Richmond St., West, Toronto, Ont. 

Phone WA 1151 

CAAA— CDNA— CPPA— CAB 

Officers 

President G. F. Mills 

Exec. Vice-President J. W. Spitzer 

Account Executives W. H. Reid, 

J. R. Charles, J. G. Wallace. W. G. Wal- 
lace, T. G. Vatcher, W. E. Macdonald. 
D. Dunlop 

Radio Dept. 

Director Wm. D. Byles 

Miss Dorothy Andison 

Branch Office 

1010 Catherine St., W., Montreal, P. Q. 

Account Executives C. W. Duncan. 

F. F. W. Lalonde 
Radio Accounts Placed — Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet Co., RCA Victor Co., Lehn & Fink, 
Quaker Oats Co., California Fruit Growers 
Exchange, Cities Service Oil Co. Ltd. 



RAYMOND SPECTOR 
COMPANY, INC. 

595 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone ELdorado 5-1270 

ANPA — PPA — ABP — NOAB 

Officers 

President Raymond Spector 

Time Buyer Hal Winter 

Radio Research Bernard Cerlin 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Serutan 
Co. National Spot: Serutan Co., Rum & 
Maple Tobacco Corp., Journal of Living, 
King David Memorial Park, Purity Products 
Co., Beverly Hills Memorial Park, The Lone 
Ranger, Inc., Macfadden Publications (True 



207 



Story Magazine), National Nutrition Society, 
Three Squires Tobacco, Doubleday Doran & 
Co., Nutrex Co., Book League of America. 



BARTON A. STEBBINS 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

811 West Seventh St., Los Angeles 

Phone Trinity 8821 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

Head of Agency Barton A. Stebbins 

Chief Executive Leigh Crosby 

Acct. Executive Arthur W. Gudelman 

Program Director Edward Bloodworth 

Time Buyer A. W. Gudelman 

Radio Accounts Placed— Signal Oil Com- 
pany, Shontex, E. F. Hutton Co., Ryan Aero- 
nautical Co. 



SCHOLTS ADVERTISING SERVICE 

1201 West 4th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Michigan 2396 

Officers 

Owner William G. Scholts 

Radio Director Fred Montgomery 



MARCEL SCHULOFF & CO. 

17 W. 45th St., New York 18, N. Y. 
Phone MUrray Hill 2-3708 

Partners Marcel Schuloff, 

Miriam C. Schuloff 
Accounts Placed— Station WHOM, Basch 
Radio Prod., Sure-Fit Products Co., Style- 
park Hats, Real Textile Co., National Sure-Fit 
Quilting Co., Voice of Experience. 



SCHWAB & BEATTY, INC. 

1230 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone Circle 5-9090 

ANPA— AAAA— PPA— AP A— ABP 

Officers 

President Victor 0. Schwab 

Time Buyer Robert W. Beatty 

Radio Account Placed — Book-of-the-Month 
Club. 



SHAPPE-WILKES, INC. 

215 Fourth Ave., New York 3, N. Y. 

Phone, GRamercy 5-5560 

Officers 

President Louis Shappe 

Radio Time Buyer Louis Shappe 

Vice-Pres.-Copy Chief. .Milton M. Hermanson 

Secy. & Treas Jesse E. Wilkes 

Space Buyer Burton Mautner 

Art Director Charles Allenbrook 

Production Mgr Samuel Groden 



J. WM. SHEETS 

Central Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Phone Main 2442 
ANPA-PPA— APA— NOAB 

Owner J. Wm. Sheets 

Radio Accounts Placed — Skinner & Eddy 
Corp., Minute Man Soup. 



SHELDON, QUICK & McELROY, INC. 

400 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-1670 

AAAA— ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

President George H. Sheldon 

Vice-President L. C. McElroy 

Time Buyer Catherine Wohlpart 

Treasurer & General Manager J. F. Quick 

Radio Account Placed — Chas. E. Hires Co., 
Inc. 

• 

SORENSEN & CO. 

919 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone, Delaware 5030 

ABP — ANPA — PPA — SNPA 

Officers 

President Roy A. Sorensen 

Radio Director Muriel Wageman 

Radio Accounts Placed — Bowey's, Inc., 
Sunway Vitamin Co., F. H. Pfunder, Inc., 
Hotel & Restaurant Co-operative Adv., J. P. 
Harding Restaurants, Old Heidelberg Corp. 

• 

C. IERRY SPAULDING, INC. 

201 Commercial St., Worcester 8, Mass. 

Phone: 3-4789 

Officers 

President-Treasurer C. Jerry Spaulding 

Asst. Treasurer M. Murray 

Secretary H. H. Hartwell 

• 

HOWARD D. STEERE ADVERTISING 

2812 Book Tower, Detroit 26, Mich. 
Phone CHerry 5688 

Owner H. D. Steere 

Production Manager Millard F. Thompson 

Art Director Rudolph R. Nauss 

Space Buyer Frances Humphreys 



STERLING ADVERTISING AGENCY 

70 West 40th St., New York 18, N. Y. 

PPA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board S. M. Brown 

President Jos. S. Edelman 



STERNFTELD-GODLEY, INC. 

280 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Phone BArclay 7-3030 
ABP — ANPA — PPA 



208 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Officers 
President-In-Charge of Radio 

Samuel I. Godley 

Vice-President Philip Scheft 

Secretary Frances C. Costello 

Treasurer Samuel S. Sternfield 

Radio Account Placed — Fada Radio. 



STOCKTON, WEST, BURKHART. 
INC. 

First National Bank Bldg., Cincinnati 3, 0. 

Phone MAin 3209 

AAAA-ANPA-PPA 

Officers 

President & Treas Win. Z. Burkhart 

Vice-Pres.-Secy Ranald S. West 

Vice-Presidents Erice W. Stockton, 

Henley W. Simpson 

Assistant Radio Director Jos. D. Nelson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Ohio Oil Co., 
Clyffside Brewery, Cincinnati Gas & Elec. 
Co., Central Trust Banking Institution. 



STODEL ADVERTISING CO. 

411 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone, TRinity 8577 

Officers 

President Edward C. Stodel 

Time Buyer Selma Schonfeld 

Radio Accounts Placed — Warner Bros. 
Pictures, Brooks Clothing Co., Eastern-Co- 
lumbia Department Stores, Beneficial Casu- 
alty Insurance Co. 

• 

CHARLES M. STORM CO., INC. 

50 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone, MUrray Hill 6-2820 

ANPA— PPA 

Chairman Ex. Comm Charles M. Storm 

Pres., Secy., & Radio Dir.. .Allston E. Storm 
Exec. V.-P., Treas. & Space 

Buyer Edward Klein 

Vice-President Lester Loeb 

Vice-Pres., Radio & Television 

Director Raymond E. Nelson 

Production Manager Paul Petrocine 

Art Director Frederick Widlicka 

Radio Time Buyer A. Loonam 

Radio Talent Buyer E. Sprague 

Account Executives A. E. Storm, 

E. Klein, L. K. Storm, L. Loeb, R. Chap- 

peron, E. Sprague 



STRAUCHEN & McKIM 
ADVERTISING 

6 East Fourth St. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Phone, MAin 1618 

AAAA 



Officrrs 

Partners Edmond R. Strauchen, 

Cordon 1'. McKim, Jr. 

Radio Director Ardeane Heiskell 

Production Manager J. Bremer 

Art Director fohn Storch 

Radio Director .A. Heiukell 

Time Buyer M. Willi gan 

Radio Accounts Placed — George Wiede- 
mann Brewing Co., Inc. 
• 

STREET & FINNEY, INC. 

330 West 42nd St., New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone: BRyant 9-2400 

ANPA— PPA— ABC— NOAB—APA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer F. N. Finney 

General Manager Robert Finney 

Assistant General Manager. .. .Frank Finney 

Secretary Foxhall Finney 

Account Executives W. E. Faxon, 

J. T. Kelly, Jr. 

Director of Radio Howard Miller 

Radio Accounts Placed — National Spot: 
Foster-Milburn Co. (Doan's Pills), Raladam 
Co. (Marmola), G. T. Fulford Co. (Baby's 
Own Tablets, Children's Own Tablets, Dr. 
William's Pink Pills). 
• 

SWAFFORD & KOEHL, INC. 

341 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone, MUrray Hill 6-8860 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— APA—NOAB 

Officers 

President Albert E. Kochl 

Vice-President A. A. Landis 

• 

SWEENEY & IAMES CO. 

1501 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Phone Main 7142 

ANPA — PPA — APA — ABP — NOAB 

Officers 

Partner John F. Sweeney 

Partner Frank G. James 

Radio Time Buyer T. M. Gregory 

Radio Account Placed — Network: Fire- 
stone Tire & Rubber Co. 

TECHNICAL ADVERTISING 

AGENCY, INC. 

475 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, MUrray Hill 3-5754 

• 

I. WALTER THOMPSON CO. 

420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone Mohawk 4-7700 

AAAA — ANPA — ABP — PPA 

Officers 

President Stanley Resor 

Secretary Howard Kohl 



209 



Treasurer Gilbert Kinney 

Assistant Treasurer-Secretary 

Luther O. Lemon 

Senior Vice-Presidents Gilbert Kinney, 

Henry T. Stanton 

Senior Consultant James W. Young 

Vice-Presidents Lloyd W. Baillie 

Henry C. Flower, Jr., Howard Hender- 
son, Henry M. Stevens, William Resor, 
Walter R. Hine, Thayer Jaccaci, William 
G. Palmer, Samuel W. Meek, Robert T. 
Colwell, O'Neill Ryan, Jr., Anson Lowitz, 
Lew A. Greene 
Director of Media and Research 

Arno H. Johnsoi 
Vice-President in Charge of Radio, 

John U. Rebel 

Radio Time Buyer Linnea Nelsor. 

Radio Talent Buyer Virginia Spragle 

Branch Offices 
1549 North Vine St., Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone Hillside 7241 
Business Manager and Radio Talent 

Buyer Norman Blackburn 

410 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Phone Superior 0303 
Vice-President and General Manager, 

Henry T. Stanton 
Vice-Presidents: Merton V. Wieland, Willard 
F. Lochridge, Harry T. Mitchell 

Radio Director Tyler Davis 

Radio Time Buyer Margaret Wylie 

100 Bush St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 3510 

Radio Time Buyer Lowell Mainland 

612 South Hope St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone Trinity 2591 

General Manager Norton W. Mogge 

Radio Accounts Placed — Atlantis Sales 
Corp., P. Ballantine & Sons, Bank of America, 
Block Drug Company (Gold Medal Capsules 
and Dentu-Grip), Bowman Dairy Co., A. S. 
Boyle Co., Carter Products, Inc. (Superin), 
H. C. Cole Milling Co., Elgin National Watch 
Co., Fanny Farmer Candy, General Cigar Co., 
Johns-Manville Corp., Kraft Cheese Co., 
Lamont P. Corliss & Co., P. Lorillard Co. 
(Old Gold Cigarettes), Lever Bros. Co. (Lux 
Flakes & Lux Toilet Soap), Libby, McNeil 
& Libby, Mentholatum Co., Northam Warren 
Corp., Northern Trust Co., Owens-Illinois 
Glass Co., Parker Pen Co., Penick & Ford, 
Ltd., Planters Nut & Chocolate Co. (Planters 
Peanuts), R. C. A., Safeway Stores, Inc., Shell 
Oil Co., Standard Brands, Inc. (Chase & San- 
born Coffee and Tender Leaf Tea), Swift & 
Co., Universal Pictures, Ward Baking Co., 
Washington State Apple Commission, Weco 
Products Co., J. B. Williams Co., William 
Wrigley, Jr. Co., W. F. Young 
• 

TOMASCHKE-ELLIOTT. INC. 

1624 Franklin St.. Oakland. Calif. 

Phone Glcncourt 4941 

NOAB — APA 



Officers 
President & Time Buyer. . . .F. L. Tomaschke 

Vice President Bruce W. Elliott 

Secretary William M. Maxfield 

Radio Accounts Placed — Cardinet Candy 
Co., Par Soap Co., Downtown Merchants 
Association, Key System, Frozen Food Dis- 
tributors, Inc. 



TRACY, KENT & CO.. INC. 

515 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Phone ELdorado 5-4404 

ANPA — PPA — NOAB 

Officers 

Chairman of Board W. I. Tracy 

President Frank S. Kent 

Treasurer George M. Pease 

Vice-Presidents Hugh Donnell, 

J. F. Donovan 

Account Executive F. W. Hobbs 

Copy Chief K. H. Thompson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Wilbert Products 
Co., John Opitz, Inc. 



UNITED STATES ADVERTISING 
CORP. 

612 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone Delaware 4466 

ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

Chairman of Board W. M. Canaday 

President J. C. Ewell 

Radio Manager A. J. Englehardt 



VANGUARD ADVERTISING 

15 East 40th St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 5-4686 

ABP 

Officers 

Owner J. M. Russakoff 

Account Executives G. A. Wilson, 

Robt. E. Hutchinson 



VANSANT, DUGDALE & CO., INC. 

Court Square Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Phone, LExington 5400 

AAAA— ABP— ANPA— PPA— NOAB— APA 

Officers 

President Wilbur Van Sant 

Executive Vice-President & Treasurer, 

H. K. Dugdale 

Vice-President-Copy Director J. P. Daiger 

Vice-President R. E. Daiger 

Production Manager C. D. Can- 
Space Buyer G. M. Talbot 

Radio Accounts Placed — Network: Sher- 
wood Bros., Richfield Oil Co. National Spot: 
Sherwood Bros., Crosse & Blackwell Co., The 
Glenn L. Martin Co. 



210 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



VIDEO & SOUND ENTERPRISES 

P. O. Box 413, Philadelphia 5, Pa. 
Officers 

General Manager Franklin O. Pease 

A. E. Smith 



WM. VON ZEHLE & CO. 

28 W. 44th St., New York, N. Y. 

Phone, BRyant 9-4750 

Managing Director Win. Von Zehh 



WADE ADVERTISING AGENCY 

208 W. Washington St., Chicago 6, 111. 

Phone State 7369 

ANPA— PPA— APA— NOAB 

Officers 

President Albert G. Wade 

Managing Director W. A. Wade 

Radio Time Buyer L. J. Nelson 

Radio Producers Edward Freckman, 

P. C. Lund, Jeff Wade, Forest Owen 

Radio Continuity Writers R. E. Dwycr, 

L. W. Davidson, Margot O'Flaherty 
Radio Account Placed — Miles Laboratories, 
Inc., Murphy Products Co., Morris B. Sachs, 
Illinois Bottled Gas Co., Wear Proof Mat Co., 
Hoover Liniment Co., General Bandages, 
Inc., Chicago Sun, Haskelite Mfg. Corp., 
Wait-Cahill Co. 



WALKER & DOWNING 

532 Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Phone Grant 1900 

ANPA — ABP — PPA 

Officers 

President William S. Walker 

Secretary-Treasurer B. I. Davis 

Account Executives W. G. Beal, 

C. P. Richardson, H. A. McCoy 

Production Victor Seydel, 

Radio Dept. 

Time Buyer & Dir R. C. Woodruff 

Account Executive W. G. Beal 

Head Production Victor Seydel 

Radio Accounts Placed — American Fruit 
Growers, Inc., Clark Bros. Chewing Gum Co., 
D. L. Clark Co., Colonial Biscuit Co., Du- 
quesne Brewing Co., Allegheny-Ludlum Steel 
Corp., Joseph Home Company, Mail Pouch 
Tobacco Co., Sterling Oil Co., Penn Tobacco 
Co., Lobney Packing. 



WARWICK & LEGLER, INC. 

230 Park Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 6-8585 
AAAA — ANPA — PPA — ABP — ABC 
APA— NOAB 



Officers 

President H. Paul Warwick 

Vice-Presidents: Henry Legler, S. 0. Young- 
heart, J. R. Warwick, Lester M. Mulitz, 
Arthur Deerson. 

Secretary-Treasurer Robert H. Hughes 

Radio Director Tevis Iiuhn 

Radio Accounts Placed— The Wm. R. War. 
ner Co., Larus & Bro. Company, The Sher- 
win-Williams Company, Pabst Brewing Co., 
Tangee Cosmetics. 

• 

TUCKER WAYNE <& CO. 

629 Ten Pryor St. Bldg., Atlanta 3, Ga. 

Phone Walnut 6701 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— SNPA—O AAA 

Officers 

President Tucker Wayne 

Vice-Pres. & Radio Talent C. W. Burgess 

Vice-Pres. & Time Buyer C. C. Fuller 

Radio Director D. D. Connah 

Radio Accounts Placed — Southern Bell 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. (Regional), 
Southern Spring Bed Co. (Regional), Ameri- 
can Bakeries Co. (Regional), J. Allen Smith 
& Co., The Schwab Co., Scripto Mfg. Co. 
• 

NORMAN D. WATERS & 
ASSOCIATES, INC. 

1140 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Phone, CAledonia 5-7430 

ABP — PPA — NOAB 

Officers 

President Norman D. Waters 

Vice-President Charles M. Whitebrook 

Treasurer E. L. Waters 

Gen. Mgr. & Time Buyer Bernard Blatt 

Art Director Sy Mogeloff 



WEARSTLER ADVERTISING. INC. 

20 West Front St., Youngstown, Ohio 

Phone: 3-4311 

PPA— ABP— APA 

Officers 

President-Treasurer Albert M. Wearstler 

Secretary Mary E. Wearsler 

• 

LUTHER WEAVER & ASSOCIATES 

200 Globe Bldg., St. Paul 1, Minn. 

Phone Cedar 3777 

APA 

Officers 

President Luther Weaver 

Associate H. E. Messenger 

Director of Radio Blanche Anderson 

Radio Accounts Placed — Minnesota Fed- 
eral Savings & Loan Association, F. C. Hayer 
Co., Marshall Co., Twin City Wholesale 
Grocer Co., Minnesota State Optometric 
Assn., Weyand Furniture Co. 



211 



MILTON WEINBERG ADVERTISING 
CO. 

325 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 

Phone Tucker 4111 

ANPA — PPA — ABP 

Officers 

Director of Radio Bernard Weinberg 

Space Buver E. Cousino 

Publicity.' W. H. Krauch 

Radio Accounts Placed — Gaffers & Sattler, 
Hollywood Pantages Theater, Hollywood 
Turf Club, May Co., Pep Boys of California, 
Sontag Cut Rate Drug Stores, Grayson's, K's 
Beverages, Lyman's Restaurants, Zukor's, 
Mini's Dog Food Co., Hamilton Diamond Co., 
Hollywood Film Studios. 



WILLIAM H. WEINTRAUB & CO., 
INC. 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

Phone, Circle 7-4282 

ANPA — PPA 

Officers 

President William H. Weintraub 

Executive Vice President & Secretary 

Elkin S. Kaufman 

Vice-Presidents Paul Rand, 

John D. Scheuer 

Media Director William Gallow 

Radio Director Hubert Chain 

Talent Vera A. Lea 

Research Tom F. Hughes 

Copy Chief Kennon Jewett 

Radio Dept. 

Time Buyer William Gallow 

Business Mgr. of Radio Dept.. .Harry Trenner 

Production Mgr Theo. Gannon 

Talent Theo. Gannon 

Producers Thomas A. McAvity, 

Prockter & Lewis, Roger Bower, Theo. 
Gannon 
Radio Accounts Placed — Anchor-Hocking 
Glass Corp., Helbros Watch Co., Emerson 
Radio & Phonograph Corp., Miss Swank, Air- 
wick (Seeman Brothers, Inc.). 



WEISS AND GELLER, INC. 

400 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone PLaza 3-4070 

ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President Max A. Geller 

Vice-Presidents Peter Artzt, 

Jos. E. Bloom, Stanley A. Brown, Jos. H. 
Cohn 

Director of Radio Lester J. Mallets 

Time Buyer Jos. E. Bloom 

Branch Office 

400 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone Del. 1124 

Radio Accounts Placed — Nedick's Stores, 

Inc., Columbia Pictures Corp., Monogram 

Pictures Corp., Kenmore Publ. 



WERTHEIM ADV. ASSOCIATES 

11 W. 42nd St., New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone, Wisconsin 7-4978 

Officers 

Sole Owner-Radio Dir Ed L. Wertheim 

Space Buyer-Prod. Mgr Ed T. Wertheim 

Account Executives E. L. Wertheim, 

E. Taylor Wertheim 



WESTON-BARNETT, INC. 

217y 2 West 5th Street, Waterloo, Iowa 

Phone, 4677 

ABP— ANPA— PPA— SAAA—SNPA 

Officers 

President Wells H. Barnett 

Vice-President A. C. Barnett 

Secretary Phillips Taylor 

Radio Dept E. V. Bohan 

Branch Office 

520 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Phone, Whitehall 7725 

Vice-President A. C. Barnett 

M. C. Swartz 
Radio Accounts Placed — Iowa Soap Co., 
American Bird Products, Inc., Walker Rem- 
edy Co., Vinton Hybrid Corn Co., J. W. Mor- 
tell Co. 

• 

FRANK E. WHALEN ADV. CO. 

15 W. 10th St. Kansas City, Mo. 

Phone, Victor 7200 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

President & Time Buyer F. E. Whalen 

Sec. & Treas J. W. Whalen 

Asst. Sec. & Treas H. F. Jepson 

Space Buyer H. G. Kaufman 



WARD WHEELOCK CO. 

Lincoln-Liberty Bldg., Philadelphia 7, Pa. 

Phone Rittenhouse 7500 

ANPA— PPA— APA 

Officers 

President .Ward Wheelock 

Vice-President Arthur A. Bailey 

Secretary-Treasurer H. E. Fauier 

Branch Office 

444 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone, PLaza 3-7120 

Vice-President R. K. Strassman 

Radio Account Placed — Campbell Soup Co. 



WILLIAMS & SAYLOR, INC. 

271 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone, LExington 2-3493 

ANPA— PPA— APA— ABP— NOAB 

Officers 

Pres. & Treas Ralph W. Williams 

Vice-President Walter T. Pollock 



212 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



Secretary William F. Adams 

Space Buyer Mrs. I. Randall 

Production Manager M. J. Osias 

Art Director Kurt Josten 

Stocking Acct. Exec Willard Yates 

• 

WOOD, BROWN & WOOD. INC. 

209 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

Phone: Capitol 1850 

ANPA-PPA-ABP 

Officers 

President Allen H. Wood 

Vice-President-Radio Director, 

Allen H. Wood, Jr. 

Vice-President Arthur F. Sisson 

Treasurer Jonathan Brown, 3rd 



THE ALBERT WOODLEY CO. 

500 Fifth Avenue, New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone, Wisconsin 7-0380 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

Owner Albert Woodley 

Vice-President Louis De Garmo 

Vice-President Charles E. Rolfe 

Radio Accounts Placed — Railroad Federal 
Savings Association. 

• 

WORTMAN. BARTON & GOOLD, 
INC. 

345 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone MUrray Hill 4-2757 

ABP— ANPA— PPA 

Officers 

President E. B. M. Wortman 

Vice-Presidents R. S. Conahay, 

James Gorton 

Secretary Gilbert Goold 

Treasurer D. Wortman 

Radio Time Buyer Hortense Easier 

Radio Account Placed — Harrisburg Steel 
Corp. 

• 

YOUNG & RUBICAM, INC. 

285 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone Ashland 4-8400 

ANPA — PPA — APA — AAAA — 

NOAB — ABC — ABP 

Officers 

President Sigurd S. Larmon 

Executive V. P Louis N. Brockway 

V. P., Chairman Plans Board 

Charles L. Whittier 

Vice-President Frank Fagan 

V. P., Director of Media and General 

Production A. V. B. Geoghegan 



Vice-Presidents Milford .1. Baker, 

Edward Barnes, Harry 15. Carpenter, J. 
Brooks Emory, Jr., John E. Grimm, Jr., 
Garril Lydecker, Donald Payne and J<>!m 
F. Reeder 
V. P., Merchandising Director. Samuel Cherr 

V. P., Copy Director H. S. Ward 

V. P., Director of Research. ..George Gallup 

V. P., Art Director \\ alter K. Nield 

Director of Publicity and Public 

Relations William II. Jnikiii- 

Treasurer J. II. Geisc 

Secretary ami Assistant Treasurer 

H. H. Enden 
V. P., General Manager of Radio 

Gordon D. Gates 
V. P. in Charge of Radio Production 

Operations Harry Ackerinan 

Associate Director of Radio. Joseph A. Moran 
Associate Director of Radio, Head of 

Station Relations Carlos Franco 

Manager, Radio Commercial Copy 

John L. Swayzc 
Supervisor, Television Department 

William E. Forbes 
Commercial Motion Pictures. .John F. Barry 
Radio Business Manager. .Frederick A. Zaghi 
Radio Publicity Director. .. .Lester Gottlieb 
Manager, Talent Department 

Alexander Stronach 

Branch Offices 

6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Phone Hollywood 2734 

Radio Manager Glen Taylor 

V. P. and Pacific Coast Manager 

William A. Blees 
333 North Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. 
Phone Central 9389 
Vicc-President-Manager. . . .John F. Whedon 

Vice-President D. G. Schneider 

7430 Second Blvd., Detroit 2, Mich. 

Phone Madison 4300 

Vice-President and Manager. . .George Davis 

235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Phone Exbrook 6685 

Manager Howard Williams 

660 St. Catherine St., West, Montreal, Que. 
Phone Plateau 4691 

Manager L. C. Arbuthnot 

80 King Str., West, Toronto, Ont. 
Phone Elgin 5347 

Manager Stuart B. Smith 

Director of Foreign Offices 

Lorimer B. Slocum 
24 St. James St., London, S.W.I, England 
Managing Director George D. Bry6on 

Radio Accounts Placed — This listing 

omitted at the request of agency. Reader 

may refer to pages 191-2 in the 1944 edition 
of the Radio Annual. 



213 



Research Organizations 



AMERICAN RESEARCH SERVICE 

4014 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 6, Calif. 
Phone: YOrk 3010 

• 

BENNETT ASSOCIATES 

512 Fifth Avenue, New York 18, N. Y. 
Phone: CHickering 4-5985 

• 

BUREAU OF RESEARCH IN 
EDUCATION BY RADIO 

University of Texas, Austin, Texas 
Phone: 9171-234 

• 

WALTER P. BURN & ASSOCIATES. 
INC. 

7 West 44th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Phone, MUrray Hill 2-7462 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATES 

417 South Hill St., Los Angeles 13, Calif. 
Phone: Madison 1196 

• 

CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU 

6331 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Phone: Ho. 5111 

• 

COMMERCIAL SERVICES, INC. 

2011 Park Avenue, Detroit 26, Mich. 
Phone: RAndolph 1485 

CANADIAN FACTS 

19 Melinda Street, Toronto 1, Ont., Canada 
Phone Adelaide 2067 

C. C. CHAPELLE COMPANY 

500 N. Dearborn St., Chicago 10, 111. 
Phone: Whitehall 7731 

• 

ROBERT S. CONLAN & ASSOCIATES 

New York Life Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 
Phone: Victor 3038 

• 

THE COOPERATIVE ANALYSIS OF 
BROADCASTING, INC. 

330 West 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

CROSSLEY, INC. 

330 West 42 St., New York 18, N. Y. 
Phone BRyant 9-5462 

• 

ELLIOTT-HAYNES, LTD. 
(Radio Research Division) 

25 King St., West, Toronto, Ont., Canada 



FACTS CONSOLIDATED 

6305 Yucca at Vine, Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone: Los Angeles, Hillside 8159 

San Francisco, DOuglas 2445 

C. E. HOOPER, INC. 

10 East 40th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Phone, LExington 2-3000 

• 

INDUSTRIAL SURVEYS CO., INC. 

347 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 3-0690 

• 

McKINSEY & CO. 

60 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone, VAnderbilt 6-5280 

NATIONAL RADIO RECORDS 

347 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone, MUrray Hill 6-9186 

• 

A. C. NIELSEN COMPANY 

2101 Howard Street, Chicago, III. 
Phone, Hollycourt 6109 

• 

OFFICE OF RESEARCH- 
RADIO DIVISION 

3470 Broadway, New York 31, N. Y. 
Phone, AUdubon 3-2335 

DR. RALPH L. POWER 

405-7 I. N. Van Nuys Bldg., 
Los Angeles 14, Calif. 
Phone: MAdison 5617 

• 

OFFICE OF RESEARCH- 
RADIO DIVISION 

3470 Broadway, New York 31, N. Y. 
Phone: AUdubon 3-2335 

THE PULSE, INC. 

500 Fifth Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 
Phone: LAckawanna 4-8305 

• 

RADIO REPORTS, INC. 

220 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 2-6406 

• 

ELMO ROPER 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Phone Circle 6-7164 

• 

ROSS FEDERAL RESEARCH CORP. 

18 East 48th St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone, PLaza 3-6500 



214 



* FCC * * 



PERSOOOEI 
OF 

FEDERAL 

commun/cflT/ons 

commissions 



FCC Regulations Regarding Broad- 
casting Applications and Rules Appli- 
cable to Stations Engaged in Chain 
Broadcasting, */// be found Qn page$ 
198 and 203, respectively, in the 1944 
edition of Radio Annual. Regulations 
Regarding Broadcast Stations tor Tele- 
vision and Facsimile, will be found on 
pages 945-50 in the same issue. 



FEDERAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 

COMMISSION 



Headquarters: New Post Office Building, Washington, D. 

Personnel as of January 1, 1945 

Commissioners 

PAUL PORTER 

Chairman 

Term 1942-49 



CLIFFORD J. DURR 

Term 1941-48 

PAUL A. WALKER 

Term 1934-46 

EWELL K. JETT 

Term 1934-50 

Secretary 
T. J. SLOW I E 

General Counsel 

CHARLES R. DENNY 

Assistants to General Counsel 

BENEDICT P. COTTONE 

ROSEL H. HYDE 

HARRY M. PLOTKIN 

Chief Engineer 

GEORGE P. ADAIR 

Assistants to Chief Engineer 

VIRGIL R. SIMPSON 

JOHN A. WILLOUGHBY 

GEORGE E. STERLING 

Acting Chief, 
Common Carrier Division 

EDWARD E. HALE 

Chief Accountant 

WILLIAM J. NORFLEET 

Assistant Chief Accountant 

HUGO REYER 



NORMAN S. CASE 

Term 1934-45 

RAY C. WAKEFIELD 

Term 1940-47 

(VACANCY) 

Eighth Commissioner not selected at time 
of going to press. 

Director of Personnel 

DICK CARLSON 

Director of Budget and 
Planning Division 

WILLIAM B. ROBERTSON 

Chief, Service Division 

NICHOLAS F. CURETON 

Chief, Records Division 

WALTER S. DAVID 

Chief, Audits and Accounts 

LAWRENCE A. CORRIDON 

Chief, Minutes 

LAVELLE W. HUGHES 

Information Office 

EARL A. MINDERMAN 

Director of Information 

DOROTHY AMES HOLLOWAY 

Assistant to Director of Information 

Chief, License Division 

WILLIAM P. MASSING 



216 



• • Federal Communications Commission • 



FIELD FORCE 



1. CHARLES C. KOLSTER 
Customhouse, Boston, Mass. 

2. ARTHUR BATCHELLER 

641 Washington St., New York, N. Y. 

3. FOREST F. REDFERN 
1200 U. S. Custom House, and 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

4. EDWARD W. CHAPIN 

508 Old Town Bank Bldg., Baltimore, M.I. 

5. HYMAN A. COHEN 

402 New P.O. Bldg., Norfolk, Va. 

ALFRED H. KLEIST 

106 U. S. Post Office Bldg., Newport News, V: 

6. PAUL H. HERNDON, JR. 
411 Federal Annex, Atlanta, Ga. 
JOSEPH L. CONDON 

P.O. Box 77, Savannah, Ga. 

7. ARTHUR S. FISH 
P.O. Box ISO, Miami, Fla. 
MILTON W. GRINNELL 

203 Post Office Bldg., Tampa, Fla. 

S. THEODORE G. DEILER 

400 Audubon Bldg., New Orleans, La. 

9. NATHAN A. HALLENSTEIN 
404 Federal Bldg., Galveston, Texas. 

10. LOUIS B. McCABE 

500 U. S. Tterminal Annex, Dallas, Texas. 

WILLIAM E. CLYNE 

P.O. Box 1527, Beaumont, Texas. 

11. BERNARD H. LINDEN 

539 U. S. P. O. & Courthouse Bldg., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
HAROLD D. DE VOE 



I0; i S. ' lustom House, San Diego, i alif. 

I. LEE SM II II 

326 U. S. P. O. & Courthouse Bldg 

San Pedro, Calif. 

FRANCIS V. SLOAN 

("usi. ,in House, San Francisco, Cal. 

GEORGE V. W1LTSE 

805 Terminal Sales Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

LANDON C. HKKXDON 

808 New Federal Bldg., Seattle, W 

DONALD A. MURRAY 
ill Custom House, Denver, Colo. 

EDWIN S. HEISER 

208 U. S. P. O. & Courthouse Bl 

St. Paul, Minn. 

w i i.i jam j. McDonnell 

809 U. S. Courthouse, Kansas City, Mo. 

HAROLD D. HAYES 

246 U. S. Courthouse Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

EM I'-RY H. LEE 

1029 New Federal Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

CHARLES F. KOCHER 

431 Old Post Office Bldg., Cleveland. O. 

WALTER L. DAVIS 

328 Federal Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 

JOHN H. HOMSY 

609 Stangenwald Bldg., Honolulu, T. II. 

EDWARD II. HACKMAN 
Box 2987, San Juan, P. R. 
HERBERT H. ARLOWE 
P.O. Box 1421. 



BENJAMIN E. WOLF 

P.O. Box 788, Grand Island, Neb. 



MONITORING STATIONS 

IRL D. BALL 

P.O. Box 89, Allegan, Mich 
GLEN W. EARNHART 
P.O. Box 632, Kingsville, Texas 



ATTORNEYS 



MAX H. ARONSON 
PHILIP BERGSON 
MARGARET CONNALLY 
ROBERT M. FENTON 
GEORGE M. HARRINGTON 
JOSEPH KITTNER 
LEONARD MARKS 
ANNIE PERRY NEAL 
PETER SEWARD 
ELISABETH C. SMITH 
BERNARD STRASSBURG 
MAURICE W. WINTON 
MAURICE R. BARNES 
TYLER BERRY 
JEREMIAH COURTNEY 
ARTHUR GLADSTONE 



hugh b. hutchinson 
robert koteen 
james l. Mcdowell 
robert neuner 
hilda shea 
lester w. spillane 
pasquale valicenti 
william h. bauer 

EDWARD BRECHER (Special Analyst) 

DAVID H. DEIBLER 

VIOLET L. HALEY 

I. FRED JOHNSON, JR. 

FANNEY LITVIN 

SAMUEL MILLER 

MAX PAGLIN 

ABE L. STEIN 

JOHN E. WICKER 



217 



Federal Communications Co 



ENGINEERING STAFF 



Chief, Safety & Special Services Division 

WILLIAM N. KREBS 

Chief, International Division 

MARION H. WOODWARD 

Assistant Chief, International Division 

JOHN A. RUSS 



* See bottom of this page. 



EDWARD W. ALLEN, JR. 
DANIEL ARNOLD 
JAMES E. BARR 
WILLARD J. BEALE 
ERNEST R. BLANKINSHIP 
WILLIAM F. BRADLEY 
LESLIE R. BRADY 
C. M. BRAUM 
JAMES P. BUCHANAN 
ARTHUR T. CAPLEN 
EDWARD COLLINS 
FRANK W. COOK 
GEORGE B. DONOHUE 
EDGAR F. VANDIVERE 
GEORGE L. GADEA 
GEORGE V. WALDO 
C. E. COEKING 
ROBERT G. WESTON 
GEORGE J. IKELMAN 
JOSEPH H. WOFFORD 
R. D. JONES 
LOUIS E. KEARNEY 
A. L. KREIS 
CARL W. LOEBER 
HOWARD C. LOONEY 
THEODORE R. McCARTNEY 
A. L. McINTOSH 
K. NEAL McNAUGHTEN 
O. D. MITCHELL 
JAMES E. MOFFATT 

* Assistant Chief, Broadcast Dii 
CLURE H. OWEN 



Principal Physicist (Chief, Technical 

Information Division) 

LYNDE P. WHEELER 

Chief, Field Division 
GEORGE S. TURNER 

Assistant Chief, Field Division 
KENNETH G. CLARK 



ENGINEERS 



MALCOLM G. MOSES 
CARL T. NUHN 
RALPH J. RENTON 
JOHN D. FULMER 
A. PROSE WALKER 
E. MERLE GLUNT 
GLENN E. WEST 
FRANK V. HIGGINS 
CHARLES O. WILSON 
WALLACE E. JOHNSON 
HART S. COWPERTHWAIT 
PAUL V. OVERMYER 
JOHN C. CURRIE 
BRAXTON PEELE 
THOMAS E. DANIELS 
JOHN C. PETERSON 
ELTON D. DAVIS 
CURTIS B. PLUMMER 
ALFRED L. DE LA CROIX 
MARVIN A. PRICE 
GEORGE J. DEMPSEY 
L. C. QUAINTANCE 
P. HOWARD DUCKWORTH 
JAMES P. VEATCH 
PAUL W. GILLIGAN 
HAROLD G. WEILER 
THOMAS L. HERON 
ELDRIDGE WILLEY 
HERRICK JOHNSON 
E. ARDEN WOOTEN 

Assistant Chief, RID 
STACY W. NORMAN 



Assistant Chief, Safety and Special Services 

Division 

GLEN E. NIELSON 

218 



• • • Federal Communications Commission • • • 

ACCOUNTING, STATISTICAL and TARIFF DEPARTMENTS 
Head, Accounting Regulations Head, Field Division 

Division MARK S. McCOY 
HENRY M.LONG 

Head, Rates and Tariff Division Ac,in 9 Head, Broadcast Division 

WILLIAM G. BUTTS HARR\ TENNYSON 

Head, Statistical Division Head, Economics Division 

ALEXANDER UELAND DALLAS V. SMYTHE 

FIELD ACCOUNTING OFFICES 

LON A. CEARLEY CURTIS M. BUSHNELL 

299 Broadway (Room 1414), New York, N. Y. I860 Railway Exchange Bldg., St. Louis, Mo, 

CARL E. ZINNS (Acting Accountant in Charge) PAUL SUMMERHAYS 

515 First National Bank Bldg., Atlanta, Georgia (>05 Market Street, San Francisco, (alii. 

LICENSE DIVISION 

Chief of Broadcast Section Chief of Amateur and Natl. Defense Section 

CLARA M. IEHL J. ]',. BEADLE 

Chief of Commercial and Natl. Defense 

Registration Section Chief of Ship Section 

WILLIAM H. IRVIN LEONORA E. MILLER 

Chief of Machine Tabulating Section 

RAYMOND E. MARTIN 

FOREIGN BROADCAST INTELLIGENCE SERVICE 

Director, Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Chief of Publications Division 

CHARLES S. HYNEMAN G. ELLIS PORTER 

Assistant Director Chief of Monitoring and Translating Division 
EDWIN W. HULLINGER BEN HALL 

Chief of Wire Service Chief, Administrative Service Division 

ARTHUR GOUL BEN WAPLE 

Senior Administrative Officer 
RUSSEL M. SHEPHERD 

SECRETARIAL STAFF 

ETHEL COX MARDEN.. Secty. to Comm. Durr ANNIE BELLE STEARNS. . Secty. to Mr. Hale 

PHYLLIS HANCOCK.. Secty. to Comm. Walker NEVA BELL PERRY. .. .Secty. to Mr. Sterling 

MINNIE SPARKS Secty. to Comm. Case EVA E. HOCUTT Secty. to Mr. Krebs 

SYLVIA KESSLER.. Secty. to Comm. Wakefield LILLIAN CONLEY Secty. to Mr. Woodward 

JOSEPHINE CURREN EVELYN B. MODANCE. .Secty. to Mr. Wheeler 

Asst. Secty. to Comm. Walker MARIE R. DOHERTY. ... Secty. to Mr. Turner 

EVA O. MELTON.. Asst. Secty. to Comm. Case THAIS G. O'BRIEN Secty. to Mr. Denny 

MARY L. REGER FAUSTA PUFFENBERGER 

Asst. Secty. to Comm. Wakefield Secty. to Mr. Cottone 

VIOLA SLATTERLY LINDA WOLIN Secty. to Mr. Hyde 

Asst. Secty. to Comm. Jett MARGARET L. CURETON 

IRENE M. DURGIN Secty. to Comm. Jett Secty. to Mr. Plotkin 

LAURA L. HOLLINGSWORTH JULIA M. SHANKLAND 

Secty. to Mr. Slowie Secty. to Mr. Minderman 

JANET B. FISHER Secty. to Mr. Carlson CATHERINE LUNDER. . Secty. to Mr. Massing 

J"EAN K. WEISSMAN. .Adm. Asst. to Mr. Adair WALESKA WATSON Secty. to Mr. Norfleet 



FRANCES F. LE VAN Principal Clerk 

OLIVE R. HENDERSON. ..Secty. to Mr. Adair 
AGNES V. ENGEBRETSON 



FRANCES M. PEXWITT. .. Secty. to Mr. Re 

BETTY STOCKMAN Secty. to Mr. Hyneman 

MRS. MARY HELMERS. Secty. to Mr. Hullinger 



Secty. to Mr. Willoughby SUSAN HOFFMAN Secty. to Mr. Cureton 

219 



Mi-.. 





WHEN AND HOW 
CAN TELEVISION 
TURN A PROFIT? 



Interest in television is assuming flood 
proportions. Within 18 months after Vic- 
tory there is every indication that tele- 
vision service will be available to 30,000,- 
000 people . . . and enjoyment limited only 
by plant capacity of set manufacturers. 

Prospective television station operators 
who reserve DuMont telecasting equip- 
ment now will be prepared to ride a wave 
of unprecedented popular enthusiasm . . . 
to ride the swift and inevitable commercial 
expansion of the greatest scientific ad- 
vance of our time. Valuable prestige and 



good-will are natural windfalls of the 
early bird in this new field. 

A fortune is not required to build a tele- 
vision station, nor years to "break even." 
DuMont designed and constructed 3 of 
the 9 television stations on the air today. 
The low operating cost and rugged de- 
pendability of DuMont equipment has 
been demonstrated week-in and week-out 
for more than 4 years. When and how 
television can turn a profit are questions 
to which DuMont holds factual answers. 
Would you like to hear them? 



TELEFLASH! More than 90 requests for permission to con- 
struct and operate commercial television stations are on file with 
the Federal Communications Commission. As only a few channels are 
available for television, the number of stations in a trading area 
is limited. In consequence, options are already being sought for 
desirable "time." More than 61 advertising agencies have installed 
television departments. The value of riding with public interest 
is attracting more and more advertisers to television every week. 
They are learning to control the terrific sales impact of this 
wonderful new medium. Their experiments are well worth watching! 




ALLEN B. DuMONT LABORATORIES. INC., GENERAL OFFICES AND PLANT. 2 MAIN AVENUE, PASSAIC, N. J. 
TELEVISION STUDIOS AND STATION WABD, 515 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK 



_y 



AUDIO- VIDEO 



TELEVISION 



Commercial Stations 

Personne/ 

Licenses Pending 

1944 News Highlights 

Allocation Proposals 

Television Broadcasting Association 



• • • • 




AT YOUR SERVICE * 

# 






Tou can call on a wide range of experience in the Farnsworth 
engineering staff. This outstanding organization includes 
specialists in television . . . FM and AM reception and trans- 
mission . . . Radar . . . phonograph reproduction . . . acoustics 
. . . record-changers. 

War keeps these men busy today. Tomorrow they will be 
the background for Farnsworth radio, phonograph and tele- 
vision equipment . . . drawing upon a rich experience of more 
than 19 years in electronics research and development ... a 
guarantee of leadership. 

. . . And they will welcome your questions regarding all 
phases of radio and television transmission and reception. 
You'll find Farnsworth engineers leading in more and more 
fields . . . Farnsworth experience and Farnsworth equipment 
belong in your plans for the future. 

• WRITE FOR COPIES of "The Story of Electronic Television"- a non- 
technical brochure for which you'll have many uses. 

FARNSWORTH 

TELEVISION • RADIO • PHONOGRAPHS 



Farnsworth Television & Radio Corporation, Fort Wayne 1, Indiana • Farnsworth Radio 
and Television Transmitters and Receivers • Aircraft Radio Equipment • Farnsworth Tele- 
vision Tubes • The Farnsworth Phonograph-Radio • The Capehart, the Capehart-Panamuse 



TI!UiimiI\ MIIIKS IIIK.tll 



By Frank Burke 
Editor, RADIO l> ill.) 



OUBLIC acceptance of television as a 
post-war sight and sound media is 
assured based on the 1944 developments 
in the video field. 

Notable among the past year's video 
achievements were the formation of the 
Television Broadcasters Association in 
January; the Television Seminar, con- 
ducted by the Radio Executives Club of 
New York during May and June; the 
FCC's allocations hearing in Washington 
and controversial issues growing out of 
spectrum allocations. 

Controversial Issues 

The controversial side of television cen- 
tered around whether it should remain 
"downstairs" or go "upstairs." Most of 
the spectrum difficulties were ironed out 
with the FCC's preliminary allocations re- 
port which took cognizance of both schools 
of thought in the allocation of channels. 
Commercially television is allowed to re- 
main roughly where it is in the lower 
spectrum with provision made in the 
higher spectrum for experimental tele- 
vision in color and higher definition mono- 
chrome pictures. 

Production Problems 

Indications that production is one of 
television's paramount problems was 
gained during the Television Seminar 
conducted last summer by the Radio Ex- 
ecutives club and discussed at subsequent 
meetings of video groups in New York, 
Chicago and Los Angeles. Two schools 
of thought on production have voiced 
opinions. One suggests that films, espe- 
cially produced for video, will constitute 
the bulk of sight and sound entertainment 
fare when television gets in stride in the 
postwar period. Another group argues 
that film programming will grow monot- 
onous and "live" programs based news 
and sports events will constitute much of 
the programming in the early days of 
commercial tele development. 

Right now television stations in New 
York, Chicago and on the west coast are 
experimenting in production with a view 
of being prepared when television is 
launched on a large scale. Some radio 



programs such as "The Missus Goes A 
Shopping," "Ladies Be Seated" have 
been given successful tryouts in New 
York together with news commentators, 
puppet shows and fashion productions. 
On the west coast films have been used 
successfully with "live" talent in the 
presenting of programs. The movies are 
used as background and for full 15 min- 
ute and half hour shows. 

Another interesting phase of experi- 
mental programming is the surveys be- 
ing conducted among television set own- 
ers on the type of programs they regard 
as the best video entertainment. Stations 
in New York have contacted approxi- 
mately 5,000 television set owners on the 
Eastern seaboard and in Chicago ques- 
tionnaires have been mailed to tele set 
owners in that area. 

TBA's First Conference 

Formation of the TBA in January of 
1944 and the first national conference of 
the organization in December was an- 
other important development of the past 
year. The conference attracted 700 regis- 
trants to the Hotel Commodore in New 
York with broadcasters, equipment man- 
ufacturers, advertising agency executives 
and others interested in video participat- 
ing. One of the highlights of the meet- 
ing was the presentation of 12 awards to 
leaders in the video field for services ren- 
dered during 1944. 

Television covered the Republican and 
Democratic national conventions in Chi- 
cago in June and special films of these 
conventions were telecast by New York 
stations and a network including Phila- 
delphia, New York, and Schenectady. 
Later the linking of New York, Philadel- 
phia and Schenectady stations were her- 
alded in the press as the nation's first 
television network. 

Chronology Presented 

Strides made by television during the 
past year are chronologically listed month 
by month in this issue of the RADIO 
ANNUAL. Recapitulation of these events 
is recreating the dramatic story of tele- 
vision's progress during 1944. 



223 



ife3V"i 



ANOTHER MILESTONE 
IN THE PROGRESS OF 

TELEVISION 



M^'^PmM. 



CHAIN television is here! With the recent dedication of the new Philco 
Relay Transmitter at Mt. Rose, N. J., the first Television Network, 
linking Philadelphia, New York and Schenectady, is in actual operation 
today. Now Philadelphians enjoy clear reception of programs from New 
York through their local Philco television station. Thus the first step has 
been taken through which millions will eventually witness events that 
take place thousands of miles away . . . by television. 



HOW PHILCO RESEARCH SPEEDS 

wmm m the advance of television 

111 W B^P* This first television network is an example of how Philco research 
^•5£* w9 * 1 ~ is working to establish transmission principles which can extend 
chain television broadcasting from coast to coast. At the same 
time, Philco research is improving the clarity, sharpness and detail of the 
television picture ... so that future television sets will have the greatest 
possible sales appeal. Thus in two ways ... by helping to broaden the 
market for television, and by designing a more saleable product for that 
market . . . Philco leads toward the goal of television as tomorrow's 
"billion dollar industry." 

Radio Hall of Fatne Orchestra and Chorus. 
Tune in Sundays, 6 P.M., E.W.T., Blue Network. 



PHILCO 



FAMOUS FOR QUALITY THE WORLD OVER 



FILM OUTLOOK IK TELEVISION 

By RALPH B. AUSTRIAN 

Executive Vice-President, RKO Television I orp. 



YV7ILL most post-war television pro- 
grams be live-talent or will they be 
filmed ? This question has been asked ten 
thousand times this past year. I believe 
that the most suitable type of television 
program as they are evolved through ex- 
perience, will be far different in charac- 
ter from the feature motion pictures 
created in Hollywood for theater exhibi- 
tion. In the evolving of such programs, 
however, motion picture technique will 
play a greater part than existing radio 
or stage techniques and the use of film 
will be infinitely more important in tele- 
vision broadcasting than the electrical 
transcription disc is today in radio. In 
short, I believe that the majority of pro- 
grams will be on film. 

No "Shackles" 

The use of the motion picture for the 
presentation of a television program im- 
mediately frees the writer, director and 
producer from the shackles of the live 
stage. A television program using live 
talent naturally faces many of the same 
restrictions that limit a stage produc- 
tion. All action at any given time is on 
a single set, and if the action is contin- 
uous, the players are held to a single 
costume. Offstage action can only be re- 
ferred to and not shown, unless an inter- 
mission is declared for a shift of scene 
and a change of costumes. But with 
television there can be no between-the- 
acts intennission. An intermission on a 
television program — and its audience 
would promptly dial to another station. 
True, a system of revolving stage sets, 
multiple cameras and quick costume 
changes might be employed, but the tech- 
nical complications would be heartbreak- 
ing. At best, it would permit only a very 
few locale changes, but would continue 
to impose a multitude of restrictions on 
both writer and producer. No reverse 
shots or complicated angle shots — no 
shots from other sets, unless there are 
three more cameras at least on each set. 
A fundamental of television as in movies 
is constant scene change and camera 
movement. The public is accustomed to 
it and will demand it. I want to see a 



typical drawing room scene with four 
or five people — lit so they may move 
around freely and remain perfectly lit 
at all times. 

Handicaps Removed 

All of these program handicaps and 
restrictions, however, are immediately 
removed when it is a film program. For 
example, should the script call for an au- 
thentic street scene in Calcutta or Miami, 
a blizzard in Alaska, or a storm at sea, 
it would be available from the extensive 
film libraries maintained by RKO in 
Hollywood or Pathe News in New York. 
The players called for in the script could 
perform against the background of such 
a scene in such a natural manner that to 
the television viewer it would all appear 
to be taken on location. When film is 
used, rather than live talent, this and hun- 
dreds of other proven motion picture 
devices can be employed to give the tele- 
vision program producer practically lim- 
itless freedom of action. There is no 
substitute for the cutting room and a 
pair of sharp scissors. 

An objection to programs on film is 
that they do not have the sense of "im- 
mediacy" that live talent has. I don't 
think that is true except, of course, in 
the case of sporting events — spot news — 
fires — floods, etc. There's no one who 
appreciates the live performance pro- 
vided by the legitimate stage any more 
than I do. There's something about sit- 
ting in a theater watching a good play 
performed by capable actors and actresses 
that has no substitute; but if you were 
to put cameras in that theater and watch 
those actors and actresses from a dis- 
tance, it is then nothing more than a 
motion picture. It loses the personal 
magnetism, the feeling of live flesh and 
blood — that thing known as "Theater." 

Immediacy Theory 

Here is another reason why I cannot 
agree to the theory of immediacy. Every 
day as I come to my office which is in 
the same building as the Radio City 
Music Hall, I see literally hundreds of 



225 



TELEVISION 




f atrick ivlicnael (^-unnina 
TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS 

'Since 1939 America's Leading Independent 
Television Producing Organization" 



THE HOME OF PACKAGE 
TELESERIALS 



STAGE 8 



6530 SUNSET BLVD. 



IN HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



226 



people on line in all kinds of weather 
patiently awaiting to go inside and see 
a picture which they know was completed 
several months ago. The people know the 
middle scenes were shot first and the first 
scenes shot last. They know each scene 
was taken and retaken. Yet they line up 
to get it. Why? It's only a cold, mov- 
ing and talking shadow — but the story 
and the actors and actresses will make 
them laugh or cry or forget thmeselves 
for a few fleeting hours. 

It has been said many times: The high 
cost of programs on film is an impossible 
obstacle. I do not believe that programs 
in order to be entertaining and good, 
necessarily have to be expensive beyond 
reason. Some radio programs today cost 
from $10,000 to $25,000 for a 30-minute 
period. That's a range of from $300 to 
$600 a minute. We could supply film 
shows for that much and less — and, of 
course, more. 

Knotty Problems 

One of the knotty little economic prob- 
lems of television which keeps occupying 
the attention of prospective station op- 
erators, especially the so-called originat- 
ing stations for networks, is the vast 
amount of equipment and personnel 
needed to put a comparatively few hours 
of live talent programs on the air. There 
are a lot of people who say that televi- 
sion will operate only between four and 
six hours a day. Others point knowingly 
to a 24-hour-around-the-clock schedule. 
Let's take for our example a 12-hour day 
although even that might be some dis- 
tance in the future. What would be re- 
quired to put on 12 hours of programs 
a day if they were all live talent pro- 
grams ? One station operator who has 
been on the air for several years and 
who has had the unique experience of run- 
ning two studios has estimated that it 
would take 15 studios to put on the air 
12 hours of live talent program material, 
allowing only four hours' rehearsal time 
to one hour air time. Believe me when 
I tell you, however, that many 15-minute 
and half-hour live talent shows require 
as much as a week of rehearsal. Five of 
these studios would be very large studios 
about 3,000 square feet apiece; five would 
be medium size, around 2,000 square feet, 
and five small — around 1,300 square feet. 
Nobody knows just how many technicians, 
property men, electricians, directors, 
cameramen, grips and other laborers 
would be needed for these 15 studios. 
With the most careful method of stag- 
gering all help (union permitting) there 
may be as many as 200 men needed. 



Rehearsal Angles 

When a program goes into reh< 
a production crew is assigned to it and 
that crew stays with it all during the 
rehearsal time and is the same crew 
that will eventually put the show on the 
air. So you can see that every show in 
rehearsal will require its own crew. 

In a radio station today at the end of 
a program there is not very much to be 
done in the studio to get ready for the 
next show but when a live television 
show is over, the crew has to come in, 
strike the set, properties and lights, 
hring in the new set, dress it, light it, 
and you just don't do that in 30 minutes. 
How very simple it is going to be when 
programs are provided on film. A large 
motion picture company can arrange 
with the advertising agency for whom 
it functions to supply identical prints of 
a program to any number of television 
stations throughout the country or, for 
that matter, the world. It would do this 
precisely as it supplies its regular mo- 
tion picture film, on a "day and date" 
basis. This would be done through its 
nationwide network of film exchanges. 
No excitement, no worry, no scurry — 
just as simple as loading a home movie. 

Commercial Opportunities 

Public relations or straight advertising 
via television opens up a vast new field 
of opportunity. Today, more than ever 
before, it has become necessary for big 
business to justify its existence. Televi- 
sion on film will offer a most unique and 
effective method of spreading the story 
of the large corporation to Mr. and Mrs. 
Public. In a most entertaining manner 
it will be possible to portray what a big 
company does for its employes — group 
insurance, social service, hospitalization, 
home economics, company stores, exten- 
sion courses, bonus system, job insurance, 
retirement funds. What better way could 
there be to present this story to the 
peoples of the world than via the motion 
picture films ? The screens of the ma- 
jority of motion picture theaters in this 
and many other countries have been 
closed to the advertising or business prop- 
aganda film— and rightfully so. People 
do not wish to buy propaganda or adver- 
tising when they go to the theater. Now, 
with television, the home screens of the 
world will be open to the advertiser. 
Here again the efficacy of the television 
program on film becomes apparent. You 
can't drag television cameras all through 
and around a big plant and put on a 
carefully planned show. Also the finest 
(Continued on Page 231) 



227 







BOB CLAMPETT 

WRITER - DIRECTOR 
WARNER BROS. CARTOONS 



Now in Production 

ON THE FIRST COMMERCIAL CARTOON EVER MADE FOR 

"TELEVISION" 

228 



THE PICTURE ll\ T K I, K 1 1 N I » \ 



/ 'ice-president-General Mamgi 



By Lewis Allen Weiss 

Don Lee Broadt asting System 



,1 W6XA0, Hollyw I. 



HPHE public is waiting, the advertisers 

are ready, and television is set to go. 
On that three-point platform, the Don 
Lee Network confirms a decision made 
13 years ago when it first put its televi- 
sion station, W6XAO, into operation with 
the statement that "in a decade, the 
experiment of television would be a 
reality in the broadcasting industry." 

Discounting the war years that have 
held up the mass production of televi- 
sion sets, the prophecy of our television 
experts, shared with others all over the 
country, came to a climax when the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission held a 
hearing to determine the status of tele- 
vision and to make ready its introduction 
to the immediate post-war world. 

Part of the testimony made at the 
hearing was on a purely technical basis, 
to substantiate what is common knowl- 
edge in the industry that television is 
ready and capable of giving the public 
greater and richer measure of broad- 
casting's third dimension than either 
radio or motion pitcure could deliver at a 
comparable point in their development, 
and thus should be permitted to operate 
in or near its present band in the spec- 
trum. 

Television stations are now capable of 
servicing nine-tenths of the population 
of most major cities in the country. We've 
also had promises from our set manu- 
facturers that receiving sets will cost 
as little as $150, combining television 
with both FM and AM reception. The 
potential television "looker" is right- 
fully at that point where he can make his 
contribution to the success of commercial 
television. 

Public Interest 

For it goes without saying that public 
enthusiasm about television is of para- 
mount importance. Coming right down 
to brass tacks, it will be the "looker" 
who will make it possible for the adver- 
tiser to make full use of television, and 
as you'll recall, the advertiser is a third, 
and important necessary third, in our 
three-part platform for the new video 
industry. Certainly a public that has 
been asked to back and fill, so to speak, 



while those in the industry make up 
their minds, isn't going to be a clamor- 
ing public who will respond when the 
signal B given. 

And now, about that "advertising 
third." Already every alert advertising 
agency in the country is making investi- 
gations about the potentialities, the cost 
and the requirements of this fascinating 
new medium. At W6XAO we've consulted 
with both production men and executives 
in advertising agencies in developing our 
program plans. We've asked them for 
specific problems to solve, so that to- 
gether we have come to some definite 
conclusions about the restrictions and 
obligations that must be observed in suc- 
cessful commercial television. 

Programming Discussed 

Actually, the programming of televi- 
sion and the production of program units 
are simple problems, and with the exper- 
ience of radio to guide us, are easily 
solved by the application of sound show- 
manship principles to this new means 
of expression. 

In our studios on Mount Lee, we've 
already produced about every type of 
program feasible for broadcast. Many 
successful years of remote broadcasting 
are on our records, and as those who 
live in the Los Angeles area remember, 
the sight of the huge red W6XAO televi- 
sion remote unit became a familiar part 
of our pre-war parades, festivals, athle- 
tic meets and aquatic events. We've 
taken our receivers up into the air to 
experiment with a combination of air- 
plane and land television reporting. We've 
filmed news events, a fire in downtown 
Los Angeles is one I remember, a flood 
at Long Beach another, and on a tele- 
visioned program later the same day 
shown the pictures we obtained. 

With studio programs, our experience 
has also been wide. Operas, famous 
dramas, original plays and musicals have 
been produced before our cameras, and 
we've even tried out the five-a-week 
serial with great success. Working with 
miniatures, combining film with live 
talent in dramatic sequences and intro- 
ducing news reporting and commentary 



229 



CONSIDER TELEVISION 
AS AN ACTUALITY! 



THE time when television was "just 
around the corner" has now passed. 
Today we have with us a vigorous new 
industry, complete with all the prob- 
lems of a virtually untried medium. 

These problems are serious but not in- 
surmountable. There are "bugs" inher- 
ent in all new things. Television's 
"bugs" must be overcome. The future 
of the entire industry lies in our ap- 
proach to these problems, and the solu- 
tions we find for them. 

In a comparatively short time, televising 
will begin on a large scale. Too late 
then for "bugs." Public and sponsor 
acceptance of television, for years to 
come, will depend on the groundwork 
that is being done today. 

In television, the glamour and eye- 
appeal of the stage, the imagery of the 
radio, the technical skills of the screen 
must be successfully combined. How 
to accomplish this? What talent will be 
best suited for the job? What stories are 
adaptable to this new medium? These 
are the problems with which Ray-Tele 
can help you. We at Ray-Tele have 
studied and anlyzed these verv difficul- 
ties. When we found the answers, we 
went into business for the express pur- 
pose of helping you and the industry as 
a whole. 

Use Ray-Tele for its fund of informa- 
tion. Use it as a stepping-stone to suc- 
cess in a new business which may easily 
become the greatest the entertainment 
world has ever known. 



RAY-TELE • BR. 9-5365 

604 Fifth Avenue, New York 20, N. Y. 




through visual means have been among 
our experiments. And of course, by now, 
after some 15,000 hours of television 
broadcasting, we're past masters on the 
''how to do it" broadcast, even having 
grown a Victory garden before the eyes 
of the "lookers" tuned to W6XAO. 

Question of Cost 

And so, of course, we finally come to 
the question of cost. Here I have some 
more specific information. First, because 
hundreds of thousands of dollars worth 
of experimenting has gone on in the 
program departments of the nation's tele- 
vision stations, the advertisers who buy 
television programs will inherit a pro- 
duction cost much lower than they would 
have if organizations like Philco, RCA, 
Farnsworth and others like ourselves at 
Don Lee had limited our ground breaking 
interests to purely technical experiments. 
Secondly, we've actually computed what 
the technical operating costs will be, and 
thus have given potential advertisers 
some material with which to start figur- 



ing. We find thai the technical costs 

will start at $300 per hour that being 
the cost to the station t<> maintain the 
staff and put the cameras and transmitter 
into operation for a four hour broadca I 
schedule. 

As I've said, for nearly 14 years now the 
Don Lee Broadcasting System has been 
helping write the history id' television. 
We began operations in our original 
downtown Los Angeles studios, and in 
1940 opened the world's first built-for- 
television studios atop Mount Lee in the 
heart of Hollywood. That we're looking 
forward to the future of both television 
and Frequency Modulation you all know 
by now, from the news released a few 
weeks ago telling of the purchase by the 
Don Lee Broadcasting System of a 160- 
acre site at Deer Park on Mt. Wilson, 
the most advantageous site our engineers 
could find in Southern California, the site 
from which we hape soon to cover all 
of Southern California as our commercial 
television station goes into regularly 
scheduled operation. 



FILfll OUTLOOK 10 TELE V(S 



(Continued from Page 227) 



live talent program produced in America 
means nothing in a country where Eng- 
lish is not spoken or understood. The 
cost of the program or series of programs 
must be borne by the one-shot perform- 
ance. Suppose it were to cost ten times 
as much to put it on films ? By the sim- 
ple expedient of what we in the picture 
business call "lip dubbing," we can trans- 
late the program into any and every 
language and send prints of such pro- 
grams to all countries just as we now 
send foreign versions of our motion 
pictures. This enables our giant corpora- 
tions whose scope is world-wide to reach 
via television not just millions in this 
country but eventually, billions of people. 

Film as Backbone 

It is quite evident that telecasting sta- 
tions will be in operation considerably 
sooner than network programs will be- 
come available and it is here that the 
film transcription or "Telereel" will prove 
to be the backbone of the programming 
system. 

In the post-war period when television 
will flourish, the advertising dollar will 
be scrutinized more carefully than it is 
today. National advertisers will not be 
so ready to buy a 15-minute or half-hour 



spot on a network between the East and 
West Coasts and perhaps be in competi- 
tion with a top rating program carried 
by another network or face a three-hour 
time differential. Advertising managers 
and market analysts will lean heavily on 
the spot type of telecasting. They will 
pick the markets in the order of their 
desirability, concentrate their appropria- 
tions on selected territories and make it 
a point to cover them at the best possible 
hours. 

RKO is going to make syndicated film 
programs available as soon as station 
construction starts. It is preparing now. 
Even after national or large regional net- 
works are established, the "Telereel" will 
remain an important, if not the most 
important factor for all programs with 
the exception of course of sporting events 
and news events which are always hot 
flash news. 

No single individual advertiser, no 
single advertising agency, nor any group 
of advertising agencies could possibly 
operate such enormous facilities as RKO 
and its subsidiary, Pathe News, Inc., now 
offer the potential television users of 
this country. These facilities are now 
available to both reputable advertisers 
and recognized advertising agencies 
through RKO Television Corporation. 



231 



TELEVISIOn HIGHLIGHTS— 1944 



(From the Files of RADIO DAILY) 



'©' 



A review of the past year's television events indicates the 
tremendous post-war possibilities of the sight-and-sound medium. 
Increasing momentum is evident from the upward surge of 
activity reported in the columns of Radio Daily. The following 
pages contain the recorded highlights of the year in television. 



JANUARY 

Jan. 18 — The newly formed Television Broad- 
casters Association discussed and adopted 
by-laws at its first annual meeting held at 
Chicago. 

Jan. 21 — NBC inaugurated a 50-week television 
course for its staff engineers in anticipation 
of post-war development of television. 

Jan. 26 — Senor Bonifacio Fernandez Aldana, New 
York correspondent for a group of South 
American newspapers, told members of the 
newly formed Television Press Club at the 
group's first monthly luncheon that Mexico 
will be one of the centers of television in 
Latin-America. 

Jan. 28 — NBC and RCA in cooperation with Gen- 
eral Electric began installation of 45 addi- 
tional tele receivers in hospitals for wounded 
servicemen in the metropolitan New York 
area. Mid State Television Corp. was formed 
in Boston and planned to open tele studios 
in Lowell, Mass., within the year. 



FEBRUARY 

Feb. 1 — After serving two years with OWI, F. P. 
Nelson has returned to Westinghouse Radio 
Stations, Inc., to resume his old post. He 
will undertake new duties as manager of 
television and shortwave. 

Feb. 2 — The Television Broadcasters Association, 
Inc., elected Allen B. DuMont as its first 
president. Other officers chosen were Lewis 
Allen Weiss, Don Lee Broadcasting System, 
vice-president, and John R. Poppele, WOR, 
assistant secretary-treasurer. 

Feb. 8 — First tele application of 1944 was filed 
by the Jamaica (N. Y.) Radio & Television 
Corp., which put in for channel three, pre- 
viously unassigned. 



Feb. 25 — A cooperative time exchange was set up 
between WNEW, New York independent 
station, and W2XWV, experimental tele- 
vision outlet operated in New York by the 
Allen B. DuMont Laboratories. 

MARCH 



Mar. 1 — Will Baltin, program manager for the 
DuMont television station W2XWV, was 
named secretary-treasurer of the Television 
Broadcasters Association at a meeting of the 
organization's board of directors. In an ad- 
dress before the Television Press Club, Dr. 
Alfred N. Goldsmith, vice chairman of the 
RTPB, forecast no conflict between FM and 
television in the post-war period. 

Mar. 6 — Television was dramatized in the morn- 
ing over CBS in one of the "American 
School of the Air" radio series, titled "The 
Vacuum Tube." Featuring Worthiton Mi- 
ner, manager of Columbia's tele department, 
the script dramatized the role of the tube 
in the development of eye-and-ear enter- 
tainment. 

Mar. 20— Statements made by NBC, CBS and 
A.T.&T. over the weekend indicated steadily 
increasing interest in planning television's 
future. N. Ray Kelley was appointed by 
NBC to take charge of the network's tech- 
nical facilities of television. Plans for a 
$2,000,000 trial of short-wave radio relays 
for intercity tele and telephone relays was 
made by A.T.&T. Paul W. Keston, executive 
vice-president of CBS, forecast post-war tele 
in full and natural color in the annual report 
to CBS stockholders. 

Mar. 21 — Stromberg-Carlson Co. announced plans 
for a tele station and a new "Rochester 
Radio City" housing AM, FM and television 
as a post-war development through William 
Fay, vice-president in charge of broadcasting. 



232 



TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS 



Mar. 24 — Allen B. DuMont, president of TBA, 
told the American Marketing Association at 
a Murray Hill Hotel luncheon that adver- 
tisers and advertising men are already con- 
vinced that television advertising has real 
possibilities. He spoke on the topic, "T.N.T. 
— Television Now and Tomorrow." 

Mar. 29 — Thomas F. Joyce, manager of RCA 
Victor's radio, phonograph and tele depart- 
ment, indicated in an address before a 
morning educational forum of The Adver- 
tising Women of New York that television's 
quality of immediacy would provide the 
greatest vehicle of mass education that he 
had ever known. 

APRIL 

April 3 — Gerald Cook, former director of tele 
for the BBC, expressed the belief that prog- 
ress of television programming would be 
advanced 10 years through a merger of 
sight-and-sound facilities by the webs and 
other interested parties for a training period 
of three years only. He added that this 
opinion was his own and did not reflect the 
policy of BBC. First among the class maga- 
zines to experiment with television was the 
"Mademoiselle," with its debut over W2- 
XWV, aimed at projecting what's new in 
the news in fashions, in jobs and futures 
and in fun. 

April 3 — As guest speaker at the organizational 
meeting of the newly formed Television 
Producers Association, Allen B. DuMont 
stressed the improvement of the technique 
of writing and creating television programs. 

April 4 — Approval of 12 members in the Tele- 
vision Broadcasters Association, Inc., was 
voted by the board of directors at a meeting 
held in the TBAI offices in New York, 
bringing the total membership to 15. 

April 7 — Addressing a luncheon meeting of the 
Radio Executive Club on "Television's Op- 
portunities," Dr. Alfred N. Goldsmith, elec- 
trical engineer, declared that the industry 
will be a boom to employment and that 
"science and engineering will have added 
one more great implement to those at the 
disposal of humanity." . . At a special press 
luncheon, General Electric revealed its post- 
war television plans. . . Announcement was 
made by the Radio Executives Club that the 
REC would conduct a "Television Seminar" 
starting in May and continuing through 
September, covering all phases of the sub- 
ject. 



Apr. 10— WFIL, of Philadelphia, has designated 
the station's "Playhouse Studio" as experi- 
mental studio for video coaching. . . . First 
television premiere of a film to be televised 
at key points across the country was 
MGM's "Patrolling the Ether." James L. 
Fly, chairman cf the FCC, appeared before 
the NBC tele cameras in New York to 
introduce the film which dramatized the war 
time activities of the radio intelligence divi- 
sion of the FCC. 

Apr. 19 — Television Actors Gnild, social organi 
zation devoted to the advancement of tele- 
vision acting, was formed in Hollywood. John 
Folger was named temporary chairman. 

Apr. 21 — Eddie Cantor announced from Chicago 
that he plans to jump the gun on television 
next season by doing away with scripts and 
staging his broadcasts as though they were 
being presented in front of television 
cameras. 

Apr. 24 — Post-war industrial applications of tele- 
vision were outlined in Detroit by Ralph R. 
Beal, assistant to the vice-president in charge 
of RCA Laboratories, before a meeting of 
the Engineering Society. He looked for tele 
as a visual means of plant control to speed 
production. 

Apr. 24 — Locations for "Vaqueros Ride" is be- 
lieved to be the first television "Western" 
movie, shot at Coe's Cove Rancho in Holly- 
woodland. Telecine 16mm. film was used 
for the first time. 

Apr. 25 — Growing interest of the nation's news- 
paper publishers and editors in the post-war 
development of television, FM, and facsimile 
were indicated at the convention of the 
American Newspaper Publishers Association 
at the Waldorf-Astoria, New York. 

Apr. 26 — Speaking on the topic "The Story of 
Television Programming," Gilbert Seldes told 
members of the Television Press Club that 
television does best what is caught unpre- 
pared. ... In a move which was believed to 
be designed to head off the formation of a 
Television Actors Guild in New York similar 
to the one recently organized on the West 
Coast, Equity Screen Actors Guild and the 
American Federation of Radio Artists issued 
a joint statement. 

MAY 



May 5 — Transformation of color in television to 
gradations of black and white was demon- 
strated by Bud Gamble, of Farnsworth Tele- 



233 



vision & Radio Corp., at a meeting of the 
TPA held in New York. 

May 8 — The first ccmmercially sponsored tele- 
vision program on the Balaban & Katz sta- 
tion, WBKB, was purchased and broadcast 
Friday night, May 5, for Marshall Field Co., 
Chicago. 

May 18 — In step with the industry's progressive 
thinking and planning, RADIO DAILY pre- 
sented the first issue of TELEVISION DAILY 
as a monthly supplement to this publication. 
TELEVISION DAILY will be published on 
a monthly basis for the duration of the war 
as an enterprising voice in the new field of 
revolutionary electronics. 

May 25 — Television and other refinements of the 
radioart will provide millions of jobs for 
American s Idiers, Senator Burton K. 
Wheeler, D. Mont., declared during his 
address on the occasion of the 100th an- 
niversary of the sending of the first tele- 
graph message. . . . George Henry Payne, 
former member of the FCC, has been named 
vice-president and director of the Finch Tele- 
communications Co. of New Ycrk. . . . The 
board of governors of the Television Press 
Club named Richard W. Hubbell chairman 
of the scribes' organization at its first semi- 
annual election of officers. 

May 31 — TelevisLn as it may be applied to 
department store advertising was demon- 
strated by NBC and RCA for 22 representa- 
tives of retail organizations comprising the 
Associated Merchandising Corp. 



JULY 

July 6 — Pacific Coast Independent Television 
Prcducers Association was formed, with Pat- 
rick Michael Cunning, Hubbard Hunt, Rudi 
Feld, Armand Piaggi and Joseph Sawyer 
charter members. 

July 13 — Because of an increasing demand for 
speakers versed in the technical and non- 
technical aspects of television, a Television 
Speakers Bureau was established by the Tele- 
vision Broadcasters Association, Inc. 

July 24 — The award for the year's outstanding 
contribution to the art of television program- 
ming was presented to WRGB, Schenectady, 
N. Y., by Dan D. Halpin, president of the 
American Television Society. 

AUGUST 



Aug. 3 — Announcement was made of an ambi- 
tious plan to educate agency executives and 
advertisers in the post-war potentialities of 
television with the launching in Baltimore on 
Aug. 20 of a 10-day tele demonstration by 
NBC and RCA in co-operation with radio 
station WBAL. 

Aug. 8 — First advertising agency to set up regu- 
larly weekly auditions for commercial tele 
talent is Ruthrauff & Ryan with try-outs 
scheduled for ever Friday at WABD. 

SEPTEMBER 



JUNE 

June 6 — First film company to enter the tele- 
vision film production field is RKO with a 
new subsidiary known as RKO Television 
Productions, Inc., which will produce news 
and entertainment shorts exclusively for 
video. 

June 7 — With the Allied Expeditionary Forces 
smashing inland from the French coast, two 
New York television stations, WBNT and 
WABD, went on the air with special events 
marking the historic thrusts into European 
contient. 

June 15 — A three-city tele network will pick 
up the video signals of WNBT, New York, 
and the pictorial proceedings of the Republi- 
can National Convention in Chicago will be 
made available to about 7,000 television in 
the Eastern area, C. L. Menser announced. 
. . . Staging of a two-hour musical comedy, 
"The Boys from Boise" on Thursday, July 13, 
will mark the opening of DuMont's new 
WABD studios and will represent television's 
most ambitious program planning to date in 
the New York area. 



Sept. 5 — Widespread interest in television as an 
advertising medium is indicated in the coun- 
trywide response of General Electric's invi- 
tation extended to the stores to be present 
at a program to be staged in Schenectady, 
N. Y., in the studios of WRGB, on Friday, 
Sept. 29. 

Sept. 8 — In a closed meeting of the television 
and FM panels of the RTPB held in New 
York City, preliminary discussions of alloca- 
tions aired in preparation for the hearings 
to be conducted in Washington, beginning 
Sept. 28. 

Sept. 18 — Presentation of a plaque by the Ameri- 
can Television Society to Allen B. DuMont, 
president of DuMont Laboratories, Inc., for 
the "best contribution to television during 
the year" highlighted the first fall meeting 
of the American Television Society Sept. 14. 

OCTOBER 

Oct. 2 — A settlement of the differences of opin- 
ion between the television and FM panels 
of the RTPB was reached at the frequency 
allocation hearings conducted by the FCC. 



234 



TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS 



This dispute, the first to be brought into 
the open since the sessions started Thurs- 
day, Sept. 28, involved claims for that portion 
of the spectrum between 50 and 56 mega- 
cycles, the present No. 1 video band. 

Oct. 3 — Four out of every ten persons plan to 
purchase television sets when they are re- 
leased after the war; six out of ten post- 
poning the purchases of tele sets say they 
will buy within three years after the end 
of the war; six cut of 10 say the clarity of 
the picture will not influence their pur- 
chases, it was disclosed by the Allen 6. 
DuMont Laboratories following a survey con- 
ducted within the New York City metropoli 
tan area. 

Oct. 5 — The appointment of Jay Strong to the 
post of director of television was made by 
the Basch Radio Productions. 

Oct. 9 — In collaboration with the University Ex- 
tension of Columbia University, NBC Uni- 
versity of the Air inaugurated a television 
course which is recognized for credit toward 
a University degree. 

Oct. 13 — Transoceanic television has not been 
stressed encugh, Gilbert Seldes, head of 
CBS' television division, declared at the 
weekly luncheon of the Overseas Press Club 
of America in New York. He referred to a 
request for an article made by an Australian 
publication that has evinced great interest in 
the new medium and its prospects for the 
"world down under." . . . The War Finance 
Committee of New York announced that 
television will be used as a public service 
function when it is employed in the fall 
as a training medium for the Sixth War Loan 
workers. 

Oct. 16 — Emphasis on the use of films as tele- 
vision entertainment characterized the pres- 
entation of four speakers before a meeting of 
the American Television Society in New York. 

Oct. 17— In Washington, D. C, television wit- 
nesses paraded before the FCC allocation 
hearing giving views for and against devel- 
opment of video in its present stage as a 
sight and sound media. 

Oct. 18 — Television stations, at least for a good 
many years to come, will be limited to cities 
having populations of more than 500,000, 
Lewis Allen Weiss, head of the Don Lee 
Broadcasting System, told the FCC at its 
allocation hearing in Washington. Only cities 
cf a half million or more will be able to sup- 
port a video broadcasting station, he de- 
clared. . . . Looking ahead 10 years and 
envisioning the potentialities of television 



in the home, Thomas J. Joyce, tele executive 
for the RCA Victor Division, told the an- 
nual Boston Conference on Distribution that 
in 1955 there will be 30,000,000 homes 
equipped with video receivers, offering that 
many showrooms for merchandise as against 
1,777,000 retail spots now used for display. 

Oct. 19 — Supporting the statement of Don 
Lee's Lewis Allen Weiss that television is too 
expensive for any but the larger cities, 
James D. McLean, General Electric tele- 
vision sales manager, told the FCC that the 
initial expense for a television station would 
run frcm $150,000 to $300,000, with oper- 
ating expenses amounting to about another 
$350,000 per year. The estimate for the 
initial cost makes no provision for grounds, 
buildings or antenna supporting structures. 

Oct. 24 — Television holds great promise in the 
first post-war decade if it can be developed 
to satisfactory state and released soon 
enough, Arno H. Johnson, director of media 
and research of J. Walter Thompson Co., 
told members of the Radio Executives Club 
of New York City. 

Oct. 27 — Two spokesmen for television who 
urged the immediate post-war development 
of the video art were heard as witnesses 
befcre the FCC's Allocation hearing, when 
Niles Trammell, president of NBC, and 
Allen B. DuMont, president of the Tele- 
vision Broadcasters Association, Inc., gave 
testimony. Trammell counseled the Com- 
mission to give a green light to full scale 
television broadcasting on present standards. 
Urging the FCC to end the "indecisions and 
restraints" that have pinned down imme- 
diate expansion of television into a national 
service, DuMont asked the FCC to accept 
the recommendations voiced by Panel No. 
6 of the RTPB. 

Oct. 31 — Three media, television, radio and 
newspaper, will collaborate to bring a visual 
presentation of the election reports to tele- 
viewers over WABD, Nov. 7, it was an- 
nounced by Raymond E. Nelson, vice-presi- 
dent in charge of television and radio for 
the Charles M. Storm agency; Bernice Judis, 
vicepresident and general manager of 
WNEW; Carl Warren of the New York 
"Daily News." 

NOVEMBER 

Nov. 2 — Television's power will be such in 1948 
that the presidential nominees will be chosen 
for their telegenic qualities just as they are 
now nominated with their radio voice in 
mind, Edward Sobol, production director of 



235 



TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS 



NBC television, told the members of the 
Television Press Club at its first meeting of 
the new season. 

Nov. 8 — Television — heralded as a major media 
in the Presidential election to come in 1948 
. . — played an interesting role in the election 
returns of last night by devoting full time 
on three New York stations, one in Chicago 
and one in Los Angeles. Other tele election 
programs were carried in Schenectady and 
Philadelphia with stations participating in 
an inter-city network linked with New York. 

Nov. 13 — Plans for the first annual conference of 
the Television Broadcasters Association were 
disclosed at a press luncheon at the Hotel 
Commodore in New York City with Jack R. 
Poppele, chairman of the conference; Will 
Baltin, secretary of TBA, and Ralph Austrian, 

-* chairman of the program, discussing the con- 

';•:•■£ vention planning. 

Nov. 20 — A discussion panel on television in ad- 
vertising agencies was organized in order to 
strengthen agency television directors' voice 
in the forthcoming annual Television Broad- 
casters Association, it was announced by 
Elkin S. Kaufman, executive vice-president 
of William H. Weintraub & Co. and mod- 
erator of the panel. 

Nov. 30 — In a by-lined article, Herbert Graf, 
NBC director of operatic production and 
stage director of Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany, stated that "television, will in my 
opinion, be the decisive medium in making 
opera a popular art in America." 



DECEMBER 



Dec. 6— WKY, Oklahoma City, NBC affiliate, 
used television effectively during the Sixth 
War Loan Drive on a tour of 19 Oklahoma 
cities. Thousands of adults lined auditorium 
aisles for closeups of reflector pictures of 
local dignitaries, citizens, children, pets, and 
bombarded technicians with amazingly 
searching questions. 

Dec. 11— First annual conference of the Televi- 
sion Broadcasters Association, Inc., got 
underway at the Hotel Commodore in New 
York City in the morning with about 700 
registrants expected to be on hand for the 
opening session of the two-day meeting. 
Registration included television broadcasters, 
radio station operators, manufacturers of 
equipment, advertising agency executives, 
and publishers, which indicated the wide- 
spread interest in the post-war planning of 
.video. 



Dec. 12 — Sixteen television leaders were pre- 
sented awards for outstanding contributions 
to video development at the First Annual 
Conference Banquet of the Television Broad- 
casters Association. . . . Three authorities 
of television, Thomas Hutchinson, head of 
RKO Television Productions, Commander 
William Eddy, formerly connected with the 
television firm of Balaban & Katz Corp., 
and Richard W. Hubbell, production man- 
ager for the Broadcast Division of the Crosley 
Corp., of Cincinnati, Ohio, are preparing 
books on television that are scheduled to 
appear during 1945. 

Dec. 13 — Jack R. Poppele. chief engineer and 
secretary of WOR, New York, was elected 
president of the TBA at the closing session 
of their two-day meeting at the Hotel 
Commodore yesterday. Other officers 
elected were Robert L. Gibson, of General 
Electric, vice-president; Will Baltin, secre- 
tary-treasurer; and O. B. Hanson, chief 
engineer and vice-president of NBC, as 
assistant treasurer. 

Dec. 15 — Television will be the motion picture 
industry's most powerful medium for ex- 
ploiting the glamour of Hollywood and its 
stars, Blaus Landsberg, director of television 
station W6XYZ, Hollywood, told a special 
events meeting of the American Television 
Society at the Museum of Modern Art in 
New York. 

Dec. 18 — Rene Barthelmy, French television ex- 
pert, in an interview with Charles Colling- 
wood, CBS correspondent in Paris, told of 
successful experiments with 1,000 line 
screen and predicted the eventual adoption 
by television interests throughout the world. 
. . . Plan to introduce television in Utah 
was announced by S. S. Fox, president and 
general manager of the Intermountain 
Broadcasting Corporation which operates 
KDYL with the filing of a license applica- 
tion with the FCC. 

Dec. 26 — Speaking before a class in tele-tech- 
niques at New York University, P. D. Mc- 
Lean, GE sales manager of television 
equipment, predicted that there will be at 
least 150 tele stations in operation within 
five years after the war. He also pointed 
out that television would be brought to the 
smaller communities with the use of satel- 
lite stations, low power relay stations draw- 
ing their programs direct from the net- 
works, and lacing the usual studio facilities. 



236 



Television 

Broadcasting Stations 



As of January 1 , 1 94 5 



The term ''television broadcast station" means a station licensed for 
the transmission of transient visual images of moving or fixed objects 
for simultaneous reception and reproduction by the general public. 



Commercial 



Licensee and Location 



Call 
Letters Frequency {kc) 



ESR (Effective 
Signal Radiated) 



Balaban & Katz Corp. 
Chicago, 111 WBKB 



60000-66000 Ch. 2 



550 



Condi. CL. 



Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. 
New York, N. Y WCBW 



60000-66000 Ch. 2 



1000 



Don Lee Broadcasting System 
Hollywood, Calif KTSL 

General Electric Co. 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Transmitter: New Scotland, N. Y. WRGB 



The Journal Co. 
Milwaukee, Wise WMJT 



50000-56000 Ch. 1 



66000-72000 Ch. 3 



66000-72000 Ch. 3 



5600 



3100 



S.A. rebroad- 
cast WNBT 
aural and loca- 
tion announce- 
ments 

(CPonly) 



National Broadcasting Co. 
New York, N. Y WNBT 



50000-56000 Ch. 1 



1800 



Philco Radio & Television Corp. 

Philadelphia, Pa WPTZ 

Transmitter: Springfield 

Twp., Pa. 



Zenith Radio Corp. 
Chicago, 111 



WTZR 



66000-72000 Ch. 3 



50000-56000 Ch. 1 



500 



1270 



(CPonly) 



Pending Applications 



Channel Call Licensee 

MC Letters 



Visual-Aural 
Power (Watts) 



Fresno 


No. 2 
60-66 


Hollywood 


No. 1 
60-66 


Hollywood 


No. 1 
50-56 



CALIFORNIA 

J. E. Rodman 



W6XAO Don Lee Broad- 
casting: System 1000 160 
Don Lee Broad- 
easting" System 1000 160 

237 



Commercial construction permit ap- 
plication. No power specified. 
Licensed experimentally. 



KTSL 



Commercial construction permit. 



Letters 



Visual-Aural 
Power (Watts) 



Remarks 



No. 2 
Los Angeles 60-66 



W6XHH Hughes Produc- 
tions, Division 
of Hughes Tool 
Company 10000 10000 



Experimental construction permit 
expired. Hearing- on application 
for commercial status indefinitely 
continued in accordance with 
FCC policy of Feb. 23, 1943. 



Los Angeles 

Los Angeles No. 8 

Los Angeles No. 3 

66-72 



Los Angeles Times 
Mirror 



MGM-Loew's Pix 
Corp. 



Warner Bros. 
Broadcasting 
Corp. 



Commercial television application. 



Commercial television application. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Los Angeles No. 3 

66-72 



National Broad- 
casting Co. 4000 



Commercial construction permit 
application. 



I.os Angeles No. 4 W6XYZ 

78-84 



Television Pro- 
ductions, Inc. 4000 



Licensed experimentally. Applica- 
tion for conversion to commercial 
status. 



Los Angeles No. 6 KSEE 

96-102 



Earle C. Anthony, 



Commercial construction permit 
application expired. Application 
for reinstatement. 



Los Angeles No. 7 

102-108 



Consolidated 
Broadcasting 
Corp., Ltd. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Los Angeles No. 8 

162-168 



Blue Network 
Co., Inc. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Los Angeles No. 11-12 W6XLA 

(Portable- 204-216 
Mobile) 



Television 
Productions, 
Inc. 



Construction permit for television 
relay pick-up station to be used 
with W6XYZ. 



Los Angeles 318-330 W6XDU 

(Portable- 
Mobile) 



Don Lee Broad- 
casting System 



Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with W6XAO. 



Riverside No. 3 

(T — San Ber- 66-72 
nardiso) 



Broadcasting 
Corp. of 
America 3000 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No Aural power 
specified. 



San Francisco No. 1 
60-66 



Don Lee Broad- 
casting System 



Commercial construction permit 
application. 



San Francisco No. 2 W0XHT 

60-66 



San Francisco No. 6 
96-102 



Hughes Produc- 
tions, Division 
of Hughes Tool 
Co. 



The Associated 
Broadcasters, 
Inc. 



Experimental construction permit 

expired. Hearing on application 

for commercial status indefinitely 

10000 10000 continued according to FCC policy 

of Feb. 23, 1943. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. 



Stockton No. 3 

66-72 



Commercial construction permi 
application. No power specified. 



Denver 



No. 2 
60-66 



COLORADO 



National Broad- 
casting Co. 



4000 2000 



Commercial construction permit 
application. 



Denver 
Denver 



No. 3 
66-72 



KLZ Broadcast- 
ing Co. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Note: The National Broadcasting Co.'s application for a commercial con- 
struction permit has been withdrawn. 

238 



• • • 


PENDING TELEVISION APPLICATIONS 


• • 




Location 


< hannel Call Licensee Visual-Aural 

MC Letters Power (Watts) Bemarki 





CONNECTICUT 



No. 7 
102-108 



Greenfield Hill No. 8 

162-lt 



The Travelers 
Broadcasting 
Service Corp. 

The Connecticut 
Television Co. 



i onstruction pei mil for commerela] 

station. No power specified 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power ^peciJled. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Washington 


No. 1 
50-56 


W3XWT 


Allen B. DuMont 
Laboratories, 
Inc. 4000 


2000 


Washington 


No. 2 
60-66 


WNEW 


National Broad- 
easting Co. 4000 


2000 


Washington 


No. 4 
78-84 




Fhilco Radio & 
Television 




Washington 


No. 4 

78-84 




Corp. 
Bamberger 
Broadcasting 
Service 




Washington 


No. 6 
96-102 




Capitol Broad- 
easting Co. 




Washington 


No. 8 




MGM-Loew's 
Pix Corp. 

FLORIDA 




JacksonviMe 


No. 1 
50-56 




Jacksonville 
Broadcasting 
Corp. 

ILLINOIS 





Chicago 



No. 1 W9XZV Zenith Radio 

50-56 Corp. 1000 1000 



Chicago 


No. 1 
50-56 




National Broad- 
casting Co. 


4000 


2000 


Chicago 


No. 2 
60-66 


WBKB 


Balaban & Katz 
Corp. 


4000 


2000 


Chicago 


No. 2 
60-66 


W9XBK 


Balaban & Katz 
Corp. 


4000 


2000 


Chicago 


No. 4 
78-84 


W9XCB 


Columbia Broad- 
casting System 


1000 


1000 


Chicago 


No. 4 
78-84 




WGN, Inc. 






Chicago 


No. 8 

162-168 




Blue Network 
Co., Inc. 






Chicago 

(Portable- 
Mobile) 


No. 11-1! 

204-216 


I W9XBT 


Balaban & Eatz 
Corp. 


40 


None 


Chicago 

(Portable- 
Mobile) 


384-396 


W9XBB 


Balaban & Katz 
Corp. 


10 


None 


Chicago 


HX4-3»fl 


WHXPR 


Balaban & Katz 
Corp. 


10 


None 


Chicago 


No. 7 




Johnson Kennedy 
Radio Corp. 






Chicago 






Zenith Radio 
Corp 







Bxper ni.ii construction permit 

expired Applications for rein- 
state ni and conversion to 

commercial --trim-. 

Commerci il constru lion p e r m i t 
reinstatemi al applicat ion, 

Commercial construction p e r in i t 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial television application. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Licensed experimentally. Commer- 
cial construction permit expired, 
call letters WTZR. Application 
for reinstatement seeking indefi- 
nte exptension of commencement 
and completion dates. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. 



Licensed commercially. 



Licensed experimentally. 

Experimental construction permit 
expired. Application for reinstate- 
ment and conversion to commer- 
cial status. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with WBKB and 
WflXBK. 

Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with WBKB and 
W9XKB. 

Licensed. Research and develop- 
ment only. 
Commercial television application. 

Application for construction permit 
for experimental tele station. 



239 



West Lafayette 
Fort Wayne 

Tort Wayne 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



Channel 
(m.c.) 


Call 

Letters 


Visual-Aural 
Licensee Power (watts) 






INDIANA 


No. 3 
66-72 


W9XG 


Purdue Univer- 
sity 750 750 


No. 3 

66-72 




Farnsworth Tele- 
cision & Radio 
Corp. 

Farnsworth Televi- 
sion & Radio Corp. 


No. 2 
60-66 




P. R. Mallory & 
Co.. Inc. 


No. 2 




WFBM, Inc. 



Experimental construction permit. 
Research and development only. 



Experimental construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Application for construction permit 
for experimental tele station. 

Experimental construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Note: Application received by FCC from Indianapolis Broadcasting-, Inc., 
Licensee of WIRE, Indianapolis, for commercial television station. 



Capitol Broadcast- 
ing- Corp. 



Commercial television application. 



IOWA 



Iowa City 


No. 1 
50-56 


W9XUI 


State University 
of Iowa 


Iowa City 


No. 12 
210-216 


W9XUI 


State University 
of Iowa 



100 None 



100 None 



Licensed experimentally. 

and development only. 
Licensed experimentally. 

and development only. 



LOUISIANA 



New Orleans 



New Orleans 



Loyola University, New Orleans, La., 
No. 6, 96-102 Megacycles. 



las now been assigned to Channel 



No. 1 
50-56 



Maison Blanche 
Co. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



MARYLAND 



Baltimore 


No. 4 
78-84 


The Tower 
Realty Co. 


Baltimore 


No. 6 
96-102 


Jos. M. Zamoiski 
Company 


Baltimore 


No. 6 
86-102 


Hearst Radio, 
Inc. 


Baltimore 


No. 17-18 . . 
282-294 


Hearst Radio, 
Inc. 


Baltimore 




Maryland Broad- 
casting Co. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Construction permit application for 
experimental relay station. No 
power specified. 

Commercial television application. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston 

Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 



No. 5 
84-90 



No. 2 
60-66 



No. 2 
60-66 



No. 4 
78-84 



No. 1 
50-56 



Westing-house 
Radio Stations, 
Inc. 

E. Anthony & 
Sons, Inc. 

The Yankee 
Network, Inc. 

Allen B. Du Mont 
Labs., Inc. 

General Televi- 
sion Corp. 



Raytheon Co. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Construction permit application for 
experimental station. No power 
specified. 

Construction permit application. 



240 



PENDING TELEVISION APPLICATIONS 



. ;, ■-..... i 

(m.C.) 



Cull 
elH-rs 



\ Isual-Aural 
Power (watts) 



MICHIGAN 



Detroit 


No. 1 
60-66 


The Jam Handy 
Organization, 
Inc. 


Detroit 


No. 2 

00-66 


International 
Detrola Co. 


Detroit 
Detroit 


No. 2 
60-66 

No. 4 
78-84 


King Trendle 
Broadcasting 
Corp. 

United Detroit 
Theatres Corp. 


Detroit 


No. 6 
96-102 


WJR, The Good- 
will Station 


Detroit 




Detroit Evening 

News 



Ci nercia] construction p ■• r m i t 

application. No power specified 

r m i t 

application. No power -i 
Commercial construction p e rmil 
application, No power speclfii d 

onetructlon v •■ rmil 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction p e rmil 
application. No power <-!• 

Commercial television application. 



Minneapolis 



No. 4 

78-84 



MINNESOTA 



Industrial Tool 
& Die Works, 
Inc. 



Experimental construction 
application. 



MISSOURI 



St. 


Louis 


No. 1 
50-66 


St. 


Louis 


No. 1 
50-56 


St. 


Louis 


No. 4 

78-84 



The Pulitzer 
Publishing Co 

Globe-Democrat 
Publishing Co. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. 



NEBRASKA 



No. 1 
50-56 



Radio Station 
WOW, Inc. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Camden 


No. 5 
84-90 


Ex-W3XEP Radio Corp. of 
America 


Camden 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 

Newark 


321-327 

No. 5 
84-90 


Ex-W3XAD Radio Corp. of 
America 

Bremer Broad- 
casting Corp. 


Passaic 


No. 4 

78-84 


W2XVT 


Alle B. DuMont 
Labortories, 
Inc. 



NEW JERSEY 

30000 30000 



Experimental license reinstatement 
application. Research and devel- 
opment only. 

Experimental license reinstatement 
application. Research and devel- 
opment only. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Licensed experimentally. Research 
and development only. 



NEW MEXICO 



Albuquerque 



Albuquerque 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 

Albuquerque 



No. 1 
50-56 



No. 17-18 
282-294 



Albuquerque 

Broadcasting 

Co. 
Albuquerque 

Broadcasting 

Co. 



Experimental construction permit 
application. No aural power 
specified. 

Construction permit application for 
television relay pick-up Btation. 



Note: Albuquerque Broadcasting Co. application for construction permit 
amended to read "Commercial station" instead of "Experimental station ." 

241 



Channel 
(m.c.) 



Call 
Letters 



Visual-Aural 
Power (watts) 



Buffalo 
Jamaica 



No. 1 
50-56 
No. 3 
66-73 

No. 1 
50-56 



NEW YORK 

WEBR, Inc. 

Jamaica Radio & 
Television Co. 250 

National Broad- 
casting- Co. 5000 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Experimental construction permit 
application. No aural power 
specified. 

Licensed commercially. 



New York 
New York 

New York 
New York 



New York 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 



New York 

New York 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 
New York 

New York 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 
New York 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 
New York 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 

New York 



No. 4 

78-84 



No. 4 

78-84 



No. 6 
96-102 



WCEW 
W2XWV 



No. 8 W2XMT 

162-168 



No. 8 W2XBT 

162-168 



No. 9 
180-186 

No. 11 
204-210 
No. 11-12 . . 
204-216 

No. 15 

258-264 

No. 15-16 WIOXKT 

258-270 

No. 17-18 W2XBU 
282-294 

346-358 W2XCB 



Columbia Broad- 
casting System 

Allen B. DuMont 
Laboratories 
Inc. 

MGM-Loew's 
Pix Corp. 

Allen B. DuMont 
Laboratories, 
Inc. 

Bamberger 
Broadcasting 
Service 



Metropolitan 
Television, 
Inc. 1000 500 



4000 1000 



National Broad- 
casting Co. 

Philco Radio & 

Television 
Corp. 

News Syndicate, 

Tnc. 
Philco Radio & 

Television 

Corp. 
Blue Network 

Co., Inc. 
Allen B. DuMont 

Laboratories, 

Inc. 
National Broad- 
casting- Co. 

Columbia Broad- 
casting System 



Licensed commercially with tempo- 
rary facilities. 
Licensed commercially. 

Commercial television application. 

Application for conversion of W2- 
XWV to commercial status. 

Experimental construction permit 
expired. Application for rein- 
statement and conversion to 
commercial status. 

Construction permit on experimental 
basis expired June 30, 1944. 
Application for conversion to 
commercial status. 

Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with WNBT. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Construction permit application for 
television relay pick-up station 
to be used with WPTZ and W3XE. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with W2XWV. 

Licensed. Television relay pick-up 
station used with WNBT. 



Construction permit for television 
None relay pick-up station to be used 

with WCBW. 



Note: Jamaica Radio Television Co., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. (formerly Radio 
& Television Co.). Construction permit for Experimental Television sta- 
tion to be operated on Channel No. 3 AMENDED to request Channel No. 
13 (230000-236000 kilocycles, 100 watts (400 watts peak) for visual 
and 100 watts for aural, and change in name. 

The Du Mont Television Station at 515 Madison Ave., N. Y. C, has now 
been granted a Commercial License. Call letters for Commercial station 
are WABD. License for experimental transmitter W2XWV is being 
retained to continue experimental work. 



Columbia Broad- 
casting- System 



Rochester 


No. 1 
50-56 




Stromberg-- 
Carlson Co. 


Schenectady 
(T — New 
Scotland) 


No. 3 
66-72 


WRGB 


General Elec- 
tric Co. 


Schenectady 
(Portable- 
Mobile) 


No. 8 
162-168 


W2XGE 


General Elec- 
tric Co. 



10000 3000 



Construction permit application for 
experimental station to be op- 
erated on 401000 to 417000 
kilo. No power and no channel 
specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Licensed commercially. 



Licensed. Studio to transmitter link 
station used with WRGB. 



242 



• • • 


PENDING TELEVISION APPLICATIONS 


• • 


Location 


Channel (all Licensee Visual-Aural 
(m.c.) Letters (Power (watts) Bemarka 





Schenectady No. 8 W2X1 

(Portable- 102-168 
Mobile) 
White Plains No. 13 
230-236 



General Elec- 
tric Co. 



Westchester 
Broadcasting 
Co. 



Licensed. Television relaj picli up 
station used with WRGB 



mimercial i onstruction p e r mi t 
application No powi r ipi ■ Ifli d 



OHIO 



Cincinnati 


No. 1 


W8XCT 


Crosley Corp. 


iooo iooo 




50-56 








Cleveland 


No. 1 




National Broad- 






50-56 




casting: Co. 


4000 2000 


Cleveland 


No. 2 
60-66 




United Broad- 
casting- Co. 




Cleveland 


No. 3 
60-72 




The WGAR Broad 
casting: Co. 




Columbus 


Note: 


Application 


received by FCC from Central Oh 




for 


commercial 


television station. 




Cincinnati 


No. 7 




Cinicinnati Broad- 
casting: Co. 





Experimental construction p< rmil 
i spired \i>ni 28, 1844. Applica- 
tion for extension o) • ompletion 

Commi rcial construction i> <■ r m i t 
applii .it 

> ommercial construction p e r va i I 
application. No power specified 

' ommi rcial construction p e r m i I 
applical ion, No powi r sp< cifled 

Broadcasting Co. 



I mm 



television :■ i > i > 1 1 • . ■ 1 1 on 



OKLAHOMA 



Oklahoma City No. 1 
•50-56 



WKY Radio- 
phone Co. 



Commercial consl ruct ion permit 
application. No power specified 



OREGON 



Radio Sales Corp. 



Commercial television application. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Philadelphia 
(T-Wynd- 

raoof) 


No. 3 
66-72 


WPTZ 


Philco Radio & 
Television 
Corp. 10000 10000 


Philadelphia 
(T-Wynd- 
moer) 


No. 3 
66-72 




Philco Radio & 
Television 
Corp. 10000 10000 


Philadelphia 


No. 5 
84-P0 


W3XAU 


WCAU Broadcast- 
ing Co. 4000 2000 


Philadelphia 


No. 4 




Gimbel Bros. 


Philadelphia 


No. 6 

96-102 




The Philadelphia 
Inquirer, Div. of 
Triangle Publi- 
cations, Inc. 


Philadelphia 


No. 7 
102-108 




WFIL Broadcast- 
ing- Co. 


Philadelphia 


No. 7 
102-108 




Westing-house 
Radio Stations, 
Inc. 4000 2000 


Philadelphia 


No. 7 
102-108 




Bamberger 
Broadcasting 
Service 


Philadelphia 


No. 9 

180-186 




WDAS Broadcast- 
ins: Station, Inc. 


Philadelphia 


No. 18 
288-294 




Seaboard Radio 
Broadcasting 
Corp. 


Philadelphia 


Note: The Philadelphia Inquirer (Div. of Triangle 
application for commercial construction permit ha 
request Channel No. 4, 78000-S4000 kilocycles. 
No. 6. 



Licensed commercially. 



Licensed experiment a 1 1.\ 



Experimental construction permit 

expired. 
Application for reinstatement and 

conversion to commercial status. 
Commercial television application. 
Commercial construction permit 

application. No power specified. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial construction permit 
applications. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power -pecified. 

Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Publications, Inc.) 
s been amended to 
instead of Channel 



243 



PENDING TELEVISION APPLICATIONS 



Channel Call 

(m.c.) Letters 



Visual-Aural 
(Power (watts) 



Philadelphia 
(Portable) 

Philadelphia 

(Portable 

Mobile) 
Philadelphia 

(Portable 

Mobile) 
Philadelphia 

(Portable 

Mobile) 
Pittsburgh 



No. 13-14 W3XP 
230-242 



No. 13-14 W3XPA 
230-242 



No. 13-14 W3XPC 

230-242 



No. 13-14 W3XPR 
230-242 



No. 1 
50-56 



Phileo Radio & 

Television 

Corp. 
Phileo Radio & 

Television 

Corp. 
Phileo Radio & 

Television 

Corp. 
Phileo Radio & 

Television 

Corp. 
Westing-house 

Radio Stations 

Inc. 



Television relay pick-up 
used with WPTZ and 



Television relay piek-up 
used with WPTZ and 



Television relay pick-up 
used with WPTZ and 



Television relay pick-up 
used with WPTZ and 



Licensed. 

station 

W3XE. 
Licensed. 

station 

W3XE. 
Licensed. 

station 

W3XE. 
Licensed. 

station 

W3XE. 
Commercial construction permit 

application. No power specified. 



RHODE ISLAND 



Providence No. 10 

186-192 



E. Anthony & 

Sons, Inc. 
The Yankee 

Network 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 

Commercial television application. 



No. 1 
50-56 



TENNESSEE 

J. W. Bird well 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



TEXAS 



Bob O'Donnell's In- 
terstate Circuit 



Commercial television application. 



UTAH 



Salt Lake City No. 1 
50-56 



Salt Lake City No. 2 
60-66 



Intermountain 

Broadcasting 

Corp. 100 200 

Utah 

Broadcasting 

Company 



Experimental construction permit 
application. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No power specified. 



Richmond No. 3 

66-72 



Havens & 
Martin, Inc 



VIRGINIA 

4000 3000 



Commercial construction permit 
application. 



South No. 1 

Charleston 50-66 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Gus Zaharis 200 110 



Experimental construction permit 
application. 



WASHINGTON 



Spokane No. 1 

50-56 



Louis Wasmer, 
Inc. 



Commercial construction permit 
application. No .power specified. 



WISCONSIN 



Milwaukee No. 3 WMJT 

66-72 



Milwaukee 300-312 W9XCV 

(Portable 
Mobile) 



Co. 4000 2000 



The Journal Co. 15 None 



Commercial construction permit 
expired Oct. 27,. 1942. Applica- 
tion for reinstatement seeking 
indefinite extension of conpletion 
date. 

Television relay pick-up station 
construction permit expired. Ap- 
plication for reinstatement. 



244 



PERSONNEL 



FACILITIES 



ACTIVITIES 



WBKB 



CHICAGO 

CHANNEL 2 

Frequency 60000-66000 Kc. 

Power 4 Kw.; 2 Kw. 

Effective Signal Radiated 796 

Owned-Operated By Balabcm & Katz Corp. 

Business Address 190 N. State St. 

Phone Number Franklin 5025 

Transmitter & Antenna Location. 190 N. State St. 
Time on the Air .... Monday and Wednesday, 

3 to 4 p.m.; Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 

7:15 to 9 p.m. 

Personnel 

Chief Engineer A. H. Brolly 

Four Technicians 

Program Director Helen Carson 

Ten Girls in the Program Department Who 
Operate Cameras and All Equipment. 

FACILITIES 

One studio, three camera chains (two for live 
talent and one for film), one mobile unit for out- 
door pickups (not being used for the duration). 

ACTIVITIES 

News, fashion shows, sports (indoor) such as 
judo, fencing, boxing; dramatic shows; musical 
comedies; operettas; music and variety acts 
such as ventriloquists, puppets, marionettes, 
magicians, etc.; quiz shows; educational; les- 
sons in dancing, Spanish, exercises for health 
and beauty. 



W9XZV 
W9XCV 



CHICAGO 

CHANNEL 1 

(Experimental) 

Frequency: 50000-56000 Kc; Power: Sight and 

Sound, 4500 Watts 

Effective Radiated Signal 1270 

Owned-Operated By Zenith Radio Corp. 

Business-Studio Address 6001 Dickens Ave. 

Phone Number Berkshire 7500 

Transmitter & Antenna Location 135 S. 

LaSalle St. 
Time on the Air Unlimited license 



Personnel 

President E. F. McDonald, Jr. 

Asst. Vice-President J. E. Brown 



W6XYZ 

HOLLYWOOD 

(Paramount Studio Lot) 

CHANNEL 4 

Frequency: 78.000-84,000 Kc; Power: Visual. 

1,000 W; Oral, 1.000 W. 
Owned-Operated By. . . Television Productions. 
Inc.. 

Business Address 5451 Marathon St., 

Hollywood 38 

Phone Number Hollywood 2411 

Transmitter and Antenna Location, 

5451 Marathon St., Hollywood 38 
Time on the Air Six Hours Per Week 

Person lie! 

President Paul Raibourn 

Vice-President Bernard Goodwin 

Vice-President Y. Frank Freeman 

Station Director Klaus Landsberg 

FACILITIES 

Equipment includes complete apparatus for 
studio as well as field operation. Cameras and 
transmitters were built by Allen B. DuMont 
Laboratories, Inc. and many additional units, 
including electronic special-effect equipment, 
were designed and built by Television Produc- 
tions, Inc. A relay transmitter, W6XLA, to 
operate in conjunction with W6XYZ, was also 
developed and constructed by the company. 
A special antenna system combining a double- 
cone type of antenna for video and a special 
four di-pole antenna for audio of its own design 
and construction are used. Studio facilities also 
include a flexible lighting arrangement, slide 
and background projection apparatus and 
screens. 

ACTIVITIES 

W6XYZ has operated regularly since Feb- 
ruary 1, 1943, each Wednesday and Friday 
night and has been producing a weekly total 
of four to six hours of live-talent programs. 
These programs were entirely dedicated to the 
training of Civilian Defense volunteers until the 
summer of 1943, since which time entertainment 
as well as educational programs have been 



245 



• • • 



COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STATIONS 



aired. These programs Include gymnastic 
courses, museum visits, variety shows, dramatic 
skits and one-act plays. Technical development 
has been directed toward improvement and 
simplification in the operation of present equip- 
ment as well as to the design and construction 
of special effects and relay equipment. 



KTSL 

LOS ANGELES (HOLLYWOOD)— 
EST. 1931 

CHANNEL 1 

Frequency 50000-56000 Kc. 

Power: Sight, 4000 Watts; Sound, 2000 Watts 

Effective Signal Radiated ". 5600 

Owned-Operated By Don Lee Broadcasting 

System 
Business Address 5515 Melrose Ave., 

Hollywood 38 

Phone Number Hollywood 8255 

Transmitter & Antenna Location .... 3800 Mount 

Lee Drive 
Tims on the Air Alternate Mondays, 7 to 

10 p.m. 

Personnel 

President Thomas S. Lee 

Vice-President and General 

Manager Lewis Allen Weiss 

Technical Director of 

Television Harry R. Lubcke 

Assistant Technical Director 

of Television Harry W. Jury 

Television Engineer William S. Klein 

Television Engineer Gilbert P. Wyland 

Television Engineer Joseph N. Dean 

Television Engineer Fred W. Mueller 

Television Producer Jack Stewart 

Film Director Marjorie Campbell 

FACILITIES 

SYSTEM IN USE: 525 line 30-60 frame F.C.C.. 
Standard, all electronic cathode-ray. Horizontal 
Polarization. Three Studio Cameras and film 
equipment. Two cameras of Orthicon type. 
Complete 100 ft. square two story television 
building housing one 100 ft. x 60 ft. x 30 ft. 
television stage, one 46 ft. x 26 ft. x 16 ft., 
stage, monitor, film, transmitter, makeup, and 
lounge rooms, offices, shop, transformer vaults, 
etc. Three hundred foot tower, antenna eleva- 
tion 2000 ft. 

K6XDU (experimental television relay station 
operating with KTSL) operates on 324 mega- 
cycles and is a beam relay type television 
transmitter used for outside pickups. 

An uninterrupted schedule of television pro- 
grams has been maintained since 1943, 
largely directed to bolster public morale in the 
War Effort. Specially written and produced 



dramas have been televised with living actors 
in the interests of the Red Cross Blood Donot 
appeals. War Bonds, USO entertainment and 
many others. Vaudeville shows have also been 
televised in which well-known Hollywood talent 
has appeared. 

The Pasadena Community Playhouse and 
other organizations have presented plays such 
as Ibsen's "Master Builder," "Alice in Wonder- 
land" and others. 

Film subjects have included cartoons from 
Walt Disney and others. OWI war films, shorts, 
musicals, and occasionally a feature. 

RECEIVERS: There are some 400 television 
receivers in the service area of W6XAO, some 
as far as Pomona at 35 miles away, a number 
in Long Beach at 25 miles away and many in 
cities at lesser distance. The predominant com- 
mercially manufactured television receiver is 
the TRK12 or 120 of RCA. There are some RCA 
TRK9, and approximately 50 TT5 RCA televi- 
sion receivers. A number of the latter are oper- 
ating satisfactorily in Long Beach at 25 miles 
from W6XAO. Other commercially manufac- 
tured television receivers are the local Gilfillan 
G12 which is an equivalent to the RCA TRK12 
and utilizes a 12-inch cathode ray tube, some 
Dumont 12 and 20-inch tube television receiv- 
ers, the General Electric 12's and 9-inch re- 
ceivers, and the Stromberg-Carlson and Stewart- 
Warner 12 and 9-inch receivers. 

• 

WMJT 

MILWAUKEE 

CHANNEL 3 

(C. P. Only) 

Frequency: 66000-72000 Kc; Power: Sight, 4180 

Watts; Sound, 3350 Watts 

Effective Radiated Signal 1200 

Owned-Operated By The Journal Co. 

Business-Studio Address 720 East Capitol 

Drive 

Phone Number Marquette 6000 

Transmitter & Antenna Location 720 East 

Capitol Drive 

WABD 

NEW YORK CITY 

CHANNEL 4 

Frequency 78000-84000 Kc. 

Power. . .Sight, 4000 Watts; Sound. 1000 Watts 
Owned-Operated By Allen B. Du Mont 

Laboratories, Inc. 
Business-Studio Address. . . .515 Madison Ave., 

New York City 

Phone Number PLaza 3-9800 

Transmitter and Antenna Location Same 

Time on the Air 7V2 Hours Weekly, 

Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday evenings 



246 



COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STATIONS 



Personnel 

President Allen B. Du Mont 

General Manager Samuel H. Cuff 

Asst. Gen. Mgr Robert F. Jamieson 

Chief Engineer Sal Patreimo 

Chief Operating Engineer Morris Barton 

FACILITIES 

The 160-foot tower of WABD atop a 42-story 
building raises the antenna to 650 feet above 
sea level. Covering a service range of 35 to 50 
miles, the station has regular viewers as 
distant as 100 miles. It is completely equipped 
by Du Mont Laboratories. WABD has two 
studios for live talent shows as well as film- 
projection facilities. It operates on a commer- 
cial license. 

ACTIVITIES 

This outlet serves not only as a commercial 
telecast service but also as a laboratory for 
p.-actical experience. Engineering, programming 
and advertising sponsorship aspects of televi- 
sion broadcasting are being worked out in 
actual practice. Broadcasters, engineers, pro- 
ducers, performers, advertisers, advertising 
men and others interested in television have 
been granted use of station facilities. 



WCBW 



NEW YORK CITY 

CHANNEL 2 
Frequency: 60000-66000 Kc; Sight, 61250; 

Sound, 65700 
Owned-Operated By . . . Columbia Broadcasting 

System 

Business Address 485 Madison Ave. 

Phone Number WIckersham 2-2000 

Studio Address 15 Vanderbilt Ave. 

Transmitter & Antenna Location Chrysler 

Building 
Time on the Air Thurs. & Fri., 8-10 p.m. 

Personnel 

Manager Worthington Miner 

Program Director Gilbert Seldes 

Chief Engineer Dr. Peter C. Goldmark 

Production Manager B. F. Feiner, Jr. 

Publicity Director James Kane 

ACTIVITIES— 1944 

On May 5, 1944, CBS Television returned to 
a schedule of two hours a week of live televi- 
sion operations. Three weeks later it expanded 
its schedule to four hours a week. 

This schedule, with an emphasis upon the 
development of new program patterns, is being 
maintained through the year 1945. 



WNBT 

NEW YORK CITY 

CHANNEL 1 



Frequency: 50000 56000 Kc. (Sight, 51250; 

Sound. 55750); Power: Sigh!. 5000 Watts; 

Sound. 3250 Walts 

Effective Signal Radiated 1800 

Owned-Operated By National Broadcast 

ing Co. 

Business Address 30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Phone Number Circle 7-8300 

Studio Address 30 Rockefeller Plaza 

Transmitter <S Antenna Location Empire 

State Bldg. Tower 
Time on the Air. . .Full time commercial license 

Personnel 

NBC Vice-President, in 

Charge of Television John F. Royal 

NBC Vice-President & 

Chief Engineer O. B. Hanson 

Eastern Sales Manager Reynold R. Kraft 

Business Manager John T. Wi'liams 

ACTIVITIES 

Still limited by the shortage of engineering 
talent and the necessity to conserve existing 
equipment, NBC, nevertheless, considerably in- 
creased its program service during 1944. In 
October, the Network's television station added 
to its regular schedule boxing bouts from Madi 
son Square Garden on Friday night. During 
that same month, WNBT also started picking 
up as a regular Tuesday night feature the 
wrestling matches from St. Nicholas Arena. In 
the latter part of the year, NBC broadcast 
many live talent programs from its newly 
opened television studio 3-H in Radio City. 

Planned operations for the early part of 1945 
include live talent telecasts as a regular Sun- 
day night feature. It is expected that WNBT 
will be on the air five days a week, broad- 
casting about 10 hours per week. 



WPTZ 

PHILADELPHIA 

CHANNEL 3 

Frequency: 66,000-72,000 Kc; Sight, Approxi- 
mately 2'2 Kw.; Sound, Approximately 3 Kw. 

Effective Signal Radiated. . Approximately 335 

Owned-Operated By Philco Radio & 

Television Corp. 

Business Address Tioga and C Sts. 

Phone Number Nebraska 5100 

Transmitter & Antenna Location. . .Wyndmoor, 
Pa. 

Time on the Air: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 
evenings, 7:45-9:45; Experimental W3XE, 
Monday through Friday afternoons, 1:30-2:30. 

Personnel 

Chief Television Engineer F. J. Bingley 

Station Manager Walter Merkle 

Program Director Paul Knight 



247 



COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STATIONS 



WRGB 

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. 

CHANNEL 3 
Frequency: 66000-72000 Kc; Power: Visual. 
40,000 Watts, Oral, 20,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . . General Electric Co. 

Effective Signal Radiated 3100 

Business Address L River Road 

Phone Number 4-2211 

Transmitter & Antenna Location New Scot- 
land, N. Y. 
Time on the Air Nine Hours Weekly 

Personnel 

Vice-President and Manager of 

Broadcasting Robert S. Peare 

Assistant Manager B. J. Rowan 

Manager G. E. Markham 

Program Manager Hoyland Bettinger 

Chief Engineer W. J. Purcell 

FACILITIES 

Technical facilities of Station WRGB include 
a direct pickup studio for live talent produc- 
tions, located at 60 Washington Ave., Schenec- 
tady. It is fitted with five camera channels. A 



film scanning room has two cameras and three 
motion picture projectors — two for 35 mm. and 
one for 16 mm. films. Film slide, lantern slide 
and projectors of small opaque pictures and 
objects are also available. 

Signals from the WRGB transmitter, located 
in the Helderberg mountains. New Scotland, 
N. Y., near Schenectady, are received over a 
service area with a radius of approximately 
50 miles, which includes the Troy-Albany- 
Schenectady area. 

WRGB claims the first television relay sta- 
tion, picking up programs from NBC in New 
York City, 129 miles away, and relaying them 
to the Capitol district area. A minimum weekly 
program service of nine hours is offered view- 
ers in the area. 

ACTIVITIES 

During 1944 WRGB's program activities have 
been varied. Among the programs various 
types have been tried, including a bridge game 
by champions, dog shows, boxing and wres- 
ting matches, barn dances, Shakespearean 
plays, Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, modern 
comedies, news reporters and analysts. Several 
commercials have also been presented by the 
station during the past year. 



FOR QUALITY 

AP . 



/ 



248 



Television Allocation s 



JJASED on hearings held before the FCC from late last summer to the 
■D year end, the Commission proposed that television and FM channels 
be reshuffled. Whether television should stay "doivnstairs" or go "upstairs" 
was one of the most controversial questions discussed at the allocation 
hearings. 

In order to permit the development of a system for color pictures and 
higher definition monochrome pictures through the use of wider channels, 
the Commission proposes space for experimental television between the 480 
and 920 mc in the ultra high frequency portion of th& spectrum. 

Commercial television is permitted to remain roughly where it is in the 
lower part of the spectrum. Specifically, it now has 18 channels six mc 
wide at intervals from 50 to 294 mc. The neio allocation gives it six channels, 
also six mc wide, from 44 to 84 mc and six from 180 to* 216 mc. This gives 
television the same number of channels — 12 — below 225 mc as heretofore. 
No additional frequencies can be assigned to television between 225 and 300 
mc because all these frequencies are required for Government services. 

Interests representing FM decried the Commission's proposals and 
additional hearings were scheduled for Feb. 28, 1945, wherein the FCC 
would be open to argument on its proposals made earlier. Decision resulting 
from this hearing tvas expected to be made known possibly by spring. 

The proposals made by the FCC regarding television and made public 
Jan. 15, 1945, follow : 



Commission's Proposals 



The Commission is fully convinced that 
by virtue of the recent developments in 
the electronic art, a wide channel televi- 
sion broadcasting system, utilizing fre- 
quencies above 400 mc, can be developed, 
and the transmission of higher definition 
monochrome pictures and high definition 
color pictures achieved. 

The Commission is also convinced that 
all of the improvements that have been 
made possible in the transmission and 
reception of monochrome pictures by re- 
cent developments in the electronic art 
cannot be utilized in the 6-mc television 
channel. However, the Commission does 
not believe that broadcast service to the 
public through the use of a 6-mc channel, 
with the improvements presently avail- 
able over pre-war developments, should 
be abandoned and commercial television 
held in abeyance until a wide channel sys- 



tem in the ultra-high frequencies can be 
developed and proven. Therefore, we 
have endeavored to assign to television 
broadcast as many 6-mc channels below 
300 mc as possible in the light of the 
needs of other services for frequency 
space in the same part of the spectrum. 

Six Channels 

We find that there can be made avail- 
able to television broadcasting, six chan- 
nels between 44 and 84 mc and six chan- 
nels between 180 and 216 mc. It will be 
noted that the frequencies between 225 
and 300 mc could not be considered for 
television broadcasting because all these 
frequencies are required for government 
services, and hence the six channels for- 
merly assigned to television in this por- 
tion of the spectrum must necessarily be 
deleted. It will be further noted that 



249 



television has been allocated the same 
number of channels — 12 channels — below 
225 mc as previously were allocated to 
that service, but that due to the demands 
of other services, it was not possible to 
provide any additional channels for tele- 
vision below 225 mc. It should also be 
noted that old television channel Number 
7 (102-108 mc) is left unassigned at this 
time and that before making an assign- 
ment the Commission will give due con- 
sideration to the requirements of tele- 
vision. It is urged that manufacturers 
of television receiving sets include this 
band. 

The table below shows the 12, 6-mc 
channels that have been assigned to tele- 
vision broadcasting: 

Channel No Megacycles 

1 44 to 50 

2 54 to 60 

3 60 to 66 

4 66 to 72 

5 72 to 78* 

6 78 to 84 

7 180 to 186 

8 186 to 192 

9 192 to 198 

10 198 to 204 

11 204 to 210 

12 210 to 216 

Television channels 7 through 12 (180- 
216 megacycles) will be available tempo- 
rarily for television relay purposes until 
such time as these facilities are required 
for television broadcasting. 

On the basis of the foregoing alloca- 
tions, it will be possible to authorize 
seven television stations in one city if the 
need therefore is shown. Four of these 
stations can be assigned in the six chan- 
nels below 100 megacycles and the other 
three in the six channels available be- 
tween 180 and 216 megacycles. 

The portion of the spectrum between 
480 and 920 mc (less 508-524 mc tempo- 
rarily) has been made available for ex- 
perimental television. The space be- 
tween 1225 and 1325 mc has been assigned 
for television relay stations to be used 
by "pick-up" stations for relaying pro- 
gram material to the main television 
station for broadcasting. In addition, 
frequencies between 480 and 920 mc will 
be available for this type of service until 
they are needed for television broadcast- 
ing. The determination of the channel 
width to be used must wait until the 
channel requirements of the equipment 
developed are known. 

The testimony indicates that sky-wave 
interference may be a problem with tele- 
vision broadcasting on the lower fre- 



quency channels assigned to this service. 
It was impossible because of the demands 
of other services, to find 12 television 
channels between the part of the spec- 
trum which is believed free of sky-wave 
interference and 225 mc. Therefore the 
use of the lower frequency channels ap- 
peared to be the only solution. However, 
should this skywave interference develop, 
the six channels above 180 mc offer a pos- 
sible means for alleviating this interfer- 
ence, in that these channels, in time, can 
be employed for the higher-powered sta- 
tions, and the low frequency channels 
reserved for stations that can utilize a 
limited power for vendering a satisfactory 
service. 

Color Provisions 

In order that a television broadcast 
system may be developed for the transmis- 
sion of color pictures and superior mono- 
chrome pictures through the use of wider 
channels, the space between 480 and 920 
mc (less 508-524 mc temporarily), has 
been made available for experimental 
television. The time which may elapse 
before a system can be developed to op- 
erate on wider channels in these ultra- 
high frequencies is indefinite and pri- 
marily dependent upon the resourceful- 
ness of the industry in solving the tech- 
nical problems that will be encountered. 
In this portion of the spectrum it is con- 
templated that the Commission will li- 
cense the entire band between 480 and 
920 megacycles for experimental televi- 
sion and will not designate any particu- 
lar channels. Applicants desiring to op- 
erate in this portion of the spectrum 
should consult with the Chief Engineer 
as to the exact frequency band they 
should utilize. 

It is the hope of the Commission that 
all persons interested in the future of 
television will undertake comprehensive 
and adequate experimentation in the 
upper portion of the spectrum. The im- 
portance of an adequate program of ex- 
perimentation in this portion of the 
spectrum cannot be over-emphasized, for 
it is obvious from the allocations which 
the Commission is making for television 
below 300 megacycles that in the present 
state of the art the development of the 
upper portion of the spectrum is neces- 
sary for the establishment of a truly 
nation-wide and competitive television 
system. 

Space Demand Great 

As has been stated in other portions 
of this report the demand for space in 
the spectrum is so great that each sta- 



250 



TELEVISION ALLOCATIONS 



tion and service is expected to make the 
best usage of its facilities and one of 
the underlying principles is that where 
within a reasonable time a particular 
station or service has not made full 
usage of its assigned or allocated facili- 
ties consideration would be given to the 
needs of others. Cognizance is taken of 
the fact that even a single television 
channel requires more spectrum space 
than is assigned to all the stations of 
some othe;' services. Therefore, while 
television stations will be licensed as at 
present on an unlimited time basis, if 
after a reasonable period licensees are 
not using the facilities sufficient to war- 
rant an unlimited assignment, considera- 
tion will be given to applicants for all or 
part of the time. 



In order further to Conserve facilities, 
the Commission, in the cast- of Television 
Channels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, and 12, 
proposes that provisions may be made 
for the operation of non-governmental 
fixed or mobile services on these channels 
upon a proper showing of need and that 
these channels may be shared on a non- 
interfering basis. Similar provision IS 
being made for the sharing of Television 
Channels 7 and X with governmental 
fixed and mobile services. 

* Arrangements must be made for the 
removal of the aviation markers centering 
on 75 mc. before this band will be avail- 
able for television. 



* * * Theater Television * * * 



'"THE proposed use of radio for theater 
television is intended to provide facili- 
ties whereby news, sporting events, op- 
eras, and other events can be televised 
and shown to the general public on large- 
size screens such as are normally used in 
motion picture theaters. It was claimed 
at the hearing that the motion picture 
industry has a definite and legitimate 
interest in television, since the industry 
is in the business of producing popular 
entertainment and presenting news 
through visual and aural means. It 
was estimated that over 85 million per- 
sons attended motion picture theaters 
weekly, and that the industry has a gross 
annual income of approximately $1,600,- 
000,000 (Tr. 3713-3716). 

It was stated that the major companies 
in the motion picture industry have indi- 
cated that, at the end of the war, or as 
soon as wartime requirements permit, 
they will begin experimentation with the 
production and exhibition of theater tele- 
vision programs in specific local theaters, 
and with the transmission of such pro- 
gi*ams, to theaters in distant cities. Cer- 
tain experiments were conducted prior to 
the war which indicated that theater tele- 
vision might be feasible. Large screen 
theater television on 15 x 18 ft. screens 
were shown in London during the year 
1939, and were subsequently demonstrated 
experimentally in two theaters in New 
York City in 1941 on screens 15 x 20 ft. 
Further experimentation with theater 
television was discontinued after the 



entry of the United States into the war 
(Tr. 3715). 

The witness for theater television was 
Mr. Paul J. Larsen (Tr. 3711-3755), who 
appeared on behalf of the Society of Mo- 
tion Picture Engineers. 

The number of channels requested was 
predicated on the possible demand for 
service in New York City. It was claimed 
that there were 42 competitive theatrical 
agencies in operation; however, it was 
believed that because of economic factors, 
only 25 of the 42 agencies could afford to 
enter the theater television field. For the 
initial postwar peri 3d experiments in the- 
ater television, it was recommended that 
frequency allocation be made for 15 pro- 
ducing or exhibiting agencies in an area 
such as New York City, each agency to 
produce and distribute one theater tele- 
vision program to specific local theaters 
and to relay this program to specific dis- 
tant theaters. This would require three 
classes of stations or services, a follows: 

1. Intra City Studio Transmitter Sta- 
tion: 

(a) 1 fixed studio to transmitter 
channel (point-to-point). 

(b) 1 clear mobile channel (remote 
pickup). 

2. Intra City Multiple Addressee Sta- 
tion: 

1 clear channel for private mul- 
tiple-directive transmission from 
a single transmitter to a group 



251 



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DOCUMENTARY and EDUCATIONAL SUBJECTS 



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A COMBINATION OF LIVESHOWS AND FILM PROGRAMS 

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Many Pictures and Serials That Will Fit In With A SPONSOR'S Product 
ALL FILMS CAN BE CUT TO MEET YOUR REQUIRED SHOWING TIME 

PROJECTION ROOMS— CUTTING ROOMS 
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COMPLETE PROGRAM DEPT. 

A Production Department Producing Pictures tor 
Advertisers who Plan to Use Television Commercially 



ADVANCE TELEVISION PICTURE SERVICE, Inc. 

Telephone: BRyant 9-5600-1-2-3-4 

729 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 



252 



TELEVISION ALLOCATIONS 



of specific addressees within the 
service area of the transmitter. 
3. Inter City Relay: 

1 channel to interconnect cities, 
for transmission of theater tele- 
vision programs simultaneously 
from a number of specific multi- 
ple address stations to a specific 
theater or theaters in different 
cities. 

The requests for frequencies for thea- 
ter television service include a total of 
1500 megacycles in 75 20 megacycle chan- 
nels as follows: 

1. 8 contiguous 20 mc. clear channels 
or a band of 160 mc. from 600 to 760 mc. 

2. 7 contiguous 20 mc. clear channels or 
a band of 140 mc. from 860 to 1000 mc. 

3. 15 contiguous 20 mc. clear channels 
or a band of 300 mc. from 1900 to 2200 mc. 

4. 15 contiguous 20 mc. clear channels 
or a band of 300 mc. from 3900 to 4200 mc. 

5. 30 contiguous 20 mc. clear channels 
or a band of 600 mc. from 5700 to 6300 mc. 

Postwar Presentation 

It was stated that theater television in 
the immediate postwar period would un- 
doubtedly be presented to the public in 
monochrome, possibly using the present 
television standard of 525 line definition. 
It was also claimed that improved pic- 
ture quality in monochrome compar- 
able to 35 millimeter motion picture 
film, and also the addition of color 
will undoubtedly be required if theatrical 
television presentations are to meet with 
public acceptance on a basis comparable 
with present motion picture film presen- 
tations. It was claimed that for a trans- 
mission of monochrome television, a band 
width of 20 megacycles would be re- 
quired which would be suitable for 525 
to 800 line definition. For monochrome 
of higher definition and for color trans- 
mission, a channel width of 40 megacycles 
would be required. This would permit a 
definition in monochrome comparable to 
the present 35 millimeter film definition 
and for three-color transmission of ap- 
proximately 750 line definition. It was 
stated that ultimately the theater indus- 
try would employ highly directive anten- 
nas and then would not require any fre- 
quencies below 10,000 mc. except in very 
rare cases where the terrain, for instance, 
would make it impossible to use frequen- 
cies above 10,000 mc. However, since it 
was questionable whether such transmit- 



ting and receiving equipmenl would 1m - 
available immediately in the postwar 
period, requests were made for frequen- 
cies below 10,000 mc. in order to permit 
immediate experimental operation of the 
proposed service (Tr. 3725-3732). 

No Specific Allocation 

Since theater television is still in the 
experimental stage of development, the 
Commission docs not propose to allocate 
any specific frequencies at this time. How- 
ever, the Commission will give considera- 
tion to applications for experimental au- 
thorization involving transmissions, in- 
cluding studio to transmitter, remote 
pickup, and intracity multiple address sta- 
tions, on the frequencies between 480 and 
920 megacycles allocated to broadcasting 
on the basis that the use of these frequen- 
cies will be discontinued when needed 
for the broadcast service. In addition, 
experimentation with intra- and inter- 
city relay of theater television programs 
may be authorized in the following bands 
of frequencies, namely, 1900-2300, 3900- 
4550, 5750-7050, 10500-13000, 16000- 
18000, and 26000-30000 megacycles, as 
discussed in section 19 of this part. 



Tor 

COMPLETE 

UP-TO-MINUTE 

COVERAGE 

of 

TELEVISION 

NEWS-DEVELOPMENTS 

Read 

RADIO DAILY 

REGULARLY 



253 



TELEVISIOn BROHDGflSTERS HSSOCIH, IDC. 



Executive Office 

500 Fifth Avenue, New York 18, N. Y. 
LAckawanna 4-4788 



Officers 

President Jack R. Poppele 

Vice-President F. J. Bingley 

Secretary-Treasurer Will Baltin 

Assistant Secretary-Treasurer O. B. Hanson 



Directors 

Dr. Allen B. DuMont, Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Inc.; F. J. Bingley. Philco Corp.; Curtis W. 
Mason, Earle C. Anthony; Jack R. Poppele, WOR. New York; Emerson Markham, General Electric. 



Functions 

Founded Jan. 1944, as a non-profit organization of television broadcasters and 
others engaged in any business directly connected with television broadcasting. 
Objects, as stated in the by-laws, are "to foster and promote the development 
of the art of television broadcasting; to protect its members in every lawful and 
proper manner; to foster, encourage and promote laws, rules, regulations, 
customs and practices which will be in the best interest of the public; to protect 
the interests of the members of the Association by opposing the enactment or 
adoption of any laws, rules, regulations, customs or practices which would 
discriminate against or in any way injure the members of this Association." 



254 



MWISIM FACTS AM FIGURES 

PROBABLY destined to go down in history as the mast revolutionary 
contribution to the field of entertainment of our time, television "-ill 
also have its place in public service and education. Facts ami figun . givi n 
beloiv are presented from the general viewpoint rather than the technical 
side, in order to reflect the activity in this nor art farm during tin past y t ar. 



NINE commercial television stations are now operating in the United 
States: three in New York City; two in Chicago; one in Schenectady; 
one in Philadelphia; two in Hollywood. 

112 applications for television stations were pending before the Federal 
Communications Commission in Washington as of March 15, 1945. 

27 stations licensed to conduct experimental television broadcasting are 
now operating in the United States. 

• 
Cost of postwar television receivers will range from $150 for the smaller 
projected image models to $750 for de luxe receivers which will include 
AM and FM radio in their cabinets. 

• 

First television network was established the past year linking stations in 
Philadelphia, New York and Schenectady. 

Estimated cost of television station equipment (pre-war cost basis) range 
from $250,000 to $300,000 and includes studio, equipment, field pickup 
equipment, installation, sound, lighting, etc. 

Paramount problem of television at the moment appears to be production 
with two schools of thought on "live" and film video shows. 

Television Broadcasters Association, with a membership of 38 companies 
associated with the industry, is the leading trade organization. 

Experts forecast use of relay or booster stations in development of tele- 
vision networks. 

• 

Several eastern seaboard organizations are experimenting with networks. 
These include General Electric, International Business Machine, Raytheon, 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company and Radio Corporation of 
America. 

• 

Leading advertising agencies have established television departments but 
regard video programming at this time as having only experimental value. 

255 



TELEVISION FACTS AND FIGURES 



Industry is awaiting final allocations of FCC and end of war for imme- 
diate commercial development of video. 

• 
Labor troubles right now loom as the drawback of the immediate future, 
with the AFM already making it tough on the use of musicians and other 
organizations preparing jurisdictional disputes. 

• 
Theater tele may well be on a subscriber basis so that special programs 
and events will go to those who subscribe only. 

• 
Programming in television was and is active in the five centers actively 
engaged in experimental and commercial television. Desire for experience 
and finding out what not to do is one of the chief objects at present. 

• 
Estimated that there are some 7,500 television receivers extant, of which 
5,000 are in the New York metropolitan area. Not a few sets have been 
placed in veteran hospital convalescent wards. 

• 
Major sports have been televised with unusual success, especially football 
and boxing. Wrestling has already proved itself one of the easiest to tele- 
vise and one of the most entertaining shows for the televiewers. 

• 
That color television is on the way, is now not denied in any quarter; it is 
agreed however that it will take quite a while yet before it is perfected. 

• 
At least five companies have announced their intention of providing tele- 
vision relay facilities after the war. The relay system has proven itself 
satisfactory more ways than one and for the past five years has carried 
television programs from New York to Schenectady, a distance of more 
than 150 miles. 

• 
That the television special event source will be and is right now plentiful, 
was indicated in a survey which revealed nearly 50 auditoriums and arenas, 
also various cultural centers in New York alone where tele programs could 
be picked up, with a large ready-made audience. In the Los Angeles area, 
16 seasonal events suitable for tele pick-up, and more than 25 events that 
take place regularly each year. All these are of national interest. Chicago 
and other tele centers to-be have equally strong prospects. 

• 
Curiosity centers on what the British are doing in television and just 
how far they were advanced at the beginning of the war and just where they 
have taken up. In Paris, 1000-line tele was reported by various Americans 
who have been abroad. 

• 
Giant strides forward are expected in television as a result of electronic 
research for the war effort and uses of tele by the military, still a guarded 
secret as to its development, but generally acknowledged to hold the key 
opening the door toward perfection. 

256 



. FOR 

tele vis ion HEWS 

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TELEVISION DAILY 

REGULARLY 



A PART OF 





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257 



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TU Nt IN is now recognized as 
the most important radio- 
listeners' magazine in America 
even though paper restrictions 
have stopped its growth cold 
at a circulation of 1 5U,UUU ! 



258 



PUBLICATIONS 

Covering the Field of Radio 
TRADE — FAN — TECHNICAL — GENERAL 



The Advertiser 

MONTHLY. 11 W. 42nd St., New York, 
N. Y. Phone, PEnnsylvania ~>3265. 
Editor and Publisher, Manuel Rosenberg; 
Managing Editor, L. M. MacMillan. 
BRANCH OFFICE: 3557 Bogart Ave., 
Cincinnati, 0. Phone, AVon 6825. Peppy 
Adams, Sec'y. The Advertiser carries 
articles on radio relative to the adver- 
tising field. There is also an annual, 
MARKETS OF AMERICA, presenting a 
compilation of market articles, each 
written by an advertising or agency ex- 
ecutive expert in the market he discusses. 



Advertising Age 

WEEKLY. 100 East Ohio St., Chicago 
11, 111. Phone, Delaware 1337. Publisher, 
G. D. Crain, Jr.; Editor, S. R. Bern- 
stein. BRANCH OFFICES: 330 W. 
42nd St., New York 18, N. Y., Phone, 
BRyant 9-6431; 1226 National Press Bldg., 
Washington 4, D. C. Phone, REpublic 
7659. Treats radio strictly from the mer- 
chandising viewpoint; prints details of 
networks and talent used, but does not 
use material dealing with show-business 
phases of radio; also regularly prints 
statistical material on broadcasting, such 
as volume of time sales for major net- 
works, and money spent on air by leading 
national advei*tisers, as well as news and 
discussions of broadcast trends and devel- 
opments of interest to advertisers and 
advertising agencies. 



Advertising & Selling 

MONTHLY. 9 E. 38th St., New York 
16, N. Y. Phone, CAledonia 5-9770. Pub- 
lished by Robbins Publishing Company, 
Inc. President, J. H. Moore; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Treasurer, and Editor, F. C. Ken- 
dall; Managing Editor, Parker James; 
Advertising Manager, John G. Tinsley; 
Eastern Advertising Manager, Lloyd 
Cain. BRANCH OFFICES: 1327 Peoples 
Gas Building, Chicago, 111., William R. 
Joyce, Western Manager; 714 West 
Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal., Ned 



Brydone-Jack, Pacific Coast. Represents 
tive; 915 Olive St., St. Louis 1, Mo., A. 
D. McKinney, Southern Representative. 
Interpretation of major trends in the 
operation of radio advertising from the 
point of view of network, agency and 
sponsor. 



The Billboard 

WEEKLY. 25 Opera Place, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. Phone, Main 5306. Pub- 
lisher, The Billboard Publishing Co.; 
Managing Editor, R. S. Littleford (Cin- 
cinnati); Leonard Traube, Editor, on 
leave with Armed Forces; Jos. Koehler, 
Acting Editor; Radio Editor, Lou Fran- 
kel (New York); President-Treasurer, 
E. W. Evans; General Manager, W. D. 
Littleford; General Manager, Eastern Di- 
vision, Joseph Caida; Advertising Mana- 
ger, C. J. Latscha. BRANCH OFFICES: 
Ashland Bldg., Chicago, 111., Maynard 
Reuter, Manager; 1564 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y., Joseph Caida, General Man- 
ager; 1509 Vine St., Hollywood, Calif., 
Sam Abbott, Manager. The editorial pol- 
icy of this publication's radio department 
is concerned with the showmanship, tal- 
ent and business phases of broadcasting. 



Broadeitsting — Broadcast 
Atlvertising 

WEEKLY. National Press Bldg., Wash- 
ington 4, D. C. Phone, MEtropolitan 
1922. Editor & Publisher, Sol Taishoff; 
Editorial Director, Robert K. Richards; 
Business Manager, Maurv Long; Circula- 
tion Manager, Bernard Piatt. BRANCH 
OFFICES: 250 Park Ave., New York 17, 
N. Y., PLaza 5-8355, Bruce Robertson, 
N. Y. Editor; 360 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago 1, 111., Centrak4115, Florence Small, 
Chicago, manager; 1509 N. Vine Street, 
Hollywood 28, Calif., Gladstone 7353, 
David Glickman, Hollywood correspon- 
dent; 417 Harbour Commission Bldg., 
Toronto, Canada, Elgin 755, James 
Montagnes. Trade journal of the broad- 
casting and broadcasting advertising 
fields. 



259 




to advertise regularly in 

STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE 

With shifting markets and sales-manpower shortages, large numbers of 
advertisers are maintaining liquid budget reserves . . . are prepared to pour 
it on wherever promotion possibilities loom the largest. 

This widespread policy involves an unprecedented volume of day-by-day 
decisions . . . offers radio many more opportunities than ever before to sell 
its services . . . makes "constant buyer contact" the golden rule of advertising 
today. 

To pull more business, sell every day through Standard Rate & Data 
Service, used constantly by your prime advertising prospects — account 
executives, time buyers, advertising and sales managers, and all other 
important advertising officials — for planning, budgeting, scheduling and 
scores of other necessary operations. 

Put this subtle power of hour after hour usership into your advertising 
appeals. Knock over sale after sale by punching hard from every angle — 
market data to broadcasting facilities. Jolt orders out of big buyers with 
timely, telling blows — when their use of the Service leaves them wide 
open for your sales-winning story. Rule out any chance of being over- 
looked in today's augmented advertising market. Make regular monthly 
use of Standard Rate & Data Service your advertising rule. 



<f§ STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE ® 

The National Authority 

333 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 111. 

420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17 • 816 W. Fifth St.. Los Angeles 13 

260 



PUBLICATION!) 



Canadian Advertising 

QUARTERLY. 481 University Avenue, 
Toronto, Ont., Canada. Phone, Adelaide 
9131. Manager, Alan C. Ball; Data Edi- 
tor, Margaret M. White. Canadian Ad- 
vertising lists information in regard to 
all media available to buyers of national 
advertising in Canada. Rates, circulation, 
mechanical requirements, etc. are incor- 
porated in quarterly volumes with in- 
terim rate bulletins being mailed between 
issues. All types of media in Canada are 
fully listed in addition to advertising as- 
sociation personnel; a complete listing 
of Canadian Advertising Agency person- 
nel and various advertising services func- 
tioning in Canada. 



< o it mii it it ications 

MONTHLY. 19 East 47th St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, Plaza 3-0483. Pub- 
lisher, Bryan Davis Publishing Co., Inc.; 
Editor, Lewis Winner; Business Mana- 
ger, B. S. Davis; General Manager, 
Paul S. Weil. Circulates among engi- 
neers, executives and other personnel 
engaged in the design, manufacture, 
installation, operation, service and main- 
tenance of radio and wire communica- 
tions, broadcast stations — police, marine, 
aeronautical radio and other point to 
point services — sound recording and pro- 
jection — public address — television and 
picture transmission — and in the manu- 
facture of all radio equipment and ac- 
cessories, components and instruments 
used in these fields. Editorial content 
features technical articles covering the 
entire communications field. 



Daily Variety 

DAILY. 1708 North Vine St., Holly- 
wood, Calif. Phone, HOllywood 1141. 
President, Sid Silverman; Editor, Arthur 
Ungar. BRANCH OFFICES: See listing 
under Variety Weekly. 



Down Beat 

FIRST and FIFTEENTH of each 
month. 203 North Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. Phone Andover 1712. Publisher, 
Glenn Burrs; Editor, Ned E. Williams; 
Advertising Manager, Ed Paro; Circula- 
tion Manager, Frank Miles. BRANCH 
OFFICES: RKO Bldg., New York, N. Y., 
Circle 7-4131, Rod Reed, N. Y. Editor; 



748 \. Ramparl Blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. Publishes news and pictures in t hi- 
radio, dance and orchestra field. 



y 

Editor and Publisher 

WEEKLY. 1700 Times Tower, New 
York, N. Y. Phone, BRyant 9-3052. 
President, James W. Brown; Publisher, 
James W. Brown, Jr.; Editor, Robert U. 
Brown; Managing Editor, Jerry Walker; 
General Manager - Advertising Director, 
Charles T. Stuart; Chicago Correspon- 
dent, G. A. Brandenburg; Los Angeles 
Correspondent, Don Taylor; San Fran- 
cisco, Harry Nelson; London, England, 
Vera Chandler; Washington Correspon- 
dent, James J. Butler. Prints radio news 
of interest to the newspaper r.nd adver- 
tising fields. 



Electronic Industries 

MONTHLY. 480 Lexington Ave., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, PLaza 3-1340. Pub- 
lisher, M. Clements; Editor, Dr. Orestes 
H. Caldwell. Electronic Industries is pub- 
lished for all who design, produce, or 
operate radio end electronic equipment. 



Electronics 

MONTHLY. 330 West 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone MEdallion 3-0700. 
Publisher, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.; 
Editor, Keith Henney; Editor, Western 
(Chicago), Beverly Dudley; Washington 
Editor, G. T. Montgomery; Managing 
Editor, W. MacDonald; Associate Editor, 
John Markus; Assistant Editors, Vin 
Zeluff, Frank Haylock, Frank Rockett; 
Publisher, H. W. Mateer; Sales Manager, 
Wallace B. Blood; Research Manager, R. 
S. Quint. BRANCH OFFICES: 330 West 
42nd St., New York, N. Y. Donald H. 
Miller, Harry R. Denmead; 1427 Statler 
Bldg., Boston, Mass., Ralph Flynn; 520 
North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.. 
Charles Wardner, A. F. Tischer; 1510 
mnna Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio, Edward J. 
Smith; 16 South Broad St., Philadelphia. 
Pa., Frank Coyle; 68 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., J. W. Otterson; 612 South 
Hope St., Los Angeles, Cal., Roy N. 
Phelan; 1105 Rhodes-Haverty Bldg., At- 
lanta, Ga., Ralph Maultsby. A magazine 
for executives, engineers and operations 
men in radio, communication including 
facsimile and television, industrial appli- 
cations in the electronic fields — Design — 
Engineering — Manufacture. 



A Message to 
Radio and Electronic Manufacturers 




NATION-WIDE SURVEY 

After the war it will be possible 
for an executive seated at his desk 
to see what is going on in any 
corner of his plant. By merely 
pressing buttons, one operation 
after the other will be projected 
on television screens. 

A new development would be to 
project your nation-wide prospects 
on a screen, enabling you to size 
them up properly. The nearest 
approach to this is the RADIO- 
CRAFT Survey. Instead of press- 
ing buttons, you impress a postage 
stamp on a letter and receive a 
mental image of thousands of 
radio-electronic technicians — pros- 
pects for your products. 

You will then readily understand 
why RADIO-CRAFT stands so high 
in their estimation. It is the maga- 
zine that tells them what is avail- 
able — how it is constructed — how 
to use it — and how to maintain it. 

Send for the Survey and get a 
"television" of your prospects. 



RADIO-CRAFT 



25 WEST BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 7 , N. Y 



262 



PUB LICATIONS 



Film Daily 

DAILY. 1501 Broadway, New York 18, 
N. Y. Phone, BRyant 9-7117. Publisher, 
John W. Alicoate; Associate Publisher and 
General Manager, Donald M. Mersereau; 
Editor, Chester B. Bahn; Los Angeles 
Correspondent, Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone GRanite 6607; Wash- 
ington Correspondent, Andrew H. Older, 
841 Longfellow St., N. W., Phone, Taylor 
0882; Chicago Correspondent, Joseph 
Esler, 6241 N. Oakley Ave. The Daily 
Newspaper of Motion Pictures: FILM 
DAILY reports the news covering every 
phase of motion pictures as well as tele- 
vision and radio to the extent they con- 
cern the film field. 



Editor, G. D. Crain, Jr.; Managing Edi 

t«>r, W. Lane Will. I5KANCH OFFICE: 
330 West 42nd St., New 5fork, X. Y. 
Phone, BRyanl 9-6432. Eastern Editor, 
Halsey Darrow. This publication prinl 
all available news stories about the use 
of radio by industrial marketers. 
• 

Marketing 

WEEKLY. 119 York Street, Toronto, 
Ont., Canada. Phone, Elgin 9137. Pub- 
lisher, W. A. Lydiatt; General Manager, 
W. R. Campbell; Editor, John L. Love; 
Features Editor, Margaret Brown; News 
Editor, Betty Watford. Articles, statis- 
tics and news of interest to Canadian 
sales and advertising executives. 



FM ami Television 

MONTHLY. 511 Fifth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, VAnderbilt 6-2483. 
Editor-Publisher, Milton B. Sleeper; As- 
sistant Editor, Rene Hemmes; Advertis- 
ing Manager, William T. Mohrman. 
BRANCH OFFICES: 360 N. Michigan 
Ave., Chicago 1, 111. Phone, State 4439, 
Marian Fleishman, Advertising Repre- 
sentative; 2989 Lincoln Ave., Altadena, 
Calif. Phone, Sycamore 7-2894, Milo 
Pugh, Advertising Representative. De- 
voted to the engineering, manufacture, 
installation, and use of FM and television 
equipment; includes semi-annual direc- 
tories; and lists FM, AM, and television 
stations with names of managers and 
chief engineers. 



Hollywood Reporter 

DAILY (Five days weekly). 6715 
Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal. Phone, 
Hillside 7411. Editor and Publisher, W. 
R. Wilkerson; Managing Editor, Frank 
Pope; General Manager, Thomas F. 
Seward; Manager of New York Office, 
Jack Harrison; Radio Editor, Joan Flynn. 
BRANCH OFFICES: 229 West 42nd St., 
New York, N. Y., Manager, Jack Harri- 
son, Phone, Wisconsin 7-2470; 504 No. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.; 2, Deanery 
Mews, Park Lane W. 1, London, Eng- 
land; Pelayo 1, Barcelona; Kungsgatan 
28, Stockholm; 198 Pitt St., Sydney; San 
Martin 501, Buenos Aires. A publication 
devoted to the Motion Picture industry, 
its allies, and radio. 



Industrial Marheting 

MONTHLY (Except 2 issues in Octo- 
ber). 100 East Ohio St., Chicago 11, 111. 
Phone, Delaware 1337. Publisher and 



Metronome 

MONTHLY. 119 West 57th St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-4500. Edi- 
tor, Barry Ulanov; Associate Editor, 
Leonard Feather; Gene Roderick, Adver- 
tising Manager; Gus Greiff, Assistant 
Advertising Manager; Phil Featheringill, 
Chicago Editor; Milt Benny, Los Angeles 
Editor. This publication is a trade jour- 
nal in the field of popular music, giving 
world coverage on news of the dance 
band and popular music fields; radio, 
band, stage, show and record reviews, 
interviews and personality stories. 
• 
Motion Picture Daily 

DAILY, except Saturdays, Sundays 
and holidays. 1270 Sixth Avenue, New 
York 20, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-3100. 
President and Editor-in-Chief, Martin 
Quigley; Publisher, Colvin Brown; Execu- 
tive Editor, Sherwin Kane; Secretary, 
T. J. Sullivan; Vice-President, Red Kann; 
News Editor, James P. Cunningham; Ad- 
vertising Manager, Herbert V. Fecke. 
BRANCH OFFICES: 6305 Yucca Street, 
Hollywood, Calif., W. R. Weaver, Editor; 
4 Golden Square, London, Wl, England, 
Hope Burnup, Manager; 624 South Michi- 
gan Avenue, Chicago, 111., Sam Honig- 
berg, correspondent. Motion picture trade 
news, film reviews and columns; radio 
and television trade news and columns. 
• 

Musical Digest 

BI-MONTHLY. 119 West 57th St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-1124. Edi- 
tor-Publisher, Pierre Key. THE MUSI- 
CAL DIGEST is a reader's digest of 
music. It publishes original articles and 
condensations of articles appearing in 
other periodicals, domestic and foreign. 



263 



Time and Space buyers, here's 



Media Data 

/o* Canada 




Media Listed 

Daily Newspapers 
National Week-End 

Newspapers 
Weekly Newspapers 
Magazines 
Financial Papers 
Farm Papers 
Business Papers 
Telephone Directory 
Non-English Dailies 
Non-English Weeklies 
Tri-Weeklies 
Radio Stations 
Religious Publications 
Labor and Political Papers 
University Papers 
City and Community Weeklies 
Transportation Advertising 
Poster Advertising 
Advertising Agencies and 

Executives 
Special Representatives 



To keep informed on media and 
markets in Canada put yourself down 
for a subscription to 

CANADIAN ADVERTISING 

Canada's Media Authority 

Published quarterly, with interim 
bulletins between issues. Gives 
complete advertising data on all 
Canadian media, including radio — ■ 
names, addresses, personnel, circula- 
tion, mechanical requirements, rates. 

This service is widely used by 
agencies and advertisers. By sub- 
scription, $5 a year; with Business 
Year Book (Canadian market study 
published in March) $6. 



Are you acquainted with The National List of Advertisers and Their Agencies? This 
handy pocket volume lists over 2,000 national advertisers in Canada, with addresses and 
personnel, gives cross index of trade names and shows present agency connection. 
Issued yearly, $2. 

CANADIAN ADVERTISING 



481 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 



TORONTO 2. CANADA 



264 



PU BLICATIONS 



Music Trade Review 

MONTHLY. 1270 Sixth Ave., New 
York 20, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-5842. Pub- 
lisher, Alex H. Kolbe; Circulation Man- 
ager, B. Borin; Editor, Carleton Chace. 
Merchandising articles on selling pianos, 
records, phonographs, sheet music, etc. 
Complete monthly report on all latest 
happenings and developments in the piano 
and musical instrument industry. 



The Musician 

MONTHLY. 139 E. 47th Street, New 
York, N. Y. Phone, PLaza 3-5925. Editor, 
Nicholas deVore; Publisher, AMF Artist 
Service, Inc. General articles of fact and 
comment regarding music and musicians. 
Official magazine of the American Musical 
Fellowship and organization of education- 
al philanthropic aims, representing the 
musical audience of America — as con- 
cerns good music, in distinction to the 
so-called popular or swing variety. 



Pan-American Radio 

MONTHLY. 45 West 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, BRyant 9-4324. Pub- 
lisher-Editor, Herbert Rosen. This pub- 
lication is an organ of information con- 
cerning broadcasting and its problems as 
they relate to both North and South 
America. It is printed in three diiferent 
languages, English, Spanish and Portu- 
gese in one and the same edition. 



Musical Advance 

MONTHLY. 100 West 57th St., New 
York 19, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-3206. Pub- 
lisher-Editor, Spencer B. Driggs; Adver- 
tising Manager, V. E. Matlack; Radio 
Editor, Frank C. Barber; Music critic, 
William Bradell. BRANCH OFFICES: 
71A Park Mansion, Bampton Roads, 
S.W. 1, London, Charles G. E. Cahier; 
10 Ave., Stephane-Mallarme, Paris, Na- 
talie DeBogory; 6206 S. Evans, Chicago, 
Mathilda Ernestine; 1165 Francisco St., 
San Francisco, Myrtle Kahn Hillman, 
1115 Hacienda Place, Los Angeles, Wm. G. 
Griffith; 1664 N. Bronson Ave., Holly- 
wood, Anton Civoru; 3617 Idaho Ave., 
N.W., Washington, B. B. James, 616 Har- 
bor Commission Bldg., Toronto, Canada, 
Margaret Pennell. Devoted to music, and 
is the only musical magazine bridging the 
gap between the serious musical maga- 
zine and the fan and the radio magazines. 
Recognized for years as among the elite 
of the musical publications in its class. 



Musical America 

EIGHTEEN TIMES YEARLY. L13 

West 57th St., New York, N. Y. Phone, 
Circle 7-0520. Publisher, John P. Ma- 
jeski; Editors, Ronald Eyer, Fiances 
Eaton; Advertising Manager, M. B. 
Swaab. BRANCH OFFICE: 304 South 
Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. Phone, Harri- 
son 4544. Musical America repori 
rent musical events in the United States 
and all foreign centers of interest to 
musicians, music lovers, music clubs and 
students. 

• 

Musical Courier 

TWICE MONTHLY. 119 West 57th St., 
New York, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-4500. 
Publisher, Music Periodicals Corp.; Edi- 
tor, Leonard Liebling; Managing Editor, 
Russell Kerr. BRANCH OFFICES: 220 
South Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., Rene 
Devries, Manager; 5617 Hollywood Blvd., 
Hollywood, Calif., Richard Drake Saun- 
ders, Manager. Review of better class 
music programs throughout the world in 
each issue; comments on broadcast pro- 
grams; features articles and interviews. 

\ • 

v Printers 9 ink 

WEEKLY. 205 E. 42nd St., New York 
17, N. Y. Phone, MUrray Hill 3-6500. 
Publisher, Printers' Ink Publishing Co.; 
President, C. B. Larrabee; Advertising 
Director, Henry W. Marks; Editor, G. A. 
Nichols; Exec. Editor, Robert W. Palmer; 
Managing Editor, Eldridge Peterson; 
Radio, Pat Murray. BRANCH OF- 
FICES: 6 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111., Harold E. Green, Chicago Editor, 
and Gove Compton, Manager; 1722 
Rhodes Haverty Bldg., Atlanta, Ga., H. 
F. Gogill, Manager; 1672 Walworth Ave., 
Pasadena, Calif., Joseph W. Conrow, 
Manager. Printers' Ink uses articles 
about radio as an advertising medium and 
as related to merchandising and distribu- 
tion; also news of personnel changes and 
spot news that will interest radio adver- 
tisers from a business point of view. 
• 

Proceedings of the Radio 
Club of America 

SIX ISSUES PER YEAR (Approxi- 
mately). 11 West 42nd St., New York, 
N. Y. Phone, LOngacre 5-6622. Pub- 
lisher, Radio Club of America, Inc.; 
Editor, M. B. Sleeper. This publication 
contains texts of engineering papers on 
radio subjects and brief accounts of 
club activities. Subscriptions are avail- 
able to non-members. .. 



265 



We Are Justifiably Proud of our 
"Associate Editors" . . . 



A MONG the many notable Advertising Executives who have written articles for past 
^* issues of the ADVERTISER and MARKETS of AMERICA are the famed Chairmen 
of the Association of National Advertisers and American Association of Advertising 
Agencies, respectively. We like to call them our "Associate Editors," for they have 
immeasurably enriched our editorial fare. 

Like their many confreres, they have written pertinent articles of interest and lasting 
value to the men and women who read The ADVERTISER — the nation's advertising 
and merchandising executives and their advertising agency personnel. 

Both of our widely read publications are the products of the men who create and place 
advertising . . . control the billion and more dollars spent in all media and notably radio. 

In each instance we select an authority to write on his subject . . . not a long- 
haired theorist. Thus our readers are fully informed and appreciative of the contents 
of our publications. Thus, too, they prove to be every broadcaster's best advertising 
prospects. Many of them are now clients — yet there are many more to reach! Reach 
them quickly and keep them sold on your station or network, via the advertising pages 
of The ADVERTISER (monthly) and MARKETS OF AMERICA, (Annual). 



THE ADVERTISER 

Space rate in The ADVERTISER and in MARKETS of AMERICA, 

Vol. 9 is $185. per page. * Only $160. per page on 12 time contract. 

NEW YORK CITY: 11 West 42nd St. (18), PEnn. 6-3265 

CINCINNATI: 3557 Bogart Ave. (29), AVon. 6825 

WASHINGTON, D. C. • KANSAS CITY • MEXICO CITY 



266 



PUB LICATIONS 



Proceedings of the f . If. E. 

(Institute of Radio Engineers) 
MONTHLY. 330 West 42nd St., New 
York 18, N. Y. Phone, MEdallion 3-5661. 
Publisher, Inst, of Radio Engineers; 
President, Hubert W. Turner; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Ralph A. Hackbusch; Treasurer, 
Raymond A. Heising; Editor, Dr. Alfred 
N. Goldsmith; Secretary, Haraden Pratt; 
Advertising Manager, William C. Copp; 
William B. Cowilich, Assistant Secretary. 
The Proceedings is an engineering jour- 
nal publishing technical papers on radio 
and allied subjects. Papers are published 
after review by three committees and the 
editor. Releases and other general news 
usually cannot be used, but new commer- 
cial literature of engineering interest is 
selected listed. 



Q S T 

MONTHLY. West Hartford, Conn. 
Publisher, American Radio Relay League; 
General Manager, Kenneth B. Warner; 
Editor, Clinton B. DeSoto; Advertising 
Manager, F. Cheyney Beekley; Circula- 
tion Manager, David H. Houghton; Tech- 
nical Editor, George Grammer. This pub- 
lication is the official organ of the Amer- 
ican Radio Relay League and is devoted 
to publication of technical data and the 
activities and developments in amateur 
radio. 



Radio-Oaf* 

MONTHLY. 25 West Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. Phone, REctor 2-9690. Presi- 
dent and Publisher, H. Gernsback; Asso- 
ciate Editor, Fred Shunamen. BRANCH 
OFFICE: 520 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. Phone, Superior 7306. This 
publication reports latest developments 
in the radio art, radio telephony, elec- 
tronics, television, amateur radio, ham 
set construction, public address and fac- 
simile, including servicing, trade news 
and technical descriptions. 



Radio World 

WEEKLY. Published monthly at the 
present time because of shortage of pa- 
per.) 1434 St. Catherine Street West, 
Montreal, Canada, phone number PLa- 
teau 4186; Publisher: Radio Publications 
Limited; Editor: Marcel Provost. RADIO 
WORLD is a combination of trade and 
fan paper, giving news, critics and photos 
of English-speaking radio artists and 
programmes. 



Radio flaili/ 

DAILY. 1501 Broadway, New York 18, 
N. Y. Phone, Wisconsin 7-6336. Publisher, 
John W. Alicoate; General Manager, 
Donald M. Mersereau; Editor, Frank 
Burke; Managing Editor, M. H. Shapiro; 
Business Manager, Marvin Kirsch; Los 
Angeles Correspondent, Ralph Wilk; 
Washington Correspondent, Andrew H. 
Older, 5516 Carolina Place, Phone, Ord- 
way 9221; Chicago Correspondent, Bill 
Irvin, 4802 Dorchester Ave.; Phone, Oak- 
land 4545. BRANCH OFFICE: 6425 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.; Ralph 
Wilk, Manager. The National Daily 
Newspaper of Commercial Radio and 
Television. 

• 

Radiomondc 

WEEKLY. 1434 St. Catherine Street 
West, Montreal, Canada, phone number 
PLateau 4186; publisher: Radio Publica- 
tions Limited; Editor: Marcel Provost. 
RADIOMONDE is a combination of trade 
and fan paper, giving news, critics and 
photos of French-speaking radio artists 
and programmes. 



The Parts Jobber 

MONTHLY. 1270 Sixth Ave., New 
York 20, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-5842. 
Editor and Business Manager, Mai Parks. 
The Parts Jobber is edited exclusively for 
radio electronic parts wholesalers, their 
executives and salesmen. It endeavors to 
cover all merchandising trends, new prod- 
uct developments. 



Radio Life 

WEEKLY. 1029 W. Washington Blvd., 
Los Angeles, Calif. Phone, Richmond 
5262. Publisher, Carl M. Bigsby; Manag- 
ing Director, Culbreth Sudler; Business 
Manager, Vinson Vaughan; Editor, Eve- 
lyn Bigsby; Radio Editor, Pearl Ralls. 
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE: 1558 No. Vine 
St., Hollywood, Calif. Phone HEmpstead 
2025. Radio Life carries complete logs 
for all Southern California stations, 
radio's weekly highlights, and a roto- 
gravure feature section. 



Radio Mirror Magazine 

MONTHLY. 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. Phone, LExington 2-9050. 
Publisher, Macfadden Publications, Inc.; 
Editorial Director, Fred R. Sammis; 
Editor, Doris McFerran; Art Editor, 



267 



OUR 62 nd YEAR 



METRONOME announces with great pride 
its entrance into its 62nd year of publication. 
During those 62 years, METRONOME has 
won the respect and confidence of the entire 
popular music industry by its consistently honest 
and accurate coverage of the field to which it 
has dedicated itself. 

METRONOME today still stands alone as 
the most respected magazine in the popular 
music field and its honest and constructive band, 
record, radio and stage show reviews, as well as 
its accurate news reports and entertaining fea- 
tures are accepted and respected as Gospel by 
those in the field it serves. 



METRONOME 

119 WEST 57th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. SUBSCRIPTION— $2.50 PER YEAR IN U. S. A. 

268 



PUBLICATIONS 



Jack Zasorin; Associate Editor, Belle 
Landesman. BRANCH OFFICES: 221 
North La Salle St., Chicago, 111., .Man- 
ager, Edward F. Lethen, Jr.; 420 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif.; Manager, Lee 
Andrews, 8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Calif. Stories, news and pictures of stars 
and shows. Hollywood Correspondent, 
Elaine Osterman. Fictionizations of radio 
scripts, romantic fiction with radio back- 
ground, biographies; Program listings. 
• 

Ratlio \etvs 

MONTHLY. 540 N. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, 111. Phone, Delaware 6100. 
Published bv Ziff-Davis Publishing Co. 
Publisher, William B. Ziff; Editor, B. G. 
Davis; Managing Editor, Oliver Read. 
BRANCH OFFICES: Empire State Bldg., 
New York 1, N. Y. Executive Assistant, 
Charles R. Tighe; 1052 Earle Bldg., 
Washington 4, D. C, Fred Hamlin, Man- 
ager, 815 S. Hill St., Los Angeles 4, Calif., 
William L. Pinney, Manager. This pub- 
lication is a technical magazine devoted 
to radio in war, including articles for the 
engineer, servicemen, dealer, recordist, 
experimenter and amateur. 
• 

Radio & Television Retailing 

MONTHLY. 480 Lexington Ave., 
New York, N. Y. Phone, PLaza 3-1340. 
Publisher and General Manager, M. 
Clements; Editor, Orestes H. Caldwell. 
Publication devoted to dealers, manu- 
facturers, service men and distributors. 
• 
Radio-Television Journal 
Combined with 
Electric Appliance Journal 
MONTHLY. 1270 Sixth Ave., New 
York 20, N. Y. Phone, Circle 7-5842. 
Publisher, Kolbe Publications, Inc., Edi- 
tor, Mai Parks; Managing Editor, Alex 
H. Kolbe; Technical Editor, George Du- 
vall; Washington Editor, B. F. Holley; 
News Editor, Patricia McKee; Business 
Management Editor, Fred Merish; Cana- 
dian Editor, E. H. Cooke; Circulation 
Manager, Betty Borin. 
• 

Radio and Television Weekly 

WEEKLY. 99 Hudson St., New York, 
N. Y. Phone, WA 5-2576. Publisher, 
Edward H. Davis; Editor, Cy Kneller; 
General Advertising Manager, Sidney E. 
Davis. News of radio, electronic and tele- 
vision industries — non-technical. News 
covers personnel, merchandising and sales 
of manufacturers, wholesalers, distribu- 
tors and retailers. 



Rodiotime 

; u [CE MONTHLY. Sun Life Bldg 
Monl real, Quebec, Can a d a , Phon< 
PLateau 6494. Pn ident, W. E. E 
Vi :e-Presidi nt, \Y. I*. Haynes; Secretary, 
.1. .M Leckie; Treasurer, E. R. Romte. 
BRANCH OFFICE: 45 Richmond St.. W. 
Toronto, Out., Canada. Radiotime is a 
composite of individual Canadian radio 

station program schedules. 

• 

Radio Tratle-Ruilder 

MONTHLY. 347 Adelaide St., West, 
Toronto, Ont., Canada. Phone, Adelaide 
6261. Publisher Hugh C. MacLean Pub- 
lications Ltd.; Editor, T. C. Van Al- 
styne; National Advertising Manager, 
John T. Rochford. BRANCH OFFICES: 
2118 Bleury St., Montreal, Que., Canada; 
75 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111. This 
publication reports general trade news 
of interest to radio dealers and service- 
men, jobbers and manufacturers, radio 
engineers, broadcasting stations, etc. It 
also contains merchandising and service 
articles of interest to retail radio trade. 



Sales Mttnagetnent 

SEMI-MONTHLY. 386 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 16, N. Y. Phone, MOhawk 
4-1760. Publisher and Editor, Raymond 
Bill; Executive Editor and General Man- 
ager, Philip Salisburv; Advertising Man- 
ager, Merril V. Reed. BRANCH OF- 
FICES: 333 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111., Phone State 1266, C. E. Lovejoy, 
Manager; 15 East de la Guerra, Santa 
Barbara, Calif., Phone, 6405, Warwick S. 
Carpenter, Manager. Sales Management's 
editorial front is a broad one, embracing 
all the phases of general management, 
market analysis, operation of the sales 
force, use of advertising media and other 
sales tools, advertising agency relations, 
consumer research, product design, etc., 
which fall within the limits of the respon- 
sibility of the Director of Sales of a busi- 
ness concern. 

• 

Service Magazine 

MONTHLY. 19 East 47th St., New 
York, N. Y. Phone, PLaza 3-0483. Pub- 
lisher, Bryan Davis Publishing Co., Inc.; 
Consulting Editor, Lewis Winner; Ad- 
visory Editor, A. A. Ghirardi; Busi- 
ness Manager, B. S. Davis; General 
Manager, Prul S. Weil; Advertising Man- 
ager, F. Walen. Circulates among distrib- 
utors of radio parts and accessories, 
radio set distributors, distributors of 
public address equipment and all types 



269 



MUSICAL 
COURIER 



Worfcl-AutliorLU 

on tflusic 

Since 1880 



PROFUSELY 
ILLUSTRATED 



For 65 history-making years, the 
Musical Courier has reflected in text 
and picture the color, art, and glory 
of the world's opera houses and con- 
cert halls. 

Today the Musical Courier, ever apace 
with the times, extends its editorial 
coverage to the broadcasting studios, 
in recognition of the cultural contribu- 
tion of radio music. 

As always, the Musical Courier re- 
mains a lively, vital exponent in all 
fields of music: opera, concert, sym- 
phony, ballet, recordings, radio, motion 
pictures. 

Published on the 1st and 15th of the month; 20c a 
copy; $3.00 a year (20 issues). Canada $4.00, Foreign 
$4.50. Subscription includes all special issues. 

119 West 57th Street New York 19, N. Y. 



270 



PU BLICATIONS 



of sound apparatus; service organiza- 
tions specializing in radio and allied 
industries', service departments of radio 
set and parts distributors and deal- 
ers, department stores, radio set manu- 
facturers, public address manufacturers, 
and kindred lines; radio dealers, sport- 
ing goods, music and automotive stores 
as well as other retailers handling radio 
and television. 

• 

Standard Rate and 
Data Service 

MONTHLY. 333 No. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago 1, 111. Phone, Randolph 5616. 
Chairman of the Board, Walter E. Bott- 
hof; President, Richard A. Trenkmann; 
Exec. Vice-Pres. and Treas.- C. Laury 
Botthof ; Exec. Vice-Pres. in Charge New 
York Office, Albert William Moss; Vice- 
Pres., C. W. Doheny; Secretary, Howard 
E. Rogers; Vice-Pres., James M. Kelly. 
BRANCH OFFICES: 420 Lexington 
Ave., New York 17, N. Y., Phone, LEx- 
ington 2-6611; 816 W. Fifth St.- Los 
Angeles 13. Advertising rate service for 
publication and radio fields revised and 
issued monthly. 

Tide 

SEMI-MONTHLY. 232 Madison Ave., 
New York 16, N. Y. Phone, AShland 4- 
3390. President and Publisher, Edwin F. 
Thayer; Editor, Reginald T. Clough; 
Radio Editor, J. Cameron Day; Vice-Pres- 
ident, J. F. Weintz; Los Angeles Repre- 
sentative, R. J. Birch & Co. BRANCH 
OFFICES: 360 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111., Franklin 1040; 0. F. Knoebber, 
Crosby Vininy, Elinor Zeigler, 607 South 
Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif., Vandike 
7386, R. J. Birch & Co.; 300 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Calif., Douglas 4393, 
R. J. Birch & Co. Report radio news of 
interest to agency executive and adver- 
tisers. 

• 

Tune In 

MONTHLY. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York 20, N. Y. Phone, Circle 5-8425. 
Published by D. S. Publishing Co. Pub- 
lisher and Editor, Richard Davis; General 
Manager, V. C. Albus; Managing Editor, 
Lawrence Falkenburg; Executive Editor, 
Teresa Buxton; Associate Editors, Elba 
Lohman, Francigene Sheridan; Research 
Editor, Alton Brimmer. Publishes news 
and pictures of radio programs and per- 
sonalities; schedules of important radio 
shows; interesting sidelights of radio in- 
cluding radio facts, humor and an overall 
picture of radio in general. 



Television Daily 

DAILY. 1501 Broadway, New York 18, 
N. Y. Phono. Wisconsin 7-6336. Pub- 
lisher, John W. Alicoate; General Man- 
ager, Donald M. Mesereau; Frank Burke, 
Editor; Managing Editor, M. H. Shapiro; 
Business Manager, Marvin Kirsch; 1."- 
Angeles Correspondent, Ralph W ilk; 
Chicago Correspondent, Bill Irvin. 
BRANCH OFFICE: 6425 Hollywood 
Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.; Ralph Wilk, 
Manager. Published regularly as a sup- 
plement to RADIO DAILY. News and 
pictures of commercial television: com- 
prehensive in its presentation of every 
new development in this field. 
• 

The Televiser 

QUARTERLY. 11 West 42nd Street, 
New York 18, N. Y., Phone, LOngacre 
5-1683. Editor and Publisher, Irwin A. 
Shane. Journal of video production, ad- 
vertising and operations, The Televiser 
features articles by experts relating to 
television problems of all kinds with spe- 
cal sections devoted to programming, pro- 
duction, television advertising and mer- 
chandising, operation and management, 
reviews, news and views. 
• 

Television 

MONTHLY. 600 Madison Ave., New 
York 22, N. Y. Editor and Publisher, 
Frederick A. Kugel; Assistant to the 
Publisher, Chas. R. Tighe, Jr.; Managing 
Editor, Thor Krogh; Associate Editor, 
T. R. Kennedy, Jr. BRANCH OFFICE: 
958 South Keniston, Los Angeles, Calif., 
York 6557, Frances Sage, Los Angeles 
correspondent. This publication aims to 
report and analyze all significant devel- 
opments in television and its allied fields. 
• 
Variety 

WEEKLY. 154 West 46th St., New 
York 19, N. Y. Phone, BRyant 9-8153. 
Publisher' Sid Silverman; Editor, Abel 
Green; Business Manager, Harold Erichs; 
Advertising Manager, Louis Rydell; 
Production Manager, Murrav Rann. 
BRANCH OFFICES: 360 N. Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111., Bill Hunt; 1708-10 
No. Vine St., Hollywood' Calif., Arthur 
Ungar. 

• 
Western Advertising 

MONTHLY, 564 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. Phone, GArfield 8966. Pub- 
lisher, Ramsey Oppenheim; Editor, Archi- 
bald MacPhail; General Manager, R. S. 
Oppenheim. New developments in radio 
and reporting news of western accounts 
and stations from a commercial angle. 



271 




This trademark is accepted 
in the advertising world as 
a warranty of accuracy. 



SERVICES TO BROADCASTERS 



•£ Coverage Maps With Data 

Original maps, mail, tn/v/m or 8MB "circulation" 
— accurate market data, corrected to 1945. 



•fc Sales Brochures 

Accurate, original, interesting. 

-fa Sales Presentations 

For local-national use. 

-fa F. M. Applications 

Preceding or supplementing engineering measure- 
ments. 

~fc Audience Measurements 
And program popularities. 



WALTER P. BURN AND ASSOCIATES, INC 



7 West 44th Street 
New York 18, N. Y. 



Under personal direction 
of Walter P. Bum 



272 



/ 



MARKETS 



RADIO DOILY 

PRESEOIS 
A AATIOJl WIDE 

UP-TO-THE-miOUTE 

CE080S BDfltySJS 
OF THE RADIO IDORKEI 



MAJOR MARKETS 




By William P. Noble 

Vice-President, Walter P. Burn & Associates, Inc. 



PERTINENT data on Metropolitan District Counties, States, and Regions 
of the United States are presented in the 1945 RADIO ANNUAL. 
Figures are from the Bureau of the Census; projections are by Walter 
P. Burn & Associates, Inc. Postwar ratings of Metropolitan District 
Counties were prepared by Dr. Philip M. Hauser, Assistant Director, Bureau 
of the Census, and were originally presented before the National War Con- 
ference of the American Marketing Association. 

Population, Families, Radio Homes 

Tables for Civilian Population Changes by Regions, Divisions and States 1940-1943 
are self-explanatory. It must be remembered that while the loss of population to the 
armed services has cut civilian population, the actual population of the country has 
increased during the period 1940-1943. 

Civilian population for the latest available period Nov. 1, 1943 is presented for all 
Metropolitan District Counties, all other counties with a city of 25,000 population 
and for all States. This is followed by a percentage change figure for quick evaluation. 

Families and Effective Radio Home Figures have been projected from latest 
available government sources. Because many recent surveys, both by the Government 
and from independent sources have begun to take account of "dead" Radio Homes, 
or those in which no radios are operative today, RADIO DAILY for the first time 
presents Effective Radio Homes as a more accurate estimate of the available listening 
audience rather than total Radio Homes. It is interesting to note that thet total of 
Effective Radio Homes, 1945, is 31,271,178 based upon an estimated 36,244,024 families 
or a national family coverage of 86.2%, while RADIO DAILY'S 1944 estimate of total 
Radio Homes 1944 reached 31,298,920, a difference of only 27,742 Radio Homes. 

Projected figures for Families and Effective Radio Homes are shown to the last 
digit, not because they are assumed to be accurate to the last digit, but for summation 
convenience and to follow the pattern set by the Bureau of the Census in estimating 
Civilian Population. 

Post- War Ratings 



A-l Markets which grew most rap- 
idly since 1940 and from 1920-1940. 
These markets are adjudged to have 
superior prospects of retaining war- 
time population growth. 

A-2 Markets which grew at above 
average rates since the war's com- 
mencement and from 1920-1940. These 
markets are adjudged to have excel- 
lent prospects of retaining wartime 
population growth. 

A-3 Markets which grew at above 
average rates since the war's com- 
mencement and which grew moderate- 
ly # 1920-1940. These markets are 
adjudged to have good prospects of 
retaining wartime population growth. 
B Markets which grew rapidly since 
the war's commencement but at a sub- 
stantially lower relative rate in the 
preceding decade. Wartime growth in 
these markets is considered transient 



unless special efforts are made to con- 
vert to peacetime production. 
C-l Markets which lost population or 
increased relatively little since the 
war's commencement but which grew 
at above average rates 1930-1940. 
These markets are believed to have 
excellent postwar prospects of coming 
back. 

C-2 Markets which lost population 
or increased relatively little since the 
war's commencement and between 
1930-1940, but which grew at rela- 
tively rapid rates between 1920-1930. 
These markets are believed to have 
fair post-war prospects of coming 
back. 

D Markets which lost population or 
grew relatively little since the war's 
commencement and between 1920-1940. 
These markets cannot be expected to 
grow rapidly nor to recoup losses in 
the post-war period. 



274 



CIVILIAN POPULATION CH4IVKES BY 

REGIONS, DIVISIONS, MO STATES 

APRIL 1, 1940, TO NOVEMBER 1, 1943 

ESTIMATED 
ESTIMATED CHANGES IN CIVILIAN CIVILIAN 

POPULATION: 1940 to 1943 POPULATION 

Net Gain 

( + )or Net 

Loss ( — ) Increase 

REGION, Through Net Loss ( + )or 

DIVISION, Civilian Natural to Armed Decrease November April 

AND STATE Migration Increase Forces (—) 1, 1943 1, 1940 

UNITED STATES ... + 305,112 5,261,586 9,740,000—4,173,302 127,228,683 131,401,985 

REGIONS 

The Northeastern States — 30,335 896,110 2,935,994—2,070,219 33,868,320 35,938,539 

The North Central States — 284,977 1,361,436 2,862,680—1,786,221 38,332,985 40,119,206 

The South —1,077,456 2,464,177 2,849,705—1,462,984 40,056,861 41,519,845 

The West +1,697,880 539,863 1,091,621 +1,146,122 14,970,517 13,824,395 

THE NORTHEASTERN STATES 

New England + 120,135 214,516 673,402— 338,751 8,084,568 8,423,319 

Middle Atlantic — 150,470 681,594 2,262,592—1,731,468 25,783,752 27,515,220 



THE NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

East North Central.... + 556,463 897,660 
West North Central... — 841,440 463,776 



1,985,499 — 531,376 26,078,548 26,609,924 
877,181 —1,254,845 12,254,437 13,509,282 



THE SOUTH 

South Atlantic 

East South Central 

West South Central... 



130,270 1,041,705 
644,079 658,174 
563,647 764,298 



1,210,257 — 38,282 17,690,024 17,728,306 
701,405 — 687,310 10,074,226 10,761,536 
938,043 — 737,392 1232,611 13,030,003 



THE WEST 

Mountain — 53,780 

Pacific +1,751,660 

NEW ENGLAND 

Maine — 30,395 

New Hampshire — 11,995 

Vermont — 31,407 

Massachusetts + 37,032 

Rhode Island + 29,478 

Connecticut + 127,422 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC 

New York + 222,970 

New Jersey + 184,882 

Pennsylvania — 112,382 



224,264 
315,599 



25,763 
11,356 
10,452 
94,652 
18,105 
54,188 



288,196 
101,337 
292,061 



297,926 — 127,442 4,018,073 4,145,515 
793,695 +1,273,564 10,952,444 9,678,880 



58,344 
36,863 
21,882 

353,327 
61,391 

141,595 



62,976 
37,502 
42,837 
221,643 
13,808 
40,015 



782,205 
453,136 
316,019 

4,092.195 
694,112 

1,746,901 



845,181 
490,638 
358,856 

4,313,838 
707,920 

1,706,886 



1,087,862 —1,022,636 12,440,005 13,462,641 
365,427 — 79,208 4,077,434 4,156,642 
809,303 — 629,624 9,266,313 9,895,937 



275 



REGION, 

DIVISION, 

AND STATE 

UNITED STATES 



ESTIMATED CHANGES IN CIVILIAN 
POPULATION: 1940 to 1943 

Net Gain 



( + )or 

Loss ( — ) 

Through 

Civilian 

Migration 

+ 305,112 



Natural 
Increase 



Net Loss 

to Armed 

Forces 



Net 

Increase 

( + )or 

Decrease 

(-) 



ESTIMATED 

CIVILIAN 
POPULATION 



November April 
J, 1943 1, 1940 



,261/786 9,710,000 -4,173,302 127,228,683 131,401,985 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL 

Ohio + 230,966 

Indiana + 78,977 

Illinois + 68,562 

Michigan + 280,812 

Wisconsin — 102,854 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL 

Minnesota — 191 ,964 

Iowa — 192,584 

Missouri — 116,916 

North Dakota — 100,430 

South Dakota — 89,113 

Nebraska — 96,294 

Kansas — 54,139 

SOUTH ATLANTIC 

Delaware + 19,383 

Maryland + 235,379 

District of Columbia.. + 205,251 

Virginia + 154,699 

West Virginia — 139,632 

North Carolina — 262,833 

South Carolina — 137,928 

Georgia — 130,793 

Florida + 186,744 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 

Kentucky — 262,676 

Tennessee — 70,843 

Alabama — 116,366 

Mississippi — 194,194 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 

Arkansas — 225,372 

Louisiana - 19,033 

Oklahoma — 303,542 

Texas — 15,700 

MOUNTAIN 

Montana — 69,012 

Idaho — 44,889 

Wyoming — 8,688 

Colorado — 22,759 

New Mexico — 44,362 

Arizona + 76,651 

Utah + 32,397 

Nevada + 26,882 

PACIFIC 

Washington + 244,931 

Oregon + 138,158 

California +1,368,571 



218,857 
114.785 
218,807 
232,425 
112,786 



111,738 
85,717 

112,101 
31,927 
26.4S6 
40,907 
54,900 



8,142 

70,498 

22,011 

145,534 

116,783 

252,087 

150,496 

196,198 

79,956 



153,014 

173,825 
187,598 
143,737 



132,398 
145,666 
120,381 
365,853 



22,579 
27.932 
12,875 
44,841 
40,826 
32,012 
39,085 
4,114 



57,736 

33,477 

224,386 



532,884 
242,104 
615,120 
392,441 
202,950 



188,026 
155,652 
256,836 
37,143 
35,746 
83,532 
120,246 



20,283 
137,345 

64,793 
182,261 
147,899 
211,112 
110,244 
190,064 
146.256 



184.341 
202,119 
176,964 
137,981 



120.640 
171.102 
162,149 
484,152 



43,022 
34,991 
18,376 
77,198 
38,386 
37,396 
37,984 
10,563 



83,061 
48,342 
"327,751 
120,796 
193,018 



268,252 
262,519 
261,651 
105,646 
98,373 
138,919 
119,485 



7,242 
168,532 
162,469 
117,972 
170,748 
221,858 
97,676 
124,659 
120,444 



294,003 
99,137 
105,732 

188,438 



213,614 

44,469 

345,310 

133,999 



89.465 
51,948 
14,189 
55,116 
41,922 
71,267 
33,498 
20,433 



131,383 + 171,284 

88,310 + 83,325 

574,002 +1,018,955 



6,822,031 
3,379,052 
7,559,576 
5,373,718 
2,944,171 



2,523,681 
2.275,086 
3,522,109 
536,229 
544,493 
1,175,336 
1,677,503 



273,370 
1,981,664 

816,982 
2,767,921. 
1,731,171 
3,344,348 
1,788,337 
2.974,868 
2,011,363 



2,546,941 
2,816,399 
2,715,919 
1,994,967 



1,734,440 
2,314,941 
1,987,539 
6.255,691 



469,916 
472,925 
235,684 
1,066,418 
489,863 
569,150 
583,560 
130,557 



1,903,649 
1,171,801 
7,876,994 



6,905,092 
3,427,394 
7,887,327 
5,252,922 
3,137,189 



2,791,933 
2,537,605 
3,783,760 
641,875 
642,866 
1,314,255 
1,796,988 



266,128 
1,813,132 

654,513 
2,649,949 
1,901,919 
3,566,206 
1,886,013 
3,099,527 
1,890,919 



2,840,944 
2,91^,536 
2,821,651 
2,183,405 



1,948,054 
2,359,410 
2,332,849 
6,389,690 



559,381 
524,873 
249,873 
1,121,534 
531,785 
497,883 
550,062 
110,124 



1,732,365 
1,088,476 
6,858.039 



J/o 













• . . POPULATION CHANGES BY 


STATES 


• • 




% 




Effective 






Civilian Increase or 




Radio 


Post- 


ALABAMA 


Population Decrease I- 
Nov. 1913 1910-1913 


a mi lies 

1945 


Homes 
1945 


war 

Rating 


Metropolitan Districts — Counties 










Birmingham (Jefferson) . . . 


470,383 + 2.3 


130,223 


L01,393 


A-3 


Mobile (Mobile) 


227,763 +60.9 


60,090 


37,369 


A-l 


Montgomery (Montgomery) . 


115,246 + 3.4 


32,619 


is, ill 


•A -2 


Cities 25,000-50,000 Population- not contained in Metropolitan 


Districts. 






Anniston (Calhoun) 


70,610 +13.6 


18,130 


10,76.1 




Gadsden (Etowah) 


77,085 + 6.2 


19,484 


13,621 




Tuscaloosa (Tuscaloosa) . . . 


67,977 —10.6 


16,858 


9,643 





369,372 



ARIZONA 

Metropolitan District — County 

Phoenix (Maricopa) 206,095 +10.7 59,436 45,335 A-l 

City 25,'000-50,000 Population — not container! in Metropolitan District. 

Tucson (Pima) 88,520 +21.5 24,498 19,265 



TOTAL STATE 569,357 +14.5 158,750 113,416 



ARKANSAS 

Metropolitan District — County 

Little Rock (Pulaski) 165,771 + 6.2 47,713 36,268 A-2 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Fort Smith (Sebastian) 58,253 -7.3 16,431 13,184 



TOTAL STATE 1,735,564 —10.9 460,341 259,855 



CALIFORNIA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Fresno (Fresno) 194,652 + 9.0 58,064 44,442 C-l 

Los Angeles (Los Angeles, 

Orange) 3,292,050 

Sacramento (Sacramento) . 188,168 

San Francisco-Oakland (Ala- 
meda, Contra Costa, Marin, 
San Francisco. San Mateo, 
Solano) 1,822,984 

San Diego (San Diego) 394,569 

San Jose (Santa Clara) 191,811 

Stockton (San Joaquin) .... 151,805 
Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained 

Bakersfield (Kern) 141,541 

Riverside (Riverside) 122,235 

San Bernardino (San Bernar- 
dino) 185,081 +14.9 58,152 50,950 

Santa Barbara (Santa Bar- 
bara) 74,629 +5.8 41,286 20,852 



+ 13.0 1,122,489 
+ 10.8 57,929 


1,046,094 
52,080 


A-2 
A-2 


+ 26.0 615,844 
+ 42.9 126,514 
+ 11.3 57,813 
+ 13.1 43,956 


564,181 

125,508 

55,215 

36,704 


A-2 
A-l 
A-2 
A-2 


letropolitan Districts. 






+ 4.7 42,440 
+ 20.1 39,446 


34,264 
32,806 





TOTAL STATE .. 7,881,694 +14.8 2,606,620 2,585,768 

277 



POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



Civilian Increase or 

/i/\T f\jy A Tl/~\ Population Decrease Families 

%^\JLt\Jl\l\lJVJ Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 
Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Denver (Arapahoe, Denver, 

Jefferson) 405,274 + 6.3 129,862 

Pueblo (Pueblo) 73,268 + 6.4 20,693 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Colorado Springs (El Paso) . 61,234 +13.3 19,904 

TOTAL STATE 1,067,095 — 4.7 323,586 

CONNECTICUT 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Bridgeport (Fairfield) 434,265 + 3.8 122,251 

Hartford-New Britain (Hart- 
ford, Middlesex) 532,921 + 5.3 146,718 

New Haven- Waterbury (New 

Haven) 477,763 — 1.4 135,356 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

New London (New London) . 129,384 + 4.9 36,774 

Torrington (Litchfield) 87,662 + 0.7 24,981 

TOTAL STATE 1,748,402 + 2.4 491,407 

DELAWARE 

Metropolitan District — County 

Wilmington (New Castle) . . . 189,532 + 6.2 52,059 

TOTAL STATE 273,614 + 3.1 77,736 



Effective 
Radio Post- 
Homes War 
1945 Rating 



122,691 A-2 
18,541 A-3 

17,886 

281,312 



120,360 A-3 

143,850 A-3 

134,367 D 

33,957 
22,891 



482,291 



48,658 A-2 



68,369 



210,860 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Metropolitan District — Counties 

Washington (District of Co- 
Columbia; Montgomery, 
Prince Georges, Md.; 
Alexandria City, Arlington, 
Va.) 1,175,384 +27.8 328,111 306,489 A-l 

TOTAL D. C 816,982 +24.2 227,733 

FLORIDA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Jacksonville (Duval) 245,123 +16.6 68,239 

Miami (Dade) 294,445 +10.0 88,918 

Tampa - St. Petersburg 

((Hillsborough, Pinellas) . 301,412 +10.8 92,939 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts 

Orlando (Orange) 77,314 +10.3 23,965 

Pensacola (Escambia) 87,335 +26.5 24,588 

West Palm Beach (Palm 

Beach) 80,932 + 1.2 25,862 

TOTAL STATE 2,012,046 + 6.4 590,071 407,472 

278 



55,275 
78,557 


A-l 
A-l 


73,706 


A-l 


17,425 
15,922 




18,273 





POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



7o 

Civilian Increase or 

f^T^f\jyf^j A Population Decrease Families 

IxHiUKlxliV Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 
Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Atlanta (DeKalb, Fulton) . 486,362 + 1.9 137,463 

Augusta (Richmond) 88,871 + 9.3 24,678 

Columbus, (Muscogee; Rus- 
sell, Ala.) 135,980 +22.2 36,269 

Macon (Bibb) 101,811 +21.5 29,782 

Savannah (Chatham) 150,111 +28.9 43,136 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Rome (Floyd) 53,187 — 5.3 14,060 

TOTAL STATE 2,976,645 — 4.1 774,807 



Effective 
Radio Post- 
Homes War 
1945 Rating 



114,289 
15,535 



A-l 
A-2 



21,160 A-3 

16,974 A-2 

26,735 A-2 

11,051 



435,498 



IDAHO 

City 25,000-50,000 Population 
Boise City (Ada) 



TOTAL STATE 



49,073 



473,166 



— 2. 



9.8 



15,072 



137,902 



13,948 



120,380 



ILLINOIS 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 
CHICAGO (Cook Dupage, 

Lake; Lake, Ind.) 4,508,492 — 1.4 1,330,891 1,309,779 

Decatur (Macon) 84,638 — 0.1 26,053 24,245 

Peoria (Peoria, Tazewell) . . 199,525 — 5.8 60,136 57,437 

Rockford (Winnebago) .... 126,110 + 4.1 38,717 37,210 

Springfield (Sangamon) . . . 113,393 — 3.8 34,302 32,678 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Aurora, Elgin (Kane) 129,669 — 0.4 37,936 36,328 

Bloomington (McLean) .... 65,453 —11.5 20,045 19,325 

Danville (Vermilion) 76,222 —12.2 23,323 21,209 

Galesburg (Knox) 48,224 — 7.7 15,402 13,918 

Joliet (Will) 116,322 + 1.8 31,630 31,129 

Quincy (Adams) 58,590 —10.2 18,115 15,932 

TOTAL STATE 7,563,770 — 4.0 2,260,698 2,173,790 



C-2 
C-2 
C-l 

B 

D 



INDIANA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Evansville (Vanderburgh; 

Henderson, Ky.) 179,995 

Fort Wayne (Allen) 152,686 

Indianapolis (Marion) 491,053 

South Bend (St. Joseph) .... 173,111 

Terre Haute (Vigo) 90,633 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in 

Anderson (Madison) 91,707 

Elkhart (Elkhart) 70,125 

Kokomo (Howard) 45,986 

Lafayette (Tippecanoe) 52,781 

Marion (Grant) 54,838 

Michigan City (La Porte) . . . 67,531 

Muncie (Delaware) 75,429 

Richmond (Wayne) 58,669 

TOTAL STATE 3,383,312 

279 



+ 14.1 


52,892 


44,055 


A-2 


— 1.5 


44,587 


43,758 


C-2 


+ 7.3 


150,619 


146,628 


A-2 


+ 7.0 


49,980 


45,781 


C-2 


— 9.1 
Melropol 


29,480 
ilan Districts. 


27,251 


D 


+ 3.5 


28,009 


26,070 




— 3.5 


19,890 


19,231 




— 3.7 


13,987 


13,263 




+ 3.5 


15,821 


15,195 




— 1.7 


16,645 


15,674 




+ 6.1 


19,004 


18,124 




+ 0.6 


23,391 


22,172 




— 0.9 


17,476 


16,716 




— 1.2 


1,008,226 


91$,870 





POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



Civilian Increase or 

j/^vtt|t a Population Decrease Families 

lUWi\ Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 
Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Cedar Rapids (Linn) 87,246 — 2.1 27,696 

Davenport -Rock Island -Mo- 
line (Scott; Reck Island, 

111.) 201,244 + 1.8 60,865 

Des Moines (Polk) 188,572 — 3.1 58,776 

Sioux City (Woodbury) 89,736 —13.4 26,606 

Waterloo (Black Hawk) . . . 75,979 — 5.0 23,096 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts 

Burlington (Des Moines) . . . 39,690 + 7.8 12,495 

Clinton (Clinton) 43,543 —2.6 13,003 

Dubuque (Dubuque) 58,741 — 7.9 15,788 

Mason City (Cerro Gordo) . . 37,543 —14.4 10,840 

Ottumwa (Wapello) 42,639 — 3.7 13,270 

TOTAL STATE 2,276,876 —10.3 679,366 



Effective 
Radio Post- 
Homes War 
1945 Rating 

26,001 C-l 



59,144 


C-l 


56,859 


C-l 


25,021 


D 


22,678 


C-l 


12,033 




12,024 




15,047 




10,324 




11,389 





633, 



KANSAS 

Metropolitan Districts - — Counties 

Topeka (Shawnee) 84,765 —7.1 26,376 24,721 

Wichita (Sedgwick) 194,945 +36.0 60,771 54,432 

City 25,000-50.000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Hutchinson (Reno) 48,129 - 7.7 14,684 13,551 

TOTAL STATE 1,678,722 — 6.5 514,176 446,817 



C-2 
B 



KENTUCKY 

Meli opolitan District — County 

Louisville (Jefferson; Clark, 

Floyd, Ind.) 508,719 +12.7 149,527 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Lexington (Fayette) 77,085 — 2.3 22,054 

Owensboro (Daviess) 49,223 — 5.9 13,719 

Paducah (McCracken) 42,814 —11.8 12,829 

TOTAL STATE 2,549,108 —10.1 677,582 



130,816 B 

19,334 

10,526 

9,801 



474,911 



LOUISIANA 

Metropolitan Districts — Parishes 
New Orleans (Jefferson, Or- 
leans) 584,181 + 7.3 166,756 

Shreveport (Caddo) 139,693 — 7.0 40,390 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Alexandria (Rapides) 88,654 +20.8 22,576 

Baton Rouge (East Baton 

Rouge) 107,066 +21.1 29,507 

Monroe (Ouachita) 57,658 — 2.6 16,549 

TOTAL STATE 2,316,681 — 1.8 624,932 347,816 

280 



127,978 
25,743 



12,650 

20,853 
10,622 



A-2 
C-l 



• • • POPULATION CHANGES BY 


STATES 


• • 


MAINE 

Metropolitan District Comity 


% 
Civilian Increase or 
Population Decrease F 
Nov. 19-13 1940-1943 


Effective 

Radio 
amilies Homes 
19ir, 1945 


Post- 
War 
Hating 


Portland (Cumberland) 
Cities 25,000-50,000 Population 


152,877 + 0.4 
not contained in Metropolitan 


4.3,852 41,455 
Districts. 


A-2 


Bangor (Penobscot) 
Lewiston (Androscoggin) 


86,442 - 1 1 .0 
73,716 - .'5.9 


23,359 21,203 

20,188 19,059 





TOTAL STATE 782,312 - 7.3 218,530 197,041 

MARYLAND 

Metropolitan District — County 

Baltimore (Baltimore City, 

Anne Arundel, Baltimore) 1,207,436 +12.5 335,156 316,677 A-2 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Cumberland (Allegany) 81,302 — 6.5 21,973 19,911 

Hagerstown (Washington) . 69,890 + 1.5 19,219 17,003 



TOTAL STATE 1,982,947 + 9.8 544,383 486,319 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Boston - Lowell - Lawrence - 
Haverhill (Essex, Middle- 
sex, Norfolk, Plymouth, 
Suffolk) 2,677,740 - 5.1 744,904 734,745 D 

Fall River - New Bedford 

(Bristol) 342,529 — 6.1 98,676 93,774 D 

Springfield-Holyoke (Hamp- 
den, Hampshire) 392,640 — 2.9 109,613 107,961 D 

Worcester (Worcester) 472,224 - 6.2 129,543 127,948 D 

Cities 25.000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Pittsfield (Berkshire) 115,704 - 5.4 33,18.3 32,623 

TOTAL STATE 4,093,072 — 5.1 1,143,205 1,124,412 

MICHIGAN 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 
Detroit (Macomb, Oakland, 

Wayne) 2,612,115 +10.0 721,933 699,648 A-2 

Flint (Genesee) 228,183 + 0.1 64,727 61,782 C-2 

Grand Rapids (Kent) 231,381 - 6.1 69,912 67,158 C-2 

Kalamazoo (Kalamazoo) . 101,716 + 1.7 29,990 28,570 C-l 

Lansing (Ingham) 135,958 + 4.1 41,026 36,079 C-l 

Saginaw - Bay City (Bay, 

Saginaw) 206,551 + 0.5 57,961 53,647 D 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Ann Arbor (Washtenaw) . . 97,829 +21.1 28,458 27,833 

Battle Creek (Calhoun) 99,590 +5.7 30,249 29,035 

Jackson (Jackson) 95,022 + 2.1 27,461 26,338 

Muskegon (Muskegon) 104,763 +10.9 30,413 27,984 

Port Huron (Saint Clair) . .. 76,770 +0.8 22,325 21,824 



TOTAL STATE 5,377,329 + 2.4 1,528,635 1,433,728 



. . « POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES * . • 

% Effective 

Civilian Increase or Radio Post- 

IVTTXTAJlT'CrkT A Population Decrease Families Homes War 

1T11JA rs -CiOU 1 i\ Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 1945 Rating 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 
Duluth-Superior (St. Louis; 

Douglas, Wis.) 228,716 — 9.9 67,540 63,151 D 

Minneapolis-St. Paul (Anoka, 
Hennepin, Ramsey, Washing- 
ton) 902,612 — 2.4 272,998 268,723 C-l 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Rochester (Olmstead) 37,155 —12.9 9,680 9,265 

TOTAL STATE 2,525,558 — 9.4 711,607 672,823 

MISSISSIPPI 

Metropolitan District — County 

Jackson (Hinds) 110,836 + 3.3 29,720 17,651 A-2 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Meridian (Lauderdale) 56,981 — 2.2 15,623 8,085 

TOTAL STATE 1,996,333 — 8.6 526,932 221,285 

MISSOURI 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Kansas City (Mo.) - Kansas 
City (Kan.), (Jackson, Mo.; 
Johnson, Wyandotte, Kan.) 670,575 + 2.2 212,824 203,500 B 

St. Joseph (Buchanan) 79,960 —15.0 24,696 20,011 D 

St. Louis (St. Louis City, St. 
Charles, St. Louis; Madi- 
son, St. Clair, 111.) 1,485,868 + 3.9 447,374 422,979 A-3 

Springfield (Greene) 85,256 —5.8 26,957 23,293 C-l 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Joplin (Jasper) 73,963 — 6.0 23,749 20,157 

TOTAL STATE 3,524,790 — 6.8 1,071,848 894,605 

MONTANA 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population 

Butte (Silver Bow) 46,355 —12.9 15,632 15,228 

Great Falls (Cascade) 42,016 . . . 13,355 12,073 

TOTAL STATE 470,033 —15.8 145,836 123,187 

NEBRASKA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Lincoln (Lancaster) 92,795 — 7.7 28,954 27,588 D 

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Iowa 

(Douglas; Pottawattamie, 

Iowa) 302,527 — 3.5 89,876 86,393 D 

TOTAL STATE 1,176,023 —10.5 348,479 310,020 

NEVADA 

TOTAL STATE 130,637 +20.1 42,346 38,460 

282 



POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



% Effective 

Civilian Increase or Radio Post- 

XT'Clir XI A "\/fI>C?XJT^>'l7 , Population Decrease Families Homes War 

INHjW JlAlVlX^MllKli. Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 1945 Rating 
Metropolitan District — County 

Manchester (Hillsborough) . 136,039 — 6.1 39,572 37,547 D 
City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Concord (Merrimack) 49,559 — 18.9 13,989 13,184 



TOTAL STATE 453,333 — 7.7 132,138 121,689 

NEW JERSEY 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Atlantic City (Atlantic) .... 107,491 —13.3 32,492 30,296 C-2 

Trenton (Mercer) 196,424 — 0.5 51,702 50,324 D 



TOTAL STATE 4,080,485 — 1.8 1,158,574 1,133,935 

NEW MEXICO 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — 

Albuquerque (Bernalillo) . . . 69,794 -f 0.6 19,471 15,158 

TOTAL STATE 490,119 - 7.6 128,828 73,329 

NEW YORK 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Albany - Schenectady - Troy 
(Albany, Rensselaer, Sche- 
nectady) 446,558 — 4.1 136,278 132,145 D 

Binghamton (Broome) 164,443 — 0.8 46,494 43,380 C-l 

Buffalo-Niagara Falls (Erie, 

Niagara) 961,345 + 0.4 269,702 264,929 D 

New York-Northeastern N. 
J. (Bronx, Kings, Nassau, 
New York, Queens, Rich- 
mond, Rockland, Westches- 
ter; Bergen, Essex, Hud- 
son, Middlesex, Monmouth, 
Morris, Passaic, Union, 

N. J.) 10,703,374 — 7.1 3,167,572 

Rochester (Monroe) 418,655 — 4.5 124,234 

Syracuse (Onondaga) 283,237 — 4.0 83,129 

Utica-Rome (Herkimer, 

Oneida) 258,433 — 1.8 72,862 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 
Amsterdam (Montgomery) . 53,415 — 9.7 16,169 

Auburn (Cayuga) 59,435 — 9.3 17,660 

Elmira (Chemung) 75,893 + 3.0 22,654 

Jamestown (Chautauqua) . . 113,793 — 7.9 35,689 

Kingston (Ulster) 76,994 —11.5 23,672 

Newburgh (Orange) 125,367 — 6.5 37,196 

Poughkeepsie (Dutchess) . . . 114,177 — 5.3 29,045 

Watertown (Jefferson) 77,184 — 6.4 23,274 

TOTAL STATE 12,442,784 — 7.6 3,643,803 

NORTH DAKOTA 

City 25,000-50,000 Population 

Fargo (Cass) 45,565 —13.8 12,336 11,944 



3,146,128 


C-2 


121,752 


D 


77,009 


D 


68,577 


D 


15,466 




16,467 




21,130 




34,214 




21,804 




35,514 




28,540 




18,650 




3,609,025 





TOTAL STATE 536,510 —16.4 137,913 127,264 

283 



POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



% Effective 
Civilian Increase or Radio Post- 
XT /~\"r>rpTj f ADAT TAJ A Population Decrease Families Homes War 
INUK1U L>i\itUljirN A Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 1945 Rating 
Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Asheville (Buncombe) 97,423 —10.4 25,505 19,245 C-l 

Charlotte (Mecklenburg) . . . 146,168 — 3.7 37,554 30,871 C-l 

Durham (Durham) 80,481 + 0.3 21,369 17,281 A-2 

Greensboro (Guilford) 150,579 - 2.2 38,647 31,645 — 

Winston-Salem (Forsyth) . . 109,847 —13.1 28,952 23,381 C-l 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Raleigh (Wake) 103,369 — 5.6 24,694 17,727 

Rocky Mount (Edgecombe, 

Nash) 92,764 —23.0 18,598 12,122 

Wilmington (New Hanover). 79,070 +65.0 20,744 14,017 

TOTAL STATE 3,346,987 — 6.1 797,556 514,412 

yjm\J Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Akron (Summit) 363,652 + 7.1 104,562 101,045 B 

Canton (Stark) 247,668 +5.4 69,956 66,970 A-3 

Cincinnati (Hamilton, Dear- 
born, Ind.; Campbell, Ken- 
ton. Ky.) 834,281 + 3.2 258,131 245,877 A-3 

Cleveland (Cuyahoga) 1,228,803 + 1.0 363,777 346,992 C-2 

Columbus (Franklin) 415,930 + 7.3 120,969 117,731 A-3 

Dayton (Montgomery) 338,688 +14.6 99,963 97,593 B 

Hamilton -Middletown (But- 
ler) 123,344 + 2.6 35,548 33,609 A-3 

Springfield (Clark) 100,466 + 5.0 29,878 27,776 A-3 

Toledo (Lucas) 336,396 — 2.3 100,691 95,083 C-2 

Youngstown (Mahoning, 

1 Trumbull) 361,613 — 2.9 96,715 92,018 C-2 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Elyria-Lorain (Lorain) .... 113,482 + 1.0 32,676 31,377 

Lima (Allen) 80,819 +10.3 23,779 19,781 

Mansfield (Richland) 72,831 —1.4 21,193 19,532 

Marion (Marion) 45,040 + 0.3 13,705 12,965 

Newark (Licking) 60,805 — 2.4 19,208 17,261 

Portsmouth (Sciota) 71,025 —18.0 19,237 16,993 

Steubenville (Jefferson) ... 86,069 —12.3 23,288 21,566 

Zanesville (Muskingum) . . . 64,947 — 6.9 19,885 18,044 

TOTAL STATE 6,828,352 — 1.1 2,011,764 1,879,086 



OKLAHOMA Metropolitan Districts - 

Oklahoma City (Oklahoma). 256,559 

Tulsa (Tulsa) 213,200 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population— not contained 

Enid (Garfield) 39,677 

Muskogee (Muskogee) 62,851 

TOTAL STATE 1,987,941 



Counties 








+ 5.1 


77,485 


69,787 


A-2 


+ 10.3 


64,153 


54,332 


B 


Metropolitan 


Districts. 






—12.8 


12,206 


10,019 




— 4.6 


21,138 


13,392 





■14.7 



564,084 



424,556 



UrvriVrUIM Metropolitan District — County 

Portland (Clackamas, Mult- 
nomah) 511,229 +24.0 176,901 162,182 

Citv 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Salem (Marion) 72,715 - 3.4 21,634 19,840 

TOTAL STATE 1,172,674 + 7.8 387,769 347,610 

284 



[onus 


War 


1945 


Rating 


00,401 


1) 


33,688 


I) 


nu.-jor, 


B 


4fi,G84 


I) 


13,092 


I) 


49,53] 


I) 



• • • POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES • • 

% Effective 

Civilian Increase or Radio Post- 

PENNSYLVANIA K« mSuS "m"' 8 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Allen town-Bethlehem-Easton 

(Lehigh, Northampton) . . 332,921 3.9 91,719 

Altoona (Blair) 126,001 L0.2 35,160 

Erie (Erie) 185,179 + 2.4 5:5,571 

Harrisburg (Dauphin) 17:5,077 1.9 18,994 

Johnstown (Cambria) 187,384 —12.2 16,038 

Lancaster (Lancaster) 201,049 - 5.1 56,484 

Philadelphia (Delaware, 
Montgomery, Phil.; Bur- 
lington, Camden, Glouces- 
ter, N. J.) 3,002,565 +1.7 8.17,6:52 810,603 D 

Pittsburgh (Allegheny, Fay- 
ette, Washington, West- 
moreland) 1,960,10.1 — 7.8 510,802 507,881 D 

Reading (Berks) 223,095 -7.8 63,226 60,879 I) 

Scranton-Wilkes Barre 

(Lackawanna, Luzerne) . . 584,282 —21.3 149,71.1 148,969 D 

York (York) 170,363 —4.3 49,601 47,210 I> 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population— not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Aliquippa (Beaver) 158,463 + 1.1 42,016 40,355 

Lebanon (Lebanon) 67,956 —6.4 19,161 18,144 

New Castle (Lawrence) .... 93,094 — 3.9 25,591 24,701 

Sharon (Mercer) 102,721 + 1.7 28.039 25,466 

Williamsport (Lycoming) . . 90,984 - 2.8 26,809 24,612 



TOTAL STATE 9,273,242 - 6.3 2,535,648 2,442,185 

RHODE ISLAND Metropolitan District — County 

Providence (Bristol, Kent, 

Newport, Providence) ... 659,319 — 2.5 187,057 183,798 



TOTAL STATE 694,616 - 2.0 197,679 193,115 

SOUTH CAROLINA Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Charleston (Charleston) .... 161,819 +37.5 46,138 24,43.1 A-l 

Columbia (Richland) 117,175 +11.8 28,886 19,404 A-l 

Cities 25.000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Greenville (Greenville) 140,362 + 2.8 37,160 26,635 

Spartanburg (Spartanburg). 121,475 -4.9 30,146 21,953 



TOTAL STATE 1,789,662 - 5.4 438,013 232,624 

oOU 1 H DAlvO 1 A City 25.000-50,000 Population 

Sioux Falls (Minnehaha). .. . 57,385 —0.5 16,527 15,723 



TOTAL STATE 544,866 —15.2 152,028 115,101 

TENNESSEE Metropolitan Districts - Counties 
Chattanooga (Hamilton; 

W T alker, Ga.) 208,333 — 1.4 56,272 45,622 C-l 

Knoxville (Knox) 195,516 + 9.6 51,316 18,757 C-l 

Memphis (Shelby) 378,108 + 5.6 109,058 78,676 A-2 

Nashville (Davidson) 261,258 + 1.6 72,745 61,564 A-l 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Johnson City (Washington) . 50,556 - 2.1 12,274 9,226 



TOTAL STATE 2,818,226 -r 3.3 742,060 477,182 

285 



POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



Civilian 
rn? V A CJ Population 

1 JCj AAO Nov. 1943 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Amarillo (Potter) 58,042 

Austin (Travis) 106,152 

Beaumont-Port Arthur (Jef- 
ferson) 178,214 

Corpus Christi (Nueces) . . . 113,403 

Dallas (Dallas) 442,967 

El Paso (El Paso) 136,173 

Fort Worth (Tarrant) 267,856 

Galveston (Galveston) 94,314 

Houston (Harris) 601,249 

San Antonio (Bexar) 364,275 

Waco (McLennan) 103,185 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population—not contained 

Abilene (Taylor) 51,056 

Laredo (Webb) 45,729 

Lubbock (Lubbock) 66,235 

San Angelo (Tom Green) . . 39,526 
^Texarkana (Bowie; Miller, 

Ark.) 87,079 

Tyler (Smith) 60,800 

Wichita Falls (Wichita) .... 72,981 

TOTAL STATE 6,259,584 

• Includes Texarkana, Ark. 



% 




Effective 




Increase or 




Radio 


Post- 


Decrease 


Families 


Homes 


war 


1940-1943 


1945 


1945 


Rating 


+ 7.0 


17,168 


15,853 


A-2 


— 4.4 


28,848 


22,707 


C-l 


4-22.7 


50,833 


40,712 


A-2 


+ 22.4 


31,086 


22,054 


A-l 


+ H.2 


133,703 


115,380 


A-l 


+ 8.2 


36,439 


27,161 


B 


+ 18.8 


81,241 


65,532 


A-2 


+ 18.2 


27,854 


24,056 


A-l 


+ 13.7 


176,855 


144,792 


A-l 


+ 15.3 


103,663 


90,113 


A-l 


+ 1.3 


29,621 


22,756 




in Metropolitan Districts. 






+ 15.6 


14,427 


10,962 




+ 0.7 


10,807 


5,049 




+ 27.9 


18,656 


13,382 




+ 0.6 


11,312 


9,206 




+ 5.8 


24,477 


14,305 




—12.0 


17,239 


11,636 




— 0.8 


21,211 


17,420 





1.9 1,765,672 1,242,083 



UTAH 

Metropolitan District — County 

Salt Lake City (Salt Lake) 230,447 + 9.2 65,850 

City 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan District. 

Ogden (Weber) 70,247 +23.9 19,785 



TOTAL STATE 



583,572 



64,242 A-2 
18,901 



+ 6.2 162,223 150,258 



VIRGINIA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport 
News (Hampton, Newport 
News, Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth, South Norfolk 
Cities; Elizabeth City, Nor- 
folk, Princess Anne, War- 
wick) 505,119 +57.1 141,042 

Richmond (Richmond City, 

Henrico) 252,777 + 7.6 70,667 

Roanoke (Roanoke City; Roa- 
noke) 104,808 — 6.6 27,810 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts 

Danville (Danville City; Pitt- 
sylvania) 88,467 — 6.4 21,250 

Lvnchburg (Lynchburg City; 

Campbell) 64,350 — 8.9 16,880 

Petersburg (Petersburg City; 

Dinwiddie) 49,055 + 0.5 12,121 

TOTAL STATE 2,769,828 + 4.8 702,208 

286 



105,489 


A-2 


61,752 


A-2 


24,346 

s. 


C-2 


13,600 




12,777 




7,688 





495,296 



POPULATION CHANGES BY STATES 



VERMONT 

City 25,000-50,000 Population 
Burlington (Chittenden) 

TOTAL STATE 



% Effective 
Civilian Increase or Radio Post- 
Population Decrease Families Homes War 
Nov. 1943 1940-1943 1945 1945 Rating 



47,147 



310,074 



0.0 



-11.5 



12,823 



88,308 



11,933 



81,110 



WASHINGTON 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Seattle (King) 594,793 +18.2 211,914 201,783 A-2 

Spokane (Spokane) 172,352 + 0.0 50,395 52,095 A-2 

Tacoma (Pierce) 208,991 +20.0 09,800 05,000 A-2 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population— not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Bellingham (Whatcom) .... 54,094 — 9.4 18,900 17,055 

Everett (Snohomish) 90,997 + 2.5 30,059 24,798 

Yakima (Yakima) 90,725 — 2.3 29,803 23,451 

TOTAL STATE 1,905,239 +10.8 033,510 571,809 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Charleston (Kanawha) 224,174 +14.7 57,006 44,412 A-2 

Huntington - Ashland ( Ky. ) 
(Cabell; Boyd, Ky.; Law- 
rence, Ohio) 172,311 — 9.4 46,398 

Wheeling (Brooke, Marshall, 

Ohio; Belmont, Ohio) 204,373 —12.8 50,747 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts 

Clarksburg (Harrison) 72,043 —13.1 19,390 

Parkersburg (Wood) 55,201 —11.4 15,884 

TOTAL STATE 1,732,355 — 8.9 437,096 337,875 



39,412 


C-2 


51,971 


D 


15,763 
13,977 





WISCONSIN 

Metropolitan Districts — Counties 

Madison (Dane) 135,232 + 3.5 39,121 37,875 A-2 

Milwaukee (Milwaukee) .... 762,105 — 0.0 223,321 212,074 C-2 
Racine-Kenosha (Kenosha, 

Racine) 154,107 — 2.1 43,844 42,919 D 

Cities 25,000-50,000 Population — not contained in Metropolitan Districts. 

Appleton (Outagamie) 05,714 — 0.2 17,076 17,003 

Beloit (Rock) 78,573 — 2.0 23,097 22,717 

Eau Claire (Eau Claire) .... 43,093 — 8.3 12,027 11,058 

Fond du Lac (Fond du Lac) . 56,201 — 9.9 15,904 15,297 

Green Bay (Brown) 82,352 — 0.9 21,777 20,782 

La Crosse (La Crosse) 55,597 — 6.8 15,899 15,545 

Oshkosh (Winnebago) 76,482 — 5.0 22,177 21,656 

Sheboygan (Sheboygan) ... 70,712 —7.2 20,537 19,810 

Wausau (Marathon) 66,711 —12.1 17,189 16,080 

TOTAL STATE 2,945,355 — 0.1 835,479 788,223 

WYOMING 

TOTAL STATE 235,739 — 3.7 77,732 61,048 

TOTAL UNITED STATES . 127,307,884 —3.1 36,244,024 31,271,178 

287 




The Pacific Coast, too, 
I IS SAWED IN TWO! 






Are you sawing the Pacific Coast in 
half? You are if you aren't using Don 
Lee on the Pacific Coast. For half the re- 
tail sales on the Pacific Coast are made 
outside the counties in which Los An- 
geles, San Francisco, Oakland, Seattle 
and Portland are located— and only Don 
Lee completely covers the outside half. 

Why. you ask? Easy! Most markets in the 
outside half are surrounded by moun- 
tains and long range broadcasting won't 
work (watts do fine until they hit moun- 
tains). However, with 38 stations, Don 



Lee broadcasts locally from ■within these 
mountain-surrounded areas. A recent 
Hooper coincidental telephone survey, 
largest ever made on the Pacific Coast, 
revealed 60 to 100% of the listeners in 
many of these "outside" markets were 
tuned to Don Lee stations. 

As for the inside half, Hooper ratings 
prove that a good show on Don Lee will 
reach more people than the same show 
on other networks. During the past year 
all the shows that switched from any of 
the other 3 networks to Don Lee, have 
received higher Hooper ratings within 
thirteen weeks! 

Don't saw the Pacific Coast in half! 
Buy Don Lee — the only network that 
covers it completely! 



The Nations Greatest Regional Nehvork 



DON/LEE 



thomas s. lee, President 

LEWIS ALLEN WEISS, Vice-Pra. h GciuAtgr. 
5515 MELROSE AVE.,HOLLYWOOD38,CAL. 

RcL-rcsciUtd Nationally by John Blai. & Co. 



NETWORKS 



n ETUI RKS 

OF THE 

0HITED STATES 



nOTIOflflL 

REGIODflL 




the Buckle on the CORN BELT 

tying up the greatest listening audience . . . 
ihe greatest £>*Mgf0£ffi audience in Iowa 



faiflltfy 



One billion and a half dollars is a lot of bucks! 

In the corn country that represents plenty of buying 

power for your products. Today . . . WMT reaches 

an audience where 96.9% of the families own 

radios. (The U. S. average is only 88.97o-) 

You can't afford to leave WMT 

off your regular schedule. 




Heprasented by the Kcstz Agency 



THE BLUE NETWORK 

of The American Broadcasting Co., Inc. 




MARK WOODS 



THE past year 
has been of 
supreme impor- 
tance to the 
Blue network. 
During it we 
have materially 
strengthened the 
Blue through a 
series of person- 
nel changes and 
departmental re- 
alignments s o 
that we are now 
in a position to 
deliver better 

shows to the advertiser and the agency 
as well as to the public at large. 

None of us can know, of course, what 
the next year will bring. But to the Blue 
Network it holds the promise of many 
things. We have laid the foundations for 
the first complete FM network. During 
the past year we queried our affiliated 
stations as to their plans for FM. Only 
one of the 111 stations replying to the 
questionnaire, declared no intention of 
applying for a license; all the others 
either have applied, are intending to 
apply, or, in the case of three Blue 
affiliates are already operating FM sta- 
tions. We ourselves have applied for FM 
transmitters in New York, Chicago, Los 
Angeles, and San Francisco. 

Own Buildinqs 

During the next year, the Blue will 
also be planning its own buildings in 
Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and 
New York. We are now reviewing poten- 
tial projects for these studios which will 
contain the latest developments in studio 
design and engineering equipment, many 
of them unique, which will give the Blue 
facilities to improve broadcasting far be- 
yond present levels. 

As the past year has so ably demon- 
strated the radio broadcasting industry's 



service to the people and the government 
of the United States in the preservation 
of free speech and the free dissemination 
of information, so will the next year show 
once again the dedication of American 
radio to the service of the American peo- 
ple. 

We at the Blue feel that great strides 
have been made during the past year. 
Greater strides will be made in the year 
to come. 

Television Plans 

The Blue's television plans are also 
beginning to take shape with a television 
department preparing to produce shows, 
perhaps already producing- them by press 
time. We have filed applications for tele- 
vision transmitters also in New York, 
Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. 
But naturally, as with the FM transmit- 
ters, any actual construction work de- 
pends upon the government releasing the 
materials for the job at some time not 
yet definite. 

Plans for the active participation of the 
Blue in the field of television were an- 
nounced early this year by the network, 
in conjunction with officials of General 
Electric Co., owners of WRGB, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., and Allen B. DuMont Labo- 
ratories, Inc., owners of WABD, New 
York City. 

Debut of the Blue in television took 
place late in February of this year and 
regular series scheduled over both the 
above television stations on a weekly 
basis. As a general policy, for the time 
being, Blue's television operations will 
concern experimentation with the tele- 
vising of radio shows, rather than produc- 
tion of shows especially for television. 
Negotiations are in progress presently 
with Balaban & Katz to present suitable 
network programs by television from 
studios of WBKB in Chicago. 



291 



THE BLUE 



OF THE AMERICAN BROAI 



*G 4 " V 

( V 



'&S. 



NETWORK FACILITIES 
AS OF FEB. 15, 1945 




* Future Changes 

WPDQ, Jacksonville, Fla., Replaces WJHP June 15, 1945 

WFTL, Miami. Fla., Replaces WKAT June 15, 1945 

WCOP, Boston, Mass., Replaces WHDH June 15, 1945 

KRNT, Des Moines, Iowa, Replaces KSO June 15, 1945 
WNAX, Yankton-Sioux City, Iowa, 

Replaces KSCJ June 15, 1945 
WLAW, Lawrence, Mass., Becomes 

Affiliated June 15, 1945 



ET WOR 



CASTING COMPANY, INC. 




( s 
----- 1 I 



(]»< 



\ to,.Sl«"Cil> 




wees / v/ish 





KWTO 


2% 


L 


/ KCMcT. 


«"6 — 'STkIl i 
i 







THE BLUE NETWORK 

of The American Broadcasting Co., Inc. 



R.C.A. Bldg., 30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 

(Telephone Number, Circle 7-5700) 
EXECUTIVES AND STAFF 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Noble, Chairman 

La Roche, Vice-Chairman of the Board 



Edward J. 
Chester J 
Mark Woods 
C. Nicholas Priaulx 

Officers 

Edward J. Noble Chairman of the Board 

Chester J. La Roche. Vice Chairman of the Board 

Mark Woods President 

E. R. Borroff Vice President 

Keith Kiggins Vice President 

Alexander D. Nicol .Controller 

DEPARTMENTS A1VD DIVISIONS 



Franklin S. Wood 
Earl E. Anderson 
Harold V. Hough 
Roy E. Larsen 



Robert E. Kintner 

Vice Pres., News & News Feature Dept. 
C. Nicholas Priaulx. .. .Vice Pres. and Treasurer 

Hubbell Robinson Vice President 

Charles E. Rynd Treasurer & Asst. Secy. 

Anthony M. Hennig Assistant Treasurer 



Advertising 

Fred Smith Vice Pres., Dir. of Promotion, 

Publicity and Advertising 

Ivor Kenway Advertising Manager 

Ted Oberfelder 

Co-ordinator of Audience Promotion 
Humboldt J. Greig 

Manager Business Development Division 
James Bennett Merchandising Manager 

Controller's Office 

Alexander D. Nicol Controller 

Engineering Department 

George O. Milne Chief Engineer 

Frank Marx Technical Advisor 

Benjamin Adler Facilities Engineer 

Legal Department 

Joseph A. McDonald General Attorney 

Geraldine B. Zorbaugh Attorney 

Clark Stover Attorney 

Office Management and 
Personnel Department 

D. B. Van Houten 

Office Manager & Personnel Manager 

Program Department 

Hubbell Robinson Vice President 

Adrian Samish National Production Director 

Stanley Joseloff 

Nat'l Director Talent & Development 
Charles C. Barry 

National Director Program Operations 



Melvin P. Wamboldt. .Eastern Production Manager 
Dorothy Ann Kemble 

Director of Continuity Acceptance 

Paul Whiteman Director of Music 

G. W. Johnstone 

Director of News and Special Features 
Harrison B. Summers. . Director of Public Service 
Grace M. Johnsen 

Director of Women's Programs 

Harry Wismer Director of Sports Division 

John Coburn Turner Script Editor 

Paul Mowrey Manager Television Division 

Juliet Glen Manager Program Promotion Division 

James W. Bixler Night Program Manager 

Raymond Diaz Supervisor of Announcers 

Maurice Brachhausen .. .Manager Sound Effects 

Helen Guy Business Manager 

Richard Bannier 

Director of Library, Supervisor of Music Rights 
Gertrude Hoffman 

Manager of Continuity Clearance 
Norah Donovan Manager of Literary Rights 

Publicity Department 

Earl Mullin Publicity Manager 

Arthur B. Donegan. .Assistant Publicity Manager 
Ralph J. Gleason Trade News Editor 

General Sales 

C. P. Jaeger Vice Pres., Gen. Sales Manager 

M. B. Grabhom Asst. General Sales Manager 

John Donohue Eastern Sales Manager 



294 



Stanley Florsheim. Manager Co-op Program Sales 

Ralph Dennis National Spot Sales Manager 

John Brooke Eastern Spot Sales Manager 

Ludwig Simmel Sales Service Manager 

International 

Donald Withycomb Manager 

Recording 

Lawrence Ruddell Manager 

Research Department 

Edward F. Evans Research Manager 

Stations Department 

Keith Kiggins Vice President 

John H. Norton, Jr. ... Station Relations Manager 
Thomas J. Dolan Traffic Manager 



Treasurer's Department 

Charles E. Rynd Treasurer 

Anthony M. Hennig Assistant Treasurer 
Henry T. Hede, Jr Purchasing Agent 

WJZ Management 

John H. McNeill Manager of WJZ 

Robert I. Garver Sales Manager 

John J. Hade Program Manager 

Duncan Miller Sales Promotion Manager 

Joseph M. Seiferth, Jr. 

Audience Promotion Manager 

Madeleine Cleary ..WJZ Sales Service Manager 

Howard St. John Merchandising Manager 

Don Rich Publicity Manager 



E. R. Borroff Vice President in Charge 

G. I. Berry Sales Manager 

Kenneth Christiansen Traffic Supervisor 

L. E. Douglass Program Business Manager 

Walter L Emerson Legal Counsel 

E. C. Horstman Engineering Manager 

E. J. Huber Sales Promotion Manager 

Eli Henry Publicity Manager 

F. E. Kasser Supervisor of Announcers 



CENTRAL DIVISION— CHICAGO 

Merchandise Mart, Chicago, Illinois 
Telephone: Delaware 1900 



Roy McLaughlin Manager Station WENR, 

Nat'l Spot & Local Sales Manager 

Cornelius O'Dea News Supervisor 

R. S. Peterson. .. .Auditor and Business Manager 

Gene Rouse Program Manager 

Merritt R. Schoenfeld. Assistant General Manager 

G. W. Vernon Research Manager 

M. S. Wetzel Production Manager 

Robert White Public Service Supervisor 



WESTERN DIVISION— HOLLYWOOD 

628 5 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, California 
Telephone: Hillside 8231 

Henry Orbach News Manager 

Ted MacMurray Production Manager 

Frank Samuels Pacific Coast Sales Manager 

Amos Baron National Spot Sales Manager 

Ernest Felix Auditor 

John J. O'Mara Sales Promotion Manager 

Francis Conrad Station Relations Manager 

Station KECA 

Clyde Scott General Manager 

Rex Bettis Station Engineer 

John Edwards Program Manager 



Don Searle 

General Manager of Western Division 

Clifford Anderson . . Program Traffic 

Dorothy L. Brown Continuity Acceptance 

R. G. Denechaud Engineering Manager 

Paul Gates Evening Program Manager 

Russell Hudson Sales Service Manager 

Walter W. Lonher Traffic Manager 

Victor H. Perrin Chief Announcer 

Milton N. Samuel Publicity Manager 

Leo B. Tyson Program Manager 



WESTERN DIVISION— SAN FRANCISCO 

Taylor and O'Farrell Streets, San Francisco, Calif. 
Telephone: Grays tone 6545 

T. B. Palmer General Manager KGO Francis La Tourette News Manager 

A. E. Evans Engineering Manager Byron Nelson Sales Manager 

Eleanor Higby Traffic Manager Lorraine Jenevein ... Continuity Editor 

Edith Kirby Auditor Robert Wesson Program Manager 

Robert Laws ..Promotion and Publicity Manager 

Stations Owned and/or Managed and/or Programmed by 

THE BLUE NETWORK 

of The American Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

WJZ, New York Owned, operated and represented by The Blue Network 

WENR, Chicago Owned, operated and represented by The Blue Network 

WMAL, Washington Owned by Evening Star Publishing Co. 

Represented by The Blue Network 
KGO, San Francisco Owned, operated and represented by The Blue Network 

295 




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»% 








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Of Course-- 

An Extra Service 
A tNo Extra Cost. 



KMBC 

OF KANSAS CITY 

Tree &. Peters, Inc. 

1928 _Basic CBS Affiliate 
Since 1928 *= 

forMi S5 °«" andN 




■-, : --«P 



'■' ■ '.'■■ '' . . .. . ■■■■■ :: : : -' .■■..■: . .:. 





PAUL W. KESTEN 



HOPE for a 
peaceful 
conclusion, in 
Europe, of our 
third war year 
has vanished. 
Yet no other 
conclusion that 
peace - with vic- 
tory is possible, 
and each pass- 
ing day brings 
us closer to that 
end. 

Although 
fully conscious 

of its special obligations in war, the Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System has given 
serious consideration to postwar opera- 
tions. Columbia intends to follow the same 
course in 1945, believing that today's ef- 
forts and decisions will do much to sim- 
plify, and therefore, hasten, tomorrow's 
neace-time development. 

We have, in this past year, offered to 
the industry and to the FCC specific 
proposals concerning three major divi- 
sions of post-war broadcasting — tele- 
vision, international shortwave, and FM. 
It is our sincere conviction that the pro- 
posals we have set forth, in all three 
fields, represent sharp advances that 
must eventually be achieved if broadcast- 
ing is to continue development at a pace 
comparable to its past performance. 

Tele Motives 

In its recommendations for television, 
however, CBS has found itself in the 
curious position of having to defend a 
proposal for progress. We have asked 
for better television, as quickly as pos- 
sible. We have pointed to the source of 
twice-as-good television, on wide bands 
in the high frequencies. We have matched 
words with actions — in applications for 
high-frequency stations, in orders for 
high-frequency transmitters, in negotia- 
tions for new type receivers, and in the 
expenditure of a larger television budget 



than is to be found on the books of any 
other non-manufacturing broadcaster. 

Our motives in all this should be per- 
fectly clear. Television pictures today 
are in our opinion simply not good 
enough to attract — and hold — the 
audience that is essential to a commer- 
cially successful medium. Prewar set 
sales were negligible, and war-time au- 
dience research tells us that the public 
now expects far better television than 
present standards can give them. Until 
the public gets the kind of television it 
expects, an audience that interests ad- 
vertisers cannot be built, and broad- 
casters will — and should — carry the 
cost of programs. But private resources 
are limited, and a television audience 
that ceases to grow will ultimately, of 
economic necessity, be allowed to die on 
the vine. 

Prospects for 1945 

There are good prospects that 1945 will 
see successful demonstration in the 
United States of the kind of television 
we can endorse. Much factual evidence 
uncovered in 1944 supports these hopes. 
High-definition, 1000-line television has 
already been demonstrated in France. 
High-frequency, wide-band television, as 
a world standard, is inevitable, at what- 
ever sacrifice it may mean of present day 
equipment. And we have repeatedly 
asserted that such sacrifice would be 
smaller today than tomorrow, and small- 
er tomorrow than the day after. 

Conclusion 

Ours, we believe, is an optimistic as 
well as a realistic stand. Television can 
become one of America's leading post- 
war industries, and we intend to do ev- 
erything possible in the coming year to 
hasten its greatest potential develop- 
ment. For that reason, we shall con- 
tinue to disagree with any policy or ac- 
tion which, in our opinion, threatens to 
stunt the growth of a new industry for 
the sake of immediate and, possibly 
temporary profit. 



297 




NETWORK FACILITIES 
AS OF JAN. 15, 7945 



ASTING SYSTEM 




COLUMBIA BROAD 



NETWORK FACHJ 
AS OF JAt 



CASTING SYSTEM 




COLUMBIA 

Broadcasting System, Inc. 



Executives and Staff 
485 Madison Avenue, New York City 
Telephone: Wlckersham 2-2000 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John J. Burns J. A. W. Iglehart Leon Levy 

Prescott S. Bush Paul W. Kesten Samuel Paley 

Ralph F. Colin Isaac D. Levy William S. Paley 

Officers 

William S. Paley President and Director 

Paul W. Kesten 

Executive Vice President and Director 
Joseph H. Ream. . . .Vice President and Secretary 

Frank Stanton Vice President 

Frank K. White Vice President and Treasurer 

H. V. Akerberg 

Vice President in Charge of Station Relations 
H. Leslie Atlass Vice President, Chicago 



N. Y. 



Dorsey Richardson 
Mefford R. Runyon 
Herbert Bayard Swope 



Douglas Coulter 

Vice President in Charge of Programs 
William C. Gittinger, 

Vice President in Charge of Sales 

Paul M. Hollister Vice President in Charge 

of Advertising and Sales Promotion 
D. W. Thornburgh. . .Vice President, Los Angeles 

Samuel R. Dean Assistant Treasurer 

James M. Seward Assistant Secretary 

Arthur S. Padgett General Auditor 



DEPARTME]\TS AND DIVISIONS 



Accounting Department 

S. R. Dean. .Assistant Treasurer and Comptroller 

William J. Flynn Assistant Comptroller 

L. C. Merrick Assistant Comptroller 

Sophie Hinze Cashier 

Auditing and Tax Department 

Arthur S. Padgett .General Auditor 

Norman duFrane Assistant General Auditor 

Construction and Building 
Operations Department 

G. Stanley McAllister 

Director of Construction and Building Operations 
C. R. Jacobs 

Assistant Director and Manager of Construction 
Joseph E. Werden 

Manager of Building Service Operations 
James R. Stevens. .Manager of Theatre Operations 

Walter Weiler Manager of Internal Security 

Roland Young. .Assistant Manager of Construction 

Editing and Copyright 
Department 

Jan C. Schimek 

Director of Editing and Copyright 

Donald I. Ball Assistant Editor 

Arthur Jersild 

Consultant on Children's Programs 
W. Clark Harrington 

Assistant Manager of Copyright 

General Engineering 
Department 

William B. Lodge 

Director of General Engineering 



J. W. Wright Chief Radio Engineer 

H. A. Chinn Chief Audio Engineer 

Engineering Research and 
Development Department 

Peter C. Goldmark Director 

Legal Department 

Julius Brauner General Attorney 

Howard L. Hausman Attorney 

Mail, File and Mimeograph 
Department 

Albert H. Bryant Manager of Mail, File 

and Mimeograph Department 

Network Sale Department 

William C. Gittinger 

Vice President in Charge of Sales 

John J. Karol Network Sales Manager 

William J. Fagan Administrative Manager 

Allyn Jay Marsh Assistant Sales Manager 

Charles E. Midgley, Jr Sales Service Manager 

Chicago Office Network Sales, 410 North Michigan 
Avenue 

W. Donald Roberts Western Manager 

Detroit Office Network Sales, Fisher Building 
Joseph R. Spadea Detroit Representative 

Personnel Department 

Joseph H. Jackson Personnel Manager 

Bennett W. Lowry Employment Manager 

Arthur L. Jansen Job Analyst 

Music Library 

Julius Mattfeld Director of Music Librar) 



300 



Network Operations 

Horace Guillorre. .Manager of Network Operations 

News and Public Affairs 
Division 

Paul W. White Director of Public Affairs 

and News Broadcasts 
Everett Holies 

Assistant Director of News Broadcasts 

Henry Wefing Night News Editor 

J. W. Gerber. ..Supervisor of Shortwave Listening 
William J. Slocum, Jr. 

Director of Special Events 

Program and Operating 
Departments 

Douglas Coulter 

Vice President in Charge of Programs 
William Fineshriber. . Asst. Director of Broadcasts 
R. S. Langham Co-ordinator of Broadcasts 

James M. Seward Director of Operations 

I. S. Becker Assistant Director of Operations 

R. R. Ray. .. .Assistant to Director of Operations 
Merritt Coleman 

Assistant to Director of Operations 

Education Division 

Lyman Bryson Director of Education 

Leon Levine Assistant Director 

Helen Sioussat Director of Talks 

Elinor Inman Director of Religious Broadcasts 

General 

James H. Fassett. .. .Supervisor of Serious Music 

Larry Puck Supervisor of Popular Music 

Programs and Talent Scout 

Marjorie Morrow Casting Director 

Lucile Singleton In Charge of Vocalists 

Auditions and Record Library 

Program Writing Division 

Robert J. Landry Director of Program Writing 

Charles Monroe Acting Script Editor 

Elwood Hoffman Script Editor 

Mortimer Frankel Script Editor 

Program Typing Division 

Harriet Hess Supervisor of Program Typing 

Sound Effects Division 

Walter R. Pierson. .Mgr. of Sound Effects Division 
Max Uhlig Assistant Manager 

Press Information 

George Crandall Director of Press Information 

Arthur Perles Assistant Director 

Charles F. Pekor Asst. to the Director 

Walter Seigal. .Manager of Photographic Division 
Joan Lane Trade News Editor 

Purchasing Department 

John E. Forsander Purchasing Agent 

Radio Sales 

Representation of Columbia 

Owned Stations 

J. Kelly Smith General Manager, Chicago 

Howard Meighan. . .Manager of Eastern Division 
New York 



Roger K. Huston. . .Manager of Central Division, 

Chicago 

Ole G. Morby Representative, San Francisco 

Royal E. Penny Representative, Charlotte 

Carter Ringlep Representative, St. Louis 

Meredith Pratt Representative, Los Angeles 

Research Department 

John K. Churchill Director of Research 

Oscar Katz Assistant Director of Research 

Edward Reeve Chief Statistician 

Reference Department 

William C. Ackerman. .Director Reference Dept. 

Stanford Mirkin Mgr. of Program Research 

Agnes Law Librarian 

Sales Promotion and 
Advertising Department 

Paul M. Hollister. .. .Vice President in Charge of 
Advertising and Sales Promotion 

John Fox Manager of Production 

Thomas D. Connolly Manager of Station 

Promotion and Merchandising 
Louis Hausman. .Manager of Presentation Division 

Harry O'Brien Art Director 

Dick Dorrance Director of Promotion Service 

for CBS Owned Stations 

Shortwave Broadcasting and 
Latin American Affairs 

(For Personnel, See Page 994) 

Station Relations Department 

H. V. Akerberg Vice President in Charge 

Howard Lane Director of Station Relations 

William A. Schudt Jr Eastern Div. Field Mgr. 

Los Angeles Office Station Relations 

Columbia Square 

Edwin Buckalew, Western Division Manager 

Chicago Office Station Relations 

410 N. Michigan Avenue 

Ralph S. Hatcher, Central Division Manager 

Washington Office Station Relations 

Earle Building 
Edward Yocum, Washington Manager 

Television Department 

Worthington Miner Manager of Television 

Gilbert Seldes. . . .Director of Television Programs 

Technical Operations 
Department 

Henry Grossman .... Dir. of Technical Operations 

R.C.Thompson Manager of 

Technical Operations, Eastern Division 

Traffic Department 

Hugh A. Cowham Commercial Engineer 

in Charge of Traffic 
A. H. Peterson Traffic Manager 

New York City 

WABC and WABC-FM, 485 MADISON AVE. 

Arthur Hull Hayes General Manager 

G. Richard Swift Program Director 

John Field, Jr Sales Manager 

Henry Grossman Chief Engineer of WABC 

Jules Dundes Sales Promotion Manager 

J. E. Doyle Manager of Press Information 



301 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS— WEEI 

182 Tremont Street 

Harold E. Fellows Mgr. New England Operations 

for CBS 

Kingsley Horton. .. .Assistant Manager-Director 

of Programs and Sales 

Walter Stiles, Jr Director of Engineering, 

Sound and Transcriptions 

John J. Murray Manager of Accounting, 

Personnel and Purchasing 

Raymond G. Girardin, . . .Production Manager and 

Assistant Program Director 

Marie Houlahan Director of Press Information 

Guy C. Cunningham. .Director of Sales Promotion 
H. Roy Marks Assistant Sales Manager 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA— WBT 
Wilder Building 

A. D. Willard, Jr General Manager 

Royal E. Penny 

Sales Manager and Radio Sales Representative 

Charles H. Crutchfield Program Director 

William F. Carley,. ..Director of Sales Promotion, 
Press Information and Merchandising M/S 

John S. Knell, News Editor and 

Supervisor of Special Events 
Edward J. DeGray 

Supervisor of Accounting and Personnel 
M. J. Miner Chief Engineer 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS— WBBM and WBBM-FM 
410 North Michigan Avenue 

H. Leslie Atlass Vice President in Charge of 

Central Division and General Manager of WBBM 
G. L. Van Volkenburg 

Assistant General Manager 
Walter Preston 

Acting Director of Program Department 

Urban Johnson Chief Sound Technician 

J. J. Beloungy, Manager of Technical Operations, 
Central Division and Chief Engineer of WBBM 
J. V. McLoughlin 

Accountant, Office and Personnel Manager 

James Crusinberry News Editor 

Jonathan W. Snow Sales Promotion Manager 

George T. Case Assistant Program Director 

Don E. Kelley Director of Press Information 

MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL, MINN.— WCCO 
625 Second Avenue, South 

Austin E. Joscelyn General Manager 

Alvin Sheehan Assistant General Manager 

H. S. McCartney Chief Engineer 

Mary Doherty Accountant 



Sam H. Kaufman. . .Manager of Sales Promotion 
and Director of Press Information 

PACIFIC COAST 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE, KNX 

Columbia Square 

D. W. Thornburgh. Vice President in Charage ot 

Western Division and General Manager of KNX 

Harry W. Witt Assistant General Manager 

Charles D. Ryder, Jr Manager of Accounting, 

Personnel and Purchasing 

Lester Bowman Mgr. Technical Operations 

Western Division and Chief Engineer of KNX 

Clinton Jones News Editor 

Hal Hudson Western Program Director 

Lloyd Brownfield Press Information Director 

Ralph W. Taylor. . Manager of Sales Promotion 

Fox Case Director of Special Features 

J. Archie Morton Sales Manager 

Ben Paley Production Manager 

Charles E. Morin. .Sales Mgr. for Pacific Network 
George L. Moskovics 

Eastern Sales Mgr., Pacific Network and KNX 
George W. Allen 

Pacific Coast Network Program Director 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

Palace Hotel 

Wayne Steffner Manager 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI— KMOX 
401 South Twelfth Blvd. 

Frank Falkner General Manager 

Arthur Casey Assistant 

Wendell B. Campbell 2nd Assistant Station 

Manager and Director of Operations 

Harry Harvey Chief Engineer 

Jerry Hoekstra Manager of Special Features 

Robert F. DeVoe Supervisor of Accounting, 

Personnel and Office 
William Zalken. .. .Director of Press Information 
David Mars 

Director of Sales Promotion and Advertising 
C. G. Renier Director of Program Sales 

WASHINGTON, D. C— WTOP 

Earle Building 

Earl H. Gammons. .Director of Washington Office 

Carl Burkland General Manager of WTOP 

William D. Murdock. .Assistant General Manager 

Martin D. Wickett Program Director 

Clyde Hunt Chief Engineer 

Harry R. Crow Supervisor of Accounting, 

Personnel and Purchasing 
Robert S. Wood Director of Special Features 



; ■■ - -., ■ .. Oji:j ■msfi !?)■; 



Columbia Broadcasting System 



WABC, New York, N. Y. 
WBBM, Chicago, Illinois 
WBT, Charlotte, North Carolina 
WCCO, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 



WTOP, Washington, D. C. 
KMOX, St. Louis, Missouri 
KNX, Los Angeles, California 
WEEI, Boston, Massachusetts 



302 



f 1 



THE war is be- 
ing fought on 
all fronts across 
the seas. But it is 
sometimes being- 
bought and sold 
on the broadcast- 
ing fronts for the 
wrong kind of 
profit far too 
much in a coun- 
try which really 
has not fully ex- 
perienced the 
tragedy and suf- EDGAR KOBAK 

f ering of the 
present war. 

We talk suavely about all the pro- 
grams we put on the air to speed victory 
and to make our active and wounded ser- 
vice men happier, but I feel strongly 
that in many cases we are neither speed- 
ing victory nor making those fighting 
for us more happy about some of the 
things we assume here at home. Too 
often we are talking, singing, playing 
and dramatizing our way into the com- 
placency our military leaders have been 
trying so hard to make us realize is a 
mortal danger. 

• 

This message is written in a time of 
great changes, yet I feel unhappily cer- 
tain that by the time it reaches you our 
attitude will not have changed sufficient- 
ly. In talking about this speeding to vic- 
tory while men are dying and undergo- 
ing hardships in a way only those who 
have seen combat can really know, we 
become entangled in a great deal of un- 
timely activity and promotion of plans 
for the post-war world. 

The broadcasting industry itself in a 
number of respects has been guilty of 
such premature planning. Actually, the 
approach of radio, in presentations of 
great peacetime production projects, 
talks of comforts for home after victory, 
is frequently discussed by those on the 
inside of the industry with a realization 
that peace is quite possibly nowhere 
nearly as close to achievement as others 
think. Nevertheless, much of the mate- 
rial which goes on the air certainly has 
a strong tendency to lull listeners into 
a false sense of security. 



It's been going on too long. A service 
man or woman on combat duty thinks 
of such things and often does what a 
Navy chaplain recently characterized as 
"a well-qualified layman offering a few 
appropriate remarks." luaybe the fighter 
doesn't even do that. Maybe he just 
screws up his face and says nothing with 
a feeling of bitterness. 
• 

The man in combat sometimes thinks 
of what we have been so casually de- 
scribing as a post-war world when he 
has the moment of leisure which often 
doesn't come for weeks at a time. Of 
course he wants a world such as he knew 
to come back to. 

Some of them were thinking of the 
life they might remake for themselves 
as they sat in canteens and read the 
newly begun post-war features in the 
Army newspaper, "Stars and Stripes," 
discussing from a fundamental stand- 
point, post-war civil aviation, housing, 
farming and education. But they well 
knew what tragedy was being created 
a few miles from them, and that "post- 
war" was a thing hard of achievement. 
• 

What's the use of building and sus- 
taining a broadcasting industry if we 
lose the war? It still is possible to lose, 
even if at best through an unfortunate 
peace compromise. 

How, then, will we be able to give 
those men who were lucky enough to 
come back, the jobs in an industry stul- 
tified because we were at least partially 
defeated ? 

How much does it mean for a broad- 
caster to tell the public what he is con- 
tributing in the way of programs toward 
winning the war? The public may some 
time awake with an unpleasant start and 
at an unpleasant time and remember that 
it was misled. 

We need to be sobered up a bit. We 
need to forget about the immediate per- 
sonal gain and think more of really win- 
ning the war instead of talking about it. 
We'd better start thinking about the 
actual price of victory so that broadcast- 
ers can blow their triumphal horns when 
we really win it and he able to give jobs 
to the men who fight for a better life 
for us all. 



303 



MUTUAL BROAD 
















« 








- KFEl 
• Denve- 








KVBI _ 
Gr«H Innd • 
KIUL« 
Garden City 




^ *™M # 


WPDN ^ 


-'.- OH<hor 




Clo.ii " 


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1 


For* Wo 







KJST 

Bio Spring • 


• Abifnn 



NETWORK FACILITIES 
AS OF MAH I, 1945 



CASTING SYSTEM 




UTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 




NETV/ORK FAC:: 
AS OF MA:. 



• M UT UA L. * 
Broadcasting System 



Executives and Staff 

1440 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. 

Phone, PEnnsylvania 6-9600 



Officers of the Corporation 



Alfred J. McCosker 

New York, Chairman of the Board 
Edgar Kobak 

New York, President and General Manager 
Theodore C. Streibert 

New York, Executive Vice-President 
Lewis A. Weiss 

Hollywood, Executive Vice-President 
I. E. Campeau Detroit, Vice-President 



Robert D. Swezey...New York, Vice-President 
and Assistant General Mgr. 

Phillips Carlin New York, Vice-President 

in charge of Programs 
Z. C. Barnes . Vice-President in charge of Sales 
Carl Haverlin 
Vice-President in charge of Station Relations 

E. M. Antrim Chicago. Secretary 

J. E. Wallen New York, Treasurer 



Board of Directors 

Edgar Kobak MBS, New York 

E. M. Antrim WGN, Chicago 

Hope E. Barroll. Jr WFBR, Baltimore 

Willet H. Brown Don Lee, Hollywood 

J. E. Campeau CKLW, Detroit 

Chesser Campbell WGN, Chicago 

H; K. Carpenter WHK, Cleveland 

Benedict Gimbel, Jr WIP, Philadelphia 

Leonard Kapner WCAE, Pittsburgh 

Alfred J. McCosker 

WOR, New York, CHAIRMAN 

John Shepard III Yankee Network, Boston 

Theodore C. Streibert WOR, New York 

Lewis Allen Weiss Don Lee, Hollywood 

Accounting Department 

lames E, Wallen Controller 

James Burk Assistant Controller 

George Ruppel Auditor 



Executive Committee 

Edgar Kobak MBS, New York 

Chesser Campbell WGN, Chicago 

H. K. Carpenter WHK, Cleveland 

John Shepard III Yankee Network, Boston 

Theodore C. Streibert WOR. New York 

Lewis Allen Weiss Don Lee, Hollywood 

Departments and Divisions 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Edgar Kobak 

President and General Manager 

Robert D. Swezey Vice President and 

Assistant General Manager 

Legal Staff 

Louis G. Caldwell Washington, D. C. 

Andrew C. Hamilton Chicago 

Emanuel Dannett New York 



306 



Program Department 

Phillips Carlin Vice-President 

in Charge of Programs 

Adolph Opfinger Program Director 

Harold Wagner . . . Assistant Program Director 

Bob Novak . . . .Commercial Program Manager 

Edwin T. Otis . Commercial Program Supervisor 

John Newhouse Night Program Manager 

Floyd Mack Night Program Supervisor 

Tom Slater Director of Special Features 

and Sports 

lohn Whitmore . . . Manager of News Division 

Edward Pettitt Broadcast News Editor 

John Thornton Bureau Chief, 

Pacific Area Headquarters 

Publicity Department 

Jim O'Bryon Publicity Director 

Sales Department 

Z. C. Barnes 

Vice-President in Charge of Sales 

Robert Somerville .... Assistant to Z. C. Barnes 

D. R. Buckham Eastern Sales Manager 

Torrence Danley . . . Manager of Sales Service 

Sales Promotion and 
Reasearch 

Robert A. Schmid Director of Sales 

Promotion and Research 

Peter Zanphir Assistant Director of 

Sales Promotion & Research 

Harold Coulter 

Manager of Audience Promotion 

Richard Puff Manager of Research 



Arnold Roston Art Director 

James Tyler Advertising Director 

Station Relations 

Carl Haverlin Vice-President in 

Charge of Station Relations 

Charles Godwin. . . .Assistant to Carl Haverlin 

Leslie L. Learned 

Manager of Engineering Traffic 

lames Mahoney Manager of Western 

Division, Station Relations 

lerome Sill Manager of Eastern 

Division, Station Relations 

Lewis Tower Station Traffic Supervisor 

Dorothy Driscoll. . . Manager of Station Traffic 

Paul Hancock Statistician 

Theater Management 

Harry Miller . . Director of Theatre Operations 

Chicago Staff 

441 North Michigan Ave.. Chicago, 
Phone— Whitehall 5060 

Adolph N. Hult Western Sales Manager 

Carroll Marts 

Midwestern Sales Service Manager 

Gilbert McClelland . . Sales Promotion Manager 

Myrtle Goulet Station Traffic Supervisor 

Washington Staff 

1627 K Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. (6) 
Phone — Metropolitan 0012 



Charter Heslep 



. Washington Representative 
in Charge of Operations 



MRS Foreign Correspondents 

Milton Bracker Rome 

David Brown Rome 

Bob Brumby China 

Sidney Fine Russia 

Edmund Franke (Engineer) Pacific 

Royal Arch Gunnison Philippines 

Ted Hoskins Cairo and Athens 

Seymour Korman France 



Arthur Mann . . .France, Belgium, and London 

lack Mahon Pacific 

Leslie Nichols Pacific 

Arthur Primm Honolulu 

Norman Paige Honolulu 

John Steele London 

John Thompson France 

Arthur Veysey Sydney 

Alfred Wagg India 



307 



jillllllllllllllillllllli!!l!!!llill!!li!l!ll!lli!IIIIU 

( Advertising COVERAGE ( 

Should Parallel DISTRIBUTION 



Straight-thinking advertising men know, to get the most from 
every advertising dollar, COVERAGE must parallel DISTRIBUTION. 



Rand McNally divides the 
United States into 366 Whole- 
sale Trading Areas. In each 
area is one central city, whose 
wholesalers distribute consum- 
er goods not only within that 
metropolitan zone, but also to 
the intermediate cities and 
rural areas surrounding them. 

For example, Cincinnati is 
the wholesale "funnel" for 25 
counties in Ohio, Indiana and 
Kentucky. 63.6% of its con- 
sumers live outside the central 
city zone, in 19 intermediate 
cities of 2500 population or 
more, and in the rural envir- 
ons. These people buy 52.6% 
of Cincinnati's total food sales, 
45.8% of Cincinnati's total 
drug sales, 46.3% of Cincin- 
nati's total sales of all goods 
at retail. 

Unless your advertising cov- 
ers the intermediate cities and 
rural territories whose source 
of wholesale supply is Cincin- 
nati, as thoroughly as it covers 
Cincinnati's city zone, you 



may be failing to give ade- 
quate sales impetus to as much 
as half of the goods you ship 
into Cincinnati warehouses. 

According to the 1944 
Hooper continuing measure- 
ment studies, WLW delivers 
50.3% of the nighttime audi- 
ence in metropolitan Cincin- 
nati— plus 55.8% of the au- 
dience in 19 intermediate 
cities, and 59.4% of the rural 
audience in the entire Trading 
Area. 

There are 37 of these rec- 
ognized Trading Areas in the 
four-state Merchandise-able 
Area of WLW-Land, and they 
represent a consumer goods 
market of $3,300,105,000 
annually.* 

Parallel thorough DISTRIBU- 
TION with thorough Advertis- 
ing COVERAGE in this 3 bil- 
lion dollar market, with one 
station, at one cost — probably 
the most efficient advertising 
buy in America. 
*The Market Data Book. 



i <i!l![|llllll» 



wiwj 

ION OF THE CROSLEY CORPORATION ^f 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



THE NATION'S MOST MERCHANDISE-ABLE STATION 




NILES TRAMMELL 



THE broadcasting in- 
dustry rendered a 
more significant ser- 
vice to the American 
public during 1944 
than in any previous 
year in its history. For 
this was the third and 
most momentous year 
of the war and also the 
year of a presidential 
election. Day by day 
radio brought news 
from the fighting 
fronts and covered the 
political campaigns — 
with promptness, accuracy and thorough- 
ness. It informed and inspired those at 
home to fulfill their responsibilities in 
the cause of victory. 

Reportorial Staff 
World-wide news coverage was main- 
tained by NBC's staff of fifty-seven re- 
porters and commentators stationed in 
all parts of the world. At 12:41 A.M. on 
June 6th, when the first invasion flash 
was received, the NBC news staff had 
been ready for months to cover the mo- 
mentous happenings of that day. NBC 
reporters accompanied the invasion forces 
to Normandy by sea and air, landed on 
the beaches and stayed with the troops 
as they moved through Normandy and 
Brittany across France and into Ger- 
many. NBC was similarly represented in 
the first B-29 raid over Japan and in the 
Philippine landings. 

During the year, roughly 1200 hours 
on 2700 network programs were devoted 
solely to the war effort?. The famous 
Army Hour, now in its third year, brought 
to millions of American homes every Sun- 
day afternoon the Army's own first-hand 
reports of its activities of every front. 
NBC programs, both commercial and non- 
commercial, provided valuable support 
for the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth War Loan 
Drives, for the Red Cross and for a multi- 
tude of other home-front activities. 

Headed by Maestro Arturo Toscanini, 
the NBC Symphony Orchestra — the 
world's first full-size, full-time symphony 
orchestra created especially for broad- 
casting — launched its eighth consecutive 
year over the NBC network. 

The war-time need of the nation for 



spiritual comfort was reflected during 
1944 in an increase in the scope and 
variety of NBC religious programs. Of 
deep significance was the first broadcast 
of a Jewish religious service from Nazi 
Germany, which was presented by NBC 
shortly after the fall of Aachen in late 
October. 

At the year-end, the NBC network 
comprised a total of 149 stations, com- 
pared with 142 at the end of 1943. Six 
stations are owned by NBC; the remain- 
ing 143 are independently, owned and 
are associated with NBC in a contrac- 
tual relationship. 

Program Service 

The National Broadcasting Company, 
the senior of America's four national 
network organizations, maintained its 
position of leadership in program ser- 
vice. 

During the evening hours of two mo- 
mentous days of 1944 — D-Day, June 6th, 
and Election Day, Novmeber 7th — the 
total radio listening audience was more 
than 50 per cent above normal. Impar- 
tial surveys revealed that a far greater 
audience was tuned to NBC stations than 
to those of any other network. 

The growing importance of television 
as a great post-war art and industry 
was reflected in the increase and divers- 
ity of television programs put on the air 
bv NBC's pioneer New York station, 
WNBT. 

Tele For Hospitals 

Fifty-five television receivers have been 
installed in nine Army and Navy Hos- 
pitals in New York City and vicinity. 
Television programs of all types, par- 
ticularly boxing bouts, are greatly en- 
joyed by the patients. The average audi- 
ence per hospital television receiver is 
35. On Election night, when visual re- 
ports and tabulations of the election re- 
turns were broadcast by television, a 
checkup of television sets in use showed 
that an average of eight persons gath- 
ered in front of ecah home receiver. 

During 1944 approximately 425,000 
visitors took the guided tour of the NBC 
New York studios. The total number of 
visitors during the eleven years since 
the NBC tours were inaugurated passed 
the five-million mark in October. 



309 



NATIONAL BROAD 






KFYR O Fargo ( 
WDAY V 




Sioux Falls 

KELC 

KSOOO 




On 

— . o Honh Pi3i, « 


HO™ 6 ' 


Hutchinson ^-v 

WitchiuO 
KANS 



NETWORK FACILITIES 
AS OF JAN. J, J 945 



ASTING COMPANY 




O 

Lakeland 



NATI 



ONAL 



BROAD ICASTING COMPANY 




NATIONAL 

Broadcasting Company 



30 Rockefeller Plaza 20, New York City 
(Telephone number, Circle 7-8300) 

Registered Telegraphic Address 
NATBROCAST NEW YORK 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Angell, James Rowland 
Braun, Arthur E. 
Cutler, Bertram 
Dunn, Gano 
Folsom, Frank M. 
Harbord, James G. 



Harden, Edward W. 
McGrady, Edward F. 
Millhauser, DeWitt 
Mullen, Frank E. 
Nally, Edward J. 
Sarnoff, David 



Trammell, Niles 



ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Young, Owen D., Chairman 



Angell, James R. 
Belmont, Mrs. August 
Coffin, Henry Sloan 
Compton, Karl 
Damrosch, Walter 



Davis, John W. 
Farrell, Francis D. 
Green, William 
Harbord, James G. 
Notestein, Mrs. Wallace 
Sarnoff, David 



Officers 



Sarnoff, David Chairman of the Board 

Trammell, Niles President 

Mullen, Frank E., 

Vice-President & General Manager 
Ashby, A. L. . ..Vice-President & General Counsel 

Egner, C. Lloyd Vice-President 

Hanson, 0. B Vice-President 

Hedges, William S Vice-President 

Kopf, Harry C Vice-President 

Menser, Clarence E Vice-President 

■ MB1I1IWM I I1HI II I I p ii uh ii i i hhh ii i h— B MM 



Royal, John F Vice-President 

Russell, Frank M Vice-President 

Strotz, Sidney N Vice-President 

Witmer, Roy C Vice-President 

MacDonald, John H., 

Vice-President in charge of finance 

Teichner, R. J Treasurer 

MacConnach, Lewis Secretary 

Pfautz, C. E Assistant Secretary 



312 



DEPARTMENTS AN II DIVISIONS 



Executive Offices 

Trammell, Niles President 

Mullen, Frank E., 

Vice-President & General Manager 

Almonte, J. deJara Assistant to President 

MacDonald, John H., 

Vice-President in Charge of Finance 

Morgan, Clayland T Assistant to President 

Heath, Horton H Assistant to 

Vice-President & General Manager 

Advertising & Promotion 
Department 

Hammond, Charles P Director 

Rumple, Barry T Manager, Research Divisicn 

Gaines, James M Assistant Director 

Forrest, Arthur L. 

Manager, Public Service Promotion 

Cusack, Parmelee Art Director 

Nelson, James H., 

Manager, Network Sales Promotion 
Samuels, Hartley L. Manager, Program Promotion 
Vaill, Charles B. H... Manager, WEAF Promotion 

Continuity Acceptance 
Department 

Mason, Joseph Manager 

Controller's Department 

McKeon, Harry F Controller 

Kelly, Harold M Assistant Controller 

McGeachie, Hugh R Assistant Controller 

Engineering Department 

Hcnson, 0. B., 

Vice-President & Chief Engineer 
Clarke, William A... Manager, Technical Service 

Guy, R. F Radio Facilities Engineer 

McElrath, George Operations Engineer 

Rackey, C. A., 

Audio & Video Facilities Engineer 

Shelby, R. E Development Engineer 

Wankel, F. A Eastern Division Engineer 

Finance Department 

Myers, J. Robert Budget Officer 

General Service Department 

Lowell, Edward M Director 

Monohan, George 

Manager cf Protection Division 



Guest Delations Department 

Mack, Lathrop Manager 

Walker, Albert Assistant Manager 

Wahlstrom, John Executive Asst. Mgr. 

Ervin, William Asst. Manager 

Skutch, Ira Asst. Manager 

Information Department 

Barnard, Anita 

Manager of Correspondence Division 

International Shortwave 
Department 

Bate, Fred Manager 

Television Department 

Royal, John F Vice-President in Charge 

Williams, John T Business Manager 

Kelly, N. Ray.. Manager of Producticn Facilities 

Legal Department 

Ashby, A. L. .Vice-President & General Counsel 

King, John P Attorney 

Ladner, Henry Asst. Gen. Counsel 

McCrossin, Edward J Attorney-Chicago 

Olliphant, S. R Attorney 

Tatum, Donn B Attorney-Hollywcod 

Hurt, Willson I Attorney-Denver 

Wright, Gordon, Zachry, Parlin & Cahill 

New York & Washington Counsel 

National Spot Sales Dept. 

McConnell, James V Manager 

Rcux, William Assistant Manager 

Tilenius, William Assistant Manager 

Network Sales Department 

Witmer, Roy C Vice-President in Charge 

Frey, George H Sales Service Manager 

Greene, F. Melville Sales Traffic Manager 

Hitz, Edward R. Asst. to Vice-President in Charge 
Showerman, I. E Eastern Sales Manager 

News & Special Events Dept. 

Brooks, William Director 

Meyers, Joseph 

Manager in Charge of Special Events 
Schneider, Adolph Acting Manager of Operations 

Personnel Department 

de la Ossa, Ernest Personnel Director 



313 



Press Department 

Eiges, Sydney H Manager 

Knode, Tom Assistant Manager 



Woodman, Harry A Mgr. Traffic Dept. 

Merryman, Philip I., 

Facilities Development & Research 



Program Department 

Menser, Clarence I Vice-President in Charge 

Robb, Arch Night Program Manager 

Belviso, Thomas H Manager, Music Library 

Black, Frank General Music Director 

Brainard, Bertha Assistant to 

Vice-President, Manager Program Sales 
Murphy, Winifred. .Supervisor of Booking Office 
Provost, de Lancey. Assistant to Manager, WEAF 

Sniff in, Evelyn Supervisor of Business Office 

Chotzinoff, Samuel. . Manager of Music Division 

Damrosch, Walter Music Counsellor 

Kelly, Patrick J Supervisor of Announcers 

Knopfke, Frederick G Sound Effects Manager 

McGray, Thomas Eastern Program Manager 

Stern, William Director of Sports 

McDonagh, Richard Manager of Script 

Wright, Wynn National Production Manager 



Public Service Department 

Angell, James Rowland. .Public Service Counselor 

Herrick, Dwight Manager 

Chase, Gilbert Specialist, 

Latin American Music and Literature 

Cuthbert, Margaret Director of 

Women's & Children's Programs 

Fisher, Sterling Asst. Pub. Serv. Counselor 

Jordan, Max. ... Director of Religious Broadcasts 

Wagner, Jane Director, Home Economics 

Corwith, Deris Assistant to Manager 

Radio Recording Department 

Egner, C. Lloyd Vice-President in Charge 

Cloutier, Norman 

Manager of Thesaurus Programs 
Davison, Walter B., 

Assistant Sales Manager-Agencies 

Hamilton, Morris Program Manager 

Friedheim, Robert W Eastern Sales Manager 

Hayes, Henry Asst. to V.-P., Office Manager 

Parscns, Willis B Asst. Sales Manager 

and Sales Promotion Manager 



Stations Departments 

Hedges, William S..V.-P. in Charge of Stations 

Woolley, Easton C Asst. to Vice-President 

Hickox, Sheldon B., Jr.. .Mgr. of Station Relations 

Mathew, Steere Asst. Mgr. Traffic Dept. & 

Supervisor Commercial Traffic 



Central Division — Chicago 

Merchandise Mart 
Postal District, Chicago 54. 
Phone: Supervisor 8300 

Kopf, H. C Vice-President & Manager 

Carlson, Emmons C. 

Sales Promotion & Adv. Manager 
Chizzini, Frank. ... Manager of Radio Recording 
Drips, William 

Agricultural Public Relations Representative 
Livezey, Henry D. ...Manager of Guest Relations 

Ray, William B Mgr. News & Special Events 

Danielson, Eric Program Traffic Supervisor 

Guilbert, Robert M.. Continuity Acceptance Mgr. 

Herbuveaux, Jules Program Manager 

Kaney, A. W Manager Stations Relations 

Kendall, Robert 

Program and Talent Sales Mgr. 

Luttgens, Howard C Division Engineer 

McCluer, Paul Network Sales Manager 

McCrossin, Edward J Attorney 

Morton, Oliver 

National Spot & Local Sales Mgr. 

Ryan, Jack Manager of Press Relations 

Waller, Judith C Director, Public Service 

Murphy, William J Script Manager 

Whalley, John F Auditor and Office Mgr. 



Western Division — 
Hollywood 

Sunset Blvd. & Vine St. 

Postal District 28 
Phone: Hollywood 6161 

Strotz, Sidney N Vice-President in Charge 

Berend, Frank Sales Manager 

Bock, Harold Manager, Press Dept. 

Dellett, F. V Auditor 

Ford, Frank 

Sales Promotion & Adv. Manager 
Frost, Lewis 

Asst. to Vice-Pres. & Program Mgr. 

Gale, Paul Traffic Manager 

Tatum, Donn B Attorney 

Pierce, Jennings 

Dir. of Public Service & Station Relations 
Robb, Alex 

Program, Talent Sales & Package Sales Manager 
Norman, Dcnald. . . Manager, National Spot Sales 

Hale, Evelyn Guest Relations Manager 

Turner, Oscar Radio Recording Manager 

Wiley, Howard Production Manager 

Donald Hourath. Continuity Acceptance Manager 



314 



San Francisco 

Elwood, Jchn Manager, KPO 

Washington, D. C. 

Trans-Lux Bldg. 
Phone: Republic 4000 

Russell, Frank M Vice-President in Charge 

Goldenstroth, R. G Auditor 

Cooper, Donald H.... Acting Engineer in Charge 

Glascock, Mahlon Sales Manager 

McAndrews, Wm. R.. . Dir. News & Special Events 

Wheeler, George Assistant Manager 

Shawn, Fred Program Manager 

Smith, Carleton D Manager 



Operated Stations 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Pribble, Vernon H., Manager, Station WTAM 
DENVER, COLO. 

MacPherscn, James R., Manager, Station KOA 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Smith, Carleton D., Manager, Station WRC 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Elwood, John W., Manager, Station KPO 

Treasurer's Department 

Teichner, R. J Treasurer 

Bloxham, William D Purchasing Agent 

Terwilliger, C. G Mgr. Credit & Collections 

Williams, William A Assistant Treasurer 



Commentators, Correspondents and Newscasters 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
William F. Brooks 

Director of News and Special Events 
Francis C. McCall 

Manager of Pacific Operations 
Adolph Schneider 

News Editor; Acting Manager of Operations 
Joseph Meyers 

Assistant Manager for Special Events 

Ann Giilis Assistant to the Director 

William McAndrew 

Washington Newsroom Manager 
Edward Wallace ..Cleveland Newsroom Manager 

William B. Ray Chicago Newsroom Manager 

Carl Mehl Denver Newsroom Manager 

Joseph Alvin. .Western Division News Manager 
Charles Cooney 

San Francisco Newsroom Manager 
Stanley P. Richardson ...London Manager 

NEW YORK— H. V. Kaltenborn, John W. Van- 
dercook, Robert St. John, Lowell Thomas, W. W. 
Chaplin, Don Goddard, Don Hollenback, Cesar 
Saerchinger, Lyle Van, C. F. McCarthy, Harold 
Fleming, Clyde Kittell, Roy Porter, Max Hill and 
James Stevenson. 

WASHINGTON — Richard Harkness, Morgan 
Beatty, Leif Eid, Henry C. Cassidy, Kenneth 



Banghart, Den Fisher, Raine Bennett, Robert 
McCormick. 

CLEVELAND— Edward Wallace. 

CHICAGO— Alex Dreier and Clifton Utley. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Elmer Peterson and Larry 
Smith. 

HOLLYWOOD— Sam Hayes, Art Baker and 
Fleetwood Lawton. 

LONDON & WESTERN FRONT — Edwin 
Haaker, John MacVane (3rd Army), Merrill 
Mueller (Eisenhower Hq.), David Anderson 
(British 21st Army), James Cassidy (1st Army), 
Chester Morrison (London), Wright Bryan (Cap- 
tured — in Germany), and Ruth Cowan. 

SOUTH PACIFIC— George Folster and Owen 
Flaherty. 

CENTRAL PACIFIC— John Cooper, Jameb 
Wahl and Wilson K. Foster. 

MOSCOW— Robert Magidoff, Eddie Gilmore 
and Daniel DeLuce. 

CHUNGKING— Spencer Moosa. 

BUENOS AIRES— Stanley Ross. 

ROME— Grant Parr. 

STOCKHOLM— Bjorn Bjornson. 

BERNE— Paul Archinard. 

CAIRO— Guthrie Janssen. 



Stations Owned and Operated by the 

National Broadcasting Company 

WEAF New York Owned and operated by NBC 

WMAQ Chicago Owned and operated by NBC 

WRC Washington Owned and operated by NBC 

WTAM Cleveland Owned and operated by NBC 

KPO San Francisco Owned and operated by NBC 

KOA Denver Owned and operated by NBC 



315 



* KEYSTONE 
Broadcasting System 



Headquarters 

580 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

Phone, LOngacre 3-2221 

Officers & Directors 

President Michael M. Sillerman 

Vice-President Arthur Wolf 

Vice-President William Wolf 

Secretary-Treasurer Sidney J. Wolf 

Director Joseph Bayer 

Offices 
iVeit? YorU Chicago 

134 North La Salle St. 
580 Fifth Avenue Chicago, 111. 

Phone, LOngacre 3-2221 Phone, State 4590 

Secretary -Treasurer Sidney J. Wolf 

President Michael M. Sillerman Accountant Elizabeth M. Mueller 

Director of Station Relations Mort Adams Western Sales Manager Naylor Rogers 



Hollywood 



Sales & Promotion Consultant .... Alvin Austin 

Statistician Irene Douglas 6331 Hollywood Blvd. 

Office Manager Rosita Seale Hollywood, Calif. 

Account Executive Albert F. Dykes Phone, Hollywood 5338 

Account Executive Noel A. Rhys Program Director Elaine N. Gonda 

SERVICES OFFERED: Keystone Broadcasting System is a transcription net- 
work principally covering BEYOND-METROPOLITAN markets from coast to 
coast. Its affiliated stations are joined together in a national system by means 
of transcriptions, eliminating wire charges. At time of going to press, the net- 
work includes 210 affiliated stations. The network supplies its stations with 
84 fully scripted sustaining shows per week filling 4 hours per day, seven days 
each week, to a total of 28 hours per week. This is the only national, full-sized 
network in the United States offering national radio advertisers the opportunity 
to cover the BEYOND-METROPOLITAN markets intensively, in a single transac- 
tion, by means of electrical transcription. The system offers its facilities in 
network time periods from one hour down to five minutes and also makes 
available announcement periods down to twenty-five word length. 

316 



FCC figures show that about one-third of the 
nation — in small town and rich rural "Beyond- 
Metropolitan" areas — receives unsatisfactory coverage, 
or none at all, from major wired network stations. 
Therefore, these millions of listeners were lost 



to national advertisers — "national" in theory 



but not in fact. Then came KBS. 



KEYSTONE NETWOR 



National advertisers now reach these lost millions 
via the Keystone transcription network. For Hooper 
surveys* prove that the vast majority of people 
in the significant "Beyond-Metropolitan" areas 
surveyed listen predominantly to their own local 
Keystone stations. KBS delivers this huge NEW 
mass of audience at the lowest cost per actual 
listener in history. Join the leading national 
advertisers now extending their network programs 



to KBS markets. 



Detailed survey on reqi 



THIS IS THE KEYSTONE 




expand its present all-time-high prosperity. Says 
distribution chief Nelson A. Miller, Dep't. of Commerce, 
"In the post-war competitive market . . . the small town 
and rural market must be brought into selling programs 
in a big way, fully in proportion to its size and 
improved quality." 



ONLY Keystone affords radio advertisers exclusive 
network coverage in this indispensable sector of the nation. 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



THIS IS "BEYOND-METROPOLITAN" AMERICA 




STREAMLINED! 



ONE OPERATION INSTEAD OF 208 



ONE TIME ORDER 



ONE TIME CLEARANCE 



ONE SCHEDULE 



ONE MECHANICS OPERATION 



ONE SOURCE FOR AFFIDAVITS 



ONE INVOICE 



Let the KBS representative tell you the complete 
story. KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM, Inc., 
New York City 19, Chicago 2, Hollywood 28 



KEYSTONE NETWORK 



REGIONAL 
NETWORKS 



Arizona Broadcasting Co. 

(ABC Network) 

711 Heard Bldg., Phoenix. Ariz. 

Phone 4-4161 

PERSONNEL 

President R. B. Williams 

Manager Dick Lewis 

Commercial Manager Dick Heath 

Promotion Manager L. D. Bradbury 

STATIONS 
KTAR; Phoenix; KVOA, Tucson; KYUM. 
Yuma; KGLU, Safford; KWJB. Globe; KYCA. 
Prescott. 

BRANCH OFFICE 

48 East Broadway, Tucson, Ariz. 

Phone 3703 

Executive In Charge R. B. Williams 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Paul H. Raymer Company 

• 

The Arizona Network 

836-838 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 
Phone: 4-4144 
PERSONNEL 

Manager Albert D. Johnson 

Program Manager J. R. Williams 

Commercial Manager John L. Hogg 

KTUC Manager Lee Little 

KSUN Manager Carleton Morris 

STATIONS 
KOY, Phoenix; KTUC, Tucson; KSUN. Bis- 
bee-Douglas. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
John Blair & Company 

• 

Arrowhead Network 

WEBC Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 
PERSONNEL 

General Manager W. C. Bridges 

Director of Operations . . . . H. E. Westmoreland 

Promotion Manager H. H. Sonnenburg 

WMGF Manager Harry Hyett 

WHLB Manager Greg Rouleau 

STATIONS 
WEBC. Duluth, Minn.; WMFG. Hibblng. 



Minn.; WHLB, Virginia, Minn.; WEAU, Eau 
Claire; WJMC, Rice Lake. 

REPRESENTATIVE 
George P. Hollingbery Co. 

• 

Connecticut State Network 

270 Atlantic St.. Stamford, Conn. 

Phone: Stamford 3-0747 

PERSONNEL 

President Harold H. Meyer 

Director Glover DeLaney 

Director Ivon Newman 

Director Richard Davis 

Director Sam Elman 

Director Levon Thomas 

STATIONS 
WNAB, Bridgeport; WATR. Waterbury; 
WSRR, Stamford; WNLC, New London; WELL 
New Haven; WTHT, Hartford. 

REPRESENTATIVES 
Helen Wood, New York 
Bertha Barman (Boston) 

• 

Daniel Boone Regional 
Network 

410 State St., Bristol, Tenn.-Va. 

Phone: Dial WOPI 

PERSONNEL 

President & Gen. Mgr., WOPI. . .W. A. Wilson 

WKPT General Manager Jess Swicegood 

STATIONS 

WOPI, Bristol. Tenn.-Va.; WISE, AshevilU. 

N. C; WKPT. Kingsport, Term. 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Bum-Smith Co. (New York and Chicago) 

Horry E. Cummings (Jacksonville, Fla.) 

• 

Don Lee Broadcasting System 

5515 Melrose Ave.. Hollywood 38. Calif. 

Phone: Hollywood 8111 

San Francisco office: 1000 Van Ness Ave. 

PERSONNEL 

President Thomas S. Lee 

V-P & General Manager Lewis Allen Weiss 



317 



V-P & Assistant General Manager 

Willet Brown 

General Sales Manager Sydney Gaynor 

Assistant Gen. Sales Mgr. .Henry Gerstenkorn 

Exec. Asst. in Production Pat Campbell 

Publicity Director Fair Taylor 

News Editor Les Mawhinney 

STATIONS 

Southern California: KHJ, Los Angeles; KGB. 
San Diego; KDB, Santa Barbara; KFXM. San 
Bernardino; KPMC. Bakersfield; KVOE, Santa 
Ana; KXO, El Centro; KVEC, San Luis Obispo; 
KHIFM, Hollywood; W6XOA (Television sta- 
tion), Hollywood. 

Northern California: KFRC, San Francisco; 
KMYC. Marysville; KHSL, Chico; KVCV, Red- 
ding; KYOS, Merced; KDON, Monterey; KIEM. 
Eureka; KFRE, Fresno. 

Northwest (Oregon): KRNR. Roseburg; KALE. 
Portland; KFJI, Klamath Falls; KORE. Eugene; 
KOOS, Marshfield; KAST. Astoria; KUIN, 
Grants Pass; KWIL, Albany; KSLM, Salem. 

Northwest (Washington): KMO, Tacoma; KIT. 
Yakima. 

KXRO, Aberdeen; KOL, Seattle; KGY, Olym- 
pia; KELA, Centralia; KRKO, Everett; KWLK. 
Longview; KFIO, Spokane; KMO, Tacoma; KUI. 
Walla Walla; KIT, Yakima. 

Idaho: KRLC, Lewiston; KWAL, Wallace. 

Supplementary: KGMB, Honolulu, Hawaii; 

KHBC, Hilo, Hawaii; CKWX, Vancouver, B. C. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

John Blair C Co. 

• 

Georgia Broadcasting System 

(Selling Group; not available as a network) 

P. O. Box 270, Columbus, Ga. 

Phone: Columbus 2-0601 

PERSONNEL 

Executive Manager J. W. Woodruff, Jr. 

STATIONS 
WATL, Atlanta; WRBL, Columbus; WGPC. 
Albany. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Spot Sales, Inc. 

• 

Georgia Major Market Trio 

(Address Any Station or The Katz Agency) 
PERSONNEL 

Associate Manager (WGST) Frank Gaither 

General Manager (WTOC W. T. Knight 

General Manager (WMAZ) Wilton E. Cobb 

STATIONS 
WGST, Atlanta; WMAZ, Macon; WTOC. 
Savannah. 

REPRESENTATIVE 
The Katz Agency 

• 

Interniountain Network 

Hotel Ben Lomond, Ogden, Utah 

Phone: 5721 

PERSONNEL 

General Manager George C. Hatch 



Sales & Gen. Manager.. .Lynn L. Meyer 

Production Manager Kenyon Bennett 

Chief Engineer D'Orr Cozzens 

STATIONS 

KLO, Salt Lake City, Ogden; KVNU, Logan. 

Utah; KOVO. Provo; KEUB, Price; KVRS, Rock 

Springs, Wyo.; KID. Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

248 S. Main St., Salt Lake City. Utah 

Phone: 4-1843 

Gen. Sales Manager Lynn L. Meyer 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Joseph Hershey McGillvra, Inc. 



Kansas State Network 

c/o Don Davis, Scarritt Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Phone: Harrison 1161 

PERSONNEL 

Sales Manager Don Davis 

Program Co-Ordinator John Wahlstedt 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Robert Lindsey (KFBI); Bob Laubengayer 
(KSAL); J. Nelson Rupard (KTSW); Clem Mor- 
gan (KVGB); John Schilling (WHB). 
STATIONS 
WHB, Kansas City (Mo.); KFBI, Wichita; 
KSAL, Salina; KTSW. Emporia; KVGB, Great 
Bend. 

• 

The Lone Star Chain 

806 Tower Petroleum Bldg., Dallas (1) 

Riverside 5663 

PERSONNEL 

Chairman of Operating Committee . O. L. Taylor 

Managing Director Clyde B. Melville 

STATIONS 
KGKO. Fort Worth-Dallas; KXYZ, Houston; 
KRIS, Corpus Christi; KTSA, San Antonio; 
KRGV, Weslaco; KGNC, Amarillo; KFYO, Lub- 
bock. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Taylor-Howe-Snowden Radio Sales 



Maryland All-Home Network 

10 East North Ave., Baltimore 2, Md. 
Phone: Mulberry 1300 
PERSONNEL 
Director of National Sales 

Andrew H. Hilgartner 

Director of Local Sales William S. Pirie 

STATIONS 
WFBR, Baltimore, Md.; WBOC, Salisbury, 
Md.; WJEJ. Hagerstown, Md. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
John Blair & Co. 



Mason-Dixon Radio Group 

8 W. King St., Lancaster. Pa. 
Phone 5252 



318 



REGIONAL NETWORKS 



PERSONNEL 

General Manager Clair R. McCollough 

Sales Manager I. Robert Gulick 

Technical Director J. E. Mathlot 

STATIONS 

WDEL, Wilmington. Del.; WORK, York, Pa.; 

WKBO. Harrisburg, Pa.; WGAL, Lancaster, Pa.; 

WAZL. Hazleton. Pa.; WEST, Easton, Pa. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Radio Advertising Co. 

• 

Michigan Radio Network 

Operated by the King-Trendle Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Stroh Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Phone: Cherry 8321 

PERSONNEL 

President George W. Trendle 

Gen. & Comm. Mgr H. Allen Campbell 

Adv. & Sales Prom. Mgr.. .Lambert B. Beeuwkes 
STATIONS 
WXYZ, Detroit (Key Station); WBCM, Bay 
City; WFDF, Flint; WJIM, Lansing; WIBM, Jack- 
son; WELL. Battle Creek; WLAV, Grand 
Rapids; WSOO, Saulte Ste. Marie; WDBC, 
Escanaba; WDMI, Marquette; WHDF, Calumet; 
WJIM, Lansing; WKBZ, Muskegon. 
REPRESENTATIVE 
Paid H. Raymer Co. 
• 

McClatchy Beeline 

708 Eye St., Sacramento 4, Cal. 

Phone: Sacramento 25011 

PERSONNEL 

President Eleanor McClatchy 

National Sales Mgr Robert A. Street 

STATIONS 
KERN, Bakersfield, Cal.; KMJ, Fresno, Cal.; 
KFBK, Sacramento, Cal.; KWG, Stockton, Cal.; 
KOH, Reno, Nev. 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Paul H. Raymer Company 

• 

Mississippi Broadcasters 
Association 

Hewes-Martin Building, Gulfport, Miss. 

Phone, 

PERSONNEL 

President Hugh O. Jones, WGCM, Gulfport 

Vice-President. .Hugh M. Smith, WAML, Laurel 
Secretary -Treasurer 

Emmet H. McMurry, WJPR, Greenville 
DIRECTORS 
P. K. Ewing. Jr., WMIS, Natchez. Miss.; W. P. 
Harris, WJOX, Jackson, Miss.; Bob McRaney. 



WCBI, Columbus, O.; L. M. Sepaugh, WSLI, 
Jackson, Miss.; C. J. Wright, WFOR, Hatties- 
burg. Miss. 

• 

New England Regional 
Network 

2G Grove St.. Hartford, Conn. 

Phone: Hartford 2-3181 

PERSONNEL 

Chairman Paul W. Morency 

Lee B. Wailes, John J. Boyle, Wm. H. Rines. 
STATIONS 
WBZ, Boston. Mass.; WCSH. Portland. Me.; 
WJAR, Providence, R. I.; WLBZ, Bangor, Me.; 
WTIC, Hartford, Conn.; WFEA, Manchester, 
N. H.; WRDO. Augusta, Me. 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Weed & Company 

• 

North Central Broadcasting 
System, Inc. 

E-622 First National Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minn. 

Phone: Cedar 8579 

PERSONNEL 

President John W. Boler 

Vice-President & Gen. Mgr Donn Clayton 

Secretary E. Iverson 

Comptroller F. Tibeau 

Merchandise Mgr B. H. Onde 

STATIONS 
KVFD, Fort Dodge. la.; WJMS, Ironwood, 
Mich.; KATE, Albert Lea, Minn.; KVOX. Fargo- 
Moorhead. Minn.; KGDE, Fergus Falls, Minn.; 
WMFG, Hibbing, Minn.; WLOL. Minneapolls- 
St. Paul, Minn.; WHLB. Virginia, Minn.; KWLM, 
Willmar, Minn.; KWNO, Winona, Minn.; 
KGCU, Bismarck-Mandan, N. D.; KDLR, Devils 
Lake, N. D.; KSJB, Jamestown, N. D.; KLPM, 
Minot, N. D.; KABR, Aberdeen. S. D.; WATW, 
Ashland. Wise; WEAU, Eau Claire, Wise; 
WDSM, Superior, Wise; WHDF, Calumet, 
Mich.; WDBC. Escanaba. Mich.; WDMJ. Mar- 
quette. Mich.; KOVC, Valley City. N. D.; 
KELD, Sioux Falls, S. D.; KSOD, Sioux Falls, 
S. D.; KOBH, Rapid City, S. D.; KTRI, Sioux 
City. Iowa; KFJB, Marshalltown. Iowa; KRDS, 
Clinton, Iowa; KDTH, Dubuque, Iowa; KICD, 
Spencer, Iowa. 

BRANCH OFFICE 
360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 
8 East 41st St., New York. N. Y. 

• 

Northern Broadcasting & 
Publishing, Ltd. 

Thomson Bldlg., Timmins, Ont., Canada 
Phone: 500 
PERSONNEL 
President R. H. Thomson 



319 



Secretary-Treasurer S. F. Chapman 

Manager (CKGB) H. Freeman 

Manager (CJKL) C. Chambers 

Manager (CFCH) Cliff Pickrem 

Manager (CHEX) H. Cooke 

Manager (CKWS) J. Davidson 

STATIONS 

CKGB, Timmins. Ont.; CJKL, Kirkland Lake. 
Ont.; CFCH. North Bay. Ont.; associated with 
CKWS. Kingston. Ont.; and CHEX, Peterbor- 
ough, Ont. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

Bank of Commerce Bldg., Toronto, Ontario 
Manager R. Leslie 

1010 University Tower, Montreal, Quebec 
Manager Roy Hoff 

• 

Northwest Network 

c/o KSTP, Hotel Saint Paul, St. Paul, Minn. 

Phone. Cedar 5511 
Sales Office: c/o KSTP, Radio City. Minne- 
apolis 2, Minn. 

Phone: Bridgeport 3222 
PERSONNEL 

General Manager Stanley E. Hubbard 

Treasurer Kenneth M. Hance 

Sales Manager Ray C. Jenkins 

STATIONS 
KSTP, St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minn. (Key sta- 
tion); WEBC, Duluth, Minn.; KYSM, Mankato. 
Minn.; WMFG, Hibbing, Minn.; WHLB, Vir- 
ginia, Minn.; KROC. Rochester, Minn.; KFAM, 
St. Cloud, Minn.; KFYR, Bismarck, N. D.; 
WD AY, Fargo. N. D.; WEAU, Eau Claire, Wise. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Edward Petry & Co. 

• 

The Oklahoma Network 

APCO Tower, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
PERSONNEL 

Managing Director Robert D. Enoch 

STATIONS 
KTOK, Oklahoma City; KGFF. Shawnee; 
KBIX, Muskogee; KCRC. Enid; KADA, Ada; 
KOME. Tulsa; KVSO, Ardmore. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Taylor-Howe-Snowden Radio Sales 

• 

Oklahoma Metropolitan Line 

c/o KOMA, Biltmore Hotel 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Phone: 2-3291 

PERSONNEL 

General Manager (KOMA) Kenyon Brown 

Sales Prom. Mgr Webster L. Benham, Jr. 

Dir. of Programs & News Bill Bryan 

Chief Engineer M. W. Thomas 

Production Manager Paul Buenning 

STATIONS 
KOMA, Oklahoma City; KTUL, Tulsa; KWFT. 
Witchita Falls. Texas. 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Free & Peters, Inc. 

• 

Pacific Broadcasting Co. 

914 Broadway, Tacoma 1, Wash. 

Phone: Main 4144 

PERSONNEL 

General Manager Carl E. Haymond 

Traffic Manager John K. Clarke 

Auditor Paul F. Benton 

STATIONS 
Oregon: KALE, Portland; KFJI, Klamath 
Falls; KOOS, Marshfield; KRNR. Roseburg: 
KORE. Eugene; KAST, Astoria; KWIL, Albany; 
KBND, Bend; KSLM, Salem. Ore. 

Washington: KGY, Olympic KELA, Centra- 
lia; KIT, Yakima; KMO, Tacoma; KOL. Seattle; 
KFIO. Spokane; KRKO, Everett; KXRO. Aber- 
deen; KWLK. Longview; KUIN, Grants Pass; 
KVU, Walla Walla. 

Idaho: KWAL, Wallace; KRLC, Lewiston. 
Canada: CKWX, Vancouver. B. C. 
REPRESENTATIVE 
John Blair & Co. 

• 

The Pennsylvania Network 

1622 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

Phone Locust 7700 

PERSONNEL 

General Manager Leon Levy 

Asst. Manager P. J. Sharkey 

Technical Director George Lewis 

STATIONS 
WCAU. Philadelphia (key station); WGAL, 
Lancaster; WORK, York; WAZL, Hazleton; 
WEST. Easton; WSAN, Allentown; WFBG. 
Altoona; WERC, Erie; WLEU, Erie; WHP. 
Harrisburg; WKBO. Harrisburg; WJAC, Johns- 
town; WKST, New Castle; KDKA, Pittsburgh; 
WJAS. Pittsburgh; KQV. Pittsburgh; WCAE. 
Pittsburgh; WRAW, Reading; WARM. Scran- 
ton; WGBI, Scranton; WKOK, Sunbury; WJPA. 
Washington; WBRE, Wilkes-Barre; WBAX, 
Wilkes-Barre; WRAK. Williamsport; (Harris- 
burg, Scranton. Wilkes-Barre. Pittsburgh and 
Erie stations optional). 

• 

Quaker Network 

WFIL, Widener Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phone; Rittenhouse 6900 

PERSONNEL 

General Manager Roger W. Clipp 

STATIONS 
WFIL, Philadelphia; WEST, Easton; WORK. 
York; WAZL, Hazleton; WGAL, Lancaster; 
WGBI. Scranton; WBRE, Wilkes Barre; WKBO. 
Harrisburg; WKOK, Sunbury; WRAK, Wil- 
liamsport; WFBG, Altoona; WJAC. Johnstown; 
WLETJ. Erie; WSAN, Allentown; WWSW. 
Pittsburgh; WSNJ, Bridgeton, N. J. 



320 



REGIONAL NETWORKS 



South Central Quality 
Network 

Address Individual Stations 
PERSONNEL 

Manager (WMC) H. W. Slavick 

Manager (WJDX) Wiley Harris 

Manager (WSMB) H. Wheelahan 

Manager (KARK) G. E. Zimmerman 

Manager (KWKH) John C. McCormack 

• 

Southern Minnesota Network 

101 N. Second St., Mankato. Minn. 
PERSONNEL 

KYSM Manager John F. Meagher 

KROC Manager Gerald Wing 

KATE Manager Ed. L. Hayek 

STATIONS 
KATE, Albert Lea, Minn.; KYSM, Mankato, 
Minn.; KROC, Rochester, Minn. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
John E. Pearson Company 

• 

The Texas Quality Network 

Address Individual Stations 
The Texas Quality Network is a cooperative 
group oi stations, each outlet being a sales 
office for the other. 

PERSONNEL 

Manager (WFAA) Martin Campbell 

Manager (WBAP) George Cranston 

Manager (WOAI) Hugh A. L. Halff 

Manager (KPRC) Kern Tips 

STATIONS 

WFAA, Dallas 2; WBAP, Fort Worth 2; 

WOAL, San Antonio 6; KPRC, Houston 2. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

• 

Texas State Network 

1201 West Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth 1, Texas 
Phone: 3-9363 
PERSONNEL 

President Gene L. Cagle 

General Manager Gene L. Cagle 

Assistant General Manager . . . Frances Griffith 

Program Director Boyd Kelley 

Chief Accountant D. C. Hornburg 

Traffic Manager Forrest Clough 

Merchandising Director L. R. Duffy 

Chief Engineer Truett Kimzey 

Musical Director Frances Kay 

STATIONS 
KFJZ. Fort Worth; KRBC, Abilene; KGKL, 
San Angela; KBST, Big Spring; KRLH, Midland; 
KRRV, Sherman-Denison; KPLT. Paris; KABC, 



San Antonio; KTEM, Temple; WRR, Dallas; 
KCMC, Texarkana; WACO, Waco; KFRD, Long- 
view; KMAC, San Antonio; KBWD, Brownwood. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Weed & Co. 



The Tobacco Network 

P. O. Box 1150, Raleigh, North Carolina 
Phone 6411 
PERSONNEL 

President Fred Fletcher. WRAL 

Secretary Harry Bright, WGBR 

Treasurer Allen Wannamaker, WGTM 

Program Director Ray Reeve 

Sales Manager Raymond Cobb 

Vice-President Louis Howard, WHIT 

STATIONS 

WFNC, Fayetteville, N. C; WGBR, Golds 

boro, N. C; WRAL, Raleigh. N. C; WGTM, 

Wilson, N. C; WGTC, Greenville. N. C; WHIT. 

Greenville, N. C. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
The Walker Company 



Tri-City Stations of Virginia 

Allied Arts Bldg., Lynchburg, Va. 
Phone: 3032 
PERSONNEL 

Manager Philip P. Allen 

Traffic Manager . . Catherine Gleaaon 

Engineer John Orth 

STATIONS 
WSLS, Roanoke; WLVA. Lynchburg; WBTM. 
Danville. 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Philip P. Allen 



West Virginia Network 

CHARLESTON BROADCASTING CO. 

1016 Lee St., Charleston, W. Va. 

Phone: 28-131 

PERSONNEL 

President John A. Kennedy 

Managing Director & V J>. . . Howard L. Chernoff 

Sales Manager Howard L. Chernoff 

Promotion Manager Elizabeth Camp 

Program Director Joseph Herget 

Production Manager Berton Sonis 

Musical Director Leah Perry 

Technical Supervisor Odes Robinson 

WBLK Manager George Blackwell 

WPAR Manager George Clinton 

WSAZ Manager Marshall Rosen* 

WCHS Manager Howard L. Chernoff 



REGIONAL NETWORKS 



STATIONS 
WCHS. Charleston; WPAR, Parkersburg; 
WBLK. Clarksburg; WSAZ, Huntington. FM 
applications tiled for these stations. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
The Branham Co. 



Wisconsin Network, Inc. 

Nash Building 

Wisconsin Rapids. Wise. 

Phone: 90 

PERSONNEL 

President W. F. Huffman 

V.P. & Managing Dir Don C. WIrth 

Secretary Geo. T. Frechette 

STATIONS 
Basic Stations: WRJN, Racine; WCLO, Janes- 
ville; WIBU, Madison; WHBL, Sheboygan; 
WHBY, Appleton; WFHR, Wisconsin Rapids; 
KFIZ, Fond du Lac; WSAU, Wausau; Supple- 
mentary Stations: WEMP, Milwaukee; WTAQ, 
Green Bay; WMAM, Marinette; WEAU, Eau 
Claire; WJMS, Ironwood; WATW. Ashland; 
WOSH, Oshkosh; WIGM. Medford; WJMC, 
Rice Lake; WOMT. Manitowoc; WBKH, La 
Crosse; WDSM, Superior. 



The Wolverine Network 

Keeler Building, Grand Rapids 2, Mich. 
Phone: 6-5461 

President Roy C. Kelley 

Gen. Manager Hy M. Steed 

STATIONS 
WLAV, Grand Rapids (Key Station); WTCM, 
Traverse City; WHLS. Port Huron. WJLB, De- 
troit; WKBZ, Muskegon; WJJD, Chicago, Illinois; 
WIND, Chicago-Gary, Ind.; WKLA, Ludington, 
Mich.; WELL, Battle Creek, Mich.; WIBM, Jack- 
son, Mich.; WHDF, Calumet. Mich.; WDBC. 
Escanaba. Mich.; WDMJ, Marquette. Mich.; 
WJMS, Ironwood, Mich.; WMAM, Marinette. 
Wis.; WJBK. Detroit. Mich. 



Assistant Controller Howard F. Wright 

Station Relations Barbara Spragua 

Sales Executive Gordon Jenkins 

Editor, Yankee Network News Service, 

Robert Meyers 
Director of Merchandising and Promotion, 

James S. Powers 
Director of Merchandising. 

Arthur Lathrop 

Director of Publicity*. Phyllis Doherty 

Director of Special Events Lester Smith 

Chief Engineer Irving Robinson 

Program Director George W. Steify 

War Program Manager Geo. W. Steffy 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
William O'Neil, Chairman; John Shepard 
3rd. Vice-Chairman; James W. Haggerty. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
William O'Neil; Loren Angus McQueen; 
Samuel Smith Poor; James W. Haggerty; John 
Shepard 3rd; Henry Linus Trovers; Frank 
Knowlton. 

STATIONS 
WNAC, Boston; WTHT, Hartford; WEAN. 
Providence; WAAB. Worcester; WICC. Bridge- 
port; WCSH. Portland; WLBZ, Bangor; WFEA. 
Manchester; WSAR, Fall River; WHEB. Ports- 
mouth, N. H.; WLLH, Lowell and Lawrence; 
WLNH, Laconia; WRDO, Augusta; WNLC. New 
London; WHAT, Greenfield; WCOU. Lewiston 
and Auburn; WBRK, Pittsfield; WSYB, Rutland, 
Vt.; WATR, Waterbury, Conn.; WEIM. Filch- 
burg; WHYN, Holyoke. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

604 State Mutual Bldg.. Worcester 8. Mass. 

Phone: Worcester 6-1411 

WAAB Manager H. Wm. Roster 

Crown Hotel. Providence 2. R. I. 
Phone: DEXter 1500 

WEAN Manager Jos. Lopez 

Hotel Stratfield, Bridgeport 1, Conn. 
Phone: Bridgeport 6-1121 

WICC Manager Joseph Lopes 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
Edward Petry & Co.. Inc. 



The Yankee Network 

21 Brookline Ave.. Boston 15, Mass. 

Phone: Commonwealth 0800 

PERSONNEL 

Chairman of Board-General Manager 

John Shepard 3rd 

President William O'Neil 

Executive Vice-President Linus Trovers 

Vice-President George W. Steffy 

Controller, , Robert F. Ide 



ZNet 

P. O. Box 1956, Butte. Montana 
Phone: 22-3-44 
PERSONNEL 

Manager E. B. Craney 

STATIONS 

KGIR. Butte; KPFA, Helena; KRBM, Bozeman. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

The Walker Co. 

WEST COAST REPRESENTATIVE 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



X 



STATIONS 



snnons 

OF m liniTEO STATES 



•b 



Alphabetical Listing 



Standard Stations Indexed 

By Call Letters—Frequency 

Power and Kilocycles 



Standard Stations Indexed 
By Cities— Network Affiliation 



Stations Alphabetically 
Listed By States— Personnel 
Other Detailed Information 



Index Of The 

Standard Stations 

Of The United States 



Call Letters — City — Power — Frequency in Kilocycles — Page Number Providing 
Complete Information 

Key to Abbreviations: C.P. — Construction Permit; d — daytime; n — night. 



Call 

Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 
Page 



KABC 
KABR 
KADA 
KALB 

KALE 

KALL 

KANT) 

KANS 

KABK 

KARM 

KASA 

KAST 

KATE 

KAVE 

KBIX 

KBIZ 

KB Kit 

KBND 

KBON 

KBtPS 

KBST 

KBTM 

KBUR 

KBWD 

KCKN 

KCMC 

KCMO 

KCRA 

KCRC 

KDAL 

KDB . 

KDFN 

KDKA 

KDLR 

KDNT 

KDON 

KDRO 

KDTH 

KDYL 

KECA 



San Antonio, Texas 1450 

Aberdeen, S. D 1420 

Ada, Okla 1230 

Alexandria, La 1240 

580 

Portland, Ore 1330 

.Salt Lake City, I tali ' 910 

Corsicana, Texas 1340 

Wichita, Kans 1240 

Little Rock, Ark 920 

Fresno, Calif 1430 

Elk City, Okla 1240 

Astoria, Ore 1230 

Albeit Lea, Minn 1450 

Carlsbad, N. M 1240 

Muskogee, Okla 1490 

Ottumwa, Iowa 1240 

Baker, Ore 1490 

Bend, Ore 1340 

Omaha, Neb 1490 

Portland, Ore 1450 

Big Spring, Texas 1490 

Jonesboro, Ark 1230 

Burlington, Iowa 1490 

Brownwood, Texas 1380 

Kansas City, Kans 1340 

Texarkana, Texas 1230 

Kansas City, Mo . 1480 

Sacramento, Calif 1340 

Enid, Okla 1390 

Duluth, Minn 610 

Santa Barbara, Calif 1490 

Casper, Wyo 1470 

Pittsburgh, Pa 1020 

Devils Lake, N. D 1240 

Denton. Texas 1450 

Monterey, Calif 1240 

Sedalia, Mo 1490 

Dubuque, Iowa 1370 

Salt Lake City, Utah 1320 

Los Angeles, Calif 790 

324 



250 


617 


5000 


599 


250 


561 


250 


441 


1000 C. P. 


441 


5000 


567 


1000 C. P. 


623 


250 


609 


250 


434 


5000 


354 


5000 


358 


100 


562 


250 


565 


250 


471 


250 


500 


250 


562 


250 


426 


250 


565 


250 


566 


250 


492 


100 


569 


100 


608 


250 




250 


423 


500 


609 


250 


433 


250 


619 


1000 


485 


250 C. P. 


367 


1000 


562 


1000 


471 


250 


372 


1000 


645 


50000 


585 


250 


543 


100 


611 


250 


365 


250 


487 


1000 


425 


5000 


623 



Call 

Letters 



City 



Brownsville, Texas 

Centralia-Chekalis, Wash 

El Dorado, Ark 

Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Las Vegas, Nev 

Bakersfield, Calif 

Price, Utah 

Seattle, Wash 

Portland, Ore 

Corpus Christi, Texas 

Lincoln, Neb 

Los Angeles, Calif 1330 

St. Cloud, Minn.. 1450 

Fairbanks, Alaska 610 

Great Falls, Mont 1310 

Cheyenne, Wyo 1240 

Wichita, Kans 1070 

Sacramento, Calif 1530 

Amarillo, Texas 1230 

Beaumont, Texas . . 560 

Denver, Colo 950 

St. Joseph, Mo 680 

Helena, Ark 1490 

Boone, Iowa 1260 

Wichita, Kans 1330 

Los Angeles, Calif 650 

Spokane, Wash. 1230 

Fond-Du-Lac, Wis 1450 

Marshalltown, Iowa 1230 

Klamath Falls, Ore 1240 

Grand Forks, N. D 1440 

Fort Worth, Texas 1270 

Greeley, Colo 910 

Lawrence, Kans 1250 

Klamath Falls, Ore 1450 

San Diego, Calif.. 1450 

Shenandoah. Iowa 920 

Lincoln, Neb 1240 

Long Beach, Calif 1280 

Fort Smith, Ark 1400 

Spokane, Mas 920 

Anchorage, Alaska 790 

San Francisco, Calif 610 

Fresno, Calif 1340 

Longview, Texas 1370 

Columbia. 3Io 1400 

San Diego, Calif 600 

Los Angeles, Calif 1150 

Las Vegas, N. M. 1230 

St. Louis, Mo 850 

Los Angeles, Calif 1020 

Cape Girardeau, Mo 1400 

Los Angeles, Calif 980 

Nampa, Idaho . . 1230 

Grand Junction, Colo 920 

San Bernardino, Calif 1240 

Lubbock, Texas . 1340 

Bismarck, N. D 550 

Spokane, Wash. . 1510 

San Diego, Calif 1360 

Harlingen, Texas 1240 

Springfield, Mo 1260 

325 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 


Power 
in Watts 


1400 


100 


1470 


1000 


1400 


250 


L2S0 


250 


1400 


250 


1110 


1000 


1450 


250 


1090 


250 


1190 


5000 


1490 


250 


1110 


10000 



1000 

250 

5000 

5000 



Sm 

P.ge 



629 
353 
590 
403 
357 
622 
630 
569 
600 
491 
359 
476 
647 
489 
645 
434 
367 
607 
608 



5000 


374 


5000 


486 


250 C. P. 


353 


250 


423 


5000 


435 


50000 


360 


250 


632 


250 


639 


250 


426 


100 


566 


500 


543 


5000 


613 


1000 


376 


1000 


433 


250 C. P. 


567 


250 


369 


500 


426 


250 


492 


1000 


359 


250 


353 


5000 


632 


1000 


647 


5000 


370 


250 


358 


1000 


615 


250 


483 


1000 


369 


2500 d., 1000 n. 


359 


250 


500 


5000 


487 


1000 


360 


250 


483 


5000 


360 


250 


402 


500 


376 


250 


369 


250 


615 


5000 


543 


10000 


632 


1000 


369 


250 


614 


5000 


487 



Call 
Letters 



KGCC 

KGCX 

KGI)E 

KG DM 

KGEK 

KGER 

KGEZ 

KGFF 

KGFJ 

KGFL 

KGFW 

KGFX 

KGGF 

KGGM 

KGHF 

KGHI 

KGHL 

KGIR 

KGIW 

KGKB 

KGKL 

KGKO 

KGKY 

KGLO 

KGLU 

KGMB 

KGNC 

KGNO 

KGO . 

KGU . 

KGVO 

KGW . 

KGY . 

KHAS 

KHBC 

KHBG 

KH.J . 

KHMO 

KHQ . 

KHSL 

KHUB 

KICA 

KICD 

KID . 

KIDO 

KIEM 

KIEV 

KILO 

KINY 

KIRO 

KIT . 

KIUL 

KIUN 

KITJP 

KJBS 

KJR . 

KLBM 

KLCN 

KLO . 

KLPM 

KLRA 

KLS . 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Mandan, N. 1> 1270 

Sidney, Mont U80 

Fergus lulls, Mil. ii 1230 

Stockton, Calif 1110 

Sterling, Colo 1230 

Long Bench, Calif 1390 

Kalispell, Mont 1340 

Shawnee, Okla 1450 

Los Angeles, Calif 1230 

Roswell, N. M 1100 

Kearney, Neb 1340 

Pierre, S. D 630 

Coffeyville. Kans 090 

Albuquerque, N. M 1260 

Pueblo, Colo 1350 

Little Rock, Ark 1230 

Billings, Mont 790 

Butte, Mont 1370 

Alamosa, Colo 1450 

Tyler, Texas 1490 

San Angelo, Texas 1400 

Fort Worth, Texas 570 

Scottsbluff, Neb 1490 

Mason City, Iowa 1300 

Safford, Ariz 1450 

Honolulu, Hawaii 590 

Amarillo, Texas 1440 

Dodge City, Kans 1370 

San Francisco, Calif 810 

Honolulu, Hawaii 760 

Missoula, Mont 1290 

Portland, Ore 620 

Olympia. Wash 1240 

Hastings, Neb 1230 

Hilo, Hawaii 1230 

Okmulgee. Okla 1240 

Los Angeles, Calif 930 

Hannibal, Mo 1340 

Spokane, Wash 590 

Chico, Calif 1290 

Watsonville, Calif 1340 

Clovis, N. M 1240 

Spencer, Iowa 1240 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 1350 

Boise, Idaho 1380 

Eureka, Calif 1480 

Glendale, Calif 870 

Grand Forks, N. D 1440 

Juneau, Alaska 1460 

Seattle, Wash 710 

Yakima, Wash 1280 

Garden City, Kans 1240 

Pecos, Texas 1400 

Durango, Colo 1400 

San Francisco, Calif 1100 

Seattle, Wash 1000 

La Grande, Ore 1450 

Blytheville, Ark 900 

Ogden, Utah 1430 

Minot, N. D 1390 

Little Rock, Ark 1010 

Oakland, Calif 1310 

326 



Power 
in Watts 


See 

Page 


250 


544 


1000 


400 


100 


473 


5000 


372 


100 


377 


5000 


359 


100 


490 


250 


564 


100 


362 


100 


501 


250 


491 


200 


599 


500 


431 


1000 


500 


500 


377 


250 


354 


5000 


488 


5000 


489 


250 


371 


250 


619 


250 


617 


5000 


613 


250 


493 


5000 


426 


250 


352 


5000 


649 


1000 


607 


250 


431 


7500 


370 


2500 


649 


1000 


490 


5000 


569 


250 


630 


250 


491 


250 


649 


250 


564 


5000 


362 


250 


483 


5000 


632 


1000 


357 


250 


373 


250 


500 


100 


429 


500 


402 


1000 


402 


1000 


358 


250 


358 


500 


543 


1000 
5000 C. P. 


647 


50000 


630 


1000 


634 


250 


431 


100 


617 


250 


376 


500 


370 


5000 


630 


250 


567 


1000 


353 


5000 


622 


1000 


544 


1000 d., 5000 n. 


354 


1000 


366 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 

Page 



Galveston, Texas I 100 

Oakland, Calif 014) 

Denver, Colo 560 

Shenandoah, Iowa 0(i() 

San Antonio, Texas 1210 

Kansas City, Mo 980 

Mtedford, Ore I 1 10 

Fresno. Calif 5S0 

Monroe, La 1230 

Grand Island, Neb T50 

Tacoma. Wash 1360 

St. Louis, Mo 1 1 14) 

Los Angeles, Calif 710 

Los Angeles, Calif 570 

Marysville. Calif 1450 

Denver, Colo 1340 

Salt Lake City, Utah 1 400 

Brady, Texas 1490 

Palestine, Texis 1450 

Monroe, La 1450 

Austin, Texas 1490 

Los Angeles, Calif 1070 

Denver, Colo 850 

Corvallis, Ore 550 

Pittsburgh, Kans 810 

Albuquerque, N. M 1030 

Kilgore, Texas 4240 

Oklahoma City, Okla 1310 

The Dalles, Ore 1 230 

North Platte, Neb 1240 

Rei;o, Nev 630 

Omaha, Neb 1 290 

Portland, Ore 970 

La Junta, Colo 1400 

Seattle, Wash 1300 

Oklahoma City, Okla 1520 

Tulsa, Okla 1310 

San Antonio, Texas 1400 

Port Angeles, Wash 1450 

Marshfield, Ore 1230 

Eugene, Ore 1450 

Fremont, Neb 4400 

Rapid City. S. D 1400 

1380 

Pine Bluff, Ark 1490 

Valley City, N. D 1490 

Provo, Utah 1240 

Omaha, Neb (500 

Phpejaix, Ariz 550 

Laredo, Texas 1490 

Port Arthur, Texas 1250 

Pasadena, Calif 1110 

Pampa, Texas 1340 

Helena, Mont 1 240 

Phoenix, Ariz 1230 

I'asco, Wash 1310 

Lake Charles, La 1490 

Paris, Texas 1494) 

Bakersfleld, Calif 1560 

San Francisco, Calif 680 

Denver, Colo 910 

Powell, Wyo 1230 

327 



1000 


365 


5000 


375 


5000 


1 26 


250 


618 


5000 


485 


1 000 


567 


5000 


358 


250 


441 


1000 


491 


5000 


632 


50000 


486 


10000 


362 


1000 


363 


250 


364 


250 


375 


250 C. P. 


623 


100 


608 


100 


616 


250 


442 


250 


607 


50000 


364 


50000 


375 


1000 


566 


1000 


434 


10000 
50000 C. P. 


500 


250 


615 


250 


563 


100 


566 


250 


492 


1000 


493 


5000 


49? 


5000 


569 


250 


377 


5000 


631 


5000 


563 


250 


564 


250 


618 


250 C. P. 


630 


250 


567 


250 


566 


250 


491 


250 
5O0O C. P. 


599 


250 


355 


250 


544 


250 


622 


500 


493 


1000 


351 


250 


615 


1000 


617 


10000 


366 


100 


616 


250 


489 


250 


351 


250 C. P. 


630 


250 


441 


250 


616 


1000 


357 


50000 


370 


1000 


376 


250 


645 



Call 
Letters 



KPPC 

KPq . 

KPRC 
KPBO 

KQV . 
KQW . 
KR15A 
KKItC 

KKItM 

KRE . 

KKGV 

KRIC 

KRIS 

KRJF 

KRKD 

KRKO 

KRLC 

KRLD 

KRLH 

KRMD 

KRNR 

KRNT 

KROC 

RROI) 

KROS 

KROW 

KROY 

KRRV 

KRSC 

KSAC 

KSAL 

KSAM 

KSAN 

KSCJ 

KSD . 

KSEI 

KSFO 

KSJB 

KSKY 

KSL . 

KSLM 

KSO . 

KSOO 

KSRO 

KSTP 

KSTJB 

KSUN 

KSWO 

KTAR 

KTBC 

KTBI 

KTBS 

KTEM 

KTFI 

KTHS 

KTHT 

KTKC 

KTKN 

KTMS 

KTNM 

KXOH 

KTOK 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycle 



Pasadena, Calif L240 

Wenatchec, Wash. 1490 

500 

Houston, Texas 050 

Riverside, Calif I l i<» 

Pittsburgh, Pa. . 1110 

Sait Jose, Calif 740 

Lufkin, Texas ' 1340 

Abilene, Texas 1150 

Bozcman, Mont 1450 

Berkeley, Calif 1400 

Weslaco, Texas 1290 

Beaumont, Texas 1450 

Corpus Christi, Texas 1360 

Miles City, Mont 1310 

Los Angeles, Calif 1150 

Everett, Wash 1400 

Lewiston, Idaho 1400 

Dallas, Texas 1080 

Midland, Texas 1230 

Shreveport, La 1340 

Roseburg, Ore 1490 

Des Moines, Iowa 1350 

Rochester, Minn 1340 

El Paso, Texas COO 

Clinton, Iowa 1340 

Oakland, Calif 960 

Sacramento, Calif 1340 

Sherman, Texas 910 

Seattle, Wash 1150 

Manhattan, Kans 580 

Salina, Kans 1150 

Huntsville, Texas 1490 

San Francisco, Calif 1450 

Sioux City, Iowa 1360 

St. Louis, Mo 550 

Pocatello, Idaho 930 

San Francisco, Calif 560 

Jamestown, N. D 1400 

Dallas, Texas 660 

Salt Lake City, L tali 1160 

Salem, Ore 1390 

Des Moines, Iowa 1460 

Sioux Falls, S. D 1140 

Santa Rosa, Calif 1350 

St. Paul, Minn 1500 

Cedar City, Utah 1340 

Bisbee, Ariz 1230 

Lawton, Okla 1150 

Phoenix, Ariz 620 

Austin, Texas 590 

Tacoma, Wash 1490 

Shreveport, La 1480 

Temple, Texas 1400 

Twin Falls, Idaho 1270 

Hos Springs, Ark 1090 

Houston, Texas 1230 

Visalia, Calif 940 

Ketchikan, Alaska 930 

Santa Barbara, Calif 1250 

Tucumcari, N. M 1400 

Lihue, Hawaii 1490 

Oklahoma City, Okla 1400 

328 



Power 
in Watts 


See 

Page 


100 


366 


250 
1 000 C. P. 


633 


5000 


614 


1000 


367 


1000 


585 


5000 


37J 


250 


616 


250 


607 


250 


488 


250 


357 


1000 


621 


250 


608 


1000 


609 


250 


490 


1000 


364 


250 


629 


250 


402 


50000 


611 


250 


616 


350 


443 


250 


570 


5000 


431 


250 


476 


500 


613 


250 


423 


1000 


366 


250 


369 


1000 


618 


1000 


631 


500 


433 


1000 


434 


250 


615 


250 


371 


5000 


426 


1000 


386 


250 


402 


1000 


371 


350 


543 


1000 


611 


50000 


633 


1000 


570 


5000 


424 


5000 


600 


1000 


372 


50000 


475 


250 


621 


250 


350 


250 


562 


5000 


351 


250 


607 


250 


633 


1000 


443 


250 


619 


1000 


403 


10000 d., 1000 n. 


353 


250 


614 


5000 


373 


1000 


647 


1000 


372 


250 


501 


250 


649 



Call 

Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 
Page 



Modesto, Calif 860 

Houston, Texas 7-10 

Sioux City, Iowa 1-150 

Jonesboro, Ark 1230 

San Antonio, Texas 550 

151 Paso, Texas 1.580 

Emporia, Kans I 100 

Springfield, Mo 1100 

Tucson, Ariz 1 100 

Tulsa, Okla I I. to 

Seattle, Wash 1250 

Yakima, Wash 1460 

Grant Pass, Ore 1340 

Walla Walla, Wash 1420 

Siloam Springs, Ark 1290 

Vermillion, S. D 920 

Salt Lake City, Utah 570 

Atchison, Kans 1450 

Vancouver, Wash 910 

Redding, Calif 1230 

San Luis Obispo, Calif. 1230 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 1400 

Great Bend, Kans 1400 

Tacoma, Wash 570 

Victoria, Texas 1340 

Logan, Utah 1230 

Tucson, Ariz 1290 

Denver, Colo 630 

Santa Ana, Calif 1490 

Lafayette, La 1340 

Tulsa, Okla 1170 

Plainview, Texas 1400 

Colorado Springs, Colo 1300 

Bellingham, Wash 790 

Moorhead, Minn 1340 

Rock Springs, Wyo 1400 

Santa Fe, N. M 1340 

Ardmore, Okla 1240 

Vernon, Texas 1490 

Wallace, Idaho 1450 

Watertown, S. D 1240 

Corpus Christi, Texas 1010 

Hutchinson, Kans 1450 

Hobbs, N. M 1490 

Hot Springs, Ark 1340 

Wichita Falls, Texas 620 

Stockton, Calif 1230 

Albany, Ore 1240 

Globe, Ariz 1240 

Portland, Ore 1080 

St. Louis, Mo 1380 

Shreveport, La 1130 

Pasadena, Calif 1430 

Decorah, Iowa 1240 

Longview, Wash 1400 

Willmar, Minn 1340 

Poplar Bluff, Mo 1340 

Bartlesville, Okla 1400 

Jefferson City, Mo 1240 

Pandleton, Ore 1240 

Pullman, Wash 1250 

Springfield, Mo 560 

329 



1000 

50000 

250 

250 

1000 
500 
250 
250 
250 

5000 

1000 
250 
250 

1000 

5000 
500 

5000 
250 
500 
250 
250 
250 
250 

5000 
250 
250 

1000 

5000 

250 

250 

50000 

250 

1000 
250 
250 
250 
100 
100 
250 
250 
250 
50000 
250 
100 
250 

1000 
250 
250 
250 

1000 

1000 
50000 

1000 
250 
250 
350 
250 
250 
250 
250 

5000 

1000 



361 
614 
427 
354 
618 
613 
431 
488 
352 
5G4 
631 
634 
566 
633 
355 
600 
623 
431 
633 
367 
871 
425 
433 
633 
619 
622 
352 
376 
372 
441 
565 
617 
374 
629 
476 
645 
591 
561 
619 
493 
600 
609 
433 
506 
354 
621 
373 
565 
359 
570 
486 
443 
367 
424 
629 
477 
485 
562 
483 
567 
630 
488 



Cill 
Letters 



KWYO 

KXA . 

KXKI. 

KXL . 

KXO . 

KXOA 

KXOK 

KXOX 

KXKO 

KXYZ 

KYA . 

KYCA 

KYOS 

KYSM 

KYUM 

KYW . 

WAAB 

WAAF 

WAAT 

WABC 

WABI 

WABY 

WACO 

WADC 

WAGA 

WAGE 

WAGF 

WAGM 

WAIM 

WAIB 

WAIT 

WA.IR 

WAKR 

WALA 

WALB 

WALL 

WAML 

WAOV 

WAPI 

WAPO 

WARM 

WASK 

WATL 

WATX 

WATR 

WATW 

WAVE 
WAWZ 
WAYS 
WAYX 
WAZL 
WBAA 
WBAB 
WBAL 
WBAP 
WBAX 
WBBB 
WBBL 

WBBM 

WBBR 
WBBZ 



Sheridan, Wyo 

Seattle, Wash 

Waterloo, l«>w:i 

Portland, Ore 

El Centro, (alii. 

Sacramento, Calif 1190 

St. Louis, Mo 030 

Sweetwater, Texas 1240 

Aberdeen, Wash I :'.!(» 

Houston. Texas 1320 

San Francisco, Calif 1260 

Prescott, Ariz 1 l!«» 

Merced, Calif 1 11)0 

Mankato, Minn 1230 

Yuma, Ariz 1210 

Philadelphia. Pa 1000 

Worcester, Mass 1H0 

Chicago, 111 950 

Newark. X, .1 970 

New York. X. Y 880 

Bangor, Me 1230 

Albany. X. Y 1100 

Waco, Texas 1450 

Akron, 1350 

Atlanta, Ga 590 

Syracuse, N. Y 020 

Dothan, Ala 1400 

Presque Isle, Me 1450 

Anderson, S. C 1230 

Winston-Salem. X. ( 1430 

Chicago, HI 820 

Morgan* own, W. Ya 1230 

Akron, 1590 

Mobile, Ala 1410 

Albany, Ga 1590 

Middletown, X. Y 1340 

Laurel, Miss 1340 

Vincennes, Intl 1450 

Birmingham, Ala 1070 

Chattanooga, Tenn 1150 

Scranton, Pa 1400 

Lafayette, Ind 1450 

Atlanta. Ga 1400 

Watertown. X. Y 1240 

Waterbnry, Conn. 1320 

Ashland, Wise 1400 

Louisville, Ky 970 

Zarepath, X. .1 1380 

Charlotte, X. C 610 

Waycross, Ga 1230 

Hazleton, Pa 1450 

West Lafayette, Ind 920 

Atlantic City, X. J 1490 

Baltimore, Md 1090 

Fort Worth, Texas S20 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 1240 

Burlington, X. C 920 

Richmond, Va 1240 

1450 

Chicago, 111 780 

Brooklyn, X. Y 1330 

Ponca City, Okla 1230 

330 



Frequency 
n Kilocycles 


Power 
in Watts 


1 100 


250 


770 


1000 


15 10 


50000 


7 50 


10000 


1 190 


100 



250 


029 


50OO 


CI 5 


1000 


371 


250 


351 


250 


301 


250 


173 


250 


352 


50000 


578 


5000 


158 


1000 


1 05 


1000 


198 


50000 


509 


250 


414 


250 


503 


250 


021 


5000 


54 


5000 


395 


1000 


529 


250 


348 


100 


445 


250 


595 


250 


542 


5000 


107 


250 


C>3(! 


5000 


540 


5000 


348 


1000 


395 


250 


509 


250 


480 


250 


422 


5000 


347 


1000 


001 


250 


580 


250 


421 


250 


395 


250 


533 


1000 


383 


100 




250 C. P. 


039 


5000 


438 


1000 


499 


1000 


535 


250 


401 


250 


577 


1000 


4 22 


250 


497 


50000 


447 


50000 


1 3 


100 


589 


1000 


535 


100 




250 C. P. 


026 


50000 


407 


1000 


505 


250 


564 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 

Page 



Bay City, Mich 1410 

Buffalo, N. Y 930 

Petersburg, Va 1240 

Hnntsville, Ala 1230 

Greensboro, N, C 1470 

Knoxville. Term 1240 

Dalton, Ga 1 2.to 

Clarksburg, W. Va 1400 

Macon, Ga 1240 

Columbus, 1460 

New York, N. Y 1380 

Buffalo, N. Y 1400 

Salisbury, Md 1230 

'ferre Haute, I ml 1230 

Birmingham, Ala 960 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 1340 

PHtsfield, Mass 1340 

Welch, W. Va 1340 

Waterbury, Conn 1590 

Charlotte. N. C 1110 

Batavia, X. Y 1490 

Williamson, W. Va 1400 

Danville, Va 1400 

Brooklyn, N. Y 1430 

Boston, Mass 1030 

Springfield. Mass 1030 

Pittsburgh, Pa 1250 

Northfield, Minn 770 

Camden, X. J 1310 

Baltimore, Md 600 

Asbury Park, N. 3 1310 

Pontiac, Mich 1130 

Rapid City, S. D 1230 

Philadelphia, Pa 1210 

Burlington, Vt 620 

Carthage, 111 1080 

Columbus, Miss 1340 

Baltimore, Md 1400 

Springfield, 111 1450 

Hoanoke Rapids, X. C 1230 

Minneapolis, Minn 830 

Du Bois, Pa 1230 

Chicago, 111 1000 

Charleston, W. Va 580 

Charlottesville, Va 1450 

1240 C.P. 

Cincinnati, 1530 

Janesville, Wise 1230 

.loliet, 111 1340 

Ashland, Ky 1340 

Elizabeth, X. C 1400 

I'ensacola, Fla. 1370 

Meridian, Miss. 910 

Columbus. 1230 

Boston, Mass 1150 

C olumbia, S. C 1400 

Lewiston, Maine 1240 

Montgomery, Ala 1240 

Cincinnati, 1230 

Greenwood, S. C 1450 

Chicago, III 1240 

Charleston, S. C 1390 

Portland, Me 970 

331 



500 
5000 

250 C. P. 

250 
5000 

250 

250 

250 

250 
1000 
5000 

250 

250 

250 
5000 

250 

250 

250 

1000 

50000 

250 

250 

250 

500 



1000 

5000 

5000 
500 

5000 
500 

1000 

100 

50000 

1000 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
50000 
250 
10000 

5000 
250 



250 
250 
250 
250 
500 

1000 
250 
500 
250 
250 
250 
250 
25© 
100 
500 

500O 



626 
348 
537 
603 
300 
635 
309 
553 
510 
505 
451 
422 
347 
590 
458 
637 
383 

503 
637 
625 
505 
453 
453 
585 
476 
497 
447 
497 
470 
599 
579 
623 
405 
478 
447 
415 
541 
473 
572 
407 
635 



547 
640 
413 
437 
536 
392 
480 
553 
453 
597 
444 
349 
548 
598 
407 
595 
445 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
n Watts 



See 
Pag« 



WDAE 
WDAF 
W»AK 
WD AN 
WDAS 
WDAY 
WDBC 
WDBJ 
WDBO 
WDEF 
WDEL 
WDEV 
WDGY 
WDLP 
WDMJ 
WDNC 
WDOD 
WDRC 
WDSM 
WDSU 

WDWS 

WDZ . 

WEAF 

WEAN 

WEAU 

WEBC 

WEEK 

WEBR 

WEDC 

WEED 

WEEI 

WEEU 

WEGO 

WEIM 

WELI 

WELL 

WELO 

WEMP 

WENR 

WENT 

WENT 

WEOA 

WERC 

WEST 

WESX 

WEVD 

WEW 

WEXL 

WFAA 

WFAS 

WFBC 

WFBG 

WFBL 

WFBM 

WFBR 

WFCI 

WFDF 

WFEA 

WFEB 

WFHK 

WFIG 

WFIL 



Tampa, Fla 1250 

Kansas City, Mo 010 

Columbus. Ga 1340 

Danville, III 1 190 

Philadelphia, Pa 1 100 

Fargo, N. D 970 

Bscanaba, Mich i 190 

Roanoke, Va 0(i0 

Orlando, Fla 580 

Chattanooga, Tenn I 100 

Wilmington, Del 1150 

Waterbury, Vt 550 

Minneapolis, Minn 1130 

Panama City, Fla 1230 

Marquette, Mich 1310 

Durham, N. C 1190 

Chattanooga, Tenn 1310 

Hartford. Conn 1360 

Superior, Wise 1230 

New Orleans, La 1280 

Champaign, 111 1100 

Tuscola, 111 , 1050 

New York, N. Y 660 

Providence, R. 1 790 

Eau Claire, Wise 790 

Duluth, Minn 1320 

Harrisburg, 111 1240 

Buffalo, N, Y 1340 

Chicago, 111 1240 

Rocky Mount, N. C 1450 

Boston, Mass 590 

Reading. Pa 850 

Concord, N. C 1410 

Fitchburg, Mass 1340 

New Haven. Conn 960 

Battle Creek, Mich 1400 

Tupelo, Miss 1490 

Milwaukee, Wise 1340 

Chicago, 111 890 

Gloversville, N. Y 1340 

Elmira, N. Y 1230 

Evansville, Ind - 1400 

Erie, Pa 1490 

Easton, Pa 1400 

Salem, Mass 1230 

New York, N. Y 1330 

St. Louis, Mo 770 

Royal Oak, Mich 1340 

Dallas, Texas 820 

White Plains, N. Y 1230 

Greenville, S. C 1330 

Altcona, Pa 1340 

Syracuse, N. Y 1390 

Indianapolis, Ind 1260 

Baltimore, Md 1300 

Pawtucket. R. 1 1420 

Flint, Mich 910 

Manchester, N. H 1370 

Sylacauga, Ala 1340 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wise 1340 

Sumter, S. C 1340 

Philadelphia, Pa 560 

332 



5000 
5000 

250 

250 

250 
5000 

250 
5000 
5000 

250 
5000 
1000 

500 

250 

250 

250 
5000 
5000 

250 
1000 
5000 C. P. 

250 
1000 
50000 
5000 
1000 
5000 

250 

250 

250 

250 
5000 
1000 
1000 

250 

500 

250 

250 

250 
50000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

250 

250 
50C0 
1000 

250 
50000 

250 
5000 

250 
5000 
5000 
5000 
1000 
1000 
5000 

250 C. P. 

250 

350 



39S 
485 
398 
412 
579 
543 
465 



601 
384 
624 
475 
492 
469 
536 
601 
379 
644 
442 

405 
415 
510 
593 
639 
473 
413 
507 
407 
542 
453 
586 
536 
455 
381 
461 
481 
643 
409 
508 
508 
417 
575 
573 
457 
511 
487 
470 
611 
533 
597 
573 
531 
419 
447 
593 
465 
495 
350 
644 



Call 
Utters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



Sec 
Page 



Findlay, 1330 

Tampa, Fla 970 

Frederick, Mil 930 

Youngstown, 1150 

Fayetteville, N. C 1450 

Hattiesburg, Miss 1100 

•St. Augustine, Fla 1240 

Atlantic City, N. -J 1450 

Kinston, K. C 1230 

Miami, Fla 710 

Fredericksburg, Va 1290 

1230 C. P. 

Cedartown, Ga 1340 

Augusta, Ga 1240 

Lancaster, Pa -. 1490 

Portland, Me 560 

Cleveland, 1480 

Athens, Ga 1340 

Freeport, N. Y 1240 

Evansville, Ind. ... 1280 

Greensboro, N. C 980 

Scranton, Pa 910 

Goldboro, N. C 1400 

Gulfport, Miss .• 1240 

Chicago, 111 1390 

Gainesville, Ga. . 1240 

Newport News, Va 1340 

Galesburg, 111 1400 

Charleston, W. Ya. 1490 

Fort Wayne, Ind 1450 

Chicago, 111 720 

Gastonia, N. C 1450 

Newburgh, N. Y 1220 

Valdosta, Ga 1450 

Albany, Ga 1450 

Buffalo, N. Y ' 550 

Louisville, Ky 1400 

Greenwood, Miss 1240 

Atlanta, Ga 920 

Greenville, N. C 1490 

Wilson, N. C 1340 

Schenectady, N. Y. 810 

Madison, Wise. 970 

Greenfield, Mass. . 1240 

Rochester, N. Y L180 

Louisville, Ky 840 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1340 

Troy, N. Y 1330 

Kansas City, Mo. ...'.'. 880 

Selma, Ala 1490 

Canton, 1480 

Rock Island, 111 1270 

Newark, N. J 1280 

Sheboygan, Wise. 1330 

Memphis, Tenn 1400 

Anderson, Ind. 1240 

Appleton, Wise 1230 

Ithaca, N. Y 870 

Calumet, Mich 1400 

Boston, Mass 850 

Olean, N. Y 1450 

Portsmouth, N. H; . . 750 

333 



5000 
500 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
10000 



250 
250 
250 

5000 

5000 
250 
100 

1000 

1000 
500 
250 
250 

5000 
250 
250 
250 
100 
250 
50000 
250 

1000 
250 
250 

1000 
250 
250 

1000 

250 

250 

50000 

5000 

250 

50000 

50000 

100 

1000 

1000 
100 

1000 

5000 

1000 
250 
250 
250 
250 

1000 
250 

5000 
250 



555 
393 
449 
559 



497 

r.:i<> 
380 
G25 



397 
577 
445 
551 
395 
508 
417 
538 



479 
409 
399 
620 
413 
635 
417 
409 
537 
509 
401 
395 
507 
438 
478 
397 
538 
542 
528 
640 
456 
527 
438 
583 
531 
485 
350 
546 
414 
498 
644 



508 
461 
453 
525 
495 



Call 
Letters 



City 



in Kilocycles 



See 

Page 



Rochester, N. V 1400 

Cicero, 111 1450 

HanisburK, Pa 1400 

Dayton, o 1290 

Bluefleld, \Y. Vo i 1 10 

Now Bom, N. C I 150 

Zanesvllle, 1240 

Greensburg, Pa 620 

Cleveland, O i 120 

Columbus, 040 

010 

Akron, 040 

Hickory, X. C 1290 

Virginia, Minn 1400 

Niagara Falls, X. Y 1290 

Harlan, Ky 1230 

Port Huron, Mich 1450 

Anniston, Ala 1450 

New York, X. Y 1050 

Henderson, X. C 850 

Des Moines, Iowa 1040 

Jersey City, X. J 1480 

Hopkinsville, Ky 1230 

South Bend, Ind c 1490 

Harrisburg, Pa 1460 

Hartford, Conn 1410 

Cookeville, Tenn 1400 

Holyoke, Mass 1400 

Hato Rey-San Juan, Puerto Rico 580 

Madison, Wise 1310 

Indianapolis, Ind 1070 

Philadelphia, Pa 990 

Jackson, Mich 1450 

Poynette, Wise 1240 

Topeka, Kans 580 

Utica, X. Y 1230 

Ashtabula, 970 

Bridgeport, Conn 600 

Medford, Wise 1490 

St. Louis, Mo 1230 

Urbana, HI 580 

Wilmington, Del 1450 

Winchester, Va 1400 

Chicago, 111 560 

Dayton, O J 1410 

Fort Myers, Fla 1240 

Louisville, Ky 1240 

Xew York, X. Y 1010 

Washington, D. C 1340 

Miami, Fla 610 

Philadelphia, Pa 610 

Indianapolis, Ind 1430 

Columbia, S. C 560 

Asheville, N. C 1230 

Indianapolis, Ind 1310 

Milwaukee, Wise 1150 

Butler, Pa 680 

Baltimore, Md 1230 

Springfield, 1340 

Johnstown, Pa 1400 

Norfolk, Neb 1090 

334 



500 


527 


250 


412 


250 C. P. 


570 


5000 


551 


500 


634 


250 


540 


250 


561 


250 


575 


5000 


551 


500 
1000 C. P. 


553 


1000 C. P. 


546 


1000 


539 


250 


477 


1000 


525 


250 


437 


250 


470 


250 


347 


50000 


513 


250 C. P. 


539 


50000 


425 


500 


498 


250 


437 


250 


422 


1000 


576 


5000 


379 


250 


603 


250 


456 


5000 


651 


5000 


640 


5000 


419 


1000 
1 0000 C. P. 


581 


250 


467 


250 


643 


5000 


434 


250 


533 


1000 


546 


500 


379 


250 


641 


250 


487 


5000 


415 


250 


384 


250 


628 


5000 


409 


5000 


555 


250 


387 


250 


438 


10000 
50000 C, P. 


515 


250 


385 


5000 


390 


5000 


583 


5000 


419 


5000 


69? 


250 


535 


1000 


420 


5000 


641 


250 


572 


250 


449 


250 


556 


250 


578 


1000 


492 



Call 

Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 
Page 



Providence, K. 1 920 

Pittsburgh, Pa 1320 

Jacksonville, Fla. , 930 

Bloomington, III I 230 

Detroit, Mich I 190 

Baton Rouse, La 1 150 

New Orleans, La 1230 

Gadsden. Ala „ 1240 

Jackson, Miss 1300 

Grand Rapids, Mich L830 

Hagerstown, Md 1240 

Johnson City, Tcnn 910 

Opelika, Ala MOO 

Jacksonville, Fla 1320 

Lansing', Mich 1240 

Chicago, 111 1160 

Detroit, Mich 1100 

Bessemer, Ala 1100 

Beckley, VV. Va 560 

Rice Lake, Wise 1210 

Ironwood, Mich 1450 

West Palm Beach, Fia 1230 

Hammond, Ind 1230 

Washington, Pa 1450 

Herrin, 111 1340 

Greenville, Miss 1310 

Detroit, Mich 760 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 1230 

Jamestown, N. Y 1 210 

Cleveland, 850 

New York, N. Y 770 

Clarksville, Tenn 1400 

San Juan, Puerto Rieo 620 

East Lansing, Mich S70 

Miami, Fla 1360 

Dubuque, Iowa 1490 

La Crosse, Wise 1410 

Youngstown, 570 

Harrisburg, Pa 1230 

Richmond, Ind 1490 

Buffalo, N. Y 1520 

Muskegon, Mich 1490 

Griffin, Ga 1450 

Covington, Va 1310 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 1450 

Columbia, S, C 1490 

Ludington, Mich 1450 

Kokomo, Ind 1400 

Keene, N. H 4290 

Kingston, N. Y 1490 

Sunbury, Pa 1240 

New Kensington, Pa 1150 

Kingsport, Tenn 1400 

Cincinnati, 550 

Cairo, 111 1490 

New Castle, Pa 1280 

Arecibo, Puerto Rico 1230 

Wheeling, W. Va 1400 

Oklahoma City, Okla 930 

Kalamazoo, Mich. . 590 

335 



5000 


51)3 


5000 


586 


1000 


388 


250 


1 05 


250 


461 


5000 


111 


250 


1 1 •: 


250 


348 


1000 


180 


250 ('. P. 


161 


250 


454 


1000 


603 


100 


349 


250 


388 


250 


469 


20000 


411 


250 


461 


250 


347 


100 

250 


631 


250 


643 


250 


467 


250 


393 


250 


419 


250 


590 


250 


U3 


250 


47S 


50000 


463 


250 


350 


250 


50S 


5000 


553 


50000 


515 


250 


601 


5000 


651 


5000 


463 


1000 


391 


250 


425 


1000 


640 


5000 


561 


250 


576 


100 
250 C. P. 


421 


50000 


508 


250 


469 


100 
250 C. P. 


399 


250 


624 


250 


527 


250 C. P. 


597 


250 


469 


250 


420 


5000 


495 


250 


509 


250 


58S 


250 


578 


250 


603 


1000 


548 


250 


405 


1000 


57S 


250 C. P. 


649 


250 


637 


1000 
5000 C. P. 


563 


5000 


469 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
n Watts 



See 

Page 



WLAC 

WLAG 

WLAK 

HLAP 

WLAV 

WLYW 

HLAY 

WLB . 

WLBC 

WLBJ 

WLBL 

WLBZ 

WLDS 

WLEU 

WLIB 

HLLH 

VVLNH 

WLOF 

WLOG 

WLOK 

WLOL 

WLPM 

WLS . 

WLVA 

WLW 

WMAL 

WMAM 

WMAN 

WMAQ 

WMAS 

WMAZ 

WMBD 

WMBG 

WMBH 

WMBI 

WMBO 

WMBR 

WMBS 

WMC 

WMCA 

WMEX 

WMFD 

WMFF 

WMFG 

WMFJ 

WMFR 

WMGA 

WMIN 

WMIS 

WMJM 
VVMMN 
WMOB 
WMOG 
WMOH 
WMPC 
WMPS 
WMRC 
WMRF 
WMRN 
WMRO 
WMSL 
WMT 



Nashville, Xenn 1510 

La Grange, Ga 1240 

Lakeland, Fla 1340 

Lexington, Ivy 1-150 

Grand Rapids, Mich 1.140 

Lawrence, Mass 680 

Muscle Shoals City, Ala 1450 

Minneapolis, Minn - . 770 

Muncie, Ind 1340 

Bowling Green, Ky 1340 

Stevens Point, Wise 930 

Bangor, Me 620 

Jacksonville, 111 1180 

Erie, Pa 1450 

Brooklyn, N. Y 1190 

Lowell-Lawrence, Mass 1400 

Laconia, N. H 1340 

Orlando, Fla 1230 

Logan, W. Va 1230 

Lima, 1240 

Minneapolis, Minn 1330 

Suffolk, Va 1450 

Chicago, 111 890 

Lynchburg, Va 1230 

Cincinnati, 700 

Washington, D. C 630 

Marinette, Wise 570 

Mansfield, 1400 

Chieago, II 670 

Springfield, Mass 1450 

Macon, Ga 940 

Peoria, 111 1470 

Richmond, Va 1380 

Joplin, Mo 1450 

Chicago, 111 1110 

Auburn, N. Y 1340 

Jacksonville, Fla 1400 

Lniontown, Pa 590 

Memphis, Tenn 790 

New York, N. Y 570 

Boston, Mass 1510 

Wilmington, JT. C 1400 

Plattsburgh, N. Y 1340 

Hibbing, Minn 1249 

Baytona Beach, Fla 1450 

High Point, N. C 1230 

Moultrie, Ga 1400 

St. Paul, Minn 1400 

Natchez, Miss 1490 

1240 C. P. 

Cordele, Ga 1490 

Fairmont, W. Va 920 

Mobile, Ala 1230 

Brunswick, Ga 1490 

Hamilton, 1450 

Lapeer, Mich 1230 

Memphis, Tenn 1460 

Greenville, S. C 1490 

Lewiston, Pa 1490 

Marion, 1490 

Aurora, 111 1280 

Decatur, Ala 1400 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 600 

336 



50000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

5000 

250 

5000 

250 

250 

5000 

5000 

250 

250 

1000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

250 

1000 

250 

50000 

250 

50000 

5000 

250 

250 

50000 

250 

5000 

1000 

5000 

250 

5000 

250 

250 

1000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

250 

250 



250 
100 

5000 
250 
100 
250 
250 
500 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 

5000 



438 
465 
456 
319 



644 
444 
413 
573 
505 
456 
495 



t>t>o 
475 
628 
411 
625 
549 
385 
641 
556 
411 
458 
400 
414 
626 
483 
412 
503 



604 
517 
455 
542 
525 
473 
387 
539 
400 
47fi 

481 
399 
635 
349 
398 
555 
469 
605 
597 
578 
556 
405 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 

in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 

Page 



Manchester, N. H 610 

Martinsville, Va 1450 

Bridgeport, Conn 1150 

Boston, Mass 1260 

Norman, Okla 640 

Yankton, S. D 570 

Binghamton, N. Y 1X90 

New Bedford, Mass 1340 

Saranac Lake, N. Y 1320 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 1320 

New York, N. Y 1130 

New Haven, Conn 1310 

New London, Conn 1490 

New Orleans, La 1450 

Knoxville, Xenn 990 

New York, N. Y 830 

San Antonio, Texas 1200 

Davenport, Iowa 1420 

W. Yarmouth, Mass 1240 

Ames, Iowa 640 

Albany, N. Y 1460 

Washington, D. C 1260 

Syracuse, N. Y 1490 

Florence, S. C 1230 

Owensboro, Ky 1490 

Manitowoc, Wise 1240 

Grand Rapids, Mich 1300 

Bristol, Tenn 1490 

New York, N. Y 710 

Worcester, Mass 1310 

Spartanburg, S. C 1400 

York, Pa 1350 

Boston, Mass 950 

Oshkosh, Wise 1490 

Columbus, O. 820 

New York, N. Y 1280 

Omaha, Neb 590 

Fort Wayne, Ind 1190 

Ponce, Puerto Rico 1370 

Paducah, Ky 1450 

Parkersburg, W. Va 1450 

Paterson, N. J 930 

Thomasville, Ga 1240 

Portsmouth, 1400 

Jacksonville, Fla 1270 

Philadelphia, Pa 950 

Sharon, Pa 790 

Alexandria, Va 730 

Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 990 

Providence, R. 1 630 

Ponce, Puerto Rico 1420 

Raleigh, N, C 680 

Miami, Fla 560 

Scranton, Pa 910 

Vicksburg, Miss 1420 

New York, N. Y 1560 

Williamsport, Pa 1400 

Raleigh, N. C 1240 

Reading, Pa 1340 

Columbus, Ga 1230 

Washington, D. C 980 

337 



1000 


405 


250 


625 


250 


379 


5000 


455 


1000 


502 


5000 


600 


5000 


503 


250 


457 


100 


527 


5000 


651 


10000 


519 


250 


382 


250 


382 


250 


442 


10000 


604 


1000 


517 


50000 


618 


5000 


424 


250 


455 


5000 


423 


500 


503 


1000 


385 


250 


529 


250 


597 


250 


439 


100 




250 C. P. 


640 


5000 


467 


250 


601 


50000 


521 


1000 


459 


250 


598 


1000 


591 


1000 


455 


250 


643 


5000 


554 


5000 


525 


5000 


493 


10000 


419 


1000 


649 


250 


439 


250 


636 


1000 


498 


250 


401 


250 


556 


5000 


389 


5000 


585 


1000 


587 


250 


624 


1000 


649 


5000 


595 


250 


651 


50000 


540 


1000 


390 


500 


587 


500 




1000 C. P. 


481 


10000 


523 


250 


589 


250 


540 


250 


586 


250 C. P. 


398 


5000 


386 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



Page 



Augusta, Me 1400 

Augusta, tin. . . . '. 1 180 

Memphis, Tenn 600 

Lawrence, Kans L250 

Rome, Ga 1490 

Rock Hill, S. C 1 190 

Racine, Wise 1400 

Richmond, Va 1450 

Toocoa, Ga 1150 

West Point, Ga 1490 

Richmond, Va 910 

Rookford, III 1440 

Knoxville, Tenn 620 

Clarksdale, Miss 1150 

Dallas, Texas 1310 

Washington, N. C 930 

Warren, 1400 

Gainesville, Fla 850 

Richmond, Va 1140 

Cincinnati, 13C0 

Grove City, Pa 1340 

Saginaw, Mich 1400 

Allentown, Pa 1470 

Portsmouth, Va 1490 

Fall River, Mass 1480 

Wausau, Wise 1100 

Savannah, Ga 1340 

Rochester, N. V 1240 

1370 

Huntington, W. Va 930 

Atlanta, Ga 750 

York, Pa 900 

Chicago, HI 1240 

South Bend, Ind 960 

Montgomery, Ala 1440 

Birmingham, Ala 610 

Nashville, Tenn 980 

Winston-Salem, N. C 600 

McComb, Miss 1230 

Ogdensburg, N. Y 1400 

Jackson, Miss 1450 

Roanoke, Va 1240 

Nashville, Tenn 650 

New Orleans, La 1350 

Bridgeton, N. J 1240 

Schenectady, N. Y 1240 

Charlotte, N. C 1240 

Henderson, Ky 860 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 1230 

Decatur, HI 1340 

Spartanburg, S. C 950 

Sarasota, Fla 1450 

Toledo, O. 1370 



100 

250 C. P, 
5000 
5000 
1000 
250 
250 
250 

250 C. I'. 

250 

250 

5000 

500 

500 

250 

5000 

1000 

250 

5000 

50000 

5000 

100 

250 

500 

250 

1000 

250 

250 

250 

1000 C. P. 

1000 

50000 

1000 

250 

1000 

500 

1000 

5000 

5000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

50000 

5000 

250 

250 

250 

500 

100 

250 

1000 
5000 C. P. 

250 

5000 



444 

398 
601 
433 
400 
598 
643 
«27 
401 
401 
627 
414 
604 
478 
611 
541 
559 
388 
627 
549 
575 
470 
572 
626 
455 
644 
400 



397 
591 
412 
422 
349 
347 
605 
542 
480 
525 
480 
627 
605 
443 
497 
528 
536 
437 
471 
412 



OOi 



Call 
Letters 



City 



Frequency 
in Kilocycles 



Power 
in Watts 



See 

Page 



Springfield, Mass 1370 

Stamford, Conn 1100 

Staunton, Va I ion 

Salisbury, N. C ! 190 

Steubenville, 1340 

Iowa City, Iowa 910 

St. Petersburg, Fla 620 

Harrisonburg, Va. . 550 

Rutland, Vt I 380 

Syracuse, N. Y 570 

Quincy, 111 930 

Worcester, Mass 580 

Tallahassee, Fla 1340 

Cleveland, 1100 

Green Bay, Wise 1360 

Norfolk, Va 790 

College Station, Texas 1150 

Springfield, HI 1240 

Cumberland, Md 1450 

Traverse City, Mich. . 1400 

Minneapolis, Minn. 1280 

Philadelphia, Pa 1340 

Hartford, Conn 1230 

Hartford. Conn. ... . 1080 

Jackson, Tenn 1390 

Charleston, S. C 1250 

Ocala, Fla 1490 

Milwaukee, Wise 620 

East St. Louis, 111 1490 

Trenton, N. J 1310 

Savannah, Ga 1290 

Toledo, 1230 

Washington, D. C 1500 

Elkhart, Ind 1340 

Troy, N. Y 980 

St. Petersburg, Fla 1380 

Trenton, N. J 920 

Sitka, Alaska 1220 

Washington, D. C 1450 

Detroit, Mich 950 

Xew Orleans, La 870 

AshevUle, N. C 570 

Watertown, N. Y 790 

Palm Beach, Fla 1340 

Woodside, N. Y 1600 

St. Albans, Vt 1420 

Pittsburgh, Pa 1490 

Wheeling, W. Va 1170 

Detroit, Mich 1270 

339 



1000 


458 


260 


382 


250 C 


P. 628 


250 


5 12 


250 


tun 


8000 


•1 25 


5000 


392 


1000 


025 


1000 


021 


5000 


:>:u 


1000 


in 


5000 


460 


250 


303 


50000 


553 


5000 


639 


5000 


626 


1000 


60!) 


100 


1 1 5 


250 


119 


250 


171 


J 000 


175 


100 


585 


250 


381 


50000 


381 


1000 


603 


1000 


595 


250 


391 


5000 


611 


500 


413 


500 


'199 


5000 


101 


250 


559 


50000 


386 


250 


417 


1000 


531 


500 


392 


1000 


-199 


15 


(Amer. 647 

Expeditionary 

Station) 


250 


386 


5000 


463 


50000 


443 


1000 


535 


1000 


533 


250 


391 


250 


634 


1000 


624 


250 


586 


50000 


637 


5000 


463 



Stations By Cities 

Major Network Affilisitioiis 



Key to Network Abbreviations: C — Columbia Broadcasting System; M — Mutual Broadcasting 

System; B — Blue Network Co.; N — National Broadcasting Co. 

* Joins Blue June 15, 1945; ** Joins CBS June 15, 1945. 



City and 
State 



Call 
Letters 

Aberdeen, S. D KABR 

Aberdeen, Wash KXRO 

Abilene, Texas KRBC 

Ada, Okla KADA 

Akron, Ohio (Tallmadge) . . .WADC 

WAKR 

WHKK 

Alamosa, Colo KGI W 



Ames, Iowa WOI 

Anchorage, Alaska KFQD 

Anderson, Ind WHBU 

Anderson, S. C WAIM 

Ann Arbor, Mich WPAG 

Anniston, Ala WHM A 

Appleton, Wise WHBY 

Ardmore, Okla KVSO 

Arecibo, Puerto Rico WKVM 

Asbury Park, N. J WCAP 



Major 
Network 

M 

M 

M-B 



Albany, Ga- 


....WALB 
WGPC 


M 
C 


Albany, N. Y 


.. . WABY 
WOKO 


M 
C 


Albany, Oregon 

Albert Lea, Minn 


KWIL 

KATE 


M 
M-I 


Albuquerque, N. M.... 


...KGGM 
KOB 


C 

N 


Alexandria, La 


KALB 


B 


Alexandria, Va 


WPIK 




Allentown, Pa 


...WSAN 


N 


Altoona, Pa 


...WFBG 


N 


Amarillo, Texas 


KFDA 

KGNC 


B 

N 



Asheville, N. C 


WISE 

WWNC 


M-N 
C 


Ashland, Ky 


WCMI 


M 


Ashland, Wise 


WATW 


M 


Ashtabula, Ohio .... 


WICA 




Astoria, Ore. 


KAST 


M 


Atchison, Kans 


KVAK 


M 


Athens, Ga 


WGAU 


C 


Atlanta, Ga 


WAGA 

WATL 

WGST 

WSB 


B 
M 
C 

N 


Atlantic City, N. J.. 


WBAB 

WFPG 


C 
B 


Auburn, N. Y 


WMBO 


M 


Augusta, Ga 


WGAC 

WRDW 


B 
C 


Augusta, Me 


WRDO 


N 


Aurora, 111 


WMRO 




Austin, Texas 


KNOW 

KTBC 


B-M 
C 



City and 
State 


Call 

Letters 


Major 
Network 


Bakersfield, Calif 


KERN 

KPMC 


M 


Baltimore, Md 


. . . WBAL 
WCAO 

WCBM 
WFBR 
WITH 


N 
C 
B 
M 


Bangor, Me 


WABI 

WLBZ 


C 

N 


Bartlesville, Okla 


. . . KWON 


M 


Batavia, N. Y 


WBTA 


M 


Baton Rouge, La 


WJBO 


B 


Battle Creek, Mich. . . . 


. ...WELL 


B 


Bay City, Mich 


. . . WBCM 


B 


Beaumont, Tex 


. . . .KFDM 
KRIC 


B 


Beckley, W. Va 


WJLS 


C 


Bellingham, Wash 


KVOS 




Bend, Ore 


KBND 


M 




KRE 




Bessemer, Ala 


WJLD 




Big Spring, Tex 


KBST 


B-M 


Billings, Mont 


KGHL 


N 


Binghamton, N. Y 


...WNBF 


C 


Birmingham, Ala 


WAPI 

WBRC 
WSGN 


C 
N 
B 


Bismarck, N. D 


KFYR 


N 


Bloomington, 111. 


WJBC 




Bluefield, W. Va 


WHIS 


N 


Blytheville, Ark 


KLCN 




Boise, Idaho 


KIDO 


N 


Boone, Iowa 


KFGQ 




Boston, Mass 


WBZ 

WCOP 
WEEI 
WHDH 
WMEX 
WNAC 
WORL 


N 
B 
C 
B 

M 


Bowling Green, Ky. . . . 


WLBJ 


M 


Bozeman, Mont 


KRBM 


N 


Brady, Texas 


KNEL 




Bridgeport, Conn 


WICC 

WNAB 


M 
B 


Bridgeton, N. J 


WSNJ 






WOPI 


N 


Brooklyn, N. Y- 


WBBR 





Baker, Ore. KBKR 



WBYN 
WLIB 

Brownsville, Texas KEEW 

Brownwood, Texas KBWD 

Brunswick, Ga WMOG 

Buffalo, N. Y WBEN 

WBNY 



340 



City and Call 

State Letters 

WEBR 

WGR 

WKBW 

Burlington, la KBUR 

Burlington, N. C WBBB 

Burlington, Vt WC AX 

Butler, Pa WISR 

Butte, Mont KGIR 

Cairo, 111 WKRO 

Calumet, Mich WHDF 

Camden, N. J WCAM 

Canton, Ohio WHBC 

Cape Girardeau, Mo KFVS 

Carlsbad, N. M KAVE 

Carthage, 111 WCAZ 

Casper, Wyoming KDFN 

Cedar City, Utah KSUB 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa WMT 

Cedartown, Ga WGAA 

Centralia-Chehalis, Wash. . . . KELA 

Champaign, 111 WDWS 

Charleston, S. C WCSC 

WTMA 

Charleston, W- Va WCHS 

WGKV 

Charlotte, N. C WAYS 

WBT 
WSOC 

Charlottesville, Va WCHV 

Chattanooga, Tenn WAPO 

WDEF 
WDOD 

Cheyenne, Wyo KFBC 

Chicago, 111 WAAF 

WAIT 

WBBM 

WCFL 

WCRW 

WEDC 

WENR 

WGES 

WGN 

WIND 

WJJD 

WLS 

WMAQ 

WMBI 

WSBC 

Chico, Calif KHSL 

Cicero, 111 WHFC 

Cincinnati, Ohio WCKY 

WCPO 
WKRC 
WLW 
WSAI 

Clarksburg, W. Va WBLK 

Clarksdale, Miss WROX 

Clarksville, Tenn WJZM 

Clayton (St. Louis) Mo KFUO 

Cleveland, Ohio WGAR 

WHK 

WJW 

WTAM 

Clinton, la KROS 

Clovis, N. M KICA 

Coffeyville, Kans KGGF 

College Station, Tex WTAW 

Colorado Springs, Colo KVOR 

Columbia, Mo KFRU 

Columbia, S. C WCOS 

WIS 
WKIX 



Major 

Network 

M 



C 
C-M 

B 

M 

C 

C 

N 

C 

N 
B-M 

C 

N 



N 

B-M 

C 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Columbus, Ga. WRBL 

WDAK 

Columbus, Miss WCBI 

Columbus, Ohio WBNS 

WCOL 

WHKC 

WOSU 

Concord, N. C WEGO 

Conway, S. C WLAT 

Cookeville, Tenn WHUB 

Coos Bay, Ore KOOS 

Cordele, Ga WMJM 

Corpus Christi, Tex KEYS 

KWBU 
KRIS 

Corsicana, Texas KAND 

Corvallis, Ore KOAC 

Covington, Va WKEY 

Cumberland, Md- WTBO 

Dallas, Texas KRLD 

KGKO 

KSKY 

WFAA 
WRR 

The Dalles, Ore KODL 

Dalton, Ga WBLJ 

Danville, 111 WDAN 

Danville, Va WBTM 

Davenport, Iowa WOC 

Dayton, Ohio WHIO 

WING 

Daytona Beach, Fla WMFJ 

Decatur, Ala WMSL 

Decatur, 111 WSOY 

Decorah, Iowa KWLC 

Denton, Texas KDNT 

Denver, Colo KFEL 

KLZ 

KMYR 
KOA 

KPOF 

KVOD 

Des Moines, Iowa KRNT* 

KSO** 
WHO 
Detroit, Mich WJBK 

WJLB 
WJR 
WWJ 

WXYZ 

Devils Lake, N. D KDLR 

Dodge City, Kans- KGNO 

Dothan, Ala WAGF 

Dublin, Ga WMLT 

Du Bois, Pa WCED 

Dubuque, la KDTH 

WKBB 
Duluth, Minn KDAL 

WEBC 

Durango, Colo KIUP 

Durham, N. C WDNC 

East Lansing, Mich WKAR 

East St. Louis, 111 WTMV 

Easton, Pa- WEST 

Eau Claire, Wise WEAU 

El Centro, Calif KXO 

El Dorado, Ark KELD 

Elizabeth City, N. C WCNC 

Elk City, Okla KASA 

Elkhart, Ind WTRC 

Elmira, N. Y WENY 



Major 
Network 
C 
B-M 
M 
C 
B 
M 



M-N 
M 



M 
C 

N 
B 
C-B 
C 

B-M 
N 
N 



M-N 
N 
M 



341 



City .ind Call 

State Letters 

El Paso, Tex KROD 

KTSM 

Emporia, Kans KTS W 

Enid, Okla KCRC 

Erie, Pa WERC 

WLEU 

Escanaba, Mich WDBC 

Eugene, Ore KORE 

Eureka, Calif KIEM 

Evansville, Ind WEOA 

WGBF 

Everett, Wash KRKO 

Fairbanks, Alaska KFAR 

Fairmont, W. Va WMMN 

Fall River, Mass WS AR 

Fargo, N. D WDAY 

Fayetteville, N. C WFNC 

Fergus Falls, Minn KGDE 

Findlay, Ohio WFIN 

Fitchburg, Mass WEIM 

Flint, Mich WFDF 

Florence, S. C WOLS 

Fond du Lac, Wis KFIZ 

Fort Dodge, Iowa KVFD 

Fort Myers, Fla WINK 

Fort Smith, Ark KFPW 

Fort Wayne, Ind WGL 

WOWO 

Fort Worth, Tex KFJZ 

KGKO 
WBAP 

Frederick, Md WFMD 

Fredericksburg, Va- WFVA 

Fremont, Neb KORN 

Freeport, N. Y WGBB 

Fresno, Calif KARM 

KMJ 
KFRE 

Gadsden, Ala WJBY 

Gainesville, Fla WRUF 

Gainesville, Ga WGGA 

Galesburg, 111 WGIL 

Galveston, Texas KLUF 

Garden City, Kans KIUL 

Gastonia, N. C WGNC 

Glendale, Calif KIEV 

Globe, Ariz KWJB 

Gloversville, N. Y WENT 

Goldsboro, N. C WGBR 

Grand Forks, N. D KFJM 

KILO 

Grand Island, Neb KMM J 

Grand Junction, Colo KFXJ 

Grand Rapids, Mich WLAV 

WOOD 
WJEF 

Grants Pass, Ore KUIN 

Great Bend, Kans- KVGB 

Great Falls, Mont KFBB 

Greeley, Colo KFKA 

Green Bay, Wise WTAQ 

Greenfield, Mass WHAI 

Greensboro, N. C WBlG 

WGBG 

Greensburg, Pa WH JB 

Greenville, Miss WJPR 

Greenville, N. C WGTC 



Major 
Network 
C 
N 
M 
B 
C 
B-M 
M 
M 
M 
C 
N 
M 

C 

M 
N 
M 

M 



N 
C-M 

M 



M-E 
N 
C 
M 
M 
C 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Greenville, S. C WFBC 

WM"RC 

Greenwood, Miss WGRM 

Greenwood, S. C WCRS 

Griffin, Ga WKEU 

Grove City, Pa WS AJ 

Gulfport, Miss WGCM 

Hagerstown, Md WJEJ 

Hamilton, O WMOH 

Hammond, Ind WJOB 

Hannibal, Mo KHMO 

Harlan, Ky. WHLN 

Harlingen, Texas KGBS" 

Harrisburg, 111 WEBQ 

Harrisburg, Pa WHP 

WKBO 
WHGB 

Harrisonburg, Va WSVA 

Hartford, Conn WDRC 

WHTD 
WTHT 
WTIC 

Hastings, Neb WHAS 

Hattiesburg, Miss WFOR 

Hazleton, Pa WAZL 

Helena, Ark KFFA 

Helena, Mont KPFA 

Henderson, Ky WSON 

Henderson, N. C- WHNC 

Herrin, 111 WJPF 

Hibbing, Minn WMFG 

Hickory, N. C WHKY 

High Point, N. C WMFR 

Hilo, Hawaii KHBC 

Hobbs, N. M KWEW 

Holyoke, Mass WHYN 

Honolulu, Hawaii KGMB 

KGU 

Hopkinsville, Ky WHOP 

Hot Springs, Ark. KTHS 

KWFC 

Houston, Texas KPRC 

KTRH 
KXYZ 
KTHT 

Huntington, W. Va WSAZ 

Huntsville, Ala WBHP 

Huntsville, Tex KSAM 

Hutchinson, Kans KWBW 

Idaho Falls, Idaho KID 

Indianapolis, Ind WFBM 

WIBC 
WIRE 
WISH 

Iowa City, Iowa WSUI 

Ironwood, Mich WJMS 

Ithaca, N. Y WHCU 

Jackson, Mich WIBM 

Jackson, Miss WJDX 

WJXN 
WSLI 

Jackson, Tenn WTJS 

Jacksonville, Fla WJAX 

WJHP 
WMBR 
WPDQ* 

Jacksonville, 111 WLDS 

Jamestown, N. Y WJTN 

Jamestown, N. D KSJB 



Major 

Network 

N 



C 

M-N 



N 

M-N 

M 

N 



342 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Janesville, Wise WCLO 

Jefferson City, Mo KWOS 

Jersey City, N. J WHOM 

Johnson City, Tenn WJHL 

Johnstown, Pa. WJAC 

Joliet, 111 WCLS 

Jonesboro, Ark KBTM 

Joplin, Mo WMBH 

Juneau, Alaska KIN Y 

Kalamazoo, Mich WKZO 

Kalispel, Mont KGEZ 

Kansas City, Kans KCKN 

Kansas City, Mo KCMO 

KMBC 

WDAF 
WHB 

Kearney, Nebr KGFW 

Keene, N. H WKNE 

Ketchikan, Alaska KTKN 

Kilgore, Texas KOCA 

Kingsport, Tenn WKPT 

Kingston, N. Y WKN Y 

Kinston, N. C WFTC 

Klamath Falls, Ore KFJI 

KFLW 
Knoxville, Tenn WBIR 

KNOX 

WROL 

Kokomo, Ind WKMO 

Laconia, N. H WLNH 

LaCrosse, Wise WKBH 

Lafayette, Ind WASK 

Lafayette, La KVOL 

La Grange, Ga WLAG 

La Grande, Ore- KLBM 

Lajunta, Colo KOKO 

Lake Charles, La KPLC 

Lakeland, Fla WLAK 

Lancaster, Pa WGAL 

Lansing, Mich WJIM 

Lapeer, Mich WMPC 

Laredo, Tex KPAB 

Las Vegas, N. M KFUN 

Las Vegas, Nev KENO 

Laurel, Miss WAML 

Lawrence, Kans- KFKU 

WREN 

Lawrence, Mass WLAW 

Lawton, Okla KSWO 

Lewiston, Ida KRLC 

Lewiston, Me WCOU 

Lewistown, Pa WMRF 

Lexington, Ky WLAP 

Lihue, Hawaii KTOH 

Lima, Ohio WLOK 

Lincoln, Nebr KFAB 

KFOR 
Little Rock, Ark K ARK 

KGHI 

KLRA 

Logan, Utah KVNU 

Logan, W. Va WLOG 

Long Beach, Calif KFOX 

KGER 

Longview, Texas KFRO 

Longview, Wash. KWLK 

Los Angeles, Calif KECA 

KFAC 



Major 

Network 

M 

M 



N 
N 

M-N 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Los Angeles. Calif KFI 

KFSG 

KFVD 

KFWB 

KGFJ 

KHJ 

KMPC 

KMTR 

KNX 

KRKD 

Louisville, Ky WAVE 

WGRC 
WHAS 
WINN 

Lowell, Ariz KSUN 

Lowell, Mass. WLLH 

Lubbock, Texas KFYO 

Ludington, Mich WKLA 

Lufkin, Texas KRBA 

Lynchburg, Va WLVA 

Macon, Ga WBML 

WMAZ 
WNEX 

Madison, Wise WHA 

WIBA 

Manchester, N. H- WFEA 

WMUR 

Mandan, N. D KCGU 

Manhattan, Kans KSAC 

Manitowoc, Wise WOMT 

Mankato, Minn KYSM 

Mansfield, Ohio WMAN 

Marion, Ohio WMRN 

Marquette, Mich WDMJ 

Marrinette, Wise WMAM 

Marshalltown, la KFJB 

Martinsville, Va WMVA 

Marysville, Calif KMYC 

Mason City, Iowa KGLO 

Mayaguez, P. R WPRA 

McComb, Miss WSKB 

Medford, Ore KMED 

Medford, Wise WIGM 

Memphis, Tenn WHBQ 

WMC 
WMPS 
WREC 

Merced, Calif KYOS 

Meridian, Miss WCOC 

Miami, Fla WIOD 

WQAM 
WFTL* 

Miami Beach, Fla WKAT 

Middletown. N. Y WALL 

Midland, Texas KRLH 

Miles City, Mont KRJF 

Milwaukee, Wise WEMP 

WISN 
WTMJ 

Minneapolis, Minn WCCO 

WDGY 

WLB 

WLOL 

WTCN 

Minot, N. D KLPM 

Missoula, Mont KGVO 

Mobile, Ala WALA 

WMOB 

Modesto, Calif KTRB 

Monroe, La KMLB 

KNOE 
Monterey, Calif KDON 



Major 

Network 

N 



M 
B 
M 
C 
N 
B-M 



343 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Montgomery, Ala WCOV 

WSFA 

Moorhead, Minn KVOX 

Morgantown, W. Va. WAJR 

Moultrie, Ga WMGA 

Muncie, Ind WLBC 

Muscle Shoals City, Ala.. ..WLAY 

Muskegon, Mich WKBZ 

Muskogee, Okla KBIX 

Nampa, Idaho KFXD 

Nashville, Tenn WLAC 

WSIX 
WSM 

Natchez, Miss WMIS 

Newark, N. J WHBI 

WAAT 

New Albany, Ind WGRC 

New Bedford, Mass. WNBH 

New Bern, N. C WHIT 

Newburgh, N. Y WGNY 

New Castle, Pa WKST 

New Haven, Conn WELI 

WHNC 

New Kensington, Pa WKPA 

New London, Conn WNLC 

New Orleans, La WDSU 

WJBW 

WNOE 

WSMB 

WWL 

Newport News, Va WGH 

New York WABC 

WBNX 

WEAF 

WEVD 

WHN 

WINS 

WJZ 

WMCA 

WNEW 

WNYC 

WOV 

WOR 

WQXR 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. WHLD 

Norfolk, Nebr WJAG 

Norfolk, Va WTAR 

Norman, Okla WNAD 

Northfield, Minn WCAL 

North Platte, Nebr KODY 

Oakland, Calif KLS 

KLX 

KROW 

Ocala, Fla WTMC 

Ogden, Utah KLO 

Ogdensburg, N. Y WSLB 

Oklahoma City, Okla KOCY 

KOMA 
KTOC 
WKY 

Okmulgee, Okla. KHBG 

Olean, N. Y WHDL 

Olympia, Wash KGY 

Omaha, Nebr KBON 

KOIL 

KOWH 
WOW 

Opelika, Ala WJHO 

Orlando, Fla WDBO 

WLOF 

Oshkosh, Wise WOSH 

Ottumwa, Iowa KBIZ 



Major 

Network 

C 

N 

M 



C 

M 

B-M 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Owensboro, Ky WOMI 

Paducah, Ky WPAD 

Palestine, Texas KNET 

Palm Beach, Fla WWPG 

Pampa, Texas KPDN 

Panama City, Fla WDLP 

Paris, Texas KPLT 

Parkersburg, W- Va WPAR 

Pasadena, Calif KPAS 

KPPC 
KWKW 

Pasco, Wash KPKW 

Paterson, N. J WPAT 

Pawtucket, R. I WFCI 

Pecos, Texas KIUN 

Pendleton, Ore KWRC 

Pensacola, Fla WCOA 

Peoria, 111 WMBD 

Petersburg, Va WBHD 

Philadelphia, Pa KY W 

WCAU 
WDAS 
WFIL 
WHAT 
WIBG 
WIP 
WPEN 
WTEL 

Phoenix, Ariz KOY 

KPHO 
KTAR 

Pierre, S. D KGFX 

Pine Bluff, Ark KOTN 

Pittsfield, Mass WBRK 

Pittsburg, Kans KOAM 

Pittsburgh, Pa KDKA 

KQV 

WCAE 

WJAS 

WWSW 

Plainview, Texas KVOP 

Plattsburg, N. Y WMFF 

Pocatello, Ida KSEI 

Ponca City, Okla WBBZ 

Ponce, Puerto Rico WPAB 

WPRP 

Pontiac, Mich WCAR 

Poplar Bluff, Mo KWOC 

Port Angeles, Wash KONP 

Port Arthur, Tex KPAC 

Port Huron, Mich WHLS 

Portland, Me WCSH 

WGAN 

Portland, Ore KALE 

KBPS 
KEX 
KGW 
KOIN 
KWJJ 
KXL 

Portsmouth, N. H WHEB 

Portsmouth, Ohio WPAY 

Portsmouth, Va WSAP 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y WKIP 

Powell, Wyo. KPOW 

Poynette, Wise. WIBU 

Prescott, Ariz KYCA 

Presque Isle, Me WAGM 

Price, Utah KEUB 

Providence, R. I WEAN 

WJAR 
WPRO 



Major 

Network 

M 

C 

K 

B-M 

M 

M 
B-M 

C 



344 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Provo, Utah KOVO 

Pueblo, Colo KGHF 

Pullman, Wash KWSC 

Quincy, 111 WTAD 

Racine, Wise WRJN 

Raleigh, N. C WPTF 

WRAL 

Rapid City, S. D KOTA 

WCAT 

Reading, Pa WEEU 

WRAW 

Redding, Calif KVCV 

Reno, Nev KOH 

Rice Lake, Wise WJMC 

Richmond, Ind WKB V 

Richmond, Va WBBL 

WMBG 
WRIV 
WRNL 
WRVA 

Riverside, Calif KPRO 

Roanoke, Va WDBJ 

WSLS 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C WCBT 

Rochester, Minn KROC 

Rochester, N. Y WHAM 

WHEC 
WSAY 

Rockford, 111 WROK 

Rock Hill, S. C WRHI 

Rock Island, 111 WHBF 

Rock Springs, Wyo KVRS 

Rocky Mount, N. C WEED 

Rome, Ga WRGA 

Roseburg, Ore KRNR 

Roswell, N. M KGFL 

Royal Oak, Mich- WEXL 

Rutland, Vt WSYB 

St. Albans, Vt WWSR 

St. Augustine, Fla WFOY 

St. Cloud, Minn KFAM 

St. Joseph, Mo KFEQ 

St. Louis, Mo KMOX 

KFUO 

KSD 

KWK 

KXOK 

WEW 

WIL 

St. Paul, Minn KSTP 

WMIN 

St. Petersburg, Fla WSUN 

WTSP 

Sacramento, Calif KFBK 

KROY 
KCRA 
KXOA 

Safford, Ariz KGLU 

Saginaw, Mich WS AM 

Salem, Mass WESX 

Salem, Ore KSLM 

Salina, Kans KSAL 

Salisbury, Md WBOC 

Salisbury, N. C WSTP 

Salt Lake City, Utah KDYL 

KALL 

KNAK 

KSL 

KUTA 

San Angelo, Texas KGKL 

San Antonio, Texas KABC 



Major 

Network 

M 



City and 
State 


Call 

Letters 


Major 
Network 


San Antonio, Texas 


KMAC 
KONO 
KTSA 
WOAI 


M 

C 

N 


San Bernardino, Calif-. . . 


KFXM 


M 


San Diego, Calif 


KFMB 

KFSD 

KGB 


B 
N 

M 


San Francisco, Calif 


KFRC 


M 




KGO 
KJBS 

KPO 
KSAN 
KSFO 

KYA 


B 

N 


San Jose, Calif 


. .KQW 


C 


San Juan, Puerto, Rico. 


WKAQ 
WNEL 
WIAC 


C 


San Luis Obispo, Calif... 


. . KVEC 


M 


Santa Ana, Calif 


. . KVOE 


M 


Santa Barbara, Calif. . . . 


KDB 

KTMS 


M 
B 


Santa Fe, N. M 


. . .KVSF 


C 


Santa Rosa, Calif 


KSRO 




Saranac Lake, N. Y 


. WNBZ 


B 


Sarasota, Fla. 


. . WSPB 


C 


Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. . . 


WSOO 


B 


Savannah, Ga 


WSAV 
WTOC 


N 
C 


Schenectady, N. Y 


. . . .WGY 
WSNY 


N 


Scottsbluff, Nebr 


. KGKY 






. .WARM 


B 




WGBI 
WQAN 


C 


Seattle, Wash 


. . .KEVR 






KIRO 

KJR 

KOL 

KOMO 

KRSC 

KTW 

KXA 


C 

B 
M 
N 


Sedalia, Mo 


. KDRO 




Selma, Ala 


. WHBB 


M 


Sharon, Pa 


...WPIC 




Shawnee, Okla. 


KGFF 


B 


Sheboygan, Wise 


. WHBL 


M 


Shenandoah, la 


. . KFNF 
KMA 


B-M 


Sheridan, Wyo 


. . KWYO 




Sherman, Texas 


. . . KRRV 


M 


Shreveport, La 


. . KTRMD 

KTBS 

KWKH 


B 
N 
C 




. . KGCX 


c 


Siloam Springs, Ark 


. . KUOA 




Sioux City, la 


. . . KSCJ** 
KTRI 


B 

M 


Sioux Falls, S. D 


. . KELO 
KSOO 


N 
N 


South Bend, Ind 


. . WSBT 
WHOT 


C 
B 


Spartanburg, S. C- 


. WORD 
WSPA 


B 

C 


Spencer, la 


. . KICD 


M 


Spokane, Wash 


. KFIO 


M 




KFPY 
KGA 
KHQ 


C 
B 
N 


Springfield, 111 


...WCBS 
WTAX 


B 
C 



345 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Springfield, Mass WBZA 

WMAS 

WSPR 

Springfield, Mo KGBX 

KTTS 

KWTO 

Springfield, Ohio WIZE 

Stamford, Conn WSRR 

Sterling, Colo KGEK 

Steubenville, Ohio WSTV 

Stevens Pt, Wise WLBL 

Stockton, Calif KGDM 

KWG 

Suffolk, Va. WLPM 

Sumter, S. C WFIG 

Sunbury, Pa WKOK 

Superior, Wise WDSM 

Sweetwater, Texas KXOX 

Sidney, Mont KGCX 

Syracuse, N. Y WAGE 

WFBL 

WOLF 

WSYR 

Sylacauga, Fla WFEB 

Tacoma, Wash KMO 

KTBI 
KVI 

Tallahassee, Fla WTAL 

Tampa, Fla WD AE 

WFLA 

Temple, Texas KTEM 

Terre Haute, Ind- WBOW 

Texarkana, Tex KCMC 

Thomasville, Ga WPAX 

Toccoa, Ga WRLC 

Toledo, Ohio WSPD 

WTOL 

Topeka, Kans WIBW 

Town of Allegany, N. Y. . . WHDL 

Traverse City, Mich WTCM 

Trenton, N. J WTN J 

WTTM 
Troy, N. Y WHAZ 

WTRY 
Tucson, Ariz. KTUC 

KVOA 

Tucumcari, N. M KTNM 

Tulsa, Okla KOME 

KTUL 

KVOO 

Tupelo, Miss WELO 

Tuscaloosa, Ala WJRD 

Tuscola, 111 WDZ 

Twin Falls, Ida KTFI 

Tyler, Texas KGKB 

Uniontown, Pa WMBS 

Urbana, 111 WILL 

Utica, N. Y WIBX 

Valdosta, Ga. WGOV 

Valley City, N. D KVOC 

Vancouver, Wash KVAN 

Vermilion, S. D KUSD 

Vernon, Texas KVWC 

Vicksburg, Miss WQBC 

Victoria, Texas KVIC 

Vincennes, Ind WAOV 

Virginia, Minn WHLB 

Visalia, Calif KTKC 



Major 
Network 
N 
C 
B 
N 
C-M 



M 

C 

N 
M-B 

N 
B-M 

M 
N 
B 
C 
B 
M 

N 



C 

N 
M 

B-M 
C 

N 
M 



City and Call 

State Letters 

Waco, Texas WACO 

Wallace, Ida KWAL 

Walla Walla, Wash KU J 

Warren, Ohio WRRN 

Washington, D. C WINX 

WTOP 

WMAL 

WOL 

WRC 

WWDC 

Washington, N. C WRRF 

Washington, Pa WJPA 

Waterbury, Conn WATR 

WBRY 

Waterbury, Vt WDEV 

Waterloo, la KXEL 

WMT 

Watertown, N. Y WATN 

WWNY 

Watertown, S. D KWAT 

Wastonville, Calif KHUB 

Wausau, Wise WSAU 

Waycross, Ga- WAYX 

Welch, W. Va WBRW 

Wenatchee, Wash KPO 

Weslaco, Texas KRGV 

West Palm Beach, Fla WJNO 

West Lafayette ,Ind WBAA 

West Point, Ga WRLD 

West Yarmouth, Mass WECB 

Wheeling, W. Va WKWK 

WWVA 

White Plains, N. Y WFAS 

Wichita, Kans. KANS 

KFBI 
KFH 

Wichita Falls, Tex KWFT 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa WBAX 

WBRE 

Williamson, W. Va WBTH 

Williamsport, Pa WRAK 

Willmar, Minn KWLM 

Wilmington, Del WDEL 

WILM 

Wilmington, N. C WMFD 

Wilson, N. C WGTM 

Winchester, Va- WINC 

Winona, Minn KWNO 

Winston- Salem, N. C WAIR 

WSJS 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wise WFHR 

Woodside, N. Y WWRL 

Worcester, Mass WAAB 

ORC 

WTAG 
Yakima, Wash KIT 

KTYW 

Yankton, S. Dak WNAX* 

York, Pa WORK 

WSBA 
Youngstown, Ohio WFMJ 

WKBN 

Yuma, Ariz. KYUM 

Zanesville, Ohio WHIZ 

Zarephath, N. J WAWZ 



Major 

Network 

B-M 

M 

M 



C-M 
M 
C 



B-M 
N 
M 



C 

M-N 



346 



AMA< 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



WHMA 



ANNISTON— EST. 1938 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Anniston Broadcasting Co. 

Operated By Anniston Broadcasting Co. 

Address Radio Building. 1330 Noble St. 

Phone Number 2380 

Transmitter Location Radio Building, 

1330 Noble St. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Anniston Star 

News Service AP. UP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative Sears & Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

Owner Harry M. Ayers 

Station-Commercial Manager I. W. Buttram 

Program-Publicity Director • Ruby Meigs 

Production Manager Malcolm Street 

Sales Promotion Manager-Musical Director. . . . 
Mrs. Ruby Meigs 

Chief Engineer Tames Hudson 

Director of War Programs J. W. Buttram 



WJLD 

BESSEMER— EST. 1942 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By George Johnston 

Address . 1831^-4th Ave. N. 

Phone Number 2300; 2301; 6-6172 

Transmitter Location .... Blue Lake Site 

Time on the Air. .6 a.m. to 10 p.m., weekdays: 

7 a.m. to 12 p.m., Sundays. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System-Keystone Broadcasting System. 

Personnel 

Owner William R. Terry 

Station Manager Hal Falter 

Commercial Manager Eugene P. Weil 

Production Manager Miriam Bunkin 

Program Director Hal Falter 

Chief Announcer Hal Falter 

Chief Engineer George Harrison, Jr. 



WBRC 



BIRMINGHAM— EST. 1925 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 960 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . Birmingham Broadcast- 
ing Co., Inc. 



Address WBRC Bldg., Second Ave. and 

18th St. N. 

Phone Number 4-7741 

Transmitter Location .... 2400 Arkedelphla Rd. 
Time on the Air 6:00 a.m to 12:00 midnite; 

Sundays, 7:00 am to 12:00. 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President-General Manager I. C. Bell 

Station Manager John M. Connolly 

Director of War Programs. . . Herbert C. Grieb 
Chief Engineer G. P. Hamann 



W A P I 



BIRMINGHAM— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1070 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned By Alabama Polytechnic In- 
stitute, University of Alabama, Alabama 
College. 

Licensee Voice of Alabama, Inc 

Address Protective Life Bldg. 

Phone Number 3-8116 

Studio Addresses Protective Life Bldg.; 

University of Alabama Campus, Tuscaloosa; 
Alabama College Campus, Montevallo; Ala- 
bama Polytechnic Institute Campus, Auburn. 

Transmitter Location Sandusky. Ala. 

Time on the Air: 5:45 a.m. to 12 midnight; Sun- 
days, 8 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Representative Radio Sales 

Personnel 

Chairman of Board Ed Norton 

President-General Manager Thad Holt 

National Sales & Promotion 

Manager H. H. Holthouser 

Program Director Jimmie Willson 

Production Manager .... Lionel Baxter 

Publicity Director Mary Bennett 

Musical Director Stanleigh Malone 

Chief Engineer N. S. Hurley 



WSGN 



BIRMINGHAM— EST. 1925 

BLUE NETWORK 
MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 610 Kc Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated by The Birmingham 

News Co. 
Address Dixie Carlton Hotel 



347 



ALABAMA 



Phone Number 4-3434 

Transmitter Location Alabama State 

Fair Grounds 
Time on the Air: 5 a.m. to 12 midnight 

days, 7 a.m. to 12 midnight 
Newspaper Affiliation .... Birmingham News; 

Birmingham Age-Herald 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus, 

Langworth 
Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager ... Henry P. Johnston 

Assistant to Manager Evelyn Hicks 

Program Director Jack McCormack 

Production Manager . Jack McCormack 

Chief Engineer Gordon F. Bishop 

• 

W M S L 

DECATUR— EST. 1935 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

NORTH ALABAMA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Tennessee Valley 

Broadcasting Co. 

Address 511 Bank St 

Phone Number 802-3-4 

Transmitter Location Decatur, Ala. 

Time on the Air. ... .6:30 ajn. until 10:15 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service . . World Broadcasting 

System and WBS 
Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President Melvin Hutson 

Secretary-Treasurer Clyde Hendrix 

Station-Commercial Manager . . Ernest Mobley 
Program Director-Director of 

War Programs Denny Wright 

Production Manager Otis Dodge 

Publicity Director Pat Wright 

Chief Announcer Frank Lokey 

Chief Engineer . . J. Roser 

Record Master of Ceremony Otis Dodge, 

Frank Lokey, Ernest Cramer 



W A G F 

DOTHAN— EST. 1933 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . Do than Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 204Vi E. Main Street 

Phone Number 1430 

Transmitter Location Headland Highway, 

Doth an 
Time on the Air Daytime license 



Newspaper Affiliation Dothan Eagle 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Headley-Reed Company 

Personnel 

Station Manager Julian C. Smith 

Commercial Manager Fred Moseley 

Program Director and 

Chief Announcer Willard Wilkes 

Production Manager and 

Chief Engineer • • John T. Hubbard 



W J B Y 



GADSDEN— EST. 1928 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .. Gadsden Broadcast- 
ing Co , Inc 

Address 108 Broad Street 

Phone Number 88 

Transmitter Location 108 Broad Street 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 

News Service Transradio 

Representative Sears & Ayer 

Personnel 

President B. H. Hopson 

Station Manager and 

Program Director Beatrice Tate Benton 

Commercial Manager ...:■• Sam Benton 

Chief Engineer L. O. Brunes 



W B H P 



HUNTSVILLE— EST. 1937 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

NORTH ALABAMA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By W. H. Pollard 

Address 318 W. Clinton St. 

Phone Number 313 

Transmitter Location Athens Pike 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service. UP 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager and 

Commercial Manager W. H- Pollard 

Program Director Margaret Speake 

Production Manager Hugh McDonald 

Chief Announcer and 

Chief Engineer John Garrison 



W A L A 



MOBILE— EST. 1930 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1410 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned By W. O. Perpe 



348 



ALABAMA 



• • • 



Operated By Pape Broadcasting Co. 

Address 106 St. Joseph St., AT&N 

Railroad Bldg. 

Phone Number Dexter 3-3787 

Transmitter Location Tensas Bridge Head, 

Baldwin County 
Time on the Air ■ -6 am- to 11:00 p.m.; 

Sundays, 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager W. O. Pape 

Commercial Manager H. K. Martin 

Program Director-Chief 

Announcer Charles Saunders 

Musical Director Agnes Plrtle 

Chief Engineer Raymond Hurley 

• 

W IV! B 

MOBILE— EST. 1939 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc • • .Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By S. B. Quigley 

Business Address 600 St. Louis St.. 

(Quigley Building) 

Phone Number Belmont 2-4566 

Studio Address 600 St. Louis St. 

Transmitter Location 600 St. Louis St. 

Time on the Air. . Unlimited License 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Sears & Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

Station Manager S. B. Quigley 

Commercial Manager F. E. Busby 

Sales Promotion Manager .... Miss Bea Quigley 

Program Director Miss Clara Malone 

Production Manager ... Mrs. Adele Hull 

Publicity Director Miss Bea Quigley 

Chief Engineer T. L. Greenwood 

• 

WCO V 

MONTGOMERY— EST. 1939 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... . Capital Broadcasting 

Company, Inc. 

Business Address 2 Montgomery St. 

Phone Number 5781 

Transmitter Location Narrow Lane Road, 

Montgomery 

Time on the Air 17 hours daily 

News Service INS 

Transcripion Service Standard Radio 

Representative Howard H. Wilson Co. 



Personnel 

President-Station Mgr G. W. Covington, Jr 

Commercial Manager John C Hughes 

Executive Secretary Evelyn B. Robinson 

Musical Director .Weston Britt 

Program Director Weston Britt 

Chief Engineer W. D. Weatherly 

• 

WS F A 

MONTGOMERY— EST. 1930 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
Frequency: 1440 Kc Power: 1000 d.; 

500 n. 
Owned-Operated By Montgomery 

Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

Business Address P. O. Box 1031 

Phone Number 8361 

Studio Address Jefferson Davis Hotel 

Transmitter Location Narrow Lane Road, 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President-General Manager. . . .Howard E. Pill 

Station Manager John B. DeMotte 

Local Sales Manager W. W. Hunt 

Publicity Director Leland Childs 

Program-Musical Director and 

Production Manager Caldwell Stewart 

Chief Engineer Cliff Shelkofsky 

• 

W L A Y 

MUSCLE SHOALS CITY— EST. 1933 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

NORTH ALABAMA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Muscle Shoals 

Broadcasting Corporation 

Address Muscle Shoals, Ala. 

Phone Number 1450 

Transmitter Location Muscle Shoals, Ala. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; 

Sundays, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 pm. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Sears & Ayer 

Personnel 

President F. M. Farris, Jr. 

Station and Commercial Manager and 

Publicity Director E. J. Sperry 

Program-Musical Director and 

Production Manager . . . Mrs. Josephine Sperry 

Sales Promotion Mgr Mrs. Lucille Johnston 

Chief Announcer G. W. Orton, III 



349 



ALABAMA-ARIZONA 



W J H 

OPELIKA— EST. 1940 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power 250 d.; 100 n. 

Owned-Operated By Opelika Auburn 

Broadcasting Co. 

Address 1400 Auburn Road 

Phone Number 856 

Transmitter Location 1400 Aubum Road 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 mid. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC and Keystone 

Broadcasting System 

Personnel 

Station Manager and 

Chief Engineer F Marion Hyatt 

Commercial Manager James T. Ownby 

Publicity Director Anne Davis 

Musical Director Ben Parsons 

Sales Promotion James T. Ownby 

Program Director Anne Davis 

W H*B B 

SELMA— EST. 1935 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... . Selma Broadcasting 

Company, Inc. 

Business Address 209 Washington St. 

Phone Number 1233 

Studio Address 209 Washington St., 

Selma, Ala. 



Transmitter Location Seventh Ave., North 

Time on the Air 14V2 hours daily 

Representative Sears & Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

Station-Commercial Mgr Julien Smith, Jr 

Chief Engineer T. F Kelley. Jr. 



WFEB 

SYLACAUGA* 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Alabama Broadcasting Co. 

President E. E. Forbes, Sr. 

* C.P. only. 

W J R D 

TUSCALOOSA— EST. 1936 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By James R. Doss, Jr. 

Address First National Bank Bldg. 

Phone Number 4464-85 

Transmitter Location Jug Factory & 

Greensboro Roads 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System, C. P. MacGregor 
Representative Headley-Reed Co.. 

Personnel 

Owner J. R. Doss. Jr. 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



K W J B 

GLOBE— EST. 1938 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 
ARIZONA BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: The Gila Broadcasting 

Co., Inc 

Business Address Globe & Safford 

Phone Number Globe 41 

Studio Address South Globe, Arixona 

Transmitter Location. . . .South Globe, Arizona 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m.-ll p.m., daily; 

7 a.m.-12.15 a.m., Sunday 

Representative Paul H. Raymer 

News Service AP, INS, UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 



Personnel 

President Louis F Long 

General Manager Paul Merrill 

Commercial and Sales 

Manager Edward E. Furman 

Chief Engineer Herbert Hartman 

Record Master of Ceremony . . Willard Shoecraft 

KSU N 

BIRBEE— EST. 1933 

CBS 
ARIZONA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . Copper Electric Co., Inc. 
Address Box C, Birbee, Ariz. 



350 



ARIZONA 



Number Birbee 9 

Transmitter Location Lowell. Ariz. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner James S. Maifeo 

Station Manager Carleton W. Morris 

Commercial Manager Eleanor Cervisi 

Program Director Marion McKinney 

Chief Announcer Hugh Keyes 

• 

K Y 

PHOENIX— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
THE ARIZONA NETWORK 

Frequency: 550 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Salt River Valley 

Broadcasting Company 

Address 838 North Central Avenue 

Phone Number 4-4144 

Transmitter Looation 12th St. & Camel- 
back Rd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Prairie Farmer 

Publishing Co., Arizona Farmer 

News Service UP; Transradio 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

Chairman of Board Burridge D. Butler 

President W. A. Baldwin 

Commercial Manager John L. Hogg 

General Manager Albert D. Johnson 

Program Director John R. Williams 

Chief Announcer and 

Production Manager Joe Dana 

Musical Director Alfred Becker 

Chief Engineer Lewis Sublett 



KPHO 

PHOENIX— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . Phoenix Broadcasting, Inc. 
Business Address . . Adams Hotel, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Phone Number 4-7367 

Studio Address. . .Adams Hotel, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Transmitter Location. .24th Ave. & Buckeye Rd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service ASCAP, BMI, SESAC 

Representative Howard H. Wilson Co. 



351 



Personnel 

President-Owner Rex Shepp 

Station Manager Charlie Garland 

Sales Manager & Sales Promotion 

Arnold J. Gregory 

PJrogram Director Libby Quinn 

Director of War Programs Libby Quinn 

Production Manager Libby Quinn 

Publicity Director Mollie Munger 

Chief Announcer John Wages 

Musical Director Mollie Munger 

Chief Engineer Ross Griffith 

Record MC. .John Wages & Graham Alexander 

• 

KTAR 

PHOENIX— EST. 1922 

NBC 
ARIZONA BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 620 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KTAR Broadcasting 

Company 

Eusiness Address 711 Heard Building 

Phone Number 4-4161 

Studio Address Atop the Heard Building 

Transmitter Location 36th St. & East 

Thomas Road 
Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12:15 am 
Newspaper Affiliation Arizona Republic 

and Phoenix Gazette 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus. 

Standard Radio Library and Langworth 
Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

Chief Owner-Ch. of Bd John J. Louis 

President & General Manager Dick Lewis 

Commercial Manager J. R. Heath 

Sales Promotion Manager L. D. Bradbury 

Program Director J. Howard Pyle 

Director of War Programs J. Howard Pyle 

Publicity Director John Snow 

Artists' Bureau Head Mary Louise Watson 

Chief Engineer Harold Haughawout 



K Y C A 

PRESCOTT— EST. 1940 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Southwest Broad- 
casting Company 

Address East Gurley St. 

Phone Number 244 

Transmitter Location East Gurley St. 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 



ARIZONA 



News Service INS and AP 

Transcription Service Standard Library 

Representative Paul Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

Station and Commercial Mgr. .. .Harold Ritter 

Program Director Roberta Pflster 

Artists' Bureau Byron Lee McCall 

Dir. of War Programs Roberta M. Pfister 

Production Manager Shirley Ritter 

Publicity Director Byron Lee McCall 

Chief Announcer Robert Giroux 

Musical Director Catharine F. Girard 

Chief Engineer George Eitel 

Office Manager Odalite Ritter 



Transcription Service Associated Record 

Program, Service & World Broadcasting 
System 

Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

Station Manager Lee Little 

Sales Manager Eugene Packer 

Chief Announcer Graham French 

Program Director and 

Dir. of War Programs Wayne Sanders 

Chief Engineer Cliff Livingston 

Production Manager Gerry O'Brien 

Musical Director Wayne A. Sanders 



K G L U 

SAFFORD— EST. 1938 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
ARIZONA BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Gila Broadcasting 

Company 

Address Saf ford, Ariz. 

Phone Number 15 

Transmitter Location 1218 - 6th Ave. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. -11p.m. dcdly 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representatives Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President Louis F. Long 

Station Manager Paul Merrill 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Edward E. Furman 

Publicity Director Paul Merrill 

Program Director, Production Manager and 

Chief Announcer Norman B- Harrington 

Chief Engineer Herbert Hartman 

Dir. of War Programs . . . Norman B. Harrington 

Musical Director Alberta Hunt 

Record MC Thomas B. Greenhaw 



KTUC 

TUCSON— EST. 1929 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
ARIZONA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . . .Tucson Broadcasting 
Co.. Inc. 

Address 900 E. B'way 

Phone Number 1400 

Transmitter Location 900 E. B'way 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 11 pjn. 

News Service UP 



K V A 

TUCSON— EST. 1929 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

ARIZONA BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Frequency: 1290 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Arizona Broadcasting 
Company, Inc. 

Business Address P. O. Box 2911 

Phone Number 3703 

Studio Address 48 East Broadway 

Transmitter Location 10th and Lee 

Time on the Air 6 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Arizona Republic 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager R. B. Williams 

• 

KYUM 

YUMA— EST.1940 

BLUE NETWORK-NBC 
ARIZONA BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Yuma Broadcasting Co. 

Business Address Post Office Box 352 

Phone Number Yuma 88 

Studio Address. . .19th Avenue and 1st Street 
Transmitter Location. .19th Avenue and 1st St. 
Time on the Air: 7 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.; Sundays, 
7:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. 

News Service. INS, UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President R N. Campbell 

Station Manager Ray Smucker 

Program Director and 

Dir. of War Programs D. Clark Hayderi 

Chief Engineer Leaven worh Wheeler 



352 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



K L C N 

BLYTHEVILLE— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 900 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned and Operated by. . .Fred O. Grimwood 

Address Noble Hotel 

Phone Number 2093 

Transmitter Location Armored. Ark. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to local sunset 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service: NBC Thesaurus 

Representative The John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel 

Station-Commercial 

Manager Harold L. Sudbury 

Sales Promotion Manager Harold Sudbury 

Program Director J. T. Sudbury 

Director of War Programs- 
Chief Announcer Bill Crable 

Musical Director ■ ■ Bob Berryman 

Chief Engineer Bob Connor 

• 

KELD 

EL DORADO— EST. 1935 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By... Radio Enterprises, Inc. 

Address Box 610, El Dorado, Ark. 

Phone 1313 

Transmitter Location Country Club Colony 

Time on the Air: 6:45 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative- Cox and Tanz 

Personnel 

President T. H- Barton 

Station and Commercial Manager. .Leon Sipes 
Sales Promotion Manager- 
Publicity Director J- R. Duerson 

Program Director Rodney Smith 

Chief Announcer lames Broach 

Director of War Programs .... Jacqueline Click 
Chief Engineer A. W- Hearin 

• 

K F P W 

FORT SMITH— EST. 1930 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Southwestern 

Hotel Co. 

Address 1215 Garrison Ave. 

Phone Number 4106 

Transmitter Location Albert Pike & 

Kelley Highway 



Time on the Air 6:30 to 12 p.m.; 

Sundays, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

News Service UP and AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus; 

World Broadcasting System 

Personnel 

President and General Mgr. . .John A England 

Station Manager J. E. "Pat" Garner 

Commercial-Sales Promotion 

Manager Bill Slates 

Program-Musical Director Dorothy Gibson 

Production Manager and 

Publicity Director Pat Garner 

Chief Announcer William A. Stapleton 

Chief Engineer John M. Van Horn 



KF F A 



HELENA— EST. 1941 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

ARKANSAS NETWORK 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By:. Helena Broadcasting Co. 

Address 215 York St. 

Phone Number Main 59 

Transmitter Location 215 York St. 

Time on the Air 104 hours weekly 

News Services UP 

Transcription 

Service Keystone Broadcasting System 

Personnel 

President-General Manager Sam Anderson 

Program Director and 

Production Manager Doris Trainer 

Chief Engineer J. C. Warren 

Chief Announcer Leland Stone 



KT H S 

HOT SPRINGS— EST. 1924 

BLUE NETWORK 
ARKANSAS NETWORK 

Frequency 1090 Kc. 

Power 10.000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated By.. Radio Broadcasting, Inc. 

Address 135 Benton Street 

Phone Number 1160-1161 

Transmitter Location Malvern Road 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Branham Company 

Personnel 

President John D. Ewing 

Station Manager K. K. Kellam 



353 



ARKANSAS 



Commercial Manager Ed Appier 

Program Director and 

Production Manager Frank A. Browne 

Chief Engineer Cecil Suirt 

• 

K W FC 

HOT SPRINGS— EST. 1940 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Clyde E. Wilson 

Address 819»/ 2 Central 

Phone Number 412-3 

Transmitter Location 819 V2 Central 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 11 pan. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

General Manager Clyde E. Wilson 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Robert Choate 

Program Director Ann Hiryak 

Production Manager and 

Publicity Director Jon Hackett 

Chief Engineer Earl H. Butler 

K B*T M 

JONESBORO— EST. 1930 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned by Jay P. Beard d/b as Regional 

Broadcasting Co. 

Operated By Mrs. Jay P. Beard 

Address: KBTM Bldg.. Madison at Jackson Sis. 

Phone Number 597 

Transmitter Location Tower Place. East of 

Jonesboro 
Time on the Air 7:00 AJvL to 10:00 P.M. 

Personnel 

President Jay P. Beard 

Station Manager Mrs. Jay P. Beard 

Commercial Manager W. H. Cate 

Program Director Mrs. M. J. Fox 

KAR K 

LITTLE ROCK— EST. 1931 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
SOUTHCENTRAL QUALITY NETWORK 

Frequency: 920 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Arkansas Radio & Equip- 
ment Co. 

Address Radio Center, 114 E. Capitol 

Phone Number LD 224 

Transmitter Location: Jackson Blvd., North Little 
Rock 



Time on the Air 6:0C a.m.- 11:05 p.m.; 

Sundays. 7:00 a.m. to 11:05 p.m. 

News Service AP. INS 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative Edward Petry & Co. 

Personnel 

V-P. and Gen. Mgr G. E. Zimmerman 

Commercial Manager Julian F. Haas 

Studio Manager Jack Rumrill 

Publicity Director Julian F. Haas 

Chief Engineer Dan L Winn 

• 

K G H I 

LITTLE ROCK— EST. 1927 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Arkansas Broadcasting 

Company 
Address . Gazette Building, 3rd & Louisiana Sts. 

Phone Number 9166 

Transmitter Location Gazette Building 

Time on the Air: 6 a.m. to llpun, Saturdays, 

6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 
Newspaper Affiliation Arkansas Gazette 

Personnel 

General Manager S. C. Vinsonhaler 

Commercial Manager R. E. Rives 

Program Director Dorothy Weiss 

Chief Engineer V. D. Vandusen 

• 

K L R A 

LITTLE ROCK— EST. 1926 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
Frequency: 10 10 Kc. . .Power 10000 d.; 5000 n. 
Owned-Operated By . . . Arkansas Broadcasting 

Company 
Address. ..Gazette Bldg., 3rd & Louisiana Sts. 

Phone LD 132 

Transmitter Location 7 miles out on 

Memphis Hi- Way 
Time on the Air: 5:00 a.m. to L2:05 a.m. Mon- 
days through Saturday; 7 a.m. to 12:05 a.m., 
Sundays. 

Newspaper Affiliation Arkansas Gazette 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

Service 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President J. N. Heiskell 

Station Manager Roy Judge 

Merchandising Manager and 

Publicity Director Claude Miller 

Program Director Raymond P. Lang 

Production Manager Raymond P. Lang 

Musical Director Tom Scott 

ChleJ Engineer K. F. Tracy 



354 



ARKANSAS 



K OT N 

PINE BLUFF— EST. 1934 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By B. J. Parrish 

Address 505V2 Main St. 

Phone Number 721 

Transmitter Location 505 Vz Main St. 

Time on the Air Unlimited 

News Service UP and AP 

Personnel 

President-General Manager B. J. Parrish 

Sales Promotion Manager R. W. Etter 

Program Director Ayleene Somervell 

Chief Engineer B. J. Parrish 



KUOA 

SILOAM SPRINGS— EST. 1922 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1290 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KUOA Incorporated 

Address Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Phone Number 77 

Transmitter Location Siloam Springs. Ark. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to Local Sunset 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System, Keystone Broadcasting System 
Representative The Walker Company 

Personnel 

President John E. Brown 

Station and Commrcial 

Manager Storm Whaley 

Program Director Gilberta Walton 

Director of War Programs Storm Whaley 

Chief Engineer Kenneth Maxwell 

For KCNC, Texarkana, see Texas listings. 




355 



The Beeline Advertising Index 






















































































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MAY 


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The above chart shows the gross dollar 
volume of national spot business per month, 
broadcast on the BEELINE during the first 
fifteen months of its existence. 

TODAY. NEARLY ALL NA- . ^^^^^ 
TIONAL SPOT ACCOUNTS 1 /^fflt^K 

ADVERTISING IN CENTRAL 5 rr^J&m \ 
CALIFORNIA AND WEST- \ 1 S> ■F.N j 
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National 
Sales Manag 

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356 



CALIFORNIA 

For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



KERN 

BAKERSFIELD— EST. 1932 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1410 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . McClatchy Broadcasting 

Address Elks Bldg. 

Phono Number 8-8131 

Transmitter Location Ming & Oak Sts. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation McClatchy Newspapers 

News Service AP and INS 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President Eleanor McClatchy 

Station Manager Deane Banta 

Commercial Manager Richard Brothers 

Chief Engineer Verne Shatto 

• 

KPMC 

BAKERSFIELD— EST. 1935 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1560 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. Pioneer Mercantile Co. 
Business Address. .Box 1709, Bakersfield, Calif. 

Phone Number 8-8151 

Transmitter Location 307 East 21st St. 

Time on the Air... 6:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. week- 
days; 7:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Sunday 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus and 

Associated Music Publishers 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President F. G. R. Schamblin 

Station Manager L. A. Schamblin 

Assistant Manager C. C. Sturm 



KRE 

BERKELEY— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Central California 

Broadcasters, Inc. 

Address 601 Ashby Avenue 

Phone Number Ashberry 7715 

Transmitter Location 601 Ashby Avenue 

Time on the Air Unlimited 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager .... Arthur Westlund 



Sales Promotion-Program 

Manager Don Hambly 

Chief Announcer Phil McKernan 

Musical Director Harrold S. Hawley 

• 

K H S L 

CHICO— EST. 1935 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1290 Kc Power 1,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Golden Empire 

Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

Address 4th & Broadway Sts. 

Phone Number Chico 237-8 

Transmitter Location Hooker Oak and 

Madrone Aves. 
Time on the Air: 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.; 8:00 

a.m. to 11:00 p.m., Sundays 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio. 

C. P. MacGregor 
Representative W. S. Grant Co. 

Personnel 

President Hugh McClung 

Station Manager M. F. Woodling 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Henry Watton. Jr. 

Program and Musical Director Mabel Swift 

Production Manager and 

Publicity Director Russell Pope 

Chief Announcer Thomas Nelson 

Chief Engineer Emory P. Milburn 



KXO 

EL CENTRO— EST. 1927 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc. . .Power: 250 Watts 250 N 

Owned-Operated By Valradio. Inc. 

Address 793 Main St. 

Phone Number 1100 

Transmitter Location 793 Main St. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President Thomas E. Sharp 

Station Manager Ken Thornton 

Commercial Manager Belle Hovey 

Program Director Mabel Dalton 

Chief Announcer Jerry Oppell 

Chief Engineer Leroy Bellwood 



357 



CALIFORNIA 



K I E M 

EUREKA— EST. 1933 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1480 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... .Redwood Broadcast- 
ing Co., Inc. 

Business Address Box 43 

Phone Number 93 

Studio Address Vance Hotel, Eureka Inn 

Transmitter Location McFarland Tract 

Humboldt Bay 

Time on the Air Unlimited 

News Service INS; UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President and Station 

Manager William B. Smullin 

Rural War Manager Eddie Logan 

Commercial Manager Betty Lundeen 

Production Manager C. Paul Corbin 

Sales Promotion Manager Betty Byrd 

Program Manager Mary Martin 

Musical Director Jack Andrews 

Religious Director. .Rev. Charles H. Hudson 

Office Manager George E. Thomson 

Traffic Manager Betty Matthias 

Education Director Earl Roberts 

Engineer Alvor Olson 

ka'r m 

FRESNO— EST. 1938 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1430 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KARM. The George 

Harm Station 

Address 1333 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Number 4-2966 

Transmitter Location Van Nest & Allu- 
vial Avenues 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

8 a.m. to 12 midnight, Sunday 

News Service AP and INS 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Edward Petry & Co.. Inc. 

Personnel 

Owner & President Mrs. Hattie Harm 

General Manager Clyde F. Coombs 

Commercial Manager Ned L. Brown 

Publicity Director Eldora Roth 

Program Director John Garrick 

Chief Engineer R. M. Dorothy 

K FR E 

FRESNO— EST. 1942 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By J. E. Rodman 

Address T. W. Patterson Bldg. 

Phone Number 4-5001 

Transmitter Location Clinton & First Sts. 

Time on the Air:. . .5:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers and World 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

Owner J. E. Rodman 

General Manager Paul R. Bartlett 

Program Director Gene Chenault 

Office Manager Lois Daniels 

Traffic Manager Frances Quinn 

Chief Engineer Sheldon Anderson 

KM J 

FRESNO— EST. 1922 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 580 Kc Power: 5.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .McClatchy Broadcasting 

Co. 

Address Van Ness & Calaveras 

Phone Number 3-6277 

Transmitter Location .... North & Madera Aves. 

Kerman 

Time on the Air: 24 hours daily 

Newspaper Affiliation The Fresno Bee 

(McClatchy Newspapers) 

News Service UP & AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President Eleanor McClatchy 

Station Manager Keith Collins 

National Sales Manager (N. Y. C.) 

Robert Srteet 

Sales Manager.. Coyle Chambers 

Sales Promotion Manager Jack Griffith 

Traffic Manager Margaret Vogelsang 

Special Events Director A. D. Patterson 

Program and Musical Director and 

Production Manager Andy Patterson 

Publicity Director Jack Griftith 

Chief Engineer. Wm. N. Wallace 

War Program Director Andy Patterson 

• 

KIEV 

GLENDALE— EST. 1933 

Frequency: 870 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Cannon Broadcasting 
System, Ltd. 

Address 102 N. Glendale Ave. 

Phone Number. Citrus 1-1133 

Transmitter Location 102 N. Glendale Ave. 

Time on the Air Daytime License 



358 



C A*L I F O R N I A 



Personnel 

President David H. Cannon 

General Manager L. W. Peters 

Chief Announcer R. W. Muller 

Chief Engineer Lee Gustafson 



K F OX 



LONG BEACH— EST. 1924 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BROADCASTERS 
ASSOCIATION 

Frequency: 1280 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Nichols & Warinner, Inc. 

Address 220 E. Anaheim Street 

Phone Number 672-81 

Transmitter Location . . . 220 E. Anaheim Street 

Time on the Air 5:00 a.m. to 1/1:00 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio. 

Langworth Transcription Service; C. P. Mac- 
Gregor 

Personnel 

President, Station Manager and 

Program Director Hal G. Nichols 

Commercial and Sales Promotion Manager 

and Chief Engineer. .Lawrence W. McDowell 
Director of War Programs Margaret Smith 

KGE R 

LONG BEACH— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1390 Kc. Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Consolidated Broadcast- 
ing Corp. 

Business Address 435 Pine Ave, 

Phone Number Long Beach 660-41 

Studio Addresses: 435 Pine Ave.; 643 So. 
Olive, Los Angeles 

Transmitter Location Atlantic & Olive 

Compton 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m, 

News Service AP & INS 

Transcription Service: World Broadcasting Sys 
tern. Standard Radio, Lang-Worth, McGregor 
and Associated 
National Representative Spot Sales. Inc. 

Personnel 

President-Gen'l Manager. . .C. Merwyn Dobyns 

Commercial Manager Lee Wynne 

Sales Promotion Manager . . . Thomas P. Hunter 

Musical Director Helene Smith 

Production Manager Irene Cook 

Chief Engineer Ronald Oakley 



K E C A 



LOS ANGELES— EST. 1929 

BLUE NETWORK 
Frequency: 790 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 



Owned-Operated By ... . Blue Network Co., Inc. 

Address 1440 No. Highland Ave. 

Phone Number Hillside 8231 

Transmitter Location 2951 S. Fairfax Ave. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

6:45 a.m. to midnight, Sunday 

News Service UP, AP 

Transcription Service Thesauras 

Representative Blue Network Spot Sales 

Personnel 

President Earle C. Anthony 

General Manager Clyde Scott 

Commercial and Sales Mgr Amos Baron 

Program Manager. John Edwards 

Musical Director Claude Sweeten 

Production Manager Wm. Davidson 

Publicity Director Virginia West 

Continuity Editor Katherine Calvert 

Chief Engineer Ralph Denechaud 



K F A C 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1929 

Frequency: 1330 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Los Angeles Broadcast- 
ing Company, Incorporated 

Address 645 South Mariposa 

Phone Number FItzroy 1231 

Transmitter Location 3725 Chesapeake, 

L. A., Calif. 

Time on the Air 168 hours a week 

News Service AP 

Personnel 

President-General Manager Calvin J. Smith 

Program Director Harry Mitchell 

Publicity Director Eileen Wheatley 

Traffic Manager Lucile R. Blake 

Chief Announcer Harry Mitchell 

Chief Engineer Owen J. Ford 

K F S G 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1923 

Frequency: 1150 Kc. . .Power: 2500 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated By: Echo Park Evangelistic 
Ass'n 

Address 1100 Glendale Blvd. 

Phone Number Exposition 1141 

Transmitter Location 1100 Glendale Blvd. 

Time on the air: 7:45 p.m. to 12 midnight (ex- 
cept Fridays); Sundays, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m., 3 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., 7:00 p.m. to 12 
midnight 

Personnel 

President Aimee Semple McPherson 

Station Manager Rev. Jack Carmaine 

Musical Director Esther Fricke Stuart 

Chief Engineer Myron Kluge 

* IVon-Commercial Station. 



359 



BOB HOPE 



benn^ 



AMOS 'N' ANDY 
EDD1 E CANTOR ^ 

INFORMATION PLEASE 

hour 

° F C HAR M 






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RED 







FIB &ER McGEE 

bergen AND molly 
and McCarthy 

<* ^ Ms 

FANNIE BR/CE 
ABBOTT 
Q & COSTELLO 




• • CALIFORNIA • • 

K F I 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1922 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 640 Kc Power: 50,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . .Earle C. Anthony, Inc. 

Address 141 North Vermont Ave. 

Phone Number FAiriax 2121 

Transmitter Location Buena Park, Calif. 

Time on the Air 24 Hours Daily, 

Except Tues. — 12 Hours 

News Service UP 

Transcripiton Service: Standard Radio, Lang- 
Worth 
Representative Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

Personnel 

President Earle C. Anthony 

General Manager William B. Ryan 

Sales Manager Geo. A. Whitney 

Program Director Don McNamara 

Production Manager Bob Hiestand 

Publicity Director Harold Carlock 

Director of Promotion and 

Public Service J. G. Paltridge 

Auditor Ernest Felix 

Special Events Supervisor Robert Purcell 

Continuity Editor Volney Cunningham 

Musical Director Claude Sweeten 

Chief Engineers Curtis Mason. 

H. L. Blatterman 

K FW B 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1925 

Frequency: 980 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Warner Bros. Broadcast- 
ing Corp. 

Address 5833 Fernwood Ave. 

Phone Number Hempstead 5151 

Transmitter Location . Baldwin Hills, Culver City 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

News Service AP, UP, INS and Reuters 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager Harry Maizlish 

Production Manager William Ray 

Program Director William Ray 

Chief Announcer Harry Hall 

Musical Director Leon Leonardi 

War Program Director Sara Longman 

Chief Engineer Harry Myers 

K F*V D 

LOS ANGELES 

Frequency: 1020 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Standard Broadcasting 

Company, Inc. 

Address 338 South Western Avenue 

Phone Number Drexel 2391 

Transmitter Location 9300 Cattaraugus St 

Time on the Air:B a.m. to sundown. 10:00 p.m. 

to 1:00 a.m. 



4 NEWS SERVICES 

1. Associated Press 
2. United Press 
3. International News Service 
4. Reuters 

4 NETWORK COMMENTATORS 

1. Sam Baiter 
2. John B. Hughes 
3. Bill Pennell 
4. Peter De Lima 

ALL 

On 

Warner Bros. 

EFWB 

Hollywood 

— and male fiuJUic Aebvice p/io^iamd 
tAan any atUesi dtattott Ut tUe Weit. 

5,000 WATTS DAY AND NIGHT 

Harry Maizlish 
General Manager 

William Rambeau, National Representative 



361 



CALIFORNIA 



News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth, 

MacGregor 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager J. Frank Burke 

Commercial Manager F. J. Smalley, Jr. 

Program Dir.-Chief Announcer. . .Howard Gray 

Publicity Director Tonl Reeder 

Director of War Programs Howard Gray 

Chief Engineer William Gags 

KG F J 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Ben S. McGlashan 

Address 1417 S. Figueroa St. 

Phone Number Prospect 2434 

Transmitter Location 1828 Oak St. 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service ...... Associated Music 

Publishers, 

Personnel 

Manager Thelma Kirchner 

Public Relations Director Harry Koplan 

Production Mgr Carolyn Caro 

Program Director Rene Bozarth 

Chief Engineer Homer Obuchon 

K H J 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1921 

MBS— DON LEE 

Frequency: 930 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Don Leo Broadcasting 

System 

Business Address 5515 Melrose Are. 

Phone Number HOllywood 8111 

Transmitter Location Venice Bird. & La 

Cienega 
Time on the Air:24 hours daily; Monday, 12:00 

midnite to 6:00 a.m. 

News Service AP. INS. City News 

Transcription Service: World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President Thomas S. Lee 

Vice-President and 

General Manager Lewis JWen Weiss 

Vice President and 

Assistant Manager Willet H. Brown 

Commercial Manager Sydney Gay nor 

Sales Promotion and 

Publicity Director Fair Taylor 

Traffic Manager Mary E. Ryan 

Musical Director Frank Du Vol 

War Program Director Tony La Frano 

Chief Engineer Frank M. Kennedy 



KMPC 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1928 

Frequency: 710 Kc Power: 10,000 Watts 

Owned By: KMPC, The Station of the Stars, Inc. 

Address 5939 Sunset Blvd. 

Phone Number Hollywood 5341 

Transmitter Location 12755 Burbank Blvd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to midnight 

News Service UP and AP 

Transcription Associated, World 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President G. A. Richards 

V. P. & Gen. Mgr Robert O. Reynolds 

Commercial Manager Herbert Wixson 

Production Manager Howard Rhines 

Program Manager Woodrow Hat tie 

Publicity Director Willard Hanes 

Special Events Director Jack Sherman 

Traffic Manager Alice. Richards 

Musical Director Marie Hudson 

Program Director Don Otis 

Acting Chief Engineer James LaShaun 




Generally speaking, he's a time or space buyer, 
merchandise manager, account executive, or 
other genus homo seeking and devising ways 
and means to influence women. In Los An- 
geles, the male species finds the best way to 
influence women is through the station pro- 
grammed and managed by women — KGFJ. 
THE TWENTY-HOUR STATION 1230 KC 



"TV /I ^r* f 



Thelma Kirchner, Manager 

"Los Angeles' BIGGEST Little Station" 

1417 South Figueroa St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



362 



• * CALIFORNIA • • 

KMTR 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1924 

Frequency: 570 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KMTR Radio Corp. 

Address 1000 Cahuenga Blvd. 

Phone Number Hillside 1161 

Transmitter Location 1000 Cahuenga Blvd. 

Time on the Air 24 hours daily 

News Service Radio News Reel, INS, AP 

Transcription Service. .Lang- Worth; Standard 
Radio, MacGregor 

Representative Burn-Smith Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager Kenneth O. Tinkham 

Program Manager Jim Strain 

Publicity Director Hal Halley 

Traffic Manager Marion Page 

Recording Division Lyman M. Smith 

Musical Director Salvatore Santaella 

Chief Engineer Pete Wilson 



i/Jou already hn 

but we want to repeat it 
again. Maybe some of you 
d it in the past — 

IN PROGRAMS ... IN PERSONNEL 
IN CONSTRUCTION 

KMTR is truly 



&Jio Station 

ZOVER 90% OF SOU 
ALIFORNIA'S POPULATIC 
'HE LOWEST COST 

:t the KMTR Picture 
and 



000 Cahuenga Blvd. 
IOLLYWOOD 



KMTR 



3^ ^\57< 



* *2* 














KMTR TheTopRadioStation with- 

DIAL fijfc.,-^ " "| 
EVERY HOUR-ON THE HOUR 

^3^ 14 HOURS AMY 




/ 

/ h 

/ki 

/ Cal 


Exclusive One Minute Announcement 

Offered in Middle of any Five Minute News broadcast on-th< 
Dur at regular five minute Card Rate. Write for availabiliti 

V* T R — Hollywood — BURN-SMITH CO., II 

fornia New York Ch 


es: \ 

MC.\ 

cago \ 



363 



CALIFORNIA 



K N X 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1070 Kc Power: 50,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . Columbia Broadcasting 
System, Inc. 

Address 6121 Sunset Blvd. 

Phone Number Hollywood 1212 

Transmitter Location Columbia Park, Tor- 
rance, Calif. 

Time on the Air 24 hours daily 

News Service AP: INS; UP 

Transcription Service . . Lang- Worth, Associated 
Representative Radio Sales 

Personnel 

Vice President and General 

Manager Donald W. Thornburgh 

Ass't Gen'l Mgr. and Director of 

Network Sales Harry W. Witt 

Pacific Coast Sales Mgr.. .George L. Moskovics 

Sales Manager (KNX) J. A. Morton 

Sales Promotion Manager Ralph Taylor 

Merchandising & Sales Service 

Manager Jack O'Maxa 

Radio Sales Representative Meredith Pratt 

Program Manager Hal Hudson 

Chief Engineer Lester H. Bowman 

Director of Public Relations Fox Case 

Director of Press Information . . Lloyd Brownfield 

Operations Manager Ben Paley 

CBS Western Musical Director Lud Gluskin 

Musical Director (KNX) Wilbur Hatch 

Continuity Chief Everett Tomlinson 

Production Manager ...Edith Todesca 

Managing News Editor Clinton Jones 

Stations Relations Manager... E. W. Buckalew 

K R*K D 

LOS ANGELES— EST. 1927 

Frequency: 1150 Kc... Power: 2500 d.; 1,000 n. 
Owned-Operated By Radio Broadcasters, 

Incorporated 

Business Address 541 So. Spring Street 

Phone Number Tucker 7111 

Studio Addresses 312 Spring Arcade Bldg.; 

541 So. Spring St. 

Transmitter Location 1100 Lemoyne 

Time on the Air Shares Time with KFSG 

News Service INS 

Personnel 

General Manager Ned Connor 

Program Director Venna Taylor 

Chief Engineer Willis O. Freitag 

Chief Announcer Doug Douglas 

K M*Y C 

MARYSVILLE— EST. 1940 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Marysville-Yuba City 

Broadcasters, Inc. 

Address P. O. Box 631. Marysville. Calif. 

Phone Number 2060 

Transmitter Location Three miles north of 

Marysville on Laurellan Road 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative W. S. Grant Co. 

Personnel 

President Horace Thomas 

Station and Commercial Manager. Joe D. Carroll 

Sales Promotion Manager Hedley Hall 

Program Director and 

Production Manager Ruth Parmeter 

Chief Engineer A. J. Powell, Jr. 

Chief Announcer Hedley Hall 



K Y S 

MERCED— EST. 1936 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . . .Merced Broadcasting 

Company 

Business Address P. O. Box 717 

Phone Numbers 1430; 1431 

Studio Address ."G" Street Grade 

Transmitter Location "G" Street Grade 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

National Sales Office 582 Market St., 

San Francisco 
Representative W. S. Grant 

Personnel 

General Director Hugh McClung 

Station Manager Mel Marshall 

Commercial Manager J. C. MacFarland 

Sales Promotion Manager George Spelvin 

Program Director Herb James 

Chief Engineer Malcolm R. Beavers 

• 

KT RB 

MODESTO— EST. 1933 

Frequency: 860 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By..KTRB Broadcasting Co., 

Business Address P. O. Box 593 

Phone Number 774 

Studio and Transmitter Norwegian Ave. 

News Service .INS 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager. .Wm. H. Bates, Jr. 

Sales Manager Virgil V. Risley 

Program Director Cecil Lynch 

Chief Engineer Wm. H. Bates, Jr. 



364 



CALIFORNIA 



KDON 

MONTEREY— EST. 1935 

DON LEE— MUTUAL 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . . .Monterey Peninsula 
Broadcasting Co. 

Business Address 275 Pearl St. 

Phone Number: Monterey 850 1 

Studio Addresses ..275 Pearl St.; 137 Mon- 
terey St.. Salinas 

Transmitter Location Municipal Wharf 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation. .. .Monterey Peninsula 
Herald; Salinas, Californian 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio, 

Associated 

Personnel 

President Paul H. Caswell 

Station Managers Howard V. Walters, 

Bernard E. Cooney 

Program Director Howard Walters 

Chiei Announcer Edward C. Duty, Jr. 

Chief Engineer Edward C. Duty 



KLX 

OAKLAND— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 910 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . . .Tribune Building Corp. 
Address Tribune Tower, 13th & Frank- 
lin Streets 

Phone Number Glencourt 0660 

Transmitter Location Tribune Tower 

Time on the Air:6:25 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.; 9:00 
a.m. to 1:00 a.m., Sunday 

Newspaper Affiliation Oakland Tribune 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System: Photo and Sound, Inc. 
Representative Joseph Hershey McGillvra 

Personnel 

President-Owner J. R. Knowland, Jr. 

General Manager Glenn Shaw 

Sales Promotion Manager Walter Brown 

Program Director Leon Churchon 

Publicity Director Gladys Herst 

Musical Director Charles Short Ridge 

Chief Engineer Ross Smith 

War Program Director Leon Churchon 



KLX 



HAS HIGH 
PRIORITY ON 



"LISTENER LOYALTY" 

From pioneer to pace setter since 1921. That's 
the record of radio station KLX, Metropolitan 
Oakland's leading Independent. 

From its broadcast of the Dempsey-Carpentier 
fight in Jersey City, July 2, 1921, to the vital war 
news of today, KLX has given its listeners a high 
standard of radio programs and outstanding public 
service. 

That's why it's "just natural" to tune to KLX. 

The TRIBUNE STATION, Oakland 4, California 
National Representative, JOSEPH HERSHEY McGILLVRA, Inc. 



USTENS* die 
rfcw LOYALTY 
e LISTENS* *« 
» LOYALTY * 
|w D$TtM« 
LOYALTY *r* 
m LISTENS* 
*«» LOYALTY 
£.Lt$TE*|fR ea 
^LOYALTY it 
USTf *_«* «« 
tnet LOYALTY; 



365 



CALIFORNIA 



K R W 

OAKLAND— EST. 1925 

Frequency: 960 Kc Power 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KROW. Inc. 

Business Address Radio Center Building. 

464 - 19th Street 

Phone Number GLencourt 6774 

Studio Addresses Radio Center Building 

Bellevue Hotel, San Francisco; Newsreel 

Theatre, Oakland, Calif. 

Transmitter Location 1522 - 8th Avenue 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to Midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service Standard Radio; 

Langworth 

Personnel 

President Sheldon Sackett 

Vice-President-General 

Manager Philip G. Lasky 

Commercial Manager Ralph Wiener 

Program Director R. W. Wassenberg 

Production Manager Jim Boswell 

Publicity Director.. Mercedes Prosser 

Chief Announcer Jim Boswell 

Chief Engineer C. E. Downey 

Director of War Programs Phyllis Flynn 



710,113 ^e^4 

in Metropolitan 

OAKLAND 



Metropolitan Oak- 
land extends nearly 
30 miles (all solidly 
built-up CITY) along 
the eastern shore of 
San Francisco Bay. 

KROW 

"The Home Interest Station" 

IS ^<J^W^ ^,eacUa$ Station. 

RADIO CENTER BUILDING, 19TH and BROADWAY 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Philip G. Lasky, General Manager 




K LS 

OAKLAND— EST. 1921 

Frequency: 1310 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned By S. W. & E. N. Warner 

Operated by Warner Brothers 

Address 327-21st Street 

Phone Number Higate 1212 

Transmitter Location 327-2 1st Street 

Time on the Air 24 hours 

News Service INS 

Personnel 

President-Owners S. W. and E. N. Warner 

Station Manager F. Wellington Morse 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager F. W. Morse 

Program Director C. de Costa 

Chief Engineer Howard Faulknor 



K P AS 

PASADENA— EST. 1941 

Frequency: 1110 Kc Power: 10.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Pacific Coast Broadcast- 
ing Co. 
Business Address. .. 1401 South Oak Knoll Rd. 
Phone Number. .RYan 1-6991: SYcamore 6-9281 
Studio Addresses: Huntington Hotel; Music 

City, Sunset & Vine Sts., Hollywood 
Transmitter Location: Lexington & Gallatin Rd.. 
El Monte. Calif. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service: Lang-Worth; Associated 

Music Publishers 
Representative. Joseph Hershey McGillvra. Inc. 

Personnel 

President J. Frank Burke 

Production Manager Loyal K. King 

Commercial Manager Frank Burke, Jr. 

• 

K P P C 

PASADENA— EST. 1924 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Pasadena Presbyterian 

Church 

Address 585 East Colorado St 

Phone Number Sycamore 3-2193 

Transmitter Location. . .585 East Colorado St. 
Time on the Air Sundays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; 

Wednesdays, 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Personnel 

President C. Franklin Ward 

Chief Announcer Vincent Parsons 

Program-Musical Director .Leon Hall 

Chief Engineer N. V. Parsons 

(Non-Commercial Station) 



366 



CAM FORN I A 



KWKW 

PASADENA— EST. 1942 

Frequency: 1430 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Southern California 

Broadcasting Co. 

Address 425 East Green St. 

Phone Ryan 1-6744 

Transmitter Location San Gabriel 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to sunset 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

Station Manager Howard L. Tullis 

General Manager William J. Beaton 

Commercial Manager William J. Beaton 

Program Director Paul Allison 

Chief Engineer Paul Spargo 

KVCV 

REDDING— EST. 1936 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Golden Empire Broad- 
casting Co. 

Business Address Box 1525 

Phone Number 1646. 1647 

Studio Address Highway No. 99 

Transmitter Location Highway No. 99 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio; 

C. P. MacGregor 
Representative Will Grant 

Personnel 

President Hugli McClung 

Station Manager Ralph R. Bryan 

Commercial Manager. . . .Fred M Stuelpnagel 

Program Director Lyle Mathis 

Chief Engineer Russell B. Pope 

K P*R 

RIVERSIDE— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1440 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion of America 

Business Address: 3401 Russell St., Riverside. 
Calif. 

Phone Number: Riverside 6290. San Bernar- 
dino 5157 

Studio Address: 3401 Russell St.. Riverside 
American National Bank Bldg., San 
Bernardino 

Transmitter Location: 3401 Russell St. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 4 a.m. 

News Service INS and AP 

Transcription Service: Associated Music Pub- 
lishers and MacGregor 

Representative Joseph Hershey McGlllvra 



Personnel 

President-General Manager W. L. Gleeson 

Station Manager W. L. Gleeson 

Sales Promotion and 

Publicity Director M Thome 

Program Director Lee Lamley 

Chief Engineer Amon Dolde 

KCRA 

SACRAMENTO— EST. 1944 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By. . .Central Valleys Broadcasting Co. 
Business Address .... Capital Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Phone Number 3-7363 

Studio Address Capital Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Transmitter Location. . .27th & American River 
Time on the Air. . .6:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 

Personnel 

Owned By . . Ewing C. Kelly, David R. McKinley. 
Vernon Hansen 

Station Manager Ewing C. Kelly 

Commercial Manager Norman Hodgkinson 

Program Director Jack Eliassen 

Production Manager Christine Ness 

Chief Engineer Marvin D. Myers 

K F B K 

SACRAMENTO— EST. 1922 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1530 Kc Power: 10.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: McCIatchy Broadcasting 
Co. 

Business Address 708 Eye St. 

Phone Number 2-5011 

Transmitter Location Yola County 

Time on the Air 24 hours daily 

Newspaper Affiliation Sacramento Bee 

News Service UP and AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President Eleanor McCIatchy 

Station Manager Leo O. Ricketts 

Program and Publicity 

Director Howard L. Bailey 

Sales Manager Jack Schacht 

Musical Librarian Rosalie Brandt 

Chief Engineer Stam Sronce 

KXO A 

SACRAMENTO 

Frequency: 1490 Power: 250 Watts 

* CP issued to Lincoln Dollar. 



367 



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SAN DIEGO'S BLUE NETWORK STATION represented by rambeau 



368 



CALI FOR N I A 



KROY 



SACRAMENTO— EST. 1937 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Royal Miller, Marion Miller. 

L. H. Penney, and Gladys W. Penney. 

Operated By Royal Miller Radio 

Address Hotel Sacramento Bldg. 

Phone Number 3-2525 

Transmitter Location 65th St. at 14th Ave. 

Time on the Air:6:15 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12 midnight. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service .... Associated Recorded 

PGM. Library 
Representative .... Joseph Hershey McGillvra 

Personnel 

President-Owner Royal Miller 

Station Manager Mrs. Royal Miller 

Public Relations Manager Howard Smiley 

Program and Musical 

Director Evangeline Baker 

Chief Engineer Howard Martineau 

Chief Announcer Bill Tries! 



K FXM 



SAN BERNARDINO— EST. 1929 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By J. C. and E. W. Lee 

Operated By Lee Bros. Broadcasting Co. 

Address California Hotel 

Phone Number 4-761. 4-762 

Transmitter Location. 990 Colton Ave. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

Partners J. C. & E. W. Lee 

Station Manager Maury A. Vroman 

Program Director Charles Craig 

Sales Manager N. Pratt Smith 

Chief Engineer George Ewing 

Director of War Programs ..... Charles Craig 



K F M B 



SAN DIEGO— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: 

Worcester Broadcasting Corp. 

Address 1375 Pacific Blvd. 

Phone Number Main 2114 

Transmitter Location Spreckles Bldg. 

Time on the Air. . . 6:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. 



News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

President, Station and 

Commercial Manager Jack Gross 

Sales Promotion Manager John Eves 

Program Director and 

Production Manager Hal Moon 

War Program Director Hal Moon 

Chief Engineer Caleb Frisk 

Publicity Director Shirley Hawley 



K FS D 

SAN DIEGO— EST. 1926 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Frequency: 600 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Airfan Radio 

Corporation, Ltd. 
Address U. S. Grant Hotel, 

San Diego 12 

Phone Number Franklin 6353 

Transmitter Location 326 Broadway 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus; 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner and 

Station Manager Thomas E. Sharp 

Assistant Manager M- R. Harris 

Commercial-Sales Manager Larry Scalf 

Program Director Leah McMahon 



KGB 

SAN DIEGO— EST. 1931 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1360 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Don Lee Broadcasting 
System 

Address 1017 First Ave. 

Phone Number Franklin 6151 

Transmitter Location Pickwick Hotel 

Time on the air: 6 a.m. to 12 midnight; Sun- 
days. 8 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP. INS, UP 

Transcription Service: World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President Thomas S. Lee 

Genl. Mgr Lewis Allen Weiss 

Station Manager F. D. Ide 

Commercial-Sales Promotion 

Manager William A. Evans 

Production Manager Jerry Lee Pecht 

Program and Musical Director James Dillon 

Chief Announcer Bailey Warren 

Chief Engineer. William G Collins 



369 



CALIFORNIA 



KFRC 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1924 

MUTUAL— DON LEE BROADCASTING 
SYSTEMS 

Frequency: 610 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Don Lee Broadcasting 

System 

Address 1000 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Number Prospect 0100 

Transmitter Location 1000 Van Ness Ave. 

Time on the air: 6 a.m. to midnight; Sundays, 

7 a.m. to midnight 

News Service AP, INS 

Transcription Service: World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President Thomas L. Lee 

General Manager Lewis Allen Weiss 

Station Manager Dan Donnelly 

Local Sales Manager Merwyn McCabe 

Program-Production Manager Pat Kelly 

Sales Promotion and 

Publicity Manager Bunty Keyser 

Chief Announcer Bob Bence 

Musical Director Cy Trobbe 

Chief Engineer Jim McArdle 

Record Master of 

Ceremony Truman Thompson 



KGO 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1924 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 810 Kc Power 7500 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Blue Network Co. 

Address 155 Montgomery St. 

Phone Number Exbrook 6544 

Transmitter Location. .5144 E 12th St., Oakland 
Time on the Air 24 hours daily; 

Midnight to 6 am. Sundays 

News Service AP. INS, UP, Transradio 

Transcription Service: Standard, Associated, 

NBC Thesaurus, BMI, Sherman Clay (local) 
National Sales Office. 

Blue Network, New York City 
Representative Blue Spot Sales 

Personnel 

President Mark Woods 

Station Manager T. B. Palmer 

Sales Manager Byron H. Nelson 

Promotion-Publicity 

Manager Robert F. Laws 

Program Director Robert H. Wesson 

Production Manager Robert H. Wesson 

Chief Announcer Berton Bennett 

Chief Engineer. A. E. Evans 

Musical Director Phil Bouere 

Record Master of Ceremony. George Fenneman 



K J B S 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST, 1925 

Frequency: 1100 Kc Power: 500 Watts 

Owned By KSBS Broadcasters 

Operated By KSBS Broadcasters 

Address 1470 Pine Street 

Phone Number Ordway 4148 

Transmitter Location 1470 Pine Street 

Time on the Air: Sunday through Friday, 

10 p.m. until local sunset; Saturday. 11:30 

p.m. until local sunset 

News Service INS; UP; AP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co., 

Homer Owen Griffith 

Personnel 

President E. P. Franklin 

Chief Engineer Cecil H. Dutton 

Manager E. P. Franklin 

Program Director C. F. Pendleton 



KPO 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1922 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Frequency: 680 Kc Power: 50.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . .National Broadcasting 

Company 

Address Taylor & O'Farrell Sts. 

Phone Number Graystone 8700 

Transmitter Location Belmont 

Time on the Air. .24 Hours daily except Sunday, 

Midnight to 6:00 a.m. Monday 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus; 

Standard Radio 

Personnel 

General Manager John W. El wood 

Local Manager Alfred Crapsey 

Program Director Wendell Williams 

Assistant to Program Manager Floyd Farr 

Director of News and Special Events 

Charles A. Cooney 

Director of Public Service Catharine Sibley 

Auditor A. G. Diederichs 

Publicity Director Louise Landis 

Continuity Director Byron Mills 

Traffic Manager Fay Pattee Smith 

Chief Announcer Floyd Farr 

Network Sales Ray Baker, Walter 

Tolleson, Jr. 

Spot Sales Car! Nielsen 

Sales Promotion Manager. Helen Murray 

Director of Agriculture Henry Schacht, Jr. 

Radio Recording Janet Sligh 

Station Engineer _ George Greaves 



370 



CALI FORN I A 



KS A N 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1925 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Walts 

Owned-Operated By ... . Golden Gate Broad- 
casting Corp. 

Address 1355 Market St.. 

Merchandise Mart Bldg. 

Phone Number Market 8171 

Transmitter Location 135/ Market St 

Time on the Air Unlimited 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Langworth 

Personnel 

President S. H. Patterson 

Station and Commercial 

Manager Jerry Akers 

Program Director Lee Giroux 

Chief Engineer N. J. Patterson 



KS FO 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1925 

Frequency: 560 Kc... Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 
Owned-Operated By ... . The Associated Broad- 
casters, Inc. 

Address .Mark Hopkins Hotel 

Phone Number Exbrook 4567 

Transmitter Location San Francisco 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 

News Service INS. UP 

Transcription Service Lang- Worth, 

Standard. AMP 
Representative Weed & Company 

Personnel 

President W. I. Dumm 

Vice President and 

General Manager Lincoln Dellar 

Station Manager Wilton Gunzendorfer 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Wilton Gunzendorfer 

Program Director Richard M. Oddie 

Publicity Director Dorothy Burtis 

Chief Engineer R. V. Howard 

Operations Director Allan A. Kees 

K Y A 

SAN FRANCISCO— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1260 Kc... Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 
Owned-Operated By. . .Palo Alto Radio Station. 

Inc. 

Address Hearst Bldg., 3rd & Market Sts. 

Phone Number DOuglas 2536 

Transmitter Location Candlestick Point, 

Bay View Park 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

News Service .INS, AP and UP 

Transcription Service .. Associated Music Pub 

lishers and Standard Library Service 
Representative Spot Sales, Ine 



Personnel 

President and Station Manager. Don Fedderson 
Sales and Sales Promotion 

Manager D. E. Lundy 

Program Director and 

Production Manager Dick Wynne 

Publicity Director Margery Hood 

Musical Director Alfred Frankenstein 

Chief Engineer Paul C. Schulx 

KQW 

SAN JOSE— EST. 1924 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 740 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Pacific Agricultural 

Foundation, Limited 
Business Address San Jose: Palace Hotel 

San Francisco 
Phone Numbers Ballard 2616 (San Jose). 

EXbrook 3233 
Studio Address 87 E. San Antonio St. 

San Jose; Palace Hotel, San Francisco 

Transmitter Location Alviso, California 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service INS; UP; AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio; 

NBC Thesaurus 
Representative Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

Personnel 

President Ralph R. Brunton 

General and Sales Manager.. C. L. McCarthy 

Vice President and 

Sales Promotion Mgr Wade Thompson 

Program Director Ken Craig 

Production Manager and 

Chief Announcer Fred Ruegg 

Musical Director Ray Hackett 

Chief Engineer Ken Owen 

KVE C 

SAN LUIS OBISPO— EST. 1937 

MUTUAL— DON LEE 

Frequency: 1230 Kc. Power: 250 Watts 

Owned & Operated By. . .Christina M, Jacobson 
trading as Valley Electric Co. 

Business Address 851 Higuera Street 

Phone Number San Luis Obispo 1100-1101 

Studio Address Mt. View & Hill Streets 

Transmitter Location Roosevelt Highway — 

lVz miles north of San Luis Obispo 
Time on the Air: 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight; Sun- 
days, 8 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative W. S. Grant Company 

Personnel 

Owner Christina M. Jacobson 

Manager Les Hacker 

Commercial and Sales 
Promotion Manager Joe Shuttle worth 



371 



CALI FORN I A 



Program Director and 

Production Manager Brad Harris 

Chief Announcer and Musical 

Director Anthony Ricca 

Chief Engineer Earle Travis 

• 

K V E 

SANTA ANA— EST. 1926 

DON LEE — MUTUAL 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Voice of the 

Orange Empire, Inc., Ltd. 

Business Address 307 North Broadway 

Phone Number 4901-R 

Studio Address 2825 West 5th St. 

Transmitter Location 2825 West 5th St 

Time on the Air: 7 a.m. to 12 midnight; Sun- 
days, 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

Transcription Service C. P. MacGregor 

Representative W. S. Grant Go. 

Personnel 

President and General Manager, 

Ernest L. Spencer 
Program Director-Chief 

Engineer Wallace S. Wiggins 

• 

K D B 

SANTA BARBARA— EST. 1921 

MUTUAL— DON LEE BROADCASTING 
SYSTEMS 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By 

Don Lee Broadcasting System 

Address 1309 State St. 

Phone Number Santa Barbara 4131 

Transmitter Location 17 East Haley 

Time on the Air: 6:45 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.; 
Sat., 6:45 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. 

New Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President Thomas S. Lee 

Vice President and General 

Manager Lewis Allen Weiss 

Station Manager Fin Hollinger 

Program Director Fin Hollinger 

Musical Director Dorris Helene Doughty 

Chief Engineer .William C. Buckley 

KT M S 

SANTA BARBARA— EST. 1937 

BLUE NETWORK 
Frequency: 1250 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 



Owned-Operated By ... .News-Press Publish- 
ing Co. 

Address De LaGuerra Plaza 

Phone Number 6111 

Transmitter Location Goleta. Calif. 

Time on the Air. . .6:30 a.m. to 12:00 Midnight; 
7 Days Weekly 

Newspaper Affiliation Santa Barbara 

News-Press 

News Service AP 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner T. M. Storke 

Station and Commercial 

Manager Louis F. Kroeck 

Sales Promotion Manager Louis F. Kroeck 

Program Director and 

Production Manager. ... .Frank P. Weltmer 

Chief Announcer Frank Weltmer 

Musical Director Carol Lee 

Chief Engineer Albert Nicolay 

• 

KSRO 

SANTA ROSA— EST. 1937 

Frequency: 1350 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Operated By Eddie Handley 

Owned By Ruth W. Finley 

Business Address 425 Mendocino Ave. 

Phone Number 110 

Studio Address 427 Mendocino Ave 

Casa de Vallejo Hotel. Vallejo 
Transmitter Location Fresno and Finley Aves. 
Time on the Air: 6:30 am. to 10 p.m ; Sundays. 

9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service: 

World Broadcasting System; Standard 

Personnel 

President Ruth Finley 

Station Manager Eddie Handley 

Chief Engineer Howard McCauley 

Production Manager Wm. Frost 

Sales Manager Ben Weaver 



K G D M 

STOCKTON— EST. 1926 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1140 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By E. F. Peffer 

Address 42 S. California 

Phone Number 4-4551 

Transmitter Location. .S.E. 3 miles on 99 hiway 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 



372 



CALI FORN I A 



• • 



Personnel 

Owner E. F. Peffer 

Manager E. Smith 

Program Director Donald J. Ralph 

Chief Engineer Lloyd Amoo 

• 

K W G 

STOCKTON— EST. 1921 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By McClatchy Broad- 
casting Co. 

Address Hotel Wolf 

Phone Number 22727 

Transmitter Location Weber & E Sts. 

Time on the Air 5 a.m. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation: 
McClatchy Newspapers 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Paul H. Rayrner Co. 

Personnel 

President Eleanor McClatchy 

Station & Sales Manager George Ross 

Sales Promotion Manager Bill Straub 

Chief Announcer Dick Fox 

Chief Engineer Lee BerryhlH 

• 

KT KC 

VISALIA— EST. 1937 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 940 Kc Power: 5,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Tulare-Kings Counties 

Radio Associates 

Business Address Post Office Box 511 

Phone Number 575, 576 

Studio Address Hotel Fresno, Fresno, Calif. 

Transmitter Location 1 % miles southwest 

of Visalia. California 

Time on the Air 5:45 a.m. to 12:10 Midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation: Visalia Times-Delta, 

Tulare Times and Advance Register. Hanford 

Sentinel, Porterville Recorder 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System, Standard 
National Sales Office Address: 

Wm. Rambeau. Chicago and New York 
Representatives: Wm. Grant Co-, San Fran- 
cisco 

Personnel 

Station Manager Chas. P. Scott 

Sales Manager C- E. Niete 

Production Manager Wilson Monroe 



Chief Engineer Bert Williamson 

Chief Announcer Bill Gracey 

Publicity Director Jean Banks 

• 

KHUB 

WATSONVILLE— EST. 1936 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Operated By Luther E. Gibson 

Owned By Luther E. Gibson 

Business Address Atkinson Lane 

Phone Number 1700-1 

Studio Address Atkinson Lane 

Transmitter Location Atkinson Lane 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m. to 11:15 p.m. 

News Service . ■ • AP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative W. S. Grant Co. 

Personnel 

President Luther E. Gibson 

Station Manager Roger R. Hunt 

Commercial Manager Roger R. Hunt 

Program Director Don De Wald 

Chief Announcer James Byron 

Chief Engineer George Kenville 




373 



COIOGIAID© 

For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



K G I W 

ALAMOSA— EST. 1929 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc ■ Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By E. L. Allen 

Address Alamosa 

Phone Number 26 

Transmitter Location East Alamosa 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 

Personnel 

Owner E. L. Allen 

KV*0 R 

COLORADO SPRINGS— EST. 1922 

CBS 

Frequency: 1300 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Outwest Broad- 
casting Company 

Address Antlers Hotel 

Phone Number Main 278 

Transmitter Location. .. .2803 E. Platte Avenue 
Time on the Air: 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.; 



Saturdays. 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 
Newspaper Affiliation Oklahoma 

Publishing Co. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President E. K. Gaylord 

Station and Commercial 

Manager Everett Shupe 

Program Director Isabelle McClung 

Dir. of War Programs Isabelle McClung 

Musical Director Isabelle McClung 

Chief Engineer Cozine Strang 

K F*E L 

DENVER— EST. 1922 

MUTUAL 

Frequency: 950 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Eugene P. O'Fallon. 

Inc. 
Address Albany Hotel 




The daily news commentaries of 

SHEELAH CARTER and B. S. BERCOVICI 

now originate from the studios of 

KFEL in DENVER 

MANAGED BY CENE O'FALLON REPRESENTED BY BLAIR 



374 



COLORADO 



Phone Number KEystone 0178 

Transmitter Location . . . 5350 West 20th Ave. 

Time on the Ai 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

and Associated Record 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President-Manager- ■ Gene O'Fallon 

Director Frank Bishop 

Program Director Milli Virgien 

Chief Announcer Tom Crago 

Chief Engineer Tom Atherstone 

Musical Director Ned Lynch 

Dir. of War Programs Milli Virgien 

• 

KLZ 

DENVER— EST. 1920 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 560 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By KLZ Broadcasting 

Company. Inc. 

Address Shirley Savoy Hotel 

Phone Number Main 4271 

Transmitter Location South Franklin at 

Hampden, Englewood, Colo. 
Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service Standard, 

C. P. MacGregor 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President E. K. Gaylord 

Station Manager Hugh B. Terry 

Commercial Manager Fred C. Mueller 

Promotion-Publicity Manager. Roger Rambeaux 

Musical Director .Les Weelans 

Chief Engineer Harvey Wehrman 

• 

K M Y R 

DENVER— EST. 1941 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By KMYR Broadcasting Co. 

Operated By F. W. Meyer 

Address 1626 Stout Street 

Phone Number Main 4161 

Transmitter Location 1626 Stout Street 

Time on the Air 18 hours per day 

News Service .UP and AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

Owner F. W. Meyer 

Station and Sales Promotion 

Manager A. G. Meyer 



Sales and Publicity Manager. .Mark Schreiber 

Program Director Dolores Plested 

Production Manager Lowell Switzer 

Chief Announcer Vernon Hiner 

Musical Director Martha Goetz 

Chief Engineer Glen James 

Record MC Dick Schmidt 

K 6 A 

DENVER— EST. 1924 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 850 Kc Power: 50.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . .National Broadcasting 
Company 

Address 1625 California Street 

Phone Number Main 6211 

Transmitter Location Aurora, Colorado 

Time on the Air: 5:30 a.m. to 12 midnight: Sun- 
days 7 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative NBC Spot Sales 

Personnel 

President, National Broadcasting Co. 

Niles Trammel) 
Station Manager James R. MacPherson 



* • * * 




COLORADO 



Sales Manager Duncan McColl 

Program Director Clarence C. Moore 

Dir. ol War Programs- • . James R. MacPherson 

Sales Promotion Manager Charles Phillips 

Production Manager T. Ellsworth Stepp 

Publicity Director Charles H. Philips 

Chief Announcer Gilbert Verba 

Musical Director Milton Shrednik 

Chief Engineer Robert H. Owen 

K PO F 

DENVER— EST. 1928 

Frequency: 910 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Pillar of Fire 

Address 1845 Champa Street 

Phone Number Tabor 3733 

Transmitter Location . . Belleview Junior College, 

Westminster, Colo. 
Time on the Air: 7:15 to 9 a.m.; 2:30 to 4:30 
p.m. and 6:00 to 8:30 p.m., Tuesdays, 
Thursdays and Saturdays; 7:15 to 9 a.m., 
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. and 7 to 8:30 p.m., Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Fridays; Sundays, 
7:30 to 9 a.m., 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 3 to 
4 p.m. and 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. 

Personnel 

President Bishop Alma White 

Station Managers Dr. A. K. White and 

Dr. Ray B. White 

Program Director Kathleen M. White 

Musical Director Ruth Staats 

Chief Engineer Paul H. Schissler 

(Non-Commercial Station) 

K V D 

DENVER— EST. 1925 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 630 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Colorado Radio Corp. 

Address Midland Savings Bldg. 

Phone Number TAbor 2291 

Transmitter Location North of Denver 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers; Lang-Worth; C. P. MacGregor 
Representative . Joseph Hershey McGillvra, Inc. 

Personnel 

President and General Manager . . W. D. Pyle 
Station & Commercial Manager . . . T. C. Ekrem 

Sales Promotion Manager Con Hecker 

Program Director V. W. Corbett 

Publicity Director B. H. Stanton 

Chief Announcer Donald B. Vest 

Auditor J. N. Hile 

Assistant Program 

Director Thelma Smallenberger 

Secretary Elaine Barcroft 

Chief Engineers. . . W. D. Pyle and T C Ekrem 



K I U P 

DURANGO— EST. 1935 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . San Juan Broadcasting 

Co. 

Address 2800 Main Ave. 

Phone Number 117 

Transmitter Location 2800 Main Ave. 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service . . Keystone Broadcasting 

System 

Personnel 

Station Manager Raymond M. Beckner 

Chief Engineer John L. Antic 



K FX J 

GRAND JUNCTION— EST. 1926 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 920 Kc... Power: 1000 d.; 500 n. 
Owned-Operated By . . Western Slope Broad- 
casting Co. 

Address P- O. Box 30 

Phone Number .. Grand Junction 126 and 142 

Transmitter Location Hillcrest Manor 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System and World Broadcasting System 
Representative Walker Company 

Personnel 

Station and Sales Manager. ...... .Rex Howell 

Farm News Editor Tom Page 

Chief Announcer Jack Lund 

Musical Director -Toni Mueller 

Chief Engineer D. E. Towne 

Auditor Charles Howell 

Dir. of War Programs .......... Mildred Fuller 

Program Director Mildred Fuller 

• 

KFKA 

GREELEY— EST. 1921 

Frequency: 910 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned Mid-Western Eadio Corp 

Address 620 - 8th Ave. 

Phone Number Greeley 450-451 

Transmitter Location Hoover Park. 

Time on Air 90 hours weekly 

News Service UP 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager Francis Price 

Program Director Charles Sumerau 

Chief Engineer Kenneth Cooper 



376 



COLORADO 



K K 

LA JUNTA— EST. 1937 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned & Operated By. ...... . .The Southwest 

Broadcasting Co. 

Business Address P. O. Box 485 

Transmitter Location .... U. S. Highway No. 50 
Time on the Air: 7 a.m. -2 p.m.; 5:30 p.m.- 

8:45 p.m. 

Phone Number 42 

News Service RNA 

Transcription Service Keystone 

Broadcasting System & Standard Radio 
Representative • • Thomas F. Clark Co. 

Personnel 

Chief Owner-Secy.-Treas Leonard E. Wilson 

Station Manager Leonard E. Wilson 

Sales Manager Margaret W. Johnson 

Program Dir.- Dir. of 

War Programs Margaret E. Hiltabildel 

Production Manager Leonard E. Wilson 

Chief Engineer Leonard E. Wilson 

KGH F 

PUEBLO— EST. 1928 

THE BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1350 Kc Power: 1000 d.; 500 n. 

Owned-Operated By Curtis P. Ritchie 



Address P.O. Box 293 

Phone Number 3877 

Transmitter Location: 3 miles south on High- 
way 85 
Time on the Air: 6:30 a.m.11 p.m. daily; 7 a.m.- 
11p.m. Sundays 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative. ... Joseph H. McGillvra, Inc. 

Personnel 

Owner Curtis P. Ritchie 

Station Manager Curtis P. Ritchie 

Commercial Manager Maxson I. Bevens 

Chief Engineer Willis C. Shanks 

Program Director-Chief Announcer . . Fred Amos 
Publicity Director Maxson I. Bevens 

K G*E K 

STERLING— EST. 1926 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Elm^r G. Beehler 

Address Fleming Road 

Phone Number 679 

Transmitter Location Sterling 

Time on the Air Limited Time 

Personnel 

Owner Elmer G. Beehler 



FOR QUALITY/ 

AP / 



377 



THE BEST IS YET TO BE . 



Already the wonder child of our age, 
radio is so busy with its future that it 
has little time to dwell upon an exciting 
past. 

We can look back over 22 years of public 
service. We can reminisce with many of 
our friends over the way programming 
and adcasting have improved. We can 



recount the countless success stories of 
our clients, and talk about the phenom- 
enal buying power through the years of 
The Hartford Market. 

The past has been as amazing, as big and 
dynamic as America itself. But we prefer 
to look ahead and join our industry in 
saying, "The best is yet to be." 




WDI{£ 



HARTFORD 4 CONNECTICU 



W O R € 



BASIC CBS 
Connecticut's 

Pioneer 
Broadcaster 



iCTICUT 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W I c c 

BRIDGEPORT— EST. 1926 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
YANKEE NETWORK 
Frequency: 600 Kc... Power: 1000 d.; 500 n. 
Owned-Operated by .... The Yankee Net- 
work. Inc. 

Address Stratfield Hotel 

Phone Number 6-1121 

Transmitter Location Pleasure Beach, 

Bridgeport 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 2 a.m 

News Service AP and INS 

Transcription Service .... Associated; Standard 

Radio 
Representative Edward Petry & Co.. Inc. 

Personnel 

President Wm. F. OTJeil 

Executive Vice-President. ...... .Linus Trovers 

Vice-President George Steffy 

Station Manager Joseph Lopez 

Assistant Manager Florence B. Robinson 

Sales Manager Norman Whittaker 

Sales Promotion James S. Powers 

Merchandising Manager. . Arthur Lathrop 

Program Director Florence Robinson 

Musical Director .Carl V. Larson 

Chief Engineer George Kelch 

• 

W N A B 

BRIDGEPORT— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 
CONNECTICUT STATE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Harold Thomas 

Operated By Levon Thomas 

Address 991 Broad Street 

Phone Number 3-3112 

Transmitter Location .... Locomobile Point — 

(Inner Harbor) 
Time on the Air: 7:45 a.m. to midnight; Sun- 
days. 9 a.m. to midnight 

News Service UP 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

Owner Harold Thomas 

Station Manager Levon Thomas 

Acting Sales Mgr Leo Langevin 

Program Director Jean O'Shea 

Chief Engineer Vinnie De Laurentis 

Sales Promotion Sidney Peters 

Dir. of War Programs Jean O'Shea 

Musical Director Dick McCutchen 



WDRC 

HARTFORD— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1360 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WDRC. Inc. 

Address 750 Main St. 

Phone Number 7-1188-9 

Transmitter Location 839 Blue Hills Ave., 

Bloomfield, Conn. 
Time on the Air: 6:45 a.m. -12:05 a.m. weekdays; 

8 a.m.-12:05 a.m. Sundays 

News Service AP & UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co.. 

R. C. Foster & Company 

Personnel 

President and Station 

Manager Franklin M. Doolittle 

Commercial and Sales Promotion 

Manager Wm. F. Malo 

Program Director Walter B. Haas© 

Publicity Director Jack Zaiman 

Chief Announcer Harvey Olson 

Traffic Manager and Educational Director. 

Sterling V. Couch 
Public Service Counselor Rev. Charles Graves 

Chief Engineer Italo Martino 

Dir. of War Programs Walter B. Haase 

Production Manager Harvey Olson 

Record MC's James Garrett, 

Lavern Colton 

• 

WHTD 

(Formerly Known as WNBC) 

HARTFORD— EST. 1935 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1410 Kc Power: 5000 Watt* 

Owned-Operated By The Yankee Network 

Address 54 Pratt St. (Hartford) 

Phone Number Hartford 7-9131 

Transmitter Location Newington. Conn. 

Time on the Air 6 ajn. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio and 

Associated 
National Sales Office Headley-Reed 

Company, New York, Detroit. Chicago 

Personnel 

Ch. of Bd. of Directors of 

The Yankee Network John Shepard, III 

Station Supervisor Ralph D. Kanna 

Program Director Richard B. Bronson 

Musical Director Maurice Sechtman 

Chief Engineer Rogers Holt 



379 



Two requisites for Sales Success 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND has them both 




The sales possibilities of the 
Southern New England market 
are ably demonstrated by the fact 
that the approximately 3,000,000 
people who comprise this mar- 
ket possess an effective buying in- 
come more than 60% higher than 
the average for the entire United 
States. These folks have money to 
spend — and spend it. And they'll 
spend it for your product once 
they're convinced of its merits. 



The power exerted by 50,000 
WATTS and the authority gained 
by twenty years of faithful service 
(February 10, 1945), combine to 
make WTIC an outstanding sales 
medium. The people of Southern 
New England have a deep respect 
for the high standards of quality 
to which WTIC has long adhered. 
They heed your sales message 
when it is spoken by the friendly 
and familiar voice of WTIC. 




IN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 
PEOPLE ARE IN THE ^¥ofct OF LISTENING TO WTIC 



CONN ECTI CUT 



WT I C 

HARTFORD— EST. 1925 

NBC— NEW ENGLAND REGIONAL NETWORK 

Frequency: 1080 Kc Power: 50,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Travelers Broad- 
casting Service Corporation 

Address 26 Grove Street 

Phone Number 2-3181 

Transmitter Location Avon. Connecticut 

Time on the Air:6 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sundays. 
8 a.m. to 1 a.m. 

News Service AP; INS; Transradio 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 
System; Lang-Worth Feature Programs; 
BMI Bonus Transcriptions 
Representative Weed & Company 

Personnel 

Station Manager P. W. Morency 

Sales Manager Walter Johnson 

Sales Promotion Manager J. F. Clancy 

Production Manager Paul Lucas 

Chief Announcer Bernard Mullins 

News Editor Tom Eaton 

Transcription Librarian Larry Keniield 

Music Librarian John DeLisa 

Musical Director Moshe Paranov 

Plant Manager H. D. Taylor 

Program Manager Leonard J. Patricelli 

• 



Dir. of War Programs Paul Lucas 

Publicity Director J. F. Clancy 

WT*H t 

HARTFORD— EST. 1936 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
YANKEE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watt* 

Owned-Operated By. .. .Hartford Timet. Inc. 

Address 983 Main St. 

Phone Number 2-0237 

Transmitter Location 983 Main St. 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Hartford Timet 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Lang- Worth 

Representative J. P. McKinney & Son 

Personnel 

President Francis S. Murphy 

Station Manager C. Grover DeLaney 

Sales Manager F. E. Beiber 

WELI 

NEW HAVEN— EST. 1935 

BLUE NETWORK— CONNECTICUT STATE 

NETWORK 

Frequency: 960 Kc... Power: 1.000 d.; 500 n. 



SOMETHING NEW 




m IN NEW ENGLAND: 



T Tnder the new ownership of Harry C. 
Wilder and Associates, WELI of New 
Haven will prize its character above all 
else. We stand for The Square Deal — 
symbolized above. 

IN LISTENERSHIP: The highest audience 
levels that expert, imaginative, quality pro- 
gramming can produce. Preserving nothing 
mediocre. Seeking always for something 
better. Deserving complete confidence of 
listener and sponsor. 

IN SELLING: In spite of growing demands, 
time on WELI will be apportioned, not just 
sold out. No sound advertiser will ever be 



denied the use of WELI in starting to build 
a postwar franchise in this market. 

IN PROMOTION: For years our friends 
have known that our stations give them 
more than their order calls for. That 
phrase is solidly linked with us throughout 
the radio industry. 

IN INFLUENCE: Character is reflected in 
a station's influence with its listeners. It's 
a priceless intangible, and it is a corner of 
our Square Deal policy. 

New Advertisers are constantly joining us 
with new and finer programs. We wel- 
come you to this important market. 

RICHARD W. DAVIS, General Manager 



Station WELI, New Haven — Associated with WSYR, WTRY, WKNE 
WELI Represented by Headley-Reed 



3S1 



CONN ECTICUT 



Owned-Operated By City Broadcasting 

Corporation 

Address 221 Orange Street 

Phone Number 8-1133 

Transmitter Location Hamden, Conn. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m.-12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System Library 
Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President H. C. Wilder 

Manager. Richard W. Davis 

Sales Manager Clair H. Shadwell 

Program Director Roland Furman 

Chief Engineer Fred T- King 

Dir. of War Programs Roland Furman 

Chief Announcer Jack Ryan 



WNHC 

NEW HAVEN— 1944 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 350 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Elm City 

Broadcasting Corp. 

Business Address 11 10 Chapel Street 

Phone Number • ■ 8-3151 

Transmitter Location 350 Kimberly Ave. 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 

Representative Wm. G. Rambeau Co. 



WNLC 

NEW LONDON— EST. 1936 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM— YANKEE 
NETWORK 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Thames Broadcasting 

Corporation 
Address Mohican Hotel, 

281 State Street 

Phone Number New London 4900 

Transmitter Location Winthrop Point 

Time on the Air: 7:30 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

Sundays, 8:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Representative. The Walker Company 

Personnel 

President R. L. Morey 

Station Manager and 

Program Director. G. J. Morey 

Commercial and Advertising 

Manager Ivon B. Newman 

Chief Engineer G. I- Morey 

Chief Announcer Leslie Morson 



WS R R 

STAMFORD— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK— CONNECTICUT STATE 
NETWORK 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Stephen R. Rintoul 

Address 270 Atlantic St. 

Phone Number 4-7575 

Transmitter Location .... Lindstrom Rd., Ship- 
pan Point, Conn. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. toll p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representatives . . Bertha Bannan, Helen Wood 

Personnel 

Owner Stephen R. Rintoul 

Station Manager Harold H. Meyer 

Sales Manager Harold H. Meyer 

Sales Promotion Manager K- MacEwen 

Program Director Fred Briggs 

Publicity Director D. Hay 

Chief Engineer Edward Markman 

Dir. of War Programs Julian Schwartz 

Production Manager Ernest Hartman 

Chief Announcer Stanley Roberts 



WSRR 



STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 






CONNECTICUT 



Musical Director Bob Henry 

Record MCs Stanley Roberts, 

Ernie Hartman, Bob Henry 



W A T R 

WATERBURY— EST. 1934 

BLUE— MUTUAL— CONNECTICUT STATE 

NETWORK— YANKEE 

Frequency: 1320 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Harold Thomas 

Address 71 Grand St. 

Phone Number 3-5161 

Transmitter Location Baldwin Avenue 

Time on the Air 7:30 a.m to 12 midnight 

News Service Transradio 

Representative Wm. G Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager. .. .Harold Thomas 

Commercial & Advertising Sam Elman 

Program Director Helen Morris 

Chief Announcer John Lotas 

Publicity Director. John Deegan 

Musical Director Edith Sacco 

Chief Engineer Russel Jensen 

Dir. of War Programs Helen Morris 

Sales Promotion Manager John Deegan 

• 

W B R Y 

WATERBURY— EST. 1934 

CBS 

Frequency: 1590 Kc Power: 1000 Watts; 

Owned-Operated By American Re- 
publican, Inc. 

Address 136 Grand St 

Phone Number 3-1125 

Transmitter Location Boyden Street 

Time on the Air 8 cm. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Waterbury Ameri- 
can; Waterbury Republican 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative ...Joseph Hershey McGillvra 

Personnel 

President W. J. Pape 

Station and Commercial Manager. . . .E. J. Frey 

Program Director Charles Lynch 

Publicity Director E. Christy Erk 

Chief Engineer Frank Hales 

Dir. of War Programs Charles Lynch 

Production Manager Charles Lynch 




DELAWARE 

For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W D E L 

WILMINGTON— EST. 1922 

NBC 
MASON-DIXON GROUP 

Frequency: 1150 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WDEL, Inc. 

Address 10th & King Sts. 

Phone Number 7268 

Transmitter Location .... Governor Printz Blvd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

Station Executive Clair R. McCollough 

Station Manager J. Gorman Walsh 

National Sales Manager J. Robert Gulick 

Program Manager Harvey Smith 

Technical Director J. E. Mathiot 



W I L M 

WILMINGTON— EST. 1922 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Delaware Broadcasting 
Co. 

Address 920 King St. 

Phone Number 7268 

Transmitter Location .. 35th St. & Bellevue Ave. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. ta 1 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service .... NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

Station Executive Clair R. McCollough 

Station Manager J. Gorman Walsh 

National Sales Manager J- Robert Gulick 

Program Director William Drury 

Chief Engineer J. E. Mathiot 




. doU«" rs 



vita 



.Aed °* or " 
•,W dW erS £ ware, 
uc t»cn» w . Oe»° . 

Representor^ _ 



Qj\f£C Basic JVetusotk J 





384 



HDBSTIRIICT ©IF C 



&= 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W I N X 

WASHINGTON, D. C— EST. 1940 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned and Operated By. Lawrence J. Heller 

Address 8th & Eye Sts., N.W. 

Phone Number Republic 8000 

Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.; 7:00 

a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Sun. 

News Service INS, AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio, 

Langworth and Associated 

Personnel 

President Lawrence J Heller 

Station Manager Robert L Kaufman 

Commercial Manager Norman Weill 

Program Director Richard Barr 

Sales Promotion Director Paul L. Heller 

Chief Announcer Larry Carl 

Musical Director Tommy Johnson 

Chief Engineer Ralph E. Cannon. Jr. 



W M A L 

WASHINGTON, D. C— EST. 1926 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 630 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned & Operated By The Evening Star 

Broadcasting Co. 

Address 724-14th St., N.W. 

Phone Number National 5400 

Transmitter Location .... Cedar Lane, Bethesda, 

Md. 
Time on the Air: 6 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sundays, 

8 a.m to midnight 
Newspaper Affiliation. .Washington Evening 

Star 

News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus; 

Standard Radio 
Representative Blue Network Spot Sales 

Personnel 

General Manager K. H. Berkeley 

Assistant General Manager and Commercial 

Manager Ben B. Baylor. Jr. 

Sales Promotion Manager Sam Digges 

Program Director John R. Edmunds 

Musical Director Sidney 

Dir. of Women's Activities Ruth Crane 

Production Manager Gordon Hubbel 

Chief Engineer Dan Hunter 



W L 

WASHINGTON, D. C— EST. 1927 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1260 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Cowles Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 1627 K Street, N.W. 

Phone Number Metropolitan 0010 

Transmitter Location Hyattsville, Maryland 

Time on the Air 19 Hours, 35 Mins. 

News Service UP. AP, Washington News 

Service 
Transcription Service . . Lang- Worth; Standard 

Radio; Texas Ranger Library 
Representative The Katz Agency, Inc. 

Personnel 

President Gardner Cowles, Jr. 

Ch. of Board John Cowles 

Vice-President T. A. M. Craven 

Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr Merle S. Jones 

Sales Manager Henry V. Seay 




WINX 







itionai Representative 

FORJOE & CO. 



385 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Publicity-Sales Promotion Mar Tom Means 

Production Manager George Sutherland 

TraJlic Manager Lillian Ruppert 

Continuity Director Martha Cram 

Musical Director Susan Mylroie 

Technical Advisor to 

All Cowles Stations T. A. M. Craven 

Chief Engineer H. H. Lyon 

WRC 

WASHINGTON, D. C— EST. 1923 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 980 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . .National Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 724 - 14th St., N. W. 

Phone Number Republic 4000 

Transmitter Location .. RFD No. 1. Hyattsville, 

Maryland 
Time on the Air: 6 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sundays. 

8 a.m. to 1 a.m. 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus. 

Associated, Standard 
Representative .... National Broadcasting Co. 

Personnel 

President Niles Trammell 

Vice-President Frank M. Russell 

General Manager Carle ton D. Smith 

Asst. to Gen. Mgr George Y. Wheeler 

Commercial Manager Mahlon A- Glascock 

Sales Promotion Manager Albert V. Cole 

Production-Program Director Fred Shawn 

Musical Director Fritz Balxer 

Chief Engineer Donald Cooper 

Record MC Bill Hereon 

WTOP 

WASHINGTON— EST. 1928 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1500 Kc Power: 50,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. Columbia Broadcasting 
System 

Address Earle Bldg. 

Phone Number Metropolitan 3200 

Transmitter Location Wheaton, Md. 

Time on the Air: 5:45 a.m- to 1:05 a.m.; Sun- 
days, 7:30 a.m. to 1:05 a.m. 

News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative Radio Sales 

Personnel 

Director E. H. Gammons 

Commercial Manager. .. .William D. Murdock 

General Manager. Carl Burkland 

Sales Promotion Director Howard Stanley 

Program Director Martin D. Wickett 

War Program Director Elinor Lee 

Chief Announcer Gunnar Back 



Director of Press Information Howard Stanley 

Chief Engineer Clyde Hunt 

Record MC Arthur Godfrey 

WWDC 

WASHINGTON, D. C— EST. 1941 

Frequency: 1450 Kc. Power: 250 (100 w. booster) 
Owned-Operated By Capitol Broadcasting Co. 

Address 1000 Connecticut Ave. 

Phone Number National 7203 

Transmitter Location 61 Pierce St. NX 

Time on the Air. . .6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.; 

Sundays, 8:00 am. to 12:00 midnight 
News Service. . . AP, UP and Washington City 

News Service 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

President Joseph Kali 

Station Manager G. Bennett Larson 

Commercial Manager Ben Strouse 

Sales Promotion Ben Strouse 

Program Director Norman Reed 

Musical Director Leonard Friendly 

Chief Engineer Ross H Belville 

Production Manager Norman Reed 

Dir. of War Programs Norman Reed 

Artists Bureau District Sales Agency 

Record MC "Mike" Hunnicutt 



FOR QUALITY 

AP . 



/ 



386 



FlOdOIDA 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W M F J 

DAYTONA BEACH— EST. 1935 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: 

Lt Comm. W. Wright Esch, USNR 

Address 126 Vis Magnolia Ave. 

Phone Number 91 

Transmitter Location . . . . 126V2 Magnolia Ave. 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Personnel 

Owner Lt. Comm W. Wright Esch, USNR 

General Manager Billee B. Esch 

Station Manager Ray Clancy 

Program Director Jack Winfree 

Publicity Director Crystal Palmer 

Chief Engineer William C. Shelton 



WINK 

FORT MYERS— EST. 1939 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Fort Myers Broadcasting 

Co. 
Business Address 54 East First St, 

WINK Bldg. 

Phone Number 818 

Studio Address ... 54 East First St.. WINK Bldg. 
Transmitter Location 54 East First St. 

WINK Bldg. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Representative John E. Pearson 

Personnel 

President Ronald B. Woodyard 

Station Manager Mary Martin 

Sales Manager Mary Martin 



W N F J 

DAYTONA BEACH. FLOBIDA 

250 WATTS 

1450 KILOCYCLES 



BLUE 



COX & TANZ 



3S7 



FLORIDA 



WRUF 

GAINESVILLE— EST. 1928 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA MUTUAL NETWORK 

Frequency: 850 Kc Power: 5.000 Walts 

Owned by State of Florida 

Operated by University of Florida 

Address University of Florida 

Phone Number 1000, Branch 55 

Transmitter Location. . . .Campus, University of 

Florida 
Time on the Air 18 Hours Monday-Sat., 

17 Hours on Sunday 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System, Langworth 
Representative Burn-Smith Co., Inc. 

Personnel 

Director Garland Powell 

Commercial Manager Rem James 

Sales Promotion Manager George Dinnick 

Program Director Irene Stanlis 

Chief Announcer .David Martin 

Musical Director Helen Edwards 

Chief Engineer Dr. Palmer Craig 

Director of War Programs David Braun 

W JA X 

JACKSONVILLE— EST. 1925 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 930 Kc Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned, Operated By . . City of Jacksonville, Fla. 

Address City Hall, Forsyth and Ocean Sts 

Phone Number 5-5821 

Transmitter Location . . Hyde Park Country Club 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 1 a.m 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

and Associated 
Representative John Blair & Co., 

Harry Cummings 

Personnel 

Commissioner in Charge Thos. C. Imeson 

Station Manager and Chief 

Engineer John T. Hopkins, III 

Program Director Evelyn Boote 

Production Manager Harry A. Cole 

Chief Announcer Grant Frankish 

Musical Director Frank Morris 

W JH P 

JACKSONVILLE— EST. 1940 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1320 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Metropolis Co. 

Address 500 Laura St. 

Phone Number 5-7610 

Transmitter Location Reed and Alamo Sts. 



Time on the Air 18 Hours Daily, 

16 Hours Sunday. 
Newspaper Affiliation. . . .Jacksonville Journal 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Representative John H. Perry Associates 

Personnel 

Owner John H. Perry 

Station Manager Ted Chapeau 

Sales Manager Ted Chapeau 

Chief Engineer B. Hayford 

Merchandising Manager Carmen Macri 

Director of War Programs Ray Herbert 

Musical Director Ray Herbert 

W MB R 

JACKSONVILLE— EST. 1928 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned, Operated By. .. Florida Broadcasting 
Company 

Address 118 West Adams St. 

Phone Number 5-4387 

Transmitter Location Vines and Mass. Ave. 

Time on the Air. . . .6:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service. . .World and Lang-Worth 
Representative Weed & Co 




FLORIDA 



Personnel 

President-Station Manager Frank King 

Commercial-Sales Promotion Manager 

Glenn Marshall. Jr. 
Chief Engineer E. B. Vordermark 

• 

WPDQ 

JACKSONVILLE— EST. 1942 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA MUTUAL GROUP 

Frequency: 1270 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: 

Jacksonville Broadcasting Corp 

Address Gulf Life Bldg. 

Phone Number 5-6781 

Transmitter Location .... Seven miles west of 
Jacksonville on Lenox Ave. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative George P. Hollingbery Co. 

Personnel 

President James R. Stockton 

Station Manager Robert R. Feagin 

Commercial and Sales 

Manager Frank Taylor, Jr. 

Production Manager Bob Willard 

Chief Announcer Gary Allen 

Publicity Director Bob Truere 

Chief Engineer James R. Donovan 

Director of War Programs Dot Horsfall 

Record Master of Ceremony. . . .Tommy Morton 

W LA K 

LAKELAND— EST. 1936 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
ORANGE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned. Operated By S. O. Ward 

Address 1412 East Lime St. 

Phone Number 2127 

Transmitter Location 1412 East Lime St. 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m to midnight 

News Service UP 

Representative , . .John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel 

President and Station Manager. . . .S. O. Ward 

Commercial Manager Powell Adams 

Program Director Nancy Hill 

Chief Announcer-Engineer Wm. P. Lee 

W FT L 

MIAMI— EST. 1939 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 710 Kc Power: 10.000 Watts 

Owned by The Fort Industry Co. 



Operated by The Fort Industry Co. 

Address . . 1605 Biscayne Blvd , Miami 

Studio Address 1605 Biscayne Blvd. 

Phcne Number 9-2401 Miami 

Transmitter Location 22 miles north of 

Miami on Road 26 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

Owner Comdr. Geo. B. Storer 

Stalion Manager Robert Venn 

Sales Manager M. N. Babcock 

Promotion Manager W. M. Skidmore 

Program Director 

and Production Manager Don M. Butler 

Publicity Director Edith Dare 

Musical Director Jane P. Butler 

Chief Engineer John A. Rutherford 

Director of War Programs W. M. Skidmore 




389 



FLORIDA 



W I D 



MIAMI— EST. 1926 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 610 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

O wned-Operated By ... . Isle of Dreams Broad- 
casting Corporation 

Business Address 600 Biscayne Blvd. 

Phone Number 3-6444 

Studio Address 600 Biscayne Blvd 

Transmitter Location Cameo Island 

Time on the Air. . .Weekdays, 6:00-12:05 a.m.; 
Sundays. 8:00-12:05 a.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Miami Daily News 

News Service AP, INS. UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio; 

Associated Music Publishers 
Representative .... George P. Hollingbery Co.; 
Harry S. Cummings 

Personnel 

President D. J. Mahoney 

General Manager James M. Legate 

Commercial Manager T. O. McCullough 

Promotion Manager Martha Henriquez 

Program Director Robert Fidlar 

Musical Director Earle Barr Hanson 

Chief Studio Engineer Wilton R. Chiles 



W Q A M 

MIAMI— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 560 Kc Power: 5000 Watts d., 

1000 Watts, n 

Owned-Operated Miami Broadcasting Co. 

Address Postal Bldg. 

Phone Number 26121 

Transmitter Location Biscayne Bay 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 1:05 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President and Commercial Manager 

Fred W. Borton 

Station Manager F. W. Mizer 

Promotion and Publicity 

Manager Norman MacKay 

Program Manager Hazel McGuire 

Chief Engineer Edw. Davenport 

Musical Director Alaine Powell 





WIOD covers this new rich 
market as completely as 
Miami's magic sun! 



National Representatives 
GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 
Southeast Representative 
HARRY E. CUMMINGS 

JAMES M. LeGate, 
Gen. Manager 



5,000 WATTS * 610 KC * NBC 




390 



FLORIDA 



WK AT 

MIAMI BEACH— EST. 1937 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1360 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By A. Frank Katxentine 

Address 1759 N. Bay Rd. 

Phone Number 5-7471 

Transmitter Location 1759 N. Bay Rd. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight. 

Weekdays; 8:00 a.m.-12 midnight, Sundays 

News Service Reuters; UP 

Transcription Service AMP 

Representative Radio Advertising Co. 

Personnel 

Owner A. Frank Katzentine 

Station Manager and 

Program Director John I. Prosser 

Commercial and Sales Promotion 

Manager John I. Prosser 

Production Manager John I. Prosser 

Publicity Director Madelaine Fullman 

Musical Director Betty Lee Taylor 

Engineers Tom Magee, Arthur Smith 

WTMC 

OCALA— EST. 1939 

BLUE NETWORK 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . Ocala Broadcasting Co. 

Address P.O. Box 831 

Phone Number 128 

Studio Address Anthony & Henry Sts. 

Transmitter Location Anthony & Henry Sts. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 Midnight 

Unlimited 
Newspaper Affiliation John H. Perry 

Newspapers 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative John H. Perry Associates 

Personnel 

President John H. Perry 

Station and Commercial 

Manager T. S. Gilchrist, Jr. 

Program Director T. S. Gilchrist, Jr. 

Chiei Engineer Beecher Hay ford 

Publicity Director Wilma Drum 

• 

W D B 

ORLANDO— EST. 1924 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA NETWORK 

Frequency: 580 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... . Orlando Broadcasting 
Co., Inc. 



Business Address 563 N. Orange Ave. 

Phone Number 6181 

Transmitter Location . . Dubsdread Country Club 

Time on the Air 24 hours daily 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representatives John Blair & Co. and 

Harry E. Cummings 

Personnel 

President-Station Manager 

Col. George C. Johnston 
National Sales-Sales Promotion Manager 

W. G. McBrlde 

Program Director W. G. McBride 

Publicity Director Rosalind Boggs 

Musical Director Dorothy Morton Parks 

Chief Engineer J. E. Yarbrough 

Director of War Programs G. Davidson 

• 

W L F 

ORLANDO— EST. 1940 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Hazle wood. Inc. 

Business Address P. O. Box 1991 

Phone Number 8163-8164 

Studio Address Angebilt Hotel 

Transmitter Location Near Orlando 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service INS 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Bum-Smith Co., Inc.; 

Frank Cook 

Personnel 

General Manager Victor Buisset 



W W P G 

PALM BEACH— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK— MUTUAL BROADCASTING 
SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Palm Beach 

Broadcasting Corp. 

Business Address South Ocean Blvd. 

Phone Number West Palm Beach 21515. 

Lake Worth 500 

Transmitter Location South Ocean Blvd. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to Midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Personnel 

President Charles E. Davis 

Station Manager Donald S. Greenlief 

Chief Engineer Paul McGinty 

Commercial Manager D. S. Greenlief 

Chief Announcer Ben Decker 



391 



FLORIDA 



W D L P 

PANAMA CITY— EST. 1940 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Panama City Broad- 
casting Co.. Inc. 

Address Mercer & Beach Drive 

Phone Number 777 

Transmitter Location Mercer & Beach Drive 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative John H. Perry Associates 

Personnel 

President John H. Perry 

Station Manager Byron Hayford 

Chief Engineer Elmer Scott 

Commercial Manager Byron Hayford 

Program Director John Thomas 

Production Manager Donnel Brookins 

Publicity Director Jack Rathbun 

Chief Announcer Elmer Scott 



WCOA 

PENSACOLA— EST. 1926 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1370 Kc Power 1000 d.; 500 n. 

Owned-Operated By. . .New Journal Publishing 
Company 

Address San Carlos Hotel 

Phone Number 4111-4112 

Transmitter Location .... Pensacola Bay Bridge 

Time on the Air 6 a.m.-12 Midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation. . .New Journal Publish- 
ing Company 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 
Representative John H. Perry Associate* 

Personnel 

President John H. Perry 

General and Commercial 

Manager Jack Rathbun 

Program Director and Production 

Manager Lamar Morgan 

Publicity Director Ruth Fillingam 

Chief Engineer Bert Meade 

• 

W F Y 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

ST. AUGUSTINE— EST. 1936 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Fountain of Youth 

Broadcasting Co. 
Address Fountain of Youth Park 



Phone Number 1622 

Transmitter Location Fountain of Youth 

Park 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

President Glenn Marshall, Jr. 

General Manager J. Allen Brown 

Sales and Sales Promotion 

Manager J. Allen Brown 

Publicity Director Sara Prince 

Program Director (Miss) Frankie 

Collyer Walker 
Chief Engineer Carl DeLay 

W S U N 

ST. PETERSBURG— EST. 1927 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 620 Kc Power: 5000 Wat* 

Owned-Operated By . . City of St. Petersburg, 

Address Municipal Pier 

Phone Number 4747-4748 

Transmitter Location . . Bay view near Tampa, 

Time on the Air 24 hours daily 

News Service ■ UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Representative Weed & Company 

Personnel 

Station Manager Norman E. Brown 

Commercial Manager Vera M. New 

Sales Promotion Manager . . . Norman E. Brown 

Program Director-Engineer Louis J. Link 

Production Manager Beth McNeely 

Public Relations Director Joe Frohock 

Musical Director Edith Sexton 

WTS P 

ST. PETERSBURG— EST. 1939 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA MUTUAL NETWORK 

Frequency: 1380 Kc Power 1000 d.; 500 n. 

Owned-Operated By . . Pinellas Broadcasting Co. 

Address 470 First Avenue South 

Phone Number 8108 

Transmitter Location .... 35th Ave. and 4th St., 

North 
Time on the Air 6:55 a.m. to midnight, 

Sundays, 7:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 
Newspaper Affiliation .... St. Petersburg Times 

News Service UP and INS 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

President Nelson P. Poynter 

Station Manager Lex L. D. Herron 

Traffic and Publicity 

Manager Jean Allyn 

Sales Promotion and 

Program Director Jack Dadswell 



392 



FLORIDA 



WSPB 

SARASOTA— EST. 1939 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WSPB. Inc. 

Business Address P. O. Box 1110 

Phone Number 211L-2110 

Studio Address City Island, Sarasota 

Time on the Air 7:25 a.m. to 11:15 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

Personnel 

President R. C. Jones, Jr. 

Station Manager John Browning 

Program Director Mrs. John B. Browning 

Chief Announcer Eric Provost 

Chief Engineer James E. Grant 



WT A L 

TALLAHASSEE— EST. 1943 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 d.; 250 n. 

Owned-Operated 

By Capitol City Broadcasting Corp. 

Manager Theresa M. Myers 

Address Thomasville Road 

Phone Number 2160 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service ... Standard & Thesaurus 

Personnel 

President Mrs. John H. Phipps 

Station Manager Mrs. Teresa M. Myers 

Program Director Paula M. Page 

Chief Announcer William A. Snowden, Jr. 

Chief Engineer William A. Snowden, Jr. 



W.D-A E 

TAMPA— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
FLORIDA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1250 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Tampa Times Company 

Business Address Tampa Terrace Hotel 

Phone Number M 1818 

Studio Address Tampa Terrace Hotel 

Transmitter Location . . Forest Hills Country 
Club Area 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Tampa Daily Times 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

Representative The Katz Agency 



Personnel 

President David E. Smiley 

Sales Promotion L. Spencer Mitchell 

Station Manager L. S. Mitchell 

Chief Engineer William Pharr Moore 

Program Director . . Kenneth W. Skelton 

Chief Announcer S. J. Fleischman 

Musical Director Elvan B. Wilson 



WFLA 

TAMPA— EST. 1925 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 970 Kc. .Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated By Tampa Tribune 

Address Seminole Bldg. 

Phone Number Tampa H 1828 

Transmitter Location: East Entrance, Davis 

Causeway, Columbus Drive 
Time on the Air: 6:45 a.m. to midnight Un- 
limited 

Newspaper Affiliation Tampa Tribune 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus; 

Standard and Lang-Worth 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

Station Manager W. Walter Tison 

Local Sales Manager Bert Arnold 

Production Manager Paul M. Jones 

Musical Director Frank Grasso 

Chief Engineer Joe Mitchell 

Director of Wot Programs Eva 



W J N 

WEST PALM BEACH— EST. 1936 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

= Owned-Operated By WJNO, Inc. 

Business Address P. O. Box 189 

Phone Number 3638 

Transmitter Location 1415 Okeechobee Rd. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus, 

C. P. MacGregor 
Representative Radio Advertising Co. 

Personnel 

Owner Marshall Heminway 

General Manager Stephen Willis 

Program Director Larry Roller 

Chief Engineer E. Whitt MacDowell 



393 




BUREAU OF CENSUS 
Report on 
SHIFT IN POPULATIONS 

Metropolitan Counties 



Marching Ihrargh- Georgia ! 




Eighty years after Sherman's famous 
"March to the Sea", another ermy is 
marching on Georgia. This time, Iiowever, 
they've marched TO Georgia rather than 
THROUGH Georgia. 

This is an army of men and women 
who have come to Georgia's Cities to take 
jobs in Georgia's industries. They like 
Georgia, — its climate, its people, its work- 
ing conditions — and when the war is over, 
they're going to stay in Georgia! 

The phenomenal increase in population 
of Georgia Cities is shown by the U. S. 
Bureau of Census report on changes in 
civilian population of metropolitan Coun- 
ties, between April 1st, 1940, and March" 
1st, 1943, based on actual registrations for: 
Ration Book Two. 



While many American cities were 
showing a net loss in population, due to 
loss of men and women to the Armed 
Services — Atlanta, Albany and Columbus 
all showed large net gains. Bear in mind 
that this covers civilian population alone, 
and does not take into consideration the 
hundreds of thousands of soldiers sta- 



tioned in Georgia, whose purchases g 
swell Georgia's ever-mounting total o: 
tail sales. 

Now's the time to sell your produc 
Georgia's prosperous urban markets! 
making up your list, pick stations that 
you concentrated coverage in Geor 
Cities, where the pay-roll dollars 



ATLANTA 



COLUMBUS 



ALBANY 



MBS ; 1230 KC 



CBS 1450 KC 



Represented by SPOT SALES, Inc. 



GEORGIA BROADCASTING COMPANYjnc 



394 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



WALB 

ALBANY— EST. 1941 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1590 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By... Herald Publishing Co. 

Address Albany, Ga. 

Phone Number 1590 

Transmitter Location Leesburg Road 

Time on the Air 6:55 a.m. to 10:20 p.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Albany Herald 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 
Representative Burn-Smith Co.; Frank Cook 

Personnel 

President H. T. Mcintosh 

Station Manager Abner M. Israel 

Commercial Manager Mildred Huie 

Promotion Director A. M. Israel 

Chief Engineer DeForest T. Lay ton 

Chief Announcer Wally Jones 

WGPC 

ALBANY— EST. 1933 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
GEORGIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Albany Broadcasting Co. 

Address 125V 2 N. Jackson St. 

Phone Number 1370; 1371 

Transmitter Location Gillionville Road 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Representative Spot Sales, Inc. 

Personnel 

President J. W. Woodruff. Jr. 

Station Manager Margaret Kinnett. 

Acting Manager 

Program Director Eliveita Powers 

Production Manager Theora Brown 

Chief Announcer Eric Chanler 

Chief Engineer Chas. M. Kinnett 

W GA U 

ATHENS— EST. 1938 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By J. K. Patrick & Co. 

Address Bobbin Mill Road 

Phone Number 1741 

Transmitter Location Bobbin Mill Road 



Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

Manager-Chief Engineer M. C. Gorman 

WAGA 

ATLANTA— EST. 1937 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 590 Kc Power: 5,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . .Liberty Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Address Western Union Bldg. 

Phone Number MAin 5101 

Transmitter Location: 

1299 North Druid Hills Road 

Time on the Air 5:30 a.m. to L2 midnight 

News Service AP, INS 

Transcription Service NBS Thesaurus 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President Lt. Comm. George B. Storer 

Station Manager Charles A. Smithgall, Jr. 

Commercial Manager Bob Venn 

Sales Promotion and 

Publicity Manager Ewald Kockritz 

Program Director John Barlett 

Production Manager John Barlett 

Musical Director Frances Wallace 

Chief Engineer Al Jones 

WAT L 

ATLANTA— EST. 1931 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
GEORGIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Georgia Broadcasting System 

Operated by Atlanta Broadcasting Co. 

Address Henry Grady Building 

Phone Number Walnut 4377 

Transmitter Location Henry Grady Building 

Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m.; 
Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Representative Spot Sales, Inc. 

Personnel 

President J. W. Woodruff. Jr. 

Station Manager J. A. Davenport 

Sales Manager Sam Kane 

Program Director Dan Homsby 

Production Manager Larry Millert 

Publicity Director , . .Dan Hornsby 

Chief Announcer Ted Fenster 

Music Director Cliff Cameron 

Chief Engineer R. W. Minton 



395 



HISTORY 




^Pioneered 



LEAVES FROM WSB'S 
NOTEBOOK • 1922 TO 1945 

Since the early days of earphones, W S B 
has made radio history in the South. Con- 
servative in policy and progressive in pro- 
gram direction, the services of this station 
rank high with our commercial friends 
and with our large listening audience. 
The leaves of achievement through the 
years are countless ..,.., ? 1? 

THE VOICE OF THE SOUTH 

GEORGIA'S ONLY 50,000 WATT, CLEAR CHANNEL STATION 




THE ATLANTA JOURNAL STATION 

AFFILIATED WITH NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 



EDWARD PETRY and CO., INC., National Representatives 



GEORGIA 



W GS T 

ATLANTA^EST. 1929 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

GEORGIA MAJOR MARKET TRIO 

Frequency: 920 Kc. . Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned By Georgia Institute of 

Technology 
Operated By Radio Committee — Board of 

Regents, State of Georgia 

Address Forsyth Bldg. 

Phone Number.. Walnut 8441 

Transmitter Location .... Cheshire Bridge Rd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP, UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

Associate Managers Frank Gaither (Sales), 

John Fulton (Programs) 
Production & Publicity Director .... Don Naylor 

Musical Director Lola Allen Wallace 

Chief Engineer Ben Akerman 

• 

WSB 

ATLANTA— EST. 1922 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 750 Kc Power: 50,000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Atlanta Journal 

Company 

Address Biltmore Hotel 

Phone Numbers Hemlock 1045 

Transmitter Location Tucker, Ga. 

Time on the Air 5:00 a.m.-12:30 a.m. daily; 

7:00 a.m.-12:30 a.m. Sunday 

Newspaper Affiliation The Atlanta Journal 

News Service AP, UP and INS 

Transcription Service . . . Standard Radio, World 
Representative Edward Petry & Co. 

Personnel 

Managing Director J. Leonard Reinsch 

General Manager John M. Outler, Jr. 

Sales Promotion Manager Tom Downing 

Artitsts' Bureau Head Harrison Kimball 

Publicity Director Frank Cason 

Production Manager M. K. Toolson 

Musical Director Albert Coleman 

Chief Engineer C. F. Dougherty 

• 

W G A C 

AUGUSTA— EST. 1940 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .The Twin States Broad- 
casting Company 




In program 
entertainment 
through its spirited 
local showmanship 
and its affiliation 
with CBS 




Represented Nationally by 

THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 




GEORGIA 



Address Augusta 

Phone Number 2-2692 

Transmitter Location Sand Bar Ferry. Md.. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Headley-Reed Company 

Personnel 

President J. B. Fuqua 

Sales Manager J. B. Fuqua 

Program and Publicity Steve Manderson 

Chief Engineer John Lyon 



W R D W 



AUGUSTA— EST. 1930 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1480 Kc Power: 5.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. Augusta Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 10th & Broad Streets 

Phone Numbers 2-8805, 8806, 8807 

Transmitter Location Berckmans Road 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight: 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative George P. Hollingbery 

Personnel 

President Win. K. Jenkins 

Station Manager W. R. Ringson 

Commercial Manager Thurston Bennett 

Program-Publicity Director W. Charles Roe 

Chief Announcer Ben Lucas 

Musical Director Gil Evans 

Chief Engineer Harvey Aderhold 



W M G 

BRUNSWICK— EST. 1940 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
SOUTH GEORGIA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 d.; 100 n. 

Owned-Operated By Coastal Broadcasting 

Company 

Address St. Simons Island Causeway 

Phone Number 1500 

Transmitter Location St Simons Causeway 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Personnel 

President Mrs. Alma W. King 

General and Sales Manager. .Kenneth E. White 

Program Director. Alfred Job 

Chief Engineer Kenneth E. White 



W G A A 

CEDARTOWN— EST. 1941 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Northwest Georgia Broad- 
casting Co. 

Operated By R. W. Rounsaville 

Address West Theater Bldg. 

Phone Number 777 

Transmitter Location Cave Spring Rd. 

Time on the Air 14 hours daily 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Keystone Broad- 
casting System 

Personnel 

President O. C. Lam 

General Manager R. W. Rounsaville 

Promotion Manager. . . .Mrs. R. W. Rounsaville 
Program, Production and 

Publicity Director Dorothy Holt 

Chief Announcer Hall Wray 

Chief Engineer Clarence Landress 

• 

W D A K 

COLUMBUS— EST. 1940 

BLUE NETWORK— MBS 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Valley Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 1028V2 Broadway 

Phone Number 3-2771 

Transmitter Location Brick Yard Rd.; 

Phenix City, Ala. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m, to midnight 

News Service AP 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner L. J. Duncan 

Station Manager Allen M. Woodall 

Program Director Dora Anna Gay 

Publicity Director Mrs. Walter Harvey 

Chief Announcer .Tommy Tucker 

Chief Engineer Denzil Pulley 

• 

W R B L 

COLUMBUS— EST. 1928 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
GEORGIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power; 250 Watts 

Owned and Operated By Columbus' Broad- 
casting Company 

Address 1420 Second Avenue 

Phone Number 2-0601 



398 



GEORGIA 



• • • 



Transmitter Location 3009 Vz Howard Ave. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m.:; 

Sundays. 6:30 a.m. to 12:05 cm. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Representative Spot Sales, Inc. 

Personnel 

President J. W. Woodruff 

Station Manager W. Heldon Herrin 

Commercial Manager W. S. Massie 

Musical Director Gertrude Handley 

Publicity Director Ed Hennessy 

Chief Engineer Albert Timms 

WMJM 

CORDELE— EST. 1940 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power 250 <L; 100 n. 

Owned-Operated By . . Cordell Dispatch Pub- 
lishing Company 

Business Address 20th Ave. and B St. 

Phone Number 666 

Studio Address 20th Ave. & B St. 

Transmitter Location 20th Ave. & B St. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Transcription Service. . .Keystone Broadcasting 
Representative Thomas F. Clarke 

Personnel 

Station Manager James S. Rivers 

Commercial Manager R. H. Thompson 

Program Director Tenna Powers 

Publicity Director James S. Rivers 

Chief Announcer Bruce Smith 

Musical Director George Waters 

Chief Engineer Howard V. Harrell 

• 

WBLJ 

DALTON— EST. 1940 

MUTUAL & KEYSTONE 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Dalton Broadcasting 

Address Ill So. Pentz Street 

Phone Number Dalton 684 

Transmitter Location River Bend Rd. 

Time on the Air 6:45 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Representative Cox & Tanz 

Personnel 

President H. C. Kenemer 

Manager W. V. Williams 

Sales Promotion Manager T. H. McMillan 

Program Director Barbara Brinkman 

Production Manager Ed Craigmiles 

Chief Announcer Paul Crandall 

Chief Engineer W. C. Roberts 



W G G A 

GAINESVILLE— EST. 1941 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. Blue Ridge Broadcasting' 
Company 

Address Athens Road' 

Phone Number 1600-1601 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 11:05 p.m. 

News Service W 

Transcription Service Lang Worth 

Personnel 

President Charles Smithgall 

Vice-President H. Russ Holt 

Secretary E. F. MacLeod 

Program and Production Claude Putnam 

Publicity Director James Vocalis 

Director of War Programs. . .Mildred Thompson 
Chief Engineer C. M. Callicott 

W KE U 

GRIFFIN— EST. 1934 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Address Griffin Hotel. Griffin 

Time on the Air Daytime License 

Transcription Service C. P. MacGregor 

Representative Sears & Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

Manager & Owner A. W. Marshall, Jr. 

W LAG 

LA GRANGE— EST. 1941 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . .LaGrange Broadcasting 

Address 303 Broome St. 

Phone Number 1700 

Transmitter Location La Grange 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 11 pjn,; 

Sundays, 7 a.m. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation LaGrange News 

News Service UP 

Personnel 

President Roy C. Swank 

Station Manager Edwin Mullinax 

Program Director Josephine Moncrief 

Chief Engineer James McKay 

W B*M L 

MACON— EST. 1940 

BLUE NETWORK 
MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
GEORGIA SPORTS NETWORK 
Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 



399 



GEORGIA 



Owned-Operated By Middle Georgia 

Broadcasting Company 

Address First National Bank Building 

Phone Number 2728 

Transmitter Location 8th & Cherry Streets 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

Sunday, 7:30 to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative ■ • . .Joseph H. McGillvra 

Personnel 

President Ernest D. Black 

Vice President E. M. Lowe 

Secretary & Treasurer Charles W. Pittman 

General Manager ........ Charles W. Pittman 

Commercial Manager Walter Graham 

Sales Promotion Manager Harold Beaty 

Program Director . . . .Mary Hester Richardson 

Production Director Harold Beatty 

Chief Announcer Harold Beaty 

Director of Women's Activities and 

Publicity Peggy Halliburton 

Musical Director Mary Hester Richardson 

Chief Engineer H. S. Goodrich 

WMAZ 

MACON— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
GEORGIA MAJOR MARKET TRIO 

Frequency: 940 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .. .Southeastern Broad- 
casting Company. Inc. 

Address Bankers Insurance Bldg. 

Phone Number 3131 

Transmitter Location Forsyth Road 

Time on the Air 5:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

News Service INS, AP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System; Lang-Worth 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President, Chief Engineer 

George P. Rankin, Jr. 

Station Manager Wilton E. Cobb 

Commercial & Sales Promotion 

Mgr Frank Crowther 

Traffic Director Dorothy Small 

Publicity Director Wilton Cobb 

Chief Announcer Frank Hubbs 

Musical Director Albert Sanders 

Director of War Programs Frank Hubbs 

Chief Engineer George P. Rankin, 

William J. Bryan (Chief Trans. Op.) 

WMGA 

MOULTRIE— EST. 1939 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
SOUTH GEORGIA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Frank R. Pidcock, Sr. 



Address Box 310, Moultrie 

Phone Number 999 

Transmitter Location Moultrie 

Time on the Air; 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays, 

8 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio, 

Keystone, World 

Personnel 

Owner Frank R. Pidcock 

Manager John F. Pidcock 

Commercial Manager James M. Wilder 

Program Director Mrs. D. E. Stringfellow 

Chief Engineer James Wilder 

Chief Announcer Wendell Adams 

W R G A 

ROME— EST. 1929 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Rome Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Address National City Bank Building 

Phone Number 6589-7737 

Transmitter Location . . . .Seventh Ave., Rome 
Time on the Air Unlimited license 

Personnel 

President John W. Quarles 

Gen'l Mgr. & Treasurer Happy Quarles 

Sales Manager Lamar Talley 

Program Director George Eubanks 

Director of War Programs .... George Eubanks 
Chief Engineer Doc Williams 



WS A V 



SAVANNAH— EST. 1939 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
ATLANTIC SPORTS NETWORK 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WSAV, Inc. 

Address Liberty National Bank Building 

Phone Number 5600 

Transmitter Location East President Street 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 
Representative George P. Hollingbery 

Company p ersonnel 

President Harben Daniel 

Station Manager Harben Daniel 

Commercial Manager N. W. Brandon 

(U. S. Army) 

Sales Promotion Manager L. H. Thesmar 

Program Director Gibson Jackson 

Director of War Programs .... Alberta Robertson 

Production Manager Gibson Jackson 

Publicity Director L. H. Thesmar 

Musical Director . .Ruth Christiansen 

Chief Announcer Francis Harden 

Chief Engineer Meredith Thompson 



400 



GEORGIA 



WT C 

SAVANNAH— EST. 1929 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1290 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned By ... . Savannah Broadcasting Com- 
pany 

Operated By Savannah Broadcasting Co. 

Address 516 Abercorn Street 

Phone Number 20127-28-29 

Transmitter Location Central Junction 

Time on the Air: 6:00 to 12 midnight; Sun- 
days, 8 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang- Worth; 

Standard Radio 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President and Station Mgr W. T. Knight, Jr. 

Sales-Merchandising Manager Bill Smart 

Local Sales Mgr Ben Williams 

Program Director • • Ben Quick 

Production Manager Dwight James Bruce 

Musical Director Jean Wallace 

Chief Engineer Claude M. Gray 



W P AX 



THOMASVILLE— EST. 1934 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Wimpy Radio 

Address 117 Remington Avenue 

Phone Number 909 

Transmitter Location. .. 117 Remington Avenue 
Time on the Air 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Personnel 

Station Manager H. Wimpy 

Commercial Manager Al Feinberg 

Chief Announcer and Engineer . James W. Poole 



WRLC 

TOCCOA— EST. 1941 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By R. G. LeTourneau 

Address Prather Bridge Road 

Phone Number 1751 

Transmitter Location. .. Prather Bridge Road 
Time on the Air. .6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. week- 
days; 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sundays 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Lang- Worth; BMI; 

Keystone 

Personnel 

Owner R. G. LeTourneau 

General and Commercial 

Manager Virgle E. Craig 

Program Director Wm. S. Kilgore 



W G V 

VALDOSTA— EST. 1940 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By E. D. Rivers 

Address • ■ Valdosta, Ga. 

Phone Numbers 1420; 1421 

Transmitter Location Valdosta, Ga. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to midnight 

News Service UP 

Representative The Walker Co. 

Personnel 

Owner E. D. Rivers 

Station Mgr Mrs. E. D. Rivers 

Sales Manager W. R. Link 

Chief Engineer James W. Stewart 

WAYX 

WAYCROSS— EST. 1936 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
SOUTH GEORGIA NETWORK 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Jack Williams 

Address 620 Plant Avenue 

Phone Number 965 

Transmitter Location Waycross 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Waycross Journal- 
Herald 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System; Keystone Broadcasting System 
Representative The Walker Company 

Personnel 

President Jack Williams 

Station Manager John J. Tobola 

Program Director R. C. Tuten 

Chief Engineer John J. Tobola 

WRLD 

WEST POINT— EST. 1944 

BLUE 
Frequency: 1490 Kc. Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Valley Broadcasting Co. 

Address • • Gen. Tyler Hotel Bldg. 

Phone Number 173 or 437 

Studio Address Gen. Tyler Hotel Bldg. and 

Cherry St., Lanett, Ala. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service- ■ . . . .World Broadcasting 
Representative Headley-Reed 

Personnel 

Chief Partner & Gen. Mgr L. J. Duncan 

Sales Manager Allen Woodall 

Program Director Frances Ledhetter 

Production and Publicity Francis Harden 

Chief Engineer Dige Bishop 

Record Master of Ceremony Dick Fennell 



401 



ADAH©* 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



K I D 

BOISE— EST. 1928 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1380 Kc... Power: 2500 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned By G. M. Phillips 

Operated By G. M. Phillips 

Address Hotel Boise 

Phone Numbers 660; 661; 682 

Transmitter Location. .4 V2 miles northwest of 

City 
Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP and AP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative John Blair & Company 

Personnel 

President G. M. Phillips 

Commercial and Sales Promotion 

Manager Boyd Braithwaite 

Station Manager Walter E. Wagstaff 

Chief Announcer Billy Phillips 

Production Manager George D. Snell 

Publicity Director. John A. Casstevens 

Chief Engineer James Johntz 



Kl D 

IDAHO FALLS— EST. 1928 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1350 Kc Power: 5000 d.; 

500 n. 
Owned-Operated By KID Broadcasting 

Co. 

Address KID Building 

Phone Number 3-4 

Transmitter Location Ammon Road 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

Personnel 

President Walter Bauchman 

General & Nat'l Sales Manager. Frank Mclntyre 
Assistant & Local Sales Manager. 

Leonard Wasden 
Sales Promotion Manager. . . .Leonard Wasden 

Program Director Harry J. Woodle 

Production Manager Gene Ackerley 

Publicity Director Frank Mclntyre 

Chief Announcer Gene Ackerley 

Artists Bureau John Sinclair 

Musical Director Dick Barber 

Chief Engineer C. N. Layne 



K R LC 

LEWISTON— EST. 1935 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By H. E. Studebaker 

Address Lewis-Clark Hotel Building 

Phone Number 1950 

Transmitter Location Lewiston Orchards 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting 

System; Longworth Feature Programs 
Representative ....... .Howard H. Wilson Co. 

Personnel 

Owner H. E. Studebaker 

Station Manager Donald A. Wike 

Commercial Manager Donald Thomas 

Chief Engineer Milton MacLaffertv 

K F*X D 

NAMPA— EST. 1929 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Frank E. Hurt 

Business Address 1024 Twelfth Ave., South 

Phone Number 1200 

Studio Addresses: 1024 Twelfth Ave., South; 

8th & Grant, Caldwell, Idaho 
Transmitter Location. . 1024 Twelfth St., South; 
Radio Sta. KSL, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Time on the Air 6 a.m.-10 p.m. 

News Service UP-AP 

Transcription Service: NBC Thesaurus; Lang- 
Worth 

Personnel 

Owner Frank E. Hurt 

Program Director Nancy Buehler 

Chief Engineer Edward Hurt 



KSEI 

POCATELLO— EST. 1926 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
Frequency: 930 Kc. .Power: 1000 d.; 250 n. 
Owned-Operated By. Radio Service 

Corporation 

Address Pocatello 

Phone Number 960 

Transmitter Location Pocatello 

Time on the Air: 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sundays. 

8:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representatives The Walker Co. (East); 

Homer Owen Griffith (West) 



402 



D A H O 



Personnel 

President O. P. Soule 

Vice-Pres.-General Manager. Henry H. Fletcher 

Program Director Ruthe A. Fletcher 

Publicity Director Olive M. Leeney 

Chief Engineer Henry H. Fletcher 

• 

KT F I 

TWIN FALLS— EST. 1928 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1270 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Radio Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Address 241 Main Ave. W. 

Phone Number 2400 

Transmitter Location . ' Highway No. 30. 

west of Twin Falls 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Library 

Representatives The Walker Co.; 

Homer Owen Griffith 

Personnel 

President O. P. Soule 

Station Manager F. M. Gardner 

Sales Promotion Manager L. Otto 

Program Director and Chief 

Announcer Charles S. Crabtree 

Musical Director Anton Guyer 

Chief Engineer Franklyn Ver Cox 

Publicity Director Eloise Webb 

Artists Bureau Victor Bruno 

Record Master of Ceremonies. . .V. I. Philippe! 

• 

K W A L 

WALLACE— EST. 1939 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
DON LEE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Silver Broadcasting Co. 

Operated By R. G. Binyon 

Address Tabor Bldg. 

Phone Number 330 

Transmitter Location Wallace 

Time on the Air Unlimited Time 

Transcription Service . . Keystone Broadcasting 

System; Standard Radio; Associated Music 

Publishers 

Personnel 

General Manager .R. G. Binyon 

Asst. Manager W. Mondell Spencer 

Sales Promotion-Commercial Manager 

Howard Olson 

Program Director Turner Dreher 

Production Manager E. Carney 

Chief Announcer W. Mondell Spencer 

Chief Engineer Arvo Haapanen 



FOR QUALITY J 

AP I 



PRESS flSSOCIRTIOn, Inc. 

50 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



403 




MORE PEOPLE ANSWERED 

"WMAQ" 

THAN THE NEXT 3 
STATIONS COMBINED! 



WMAQ 

CHICAGO 



In a recent nation-wide, all-county surveys 
people were asked: 

**What radio station do you 
listen to most?" 

In the Chicago area — America's second 
largest market — 42% of the thousands who 
answered named WMAQ. This overwhelm- 
ing choice of WMAQ is greater than that 
accorded to all other Chicago network out- 
lets combined. 

This fact is a fitting tribute to the great 
shows, the expert production and the fine 
transmission which are characteristic of 
NBC's key Midwest outlet. 

To blanket the 2,855,700 families in the 
Chicago area — to cut a cash slice of this 
$3,500,000,000 market— astute advertisers 
place their local and spot campaigns on 
WMAQ. 



The station most people 
listen to most 



670 ON YOUR DIAL— 50,000 WATTS 

REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 




A Service of Radio 

Corporation of I 



ILLINOI 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W M R 

AURORA— EST. 1938 

Frequency: 1280 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Martin R. O'Brien 

Address 34 S. River St. 

Phone Number Aurora 4215 

Transmitter Location N. Aurora 

Time on the Air.... Local sunrise to local 

sunset 

News Service AI> 

Transcription Service: Keystone Broadcasting 

System; Standard Radio 

Personnel 

Owner-General Manager. . . .Martin R. O'Brien 

Commercial Manager Vincent G. Cofey 

Program-Musical Director Dorothy O'Brien 

Dir. of War Programs Dorothy O'Brien 

Publicity and Production 

Director Jeanne Doran 

Chief Announcer I. T. Hankinson 

Supervising Engineer • • Vincent Cofey 

Chief Engineer Phillip Olson 

• 

W J B C 

BLOOMINGTON— EST. 1924 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. A. M. McGregor. Hugh 

L. Gately & D. C. McGregor 

Business Address 209 E. Washington 

Phone Number 535 

Transmitter Location West Gregory Ave. 

Normal. 111. 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

Transcription Serviec World 

Representative Sears and Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

Director A. M. McGregor 

Commercial Manager Hugh L. Gately 

• 

WKRO 

CAIRO— EST. 1942 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Oscar C. Hirsch 

Business Address 324 B'way. 

Cape Girardeau. Mo. 

Phone Number 1490 

Transmitter Location Cairo 

Time on the Air 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 

Sunday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
News Service UP 



Personnel 

Owner Oscar C. Hirsch 

Station Manager Merrill C. Currier 

Chief Engineer Oscar C. Hirsch 

w c'az 

CARTHAGE— EST. 1921 

Frequency: 1080 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .. .Superior Broadcasting 
Service, Inc. 

Business Address Carthage 

Phone Number 520 

Studio Address Carthage; Macomb, 111. 

Transmitter Location Carthage 

Time on the Air Daytime to local sunset 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Representative Thomas F. Clark Co., Inc. 

Personnel 

President Bob Compton 

Station Manager John Palmer 



WDWS 



CHAMPAIGN— EST. 1937 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Champaign News- 
Gazette, Inc. 

Address 48 Main St. 

Phone Number 6-1855 

Transmitter Location . 1 mile south of Champaign 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

Newspaper Affiliation ..... Champaign News 

Gazette 
National Sales Office . Texas Daily Press League 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 

Personnel 

General Manager J. A. McDermott 

Station Manager Marajen S. Dyess 

Sales Manager Frank R. Mills 

Program Director Juanita Hall 

Dir. of War Programs Juanita Hall 

Chief Engineer Jack R. Baum 

WAAF 

CHICAGO— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 950 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... . Drover's Journal Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Address Palmer House 

Phone Number Randolph 1932 

Transmitter Location 1001 Exchange Ave. 



405 













WCFL- CHICAGO 

10000 Watt Transmitter 
1000 Kilocycles 
100% Reception 












You Get 

Your 
Money's 

Worth 
at 

WCFL 

CHICAGO 

THE 

VOICE OF 

LABOR 



Accepted 
Interpretation 
of the 
News by . . . 

Martin Agronsky 
Baukhage 
Walter Kiernan 
Richard Harkness 
Dr. Schacher 

Currently 
Featured: 

Metropolitan Opera 
Breakfast Club 
Ladies Be Seated 
Appointment with 

Life 
London Calling 
Lies from Tokyo 
Transatlantic Quiz 
Land of the Lost 
Atlantic Spotlight 
Harry Wismer's 

Sports Review 
Coast to Coast on a 

Bus 
Soldiers with Wings 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 



Piaaiami. e<cp,e*tly. styled fa* lute+ti+ttj. p.le.alu\e and Sale* Appeal 



LLI NOIS 



Newspaper Affiliation Drovers Journal 

Publishing Co., Inc. 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to local sunset 

News Service UP, AP, Transradio 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative George P. Hollingbery Co. 

Personnel 

President Ward A. Neff 

Station and Commercial 

Manager Bradley R. Eidmann 

Sales Promotion Manager Nicholas Frank 

Production Manager Russell Ryan 

War Program Director Cynthia Coyle 

Chief Engineer Carl Uhlrich 

Musical Director Helen Colton 

Chief Announcer. Russell Ryan 

Record MC Paul Dixon 

• 

WAIT 

CHICAGO— EST. 1923 

Frequency: 820 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Radio Station WAIT 

Address 360 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Number Franklin 0660 

Transmitter Location Church Road, 

Elmhurst, 111 
Time on the Air Local sunrise to sunset; 

Dallas, Texas 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service AMP 

Representative Howard ' Wilson Co. 

Personnel 

Managing Director Gene T. Dyer 

Station Manager Joseph Rudolph 

Commercial Manager Joseph J. Rudolph 

Program Director and Chief 

Announcer Linn Burton 

Sales Promotion Manager George Provol 

War Program Director Joseph Rudolph 

Musical Director Elizabeth Hinzman 

Chief Engineer E. W. Jacker 

Record MC Tom Moore 

• 

WBBM 

CHICAGO— EST. 1923 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 780 Kc Power: 50.000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Columbia Broad- 
casting System, Inc. 

Address 410 North Michigan Ave. 

Phone Whitehall 6000 

Transmitter Location Itaska, 111. 

Time on the Air 5:30 a.m. to 1:30 a.m.; 

Sundays, 7:00 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth, World, 

Associated Recorded Program Service 
Representative Radio Sales 



Personnel 

Vice-President in Charge of 

Western Division H. Leslie Atlass 

Station Manager J. L. Van Volkenburg 

Commercial Manager E. H. Shomo 

Sales Promotion Manager Jonathan Snow 

Program Director Walter J. Preston 

Dir. of War Programs Walter J. Preston 

Production Manager Fred Kilian 

Dir. of Press Information Don Kelley 

Musical Director Caesar Petrillo 

Chief Announcer Val Sherman 

Chief Engineer • -J. J. Beloungy 

WCFL 

CHICAGO— EST. 1926 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1000 Kc Power: 10000 Watts 

Owned-Oper. By . . Chicago Federation of Labor 

Address 666 Lake Shore Drive 

Phone Number Superior 5300 

Transmitter Location . . . Downers Grove, Illinois 
Time on the Air. . .6:00 a.m. to 12:00 Midnight; 

Sundays. 8:00 a.m. to 12 Midnight. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President John- Fltspatrick 

Commercial and Sales Manager. ,M. B. Wolens 

Program Director Howard Keegan 

Station Manager Howard Keegan 

Sales Promotion Manager .... Melvin B. Wolens 

Director of War Programs Howard Keegan 

Production Manager Howard Keegan 

Publicity Director Melvin B. Wolens 

Chief Announcer Roy Franklyn 

Musical Director Jack Kelly 

Chief Engineer Richard Pappin 

W C*R W 

CHICAGO— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Clinton R. White 

Address 2756 Pine Grove Ave. 

Phone Number Diversey 4440 

Transmitter Location 2756 Pine Grove Ave. 

Time on the air: 11 .m. to 2 p.m. nd 5 p.m. to 
7 p.m. 

Personnel 

Owner Clinton R. White 



W E D C 



CHICAGO— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Emll Denemarlc Inc. 



407 






THE VOICE OF THE PEOPLE 



N 



Through this medium of communication flows 
a constant stream of human action and emotion 
expressed in the shape of news— music — sports 

—drama — comedy— pathos — science — hornemak- 
1«0*~» mystery— and all things affecting and reflect- 
ing the lives of a host of faithful WGN listeners. 

Since 1924 Radio tm4 WON have been synon- 
ymous in the Midwest. 

WGN is truly the radio institution that evolved 
into the Voice of The People. 

A QleaA Gkatmel £iaikm 



CHICAGO II ^m^ ILLINOIS 

50,000 WATTS ^^^^ 720 KiLOCYCiEi 




vw 




MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

EASTERN SALES OFflCfc 220 £ 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
Edward S. Townsead Co., Ruts Bvitdittg, San Francisco, Col. 



408 



ILLINOIS 



Address 38G0 Ogden Ave. 

Phone Number Crawford 4100 

Transmitter Location 3860 Ogden Ave. 

Time on the Air: 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.; 3:30 to 

5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.; 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Personnel 

President Emil Denemark 

General and Commercial 

Manager Frank J. Kotnour 

Program Director and Chief 

Announcer Bill Mack 

Director of War Programs Ruth Roberts 

Publicity Director Serena Notari 

Production and Musical Director .... Bill Brady 
Chief Engineer Chester Lewicki 

we'n r 

CHICAGO— EST. 1925 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 890 Kc Power: 50000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Blue Network Co. 

Address Merchandise Mart 

Phone Number Delaware 1900 

Transmitter Location Tinley Park, 111. 

Time on the Air: Monday thru Saturday, 6:30- 
7:00 p.m.; Monday thru Friday, 3:00 p.m.- 
6.00 p.m. and 800 p.m.-l:00 am.; Saturday, 
3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m and 12:00 Midnight-100 
am.; Sunday. 12:00 Noon to 7:00 p.m. and 
8:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. 

News Service AP; INS; UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Spot Sales 

Personnel 

President Mark Woods 

Advertising and Sales Promotion Manager, 

E. J. Huber 

Chief Announcer F. Edmund Kasser 

Publicity Director Ell Henry 

Production Manager Maurice Wetzel 

Sales Manager Roy McLaughlin 

Director of Public Service Programs. 

Robert White 

Chief Engineer E. C. Horstman 

Station Manager Roy McLaughlin 

Program Director Gene Rouse 

Artists Bureau L. E. Douglass 

Musical Director Rex Maupin 

wg'es 

CHICAGO— EST. 1924 

Frequency: 1390 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned and Operated Radio Station WGES 

Address 14 N. Western Ave. 

Phone Number Seeley 8066 

Transmitter Location. .. .8601 So. Kedzie Ave. 
Time on the Air.. 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 



Personnel 

President-Owner Partnership 

Station Manager John A. Dyer 

Commercial Manager E. M. Hinzman 

Sales Promotion Manager E. M. Hinzman 

Program Director Herbert Rudolph 

Musical Director John Van Kanegon 

Dir. of War Program Herbert Rudolph 

Production Manager Herbert Rudolph 

Publicity Director M. V. Baker 

Chief Announcer Robert Zelens 



WGN 

CHICAGO— EST. 1932 

MUTUAL 

Frequency: 720 Kc Power: 50000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WGN. Inc 

Address 441 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone Number Superior 0100 

Transmitter Location Roselle, Illinois 

Time on the Air: 5:30 a.m. to 1:05 a.m.; Satur- 
days, 5:30 a.m. to 1:35 a.m.; Sundays, 8 a.m. 
to 1:05 p.m. 
Newspaper Affiliation .... The Chicago Tribune 

News Service AP, UP, Chicago Tribune 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System;Associated Music Publishers and 
Standard Radio 
Representative WGN. Inc. (N. Y.) 

Personnel 

President Col. Robert R. McCormick 

Station Manager Frank P. Schreiber 

Commercial Manager . . . William A. McGuineas 
Program Director .... Buckingham W. Gunn 

Publicity Director Dale O'Brien 

Production Manager Lewis B. James 

News Editor Tom Foy 

Farm Director Holland Engle 

Musical Director Henry Weber 

Chief Engineer George Lang 

W IN D 

CHICAGO— EST. 1927 

Frequency: 560 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . . Johnson-Kennedy Radio 

Corp. 
Business Address. . .230 North Michigan Ave. 

Phone Number State 4176 

Transmitter Location Black Oak, Ind. 

Time on the Air 24 Hours a Day 

News Services AP, INS, UP 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner Ralph L. A tlass 

Station Manager Ralph L. Atlass 

Sales Manager John T. Carey 

Sales Promotion Manager John T. Carey 

Program Director Fred Willson 



409 




Microphones at Work in Midwest America 



"We'll be there" is the phrase heard over four 
states, as WLS microphones bring direct to 
WLS listeners the important, the human, the 
profitable and new. It might be possible, in 
this entire yearbook to picture every WLS 
special broadcast of 1944. On this one page, 
we can only suggest a very few highlights. 
Basically, it is the WLS policy to cover every 



part of the vivid life in Midwest America; to 
bring our listeners all the voices that can in- 
spire, entertain or help. This policy, in prac- 
tice more than twenty years, has built an 
audience that LISTENS and ACTS! WLS 
microphones are at work in Midwest Amer- 
ica. Put them to work for YOU. Find out why 
we say so often: WLS GETS RESULTS! 



IIFIISINTID IT 

John Biaii a Company 




MANAGEMENT AFFILIATED WITH 



5%e rfttytota, 7tetwwi£. 




ILLINOIS 



Publicity Director Joan Kauffman 

Chief Announcer Jim Dale 

Musical Director Reba Jane Chapman 

Chief Announcer Victor Vosb 

WJJ D 

CHICAGO— EST. 1932 

Frequency: 1160 Kc Power: 20000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WJJD Incorporated 

Address 230 North Michigan Ave. 

Phone Number STAte 5466 

Transmitter Location Box 296 G, Des- 

plaines, Ilinois 
Time on the Air: 4 a.m. to sundown. Salt Lake 

City 

Transcription Service World 

Newspaper Affiliation Chicago Sun 

News Service AP. UP 

Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President and Station Manager. .Marshall Field 

Station Manager H. Leslie Atlass 

Sales Promotion Manager Bob Ward 

Commercial Manager Fred G. Harm 

Musical Director Ken Nelson 

Publicity Director Bob Ward 

Chief Engineer Walter Myers 

Program Director Randy Blake 

Dir. of War Programs Randy Blake 

Chief Announcer Don Doolittle 

wis 

CHICAGO— EST. 1924 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 890 Kc Power: 50000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By ... Agricultural Broadcast- 
ing Co. 

Address 1230 W. Washington Blvd. 

Phone Number Monroe 9700 

Transmitter Location Tinley Park, III. 

Time on the Air: Sat., 5:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; 

and 6:00 p.m.-12:Q0 a.m.; Mon. thru Fri., 5:00 

a.m.-3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.-8:00 pan.; 

Sun., 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m,- 

8:00 p.m. 

News Service AP. UP, Transradio 

Transcription Service Standard 

Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President Burridge D. Butler 

Station Manager Glenn Snyder 

Commercial Manager Charles M. Freeman 

Artists' Bureau Head George Ferguson 

Farm Program Director Arthur C. Page 

News Editor Julian Bentley 

Production Manager Al Boyd 

Musical Director Ozzie Westley 

War Program Director Harold A. Safford 

Chief Engineer Thomas L. Rowe 

Sales Promotion Don Finlayson 



Program Director Harold A. Safford 

Publicity Director Wilma Gwilliam 

Continuity Director HaTry Templeton 

W MA Q 

CHICAGO— EST. 1922 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 670 Kc Power: 50000 WatU 

Owned-Operated By 

National Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

Address 222 North Bank Drive 

Phone Number Superior 8300 

Transmitter Location Elmhurit. 111. 

Time on the Air 5:30 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sun- 
days, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

News Service AP. INS. UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus, 

Standard Radio 
Representative National Broadcasting Co. 

Personnel 

President Niles Trammell 

V-P. WMAQ Mgr Harry C. Kopf 

Division Engineer Howard C. Luttgens 

Supervisor of Music Library D. A. Marcotte 

Night Manager H. D. Livezey 

Special Events Director William B. Ray 

Station Relations Mgr A. W. Kaney 

Chief Announcer William Kephart 



WJJD 

Chicago's 

Largest 

Independent 

Station 

20,000 WATTS 

CHICAGO 



411 



ILLINOIS 



Publicity Director Jack Ryan 

Continuity Editor William Murphy 

Production Manager Arthur Jacobson 

Sales Manager Oliver Morton 

Business Manager John F. Whalley 

Program Manager Jules Herbuveaux 

Advertising and Sales Promotion Manager. 

Emmons C. Carlson 

Musical Director Roy Shield 

Director of Public Service Programs, 

Judith Waller 

WMBI 

CHICAGO— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1110 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By The Moody Bible 

Institute of Chicago 

Address 153 Institute Place 

Phone Number Michigan 1570 

Transmitter Location Addison, 111. 

Time on the Air: Limited time with WBT; 72 

to 99 Vz hours weekly 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service NBC Thesaurus 

Personnel 

Station Manager H. Coleman Crowell 

Program Director. . . .Rev. Wendell P. Loveless 

Dir. of War Programs Robert H. Parsons 

Production Mgr Robert H. Parsons 

Publicity Director Russell Hitt 

Musical Director Don P. Hustad 

Chief Engineer A. P. Frye 

{The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
also operates station JVDLM.) 

VISE C 

CHICAGO— EST. 1925 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Radio Station WSBC 

Address 2400 West Madison St. 

Phone Number Monroe 9060 

Transmitter Location .... 2400 West Madison St. 
Time on the Air: 6 to 8:30 a.m., 10 to 11 a.m.. 

2 to 3:30 p.m., 8 to 10 p.m. and 11 to 12 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 

Personnel 

Station Manager Robert O. Miller 

Commercial Manager Julius Miller 

Sales Promotion Manager Julius Miller 

Program Director Robert O. Miller 

Dir. of War Programs Robert O. Miller 

Musical Director Arnold B. Miller 

w hV c 

CICERO— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WHFC, Inc. 



Address 6138 W. Cermnk Road 

Phone Number Lawndale 8228, Cicero 4305 

Transmitter Location 6138 W. Cermak Road 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m.-12 Midnight 

News Service UP 

Personnel 

General Manager R. W. Hoffman 

Manager M. E. Clifford 

Chief Announcer Wm. H. Scott 

Chief Engineer George M. Ives. Jr. 

W DA N 

DANVILLE— EST. 1938 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Northwestern Publish- 
ing Co. 

Operated By Danvil'e Commercial News 

Address 17-19 W. North St. 

Phone Number 1000 

Transmitter Location E. Woodlawn and 

Washington Ave. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 10:15 p.m., Mon. 

to Sat.; Sun., 8 a.m.-10:15 p.m. 
Newspaper Affiliation Danville Commer- 
cial News 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative J. P. McKinney & Son 

Personnel 

President and General Manager. .E. C. Hewes 

Commercial Manager Robert J. Burow 

Program Director Cody Noble Chapman 

Chief Announcer Francis Hourigan 

Chief Engineer Ted Magin 

Publicity Director Bette Austin 

Musical Director Bette Austin 

Chief Engineer Ted G. Magin 

Publicity Director Honore Ronan 

WSO Y 

DECATUR— EST. 1924 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Commodore Broad- 
casting, Inc. 

Address 351-357 No. Main St. 

Phone Number .5371-2 

Transmitter Location. . .1891 No. Oakland Ave. 
Time on the Air: 6 a.m. to 12:05 a.m.; Sun- 
days, 7:30 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation Decatur Herald. 

Decatur Review 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service: Standard Radio; World 

Broadcasting System 
Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

Acting President and General 

Manager Edward Lindsay 



412 



LLI NO IS 



Manager Charles F. Bruce 

Program Director Easter Straker 

War Program Director and Chief 

Announcer E. B. Pennhallegon 

Acting Chief Engineer. ...■ Paul Wnorowski 

wt'm V 

EAST ST. LOUIS— EST. 1935 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Mississippi Valley 

Broadcasting Co.. Inc. 
Address. . .Broadview Hotel, 5th and Broadway 

Phone Number East 4390 and Bridge 3424 

Transmitter Location Broadview Hotel. 5th 

and Broadway 
Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 1:05 a.m.; 

Sundays, 7 a.m. to 1:05 a.m. 

Mews Service INS 

Representative Sears & Ayer, Inc. 

Personnel 

President-General Manager . . Carlin S. French 

Commercial Manager Frank J. Prendergast 

Sales Promotion Manager Thomas Riggs 

Program Director Agnes Mites 

Publicity Director Michael Henry 

Musical Director William Hart 

Chief Announcer ... Bob Terry 

Chief Engineer Erie White 

Record MC Bob Baker 

Dir. of War Programs Agnes Mites 

Production Manager Michael Henry 

WGIL 

GALESBURG— EST. 1938 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Galesburg Broad- 
casting Co. 

Address Hill Arcade 

Phone Number 4626 Main 

Transmitter Location Hill Arcade 

Time on the Air Unlimited license 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Sears & Ayer 

Personnel 

General Manager Rollin B. Laughner, Jr. 

W E*B Q 

HARRISBURG— EST. 1923 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Harrisburg Broad- 
casting Company 

Address 100 East Poplar St. 

Phone Number 28 

Transmitter Location 100 East Poplar St. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

News Service UP 



Personnel 

Station Manager I. M. Taylor 

Program-Musical Director Mary Downen 

Production Manager-Publicity Director 

Bill Bailey 

Chief Engineer Joseph R. Tate 

Sales Promotion Mgr Bernie Smith 

Dir. of War Programs Inglis M. Taylor 

Chief Announcer Bill Bailey 

W JP F 

HERRIN— EST. 1940 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Orville W. Lyerla 

Address Herrin 

Phone Number 382 and 383 

Transmitter Location Herrin 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 10:15 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 

Personnel 

President Orville W. Lyerla 

Station and Commercial Manager. .Charles R. 
Cook 

Production , Manager Betty Kinler 

Chief Announcer Ellis Joe 

Chief Engineer Marian F. Sawyer 

• 

W L D S 

JACKSONVILLE— EST. 1942 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1180 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Stephenson, Edge & 

Korsmeyer 

Address Fox-Illinois Theater Bldg. 

Phone Number 1180 

Transmitter Location 1 Vz miles east of 

Jacksonville 

Time on the Air Daytime license 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

General Manager E. J. Korsmeyer 

WCLS 

JOLIET— EST. 1923 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WCLS, Inc. 

Address 601 Walnut St.. 

Joliet & 362 E. Court St., Kankakee 

Phone Number Joliet 4761 

Transmitter Location Joliet 

Time on the Air Unlimited 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 



413 



ILLINOIS 



Personnel 

President Walter Ashe 

General Manager Robert L. Bowles 

Station Manager Robert M. Holt 

Commercial Manager Robert L. Bowles 

News Editor Ted Blair 

Chief Engineer Lester DeCosta 

W MB D 

PEORIA— EST. 1927 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1470 Kc Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated By Peoria Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 200 Alliance Life Bldg. 

Phone Number 7133 

Transmitter Location Highway No. 29, 

halfway between Peoria and Pekin 
Time on the Air: 5:30 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.; Sun- 
days, 8 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System 
Representative Free & Peters, Inc. 

Personnel 

President and Manager Edgar L. Bill 

Sales Manager Hugh K. Boice, Jr. 

Promotion Manager . . • • James Kyler 

Program Director Vernon Nolte 

Publicity Director James Kyler 

Chief Announcer Paul Ruhle 

War Program Director Fred Leo 

Artists Bureau Vernon Nolte 

Musical Director Harould Osborne 

Chief Engineer Ted Giles 

WTA D 

QUINCY— EST. 1926 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 930 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. . .Lee Broadcasting, Inc. 

Address W.C.U. Bldg.. 510 Main St. 

Phone Number 6200 

Transmitter Location Quincy Gardens 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. thru 12:05 a.m. 

News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service .... Lang-Worth, Standard 
Representative The Katr Agency 

Personnel 

President Lee Loomis 

Secretary -Treasurer Frank Eighmey 

Station Manager Walter J. Rothschild 

Asst. Manager Nancy Halspr 

Program Director C. Arthur Fifer 

Dir. of War Programs C. Arthur Fifer 

Production Manager Dick Faler 

Chief Announcer Dick Faler 

Musical Director Jean Fessler 

Chief Engineer J. E. Gray 



W R K 

ROCKFORD— EST. 1923 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1440 Kc Power: 1000 d. 500 n. 

Owned-Operated By ... . Rockford Broadcasters, 

Inc. 

Address News Tower 

Phone Number Main 5632 

Transmitter Location Kilburn Ave. Rd. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Rockford Morning 

Star, Rockford Register Republic 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 

Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

President-Owner Albert G. Simms 

General Manager Walter Koessler 

Comm. Manager John J. Dixon 

Program Director Morey Owens 

Promotion Director Wm. R. Traum 

Chief Engineer Maurice H. Nelson 

WHBF 

ROCK ISLAND— EST. 1925 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
Frequency: 1270 Kc Power: 5000 Watti 




414 



LLI NOIS 



Owned-Operated By Rock Island Broad- 
casting Co. 

Business Address 1800 Third Ave. 

Phone Number 917. 918 and 919 

Studio Addresses. . . 1800 Third Ave., Fifth Ave. 
Bldg.. Moline 

Transmitter Location 23rd Ave. and 52 St.. 

Moline, 111. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 1:00 aan.; 

Sundays, 8 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

Newspaper Affiliation. .The Rock Island Argus 

News Service AP. UP, Transradio 

Transcription Service Standard Radio. 

Lang-Worth, NBC Thesaurus 

Representative. . .Howard H. Wilson Company 

Personnel 

President John W. Potter 

Station Manager L. C. Johnson 

Sales Manager • • Maurice Corken 

Publicity Director Francis I. Kennedy 

Ass't Program Director Forest W. Cooke 

Sales Promotion Manager Ted Arnold 

Chief Engineer Robert J. Sinnett 

Dir. of War Programs Forest W. Cooke 

Musical Director John Gilbert 

• 

WCBS 

SPRINGFIELD— EST. 1922 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Operated By WCBS. Inc. 

Address 523 E. Capital 

Phone Number 9855 

Transmitter Location 2200 S. 6th 

Time on the Air 18 hrs. daily 

Newspaper Affiliation .... Illinois State Journal 

News Service AP 

Representative Sears & Ayer. Inc. 

Personnel 

President and Chief 

Engineer Harold L. Dewing 

Station and Commercial 

Manager Carroll W. Neeld 

Program Director John C. Geil 

Sales Promotion-Publicity Director 

Carroll W. Neeld 

Musical Director John Geil 

Chief Announcer. Ken Spengler 



WT AX 

SPRINGFIELD— EST. 1930 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 100 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WTAX. Inc. 



Business Address 204 Reisch Bldg. 

Phone Number 2-4441 

Studio Address 117-119 S. 5th St. 

Transmitter Location 117-119 S. 5th St. 

Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m.; Sun- 
days, 7:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 

Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

President and Manager Jay A. Johnson 

Program Director Gladys McGrew 

Chief Engineer Eli Swaringen 

Sales Manager Jay A. Johnson 

Dir. of War Programs Jay A. Johnson 

Publicity Director Bonnie Baker 

Chief Announcer Randall Furnance 

Musical Director Betty Cole 

• 

WDZ 

TUSCOLA— EST. 1921 

Frequency: 1050 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WDZ Broadcasting 

Company 

Address Star Building 

Phone Number 98 and 153 

Transmitter Location Intersection oi U. S. 

Highways 36 and 45 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to Local Sunset 

Transcription Service Lang-Worth 

Representative Howard H. Wilson Co. 

Personnel 

General Manager Walter C. Schafer 

WILL 

URBANA— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 580 Kc Power: 5000 W. 

Owned-Operated By University of Illinois 

Business Address Urbana 

Phone Number 7-2400 and 7-2616 

Studio Address 1010 S. Wright St. 

Transmitter Location 1 mile south on First 

St. Road, Champaign, 111. 

Time on the Air 7:00 a.m. to local sunset 

News Service - AP 

Personnel 

President A. C. Willard 

Station Manager Joseph F. Wright 

Program Director Frank E. Schooley 

Publicity Director Art Wildhagen 

Musical Director Lanson F. Demmlng 

Chief Engineer A. James Ebel 

Dir. of War Programs Frank E. Schooley 

Chief Announcer Nelson F. Norman. 



415 



Listeners tat Our 
Words... 

When you re cooking up Food advertising 
plans, remember . . . we always nave Some- 
thing Tasty to add to your sales recipes — 
thousands and thousands oj richly seasoned 
regular Listeners who eat a good thing when 
they hear about it on 



WFBM 

BASIC C.B.S. 5000 WATTS DAY and NIGHT 
INDIANAPOLIS 

nted nationally bu THE KATZ AGENCY 




■5f or what have you ? 
416 



INDIANA' 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



WHBU 

ANDERSON— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Anderson Broad- 
casting Corp. 

Business Address Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Phone Number 7791 

Studio Address 1110 Meridian St. 

Transmitter Location 1110 Meridian St. 

Time on the Air: 6:30 a.m. to midnight; 7:00 
a.m. to midnight Sun. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative. Weed & Company 

Personnel 

President-General Manager. 

C. Bruce McConnell 

Manager John R. Atkinson 

Chief Engineer L. F. Podhaski 

• 

WT R C 

ELKHART— EST. 1931 

BLUE NETWORK 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. Truth Publishing Co.. Inc. 

Address Hotel Elkhart 

Phone Number 948 

Transmitter Location .... Oakland Avenue and 
Mishawaka Road 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12 midnight 

Newspaper Affiliation Elkhart Daily Truth 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service . . . World; Standard Radio 
Representative Burn-Smith Company, Inc. 

Personnel 

President C. D. Greenleaf 

General Manager R. R. Baker 

Commercial Manager Paul Upson 

Program-Musical Director. .... Margaret Lemtz 

Chief Announcer V. V. Swartz 

Chief Engineer Lester Zellmer 

W EO A 

EVANSVILLE— EST. 1936 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Evansville On The 

Air, Inc. 

Address 519 Vine St. 

Phone Number 2-1171 



Transmitter Location Evansville 

Time on the Air Full Time 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World Broadcasting 

System and Standard 
Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

President and 

General Manager Clarence Leich 

Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Guy Crecelius 

Program and 

Production Director Pat Roper 

Publicity Director Clarence Leich 

Chief Engineer Erwin Schoeny 

WGBF 

EVANSVILLE— EST. 1925 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 
Frequency: 1280 Kc... Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 
Owned-Operated By Evansville On The 

Air, Inc. 

Address 519 Vine St. 

Phone Number 2-1171 

Transmitter Location Evansville 

Time on the Air Full Time 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service ....World Broadcasting 

System and Standard 
Representative Weed & Co. 

Personnel 

President-General Manager .... Clarence Leich 
Commercial and Sales 

Promotion Manager Guy Crecelius 

Program and Production 

Director Pat Rope; 

Chief Engineer Fay Gehres 

• 

W G L 

FORT WAYNE— EST. 1924 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By: 

Farnsworth Television and Radio Corp. 

Business Address 925 So. Harrison St. 

Phone Number Eastbrook 3366 

Transmitter Location 925 So. Harrison St. 

Time on the Air: 6:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. — 
Sun., 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative NBC Spot Sales 




*«^m?m&£&J£g& 




OWNED AND 
OPERATED BY 



INDIANAPOLIS 



A Clear Channel To A 
Bigger Market 



The advertiser who wants the broadest coverage 
of the rich Central Indiana Market will un- 
questionably select radio station WIBC as 
his medium. The lower frequency of this station, 
1070 Kilocycles, on a clear channel, and with 
5000 Watts power, covers a wider radius than 
any other Indianapolis station. Write or wire 
for information about the intensive merchandis- 
ing support this station offers to its advertisers. 

Represented Nationally by John Blair & Company 

WIBC 

A Mutual STATION • Indianapolis, Indiana 



418 



INDIANA 



Personnel 

Gen'l Mgr Frank V. Webb 

Station Manager Frank V. Webb 

Commercial Manager ......... Wm. R. Aldrich 

Sales Promotion Mgr Wm. R. Aldrich 

Program Director Wm. R. Aldrich 

Director of War Programs. ...... .Paul Roberts 

Chief Engineer Howard Beck 

Asst. Program Director Rosemary Stanger 



W W 

FORT WAYNE— EST. 1925 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1190 Kc Power: 10.000 Watts 

Owned By . . . Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 
Operated By . Westinghouse Radio Stations, Inc. 

Address 925 So. Harrison St. 

Phone Number A-2136 

Transmitter Location Routes 30 and 33 

(Junction) 

Time on the Air 5 a.m. to 1 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Services .... World Broadcasting 
Representative National Broadcasting Co. 

Personnel 

Vice-President Walter Evans 

Station Manager Paul E. Mills 

Commercial Manager H. D. Longsworth 

Program Director Carl Vandagrift 

Publicity Director Amy Scharf 

Chief Announcer J. Howard Ackley 

Musical Director Guy Fitzsimmons 

Chief Engineer Bruce Ratts 

Director of War Programs Tom Carnegie 

• 

W J B 

HAMMOND— EST. 1928 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By . . . Adair-Richardson-Adair 

Address 449 State St. 

Phone Number Hammond 9800 

Transmitter Location 449 State St. 

Time on the Air 7 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. 

News Service UP 

Representative Cox & Tanz 

Personnel 

Station Manager O. E. Richardson 

Commercial Manager Robert C. Adair 

Sales Promotion Manager . R. W. Widdel 

Program Director L. B. Weller 

Chief Announcer and 

Publicity Dir Ed Rees 

Musical Director. . J. Gibbs Spring 

Chief Engineer Stanley Strasburg 

Record MC Ted Lindgren 



WFBM 

INDIANAPOLIS— EST. 1924 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1260 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WFBM. Inc. 

Address 48 Monument Circle 

Phone Number Lincoln 8506 

Transmitter Location 2 miles northeast of 

Millersville, Indiana 
Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12:05 a.m.; 

Sundays. 7:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

News Service AP; INS 

Transcription Service Associated Music 

Publishers 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President H. M. Bitner, Sr. 

Station Manager Frank O. Sharp 

Commercial Manager. .. .William F. Kiley, Jr. 

Sales Promotion Mgr Edward Schneider 

Chief Announcer Lyell Ludwig 

Program Director Mrs. Jean Bitner 

Publicity Director Norman Travis 

Musical Director Walter H. Reuleaux 

Chief Engineer Harold Holland 

Record MC Sam K. Sims 

W IB C 

INDIANAPOLIS— EST. 1938 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1070 Kc Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned By Indiana Broadcasting Corp. 

Operated By The Indianapolis News 

Address 350 N. Meridian St. 

Phone Number Li 2305 

Transmitter Location . . 59th & Hollingsworth Rd. 

Time on the Air 5 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

News Service . AP. UP 

Transcription Service. .Lang- Worth, Associated 
Representative John Blair & Co. 

Personnel 

President C. Walter McCarty 

Station Manager Alex Campbell, Jr. 

Program Director Stan Corley 

Musical Directors, 

Walter Jackson and Jean Williams 

Chief Engineer Harry Adams 

Chief Announcer Hal Shidler 

W l*R E 

INDIANAPOLIS— EST. 1924 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1430 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By .... Indianapolis Broad- 
casting, Inc. 

Address Claypool Hotel 

Phone Number Riley 1541-2-3-4 

Transmitter Location 44th & Ralston Road 

Time on the Air Full Time 



419 



INDIANA 



News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service .... World Broadcasting, 

Lang-Worth 
Representative John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel 

President & Gen. Mgr Eugene C. Pulliam 

Commercial Manager Rex Schepp 

Program Director Bill Dean 

Musical Director Harry Bason 

Chief Engineer Eugene E. Alden 

W l*S H 

INDIANAPOLIS— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 
Frequency: 1310 Kc... Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 
Owned-Operated By Capitol Broadcasting 

Corporation 

Address Board of Trnde Building 

Phone Number Market 6345 

Transmitter Location .... Post Road and Rawls 

Ave. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Free & Peters. Inc. 



Personnel 

President-Gen. Manager. . .C. Bruce McDonnell 
Commercial Manager. ... .Robert E. Bausman 

Program Director Felix D. Adams 

Musical Director Margaret Pryce 

Chief Engineer Stokes Gresham. Jr. 

Sales Promotion Manager. . .Lyman G. Hunter 



WKMO 

KOKOMO— EST. 1941 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1400 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Kokomo Broadcast- 
ing Co. 

Address 400 North Main St. 

Phone Number 5171-5172 

Transmitter Location Morgan & Ohio Sts. 

Time on the Air 6:00 a.m. to 12:05 a.m. 

Transcription Service Lang- Worth 

Representative Howard Wilson Company 

Personnel 

Tresident Dr. R. Spencer Taylor 

General and Sales Mgr John Carl Jeffrey 



iukhio 



INDIANA'S 

PUBLIC SERVICE 

STATION Plus 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System Programs 




»o— by i 

folks. And there's a double plus — II 

of Columbia Broadcasting System 

the plus of great signal strength 
provides strong, clear reception through- 
out the WKMO i 

All of which adds up to SUPERIOR SALES 
POWER in this rich market. 

Write or call 
John Carl Jeffrey, Gen. Mgr, WKMO, Kokomo, Ind., 
Howard H. Wilson Co., Chicago, New York, Holly 
wood, San Francisco, Seattle. 



COVERAGE 

WHERE IT 

COUNTS. .IN 

15 COUNTIES 

AT THE HEART 

OF INDIANA'S RICH 

FARMING AND 

INDUSTRIAL AREAI 



420 



INDIANA 



Program Director Ward Charles Glenn 

Record MC Paul Price 

Chief Engineer George Palmer 

Publicity Director J. C. Jeffrey 

• 

W AS K 

LAFAYETTE— EST. 1942 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By WFAM. Inc. 

Business Address Lafayette 

Studio Address Wallace Bldg. 

Phone Number . . .Lafayette 4300 

Transmitter Location No. River Road 

West Lafayette 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. to 11 F-nt 

News Service AP 

Personnel 

President O. E. Richardson 

Station and Sales Manager .... J. Gibbs Spring 

Program Director Bayne Spring 

Chief Announcer William Warren 

Chief Engineer Harry C. Garba 



W L B C 

MUNCIE— EST. 1926 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Donald A. Burton 

Business Address P. O. Box 271 

Phone Number 4403 

Transmitter Location: Radio Center, U. S. High- 
way No. 35, So. of Muncie 

Time on the Air 6:30 a.m. to 12:10 a.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Waler Company 

Personnel 

Owner-Station Manager Donald A. Burton 

Commercial Manager Wm. F. Craig 

Production Manager Hugh Harling 

Musical Director June Johnson 

Chief Engineer Maurice Crain 

Director of War Programs Don Russell 

W KB V 

RICHMOND— EST. 1926 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 100 Watts 



AMERICA'S MIDDLETOWN 
THE TEST MARKET 

103,000 Radio Homes 

COLUMBIA NETWORK 

WLBC 

MUNCIE, IND. 

Represented By THE WALKER CO. 

Chicago — New York 



421 



N D I AN A 



Owned-Operated By, 

Central Broadcasting Corp. 

Address 25 S. 9th St. 

Phone Number ....•• 1156 

Transmitter Location Richmond 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 

Transcription Service: Lang-Worth; Keystone 

Personnel 

President J. Robert Quigg 

General Manager G. F. Albright 

Comm. Mgr • • . .R. L. Nusbaum 

W HO T 

SOUTH BEND— EST. 1944 

BLUE 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: South Bend Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Business Address St. Joseph & Monroe Sts. 

Phone Number 3-4155 

Studio Address and Transmitter Location: St. 

Joseph and Monroe Sts. 
Time on Air: 6:30 a.m. to 12 midnight — Sun., 

7:30 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service: NBC Thesaurus and 

Standard 
Representative Weed and Company 

Personnel 

President C. Bruce McConnell 

Station and Sales Manager Harry Burdick 

Promotion Manager Don Harding 

Chief Engineer Jack Willson 

• 

WS B T 

SOUTH BEND— EST. 1922 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 960 Kc Power: 1000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By South Bend Tribune 

Address 225 W. Colfax Ave. 

Phone Number 3-6161 

Transmitter Location: 5 miles south of South 

Bend on Ironwood Road 
Time on the Air: 6:15 a.m. to midnight; Sun- 
days, 8 a.m. to 11:15 p.m. 
Newspaper Affiliation. .. .South Bend Tribune 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service. .Lang-Worth; Associated 
Representative Paul H. Raymer Co. 

Personnel 

President F. A. Miller 

Station Manager Franklin D. Schurz 

Commercial Manager R. H. Swintz 

Program Director-Chief 

Announcer Marc Boyden 

Musical Director Harlan Hogan 

Chief Engineer H. G. Cole 



W B W 

TERRE HAUTE— EST. 1925 

BLUE NETWORK 
NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

Frequency: 1230 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned By Banks of the Wabash. Inc. 

Operated By ...... . Banks of the Wabash, Inc. 

Address 303 South Sixth Street 

Phone Number Crawford 3394-3395 

Transmitter First St. and Peyton Ave. 

Time on the Air: M\W hrs. daily — I6V2 hrs. 
Sunday 

Newspaper Affiliation Saturday Spectator 

News Service UP-AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Weed & Company 

Personnel 

President Alvin Eades 

General Manager George M. Jackson 

Sales Promotion Jill Girrard 

Chief Engineer Don Aldrich 

WAO V 

VINCENNES— EST. 1940 

KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Frequency: 1450 Kc Power: 250 Watt* 

Owned-Operated By . . Vincennes Newspapers, 

Inc. 

Studio Address Grand Hotel 

Business Address 320 Busseron St. 

Phone Number 787-788 

Transmitter Location: US 41, north of Vincennes 
Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. daily; 

8:00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. Sundays 
Newspaper Affiliation Vincennes 

Sun-Commercial 

News Service UP 

Representative John E. Pearson Co. 

Personnel 

President Eugene C. Pulliam 

Station Promotion Manager. .. .Victor H. Lund 

Commercial Manager Richard B. Harris 

Chief Engineer Eugene E. Alden 

W B°A A 

WEST LAFAYETTE— EST. 1922 

Frequency: 920 Kc. .Power: 5000 d.; 1000 n. 

Owned-Operated By Purdue University 

Address Hall of Music. West Lafayette 

Phone Number 92-2128 

Transmitter Location 6 miles south of La- 
fayette 
Time on the Air. ...... - .9:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Personnel 

Business Manager John W. Ditamore 

Chief Engineer Paul Franklin 



422 



For Latest U. S. Census Population And Radio Homes Data And 
Statistics on "Shifting Population" Please Turn To Pages 273-287 



W I 

AMES— EST. 1921 (9YI) 

Frequency: 640 Kc Power: 5000 Watts Day 

Owned By Iowa State College 

Operated By Agricultural Extension 

and Engineering Extension 

Address Service Building 

Phone Number 2500; Extension 231 

Transmitter Location Service Building 

Time on the Air. .Local sunrise to local sunset 

News Service AP 

Transcription Service World 

Personnel 

President (of Iowa State College): 

Charles E. Friley 

Station Director W. I. Griffiths 

Program Director and 

Station Manager Richard B. Hull 

Production Manager Edward Wegener 

Publicity Director lone McNay 

Chief Announcer Richard Vogl 

News Editor • ■ Robert Mulhall 

Musical Director Edward Wegener 

Market Editor R. C. Bentley 

Chief Engineer L. L. Lewis 

Farm Editor Dale Williams 

Woman's Editor Mrs. Eleanor Wilkins 

Record MC Verne Carlsen 

(Non-Commercial Station) 

K F°GQ 

BOONE— EST. 1927 

Frequency: 1260 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By.. Boone Biblical College 

Business Address 924 West Second Street 

Phone Number 1119-W 

Transmitter Location 924 West Second St. 

Time on the Air Daytime License 

Personnel 

Manager Lois Crawford 

Chief Announcer Anne Reif f enstein 

Musical Director Lydia Smabils 

Chief Engineer L. L. Lewis 

(Non-Commercial Station) 

K B*U R 

BURLINGTON— EST. 1941 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1490 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By. .Burlington Broadcasting 
Co. 

Address National Bank Bldg. 

Phone Numbers 680; 681 



Transmitter Location National Bank Bldg. 

Time on the Air 6 a.m. -11 p.m. 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 

Representative William G. Rambeau Co. 

Personnel 

President-General Manager. .G. B. McDermott 

Commercial Manager. ... G. B. McDermott 

Sales Promotion Mgr Mary Mangold 

Program Publicity Director Mary Mangold 

Production Manager Walter Stone 

War Program Director Mary Mangold 

Chief Announcer Dick Mosena 

Chief Engineer John Gallino 

Record MC Ray Bennett 

WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS, WATERLOO— 
EST. 1922 

CBS & MBS 

Frequency: 600 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: American Broadcasting 

Stations, Inc. 
Addresses: Paramount Bldg.. Cedar Rapids; 

Russell Lamson Hotel, Waterloo 
Phone Numbers: 6127 (Cedar Rapids); 3618 

(Waterloo) 

Transmitter Location Marion, Iowa 

Time on the Air: 5:30 a.m. to 12 midnight; 

Sundays. 7 a.m. to 12 midnight 

News Services AP; UP 

Transcription Service- Lang- Worth & Standard 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President Mrs. Helen S. Mark 

Exec. V.-P. and 

General Manager William B. Dolph 

Station Manager. W. B. Quarton (Cedar Rapids) 
V. A. L. Linder (Waterloo) 

Commercial Manager Donald D. Sullivan 

Merchandising Manager Leo F. Cole 

Program Director- Douglas B. Grant 

Production Manager-Chief 

Announcer Robert C. Leefers 

Musical Director Maureen Canavan 

Chief Engineer George P. Hixenbaugh 

K R*0 S 

CLINTON— EST. 1941 

MUTUAL— NORTH CENTRAL & TALL CORN 

Frequency: 1340 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Clinton Broadcasting 

Corp. 

Address Jacobsen Bldg. 



423 



OWA 



Phone Number 448 

Studio Address Jacobsen Bldg. 

Transmitter Location Jacobsen Bldg. 

Time on the Air Unlimited License 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio 

Representative Walker Co. 

Personnel 

Owner W. S. Jacobsen 

General and Commercial Mgr. .Morgan Sexton 

Program Director Lucille DeLeers 

War Program Director Lucille DeLeers 

Chief Engineer Gilbert Andrew 

• 

woe 

DAVENPORT— EST. 1921 

BLUE NETWORK 

Frequency: 1420 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Tri-City Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 1002 Brady Street 

Phone Number 3-3661 

Transmitter Location R.R No. 1 

Time on the Air: 18 hours daily; 16 hours 

(Sunday) 

News Service UP 

Transcription Service World 

Representative Free & Peters. Inc. 

Personnel 

President Col. B. J. Palmer 

General Manager J. Buryl Lottridge 

Commercial Manager L. O. Fitzgibbons 

Sales Promotion and 

Publicity Manager Jane Boom 

Program Director Marshall Dane 

Musical Director George Sontag 

Chief Announcer Clark Hayden 

Chief Engineer. Paul Arvidson 

• 

KWLC 

DECORAH— EST. 1926 

Frequency: 1240 Kc Power: 250 Watts 

Owned-Operated By Luther College 

Business Address. . .600 Leiv Eiriksson Drive 

Phone Number 690 

Studio Address C. K. Preus Gymnasium 

Transmitter Location . . C. K. Preus Gymnasium 
Time on the Air . . Operating four hours daily 
for the duration 

Personnel 

President (of Luther College) . . Dr. O. J. H. Preus 
Station Manager and 

Program Director Kenneth L. Berger 

Publicity Director Ruth Kalnes 

Musical Director Helen Trilhus 

Chief Announcer Olive Sharpee 



Chief Engineer and 

Production Manager O. M. Eittrlm 

Director of 

War Programs Mary Margaret Roberts 

(Non-Commercial Station) 



KRNT 

DES MOINES— EST. 1935 

CBS— THE COWLES STATIONS 

Frequency: 1350 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By: Cowles Broadcasting 

Company 

Address 715 Locust St. 

Phone Number 3-2111 

Transmitter Location S. E. 22nd & Park 

Ave. 
Time on the Air: 6:00 a.m. to 12 midnight 
Newspaper Affiliation . . Des Moines Register 

and Tribune 

News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio. 

Lang-Worth 
Representative The Katz Agency 

Personnel 

President Gardner Cowles, Jr. 

Station Manager Phil Hoffman 

Commercial Manager Bob Dillon 

Program Director. Charles Miller 

Director of War Programs .Wayne Crew 

Sales Promotion Manager Orville Lawson 

Publicity Director Mary Little 

Chief Engineer Charles Quentin 

KSO 

DES MOINES— EST. 1921 

BLUE NETWORK— MBS— 

Frequency: 1460 Kc Power: 5000 Watts 

Owned-Operated By .... . Kingsley H. Murphy 

Address 800 Old Colony Bldg. 

Phone Number 3-0571 

Transmitter Location S.E. 22nd & Park 

Avenue 

Time on the Air Full Time 

Newspaper Affiliation . . Des Moines Register 

and Tribune 

News Service AP; UP 

Transcription Service Standard Radio; 

Lang-Worth 
Representative Headley-Reed Co. 

Personnel 

Gen. Mgr George J. Higgins 

Program Director Ed